Obituaries
& Death Notices
in the
Sentinel
August 5, 1875 -
September 20, 1883
Minneapolis
Ottawa County, Kansas
Compiled by K.A. Jacques
2005

Delphos Items in The Solomon Valley Pioneer, 1870-1873

Obituaries and Death Notices from
The Minneapolis Independant for 1880

Obituaries and Death Notices
in the Delphos Republican
1900-1909

Obituaries and Death Notices from
The Sentinel
1875-1883

Obituaries and Death Notices from
The Delphos Republican
1879-1899

 


i
Table of Contents
1875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1876 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1877 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1878 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1879 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
1881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
1882 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
1883 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
ii
Adams, child
Sentinel, September 2, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Geo. H. Adam's little child, aged about one year, died
last week.
Allan, infant
Sentinel, November 11, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Mrs. E. Hale, who has been lying very low for several
weeks, departed this life Friday morning last. She leaves
a husband and three children. Also on the same morning
the infant child of Albert and Mary Harman. The funeral
of both was preached Saturday by Rev. N. Bracken, and
their remains followed to the cemetery by a large
procession of people. The infant child of Mrs. Allan was
buried Monday of this week.
Allen, Mike
Sentinel, November 25, 1875
At sunset on last Saturday Mike Allen, a white man,
married to an Indian woman and living in the Indian
Territory about four miles from Coffeyville, Kansas, was
shot and killed. He was discovered before he died by two
men from Coffeyville. He told them the shooting was
done by Cowan and Smith, brother and half brother of
the wife of Allen. The Indian woman was by her
husband's side when he died. The murder, it is supposed,
grew out of a property quarrel.
Davis, Milton
Sentinel, September 16, 1875
We learn from the CONCORDIA EMPIRE that Mr. Milton
Davis, a young man who had been attending the State
Normal School, was drowned on September 4th, while
bathing in the Republican River. The citizens turned out
en masse, but as far as heard from the body has not been
recovered.
Hale, Mrs. E.
Sentinel, November 11, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Mrs. E. Hale, who has been lying very low for several
weeks, departed this life Friday morning last. She leaves
a husband and three children. Also on the same morning
the infant child of Albert and Mary Harman. The funeral
of both was preached Saturday by Rev. N. Bracken, and
their remains followed to the cemetery by a large
procession of people. The infant child of Mrs. Allan was
buried Monday of this week.
Haley, child
Sentinel, December 30, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Old Mr. Hartig, west of town, died last week, aged about
65 years. Also Miss Haley, aged 14 years; this makes
three who have died in Mr. Haley's family the past two
months.
1
1875
Sentinel
EDITORS: D.R. CROSBY, THEN D.R. CROSBY & CHAS. HOYT
FIRST ISSUE: AUGUST 5, 1875
Haley, James
Sentinel, December 30, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Just as we are closing our items this Tuesday morning the
news of the death of James Haley reaches us. This is the
father of the family who have all been down with the
typhoid fever, of which four have died during the past six
or eight weeks, and several of the family are very low.
April 27, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Rev. N. Bracken preached the funeral of six persons who
died last winter, on Sunday last, all in one sermon. The
names of the departed are J.A. Virtue and child, James
Haley, his mother and two of his daughters.
Haley, Lizzie
Sentinel, December 2, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Mr. Haley and family, west of town, have all been lying
very low and are not expected to live.
December 9, 1875
Lizzie Haley, west of town, aged about ten years, died on
Saturday morning last.
Haley, Mrs.
Sentinel, October 28, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Grandmother Haley, living west of town, departed this
life last week.
Harman, infant
Sentinel, November 11, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Mrs. E. Hale, who has been lying very low for several
weeks, departed this life Friday morning last. She leaves
a husband and three children. Also on the same morning
the infant child of Albert and Mary Harman. The funeral
of both was preached Saturday by Rev. N. Bracken, and
their remains followed to the cemetery by a large
procession of people. The infant child of Mrs. Allan was
buried Monday of this week.
Hartig, Mr.
Sentinel, December 30, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Old Mr. Hartig, west of town, died last week, aged about
65 years. Also Miss Haley, aged 14 years; this makes three
who have died in Mr. Haley's family the past two months.
McHenry, James C.S.
Sentinel, November 25, 1875
DIED. On Friday, Nov. 19, 1875, James C.S., little son
of Dr. James and Mrs. A.V.S. McHenry, aged 1 year, 8
months and 16 days.
"Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come
unto me, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." This
little one, frail from its birth, and an only child, has
returned to the Giver, ere its little mind had ever been
perverted by the influences of an uncertain world. The
parents have the sympathy of the entire community in
their sore bereavment.
But though earth's fairest blessings die,
And all beneath the skies is vain,
There is a brighter world on high
Beyond the reach of care and pain.
H.R.G.
Newsam, Wessley
Sentinel, September 2, 1875
Mr. Swartz, of Culver township, brings us sad news
concerning the death of a young man in that
neighborhood occurring on Tuesday of this week. Mr.
Wessley Newsam, who has been at work for Mr.
Converse, being sent down into a well that had been dug
some thirty feet deep, to drill a hole in the sandrock to
prepare for a blast, was heard to call, after being in the
well for a short time. Mrs. Converse went to the well and
speaking to him received no response, whereupon she
called for help. Mr. Converse being but a short distance
away at the time came up, but could do nothing without
assistance. Mr. Swartz and others appearing as quickly
as possible, Mr. Converse was let down into the well,
2 Sentinel, 1875
and found the man lying on his face on the bottom of the
well with little signs of life. He was immediately raised,
and all possible means applied to restore him, but to no
purpose. He died in about half an hour, his brother and
sister being present. The supposition now is that he
attempted to climb out by means of the rope, and when
near the top loosed his hold and fell, though the external
portion of his body is not bruised except a scratch under
one eye. There may have been poisonous gasses emitted
from the well which caused his death, this will be tested
in due time. Funeral of deceased today at 2 o'clock p.m.
at Tripp's school house.
Pace, child
Sentinel, December 16, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
A distressing death occurred last Sunday, in which John
Pace's little girl, aged 3 years, was the victim. The child
accidently got hold of and eat some strychnine, which
resulted in its death in one and one-half hours. Dr.
Burchard was called in, but too late, as the child was
already in convulsions. This is a heavy blow upon the
heart-stricken parents. G.W.S.
Tolley, child
Sentinel, September 30, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Wm. Tolley's child, aged about nine months, died last
week.
Virtue, John A.
Sentinel, December 30, 1875
It becomes our painful duty to chronicle the death of
John A. Virtue, an old and highly respected citizen, who
lived two miles south of Delphos. Many trials has he
passed through here during the Indian troubles. He was
an industrious, hard working farmer. His lungs have
been affected for some time. He died Sunday night,
leaving a wife and several children.
April 27, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Rev. N. Bracken preached the funeral of six persons who
died last winter, on Sunday last, all in one sermon. The
names of the departed are J.A. Virtue and child, James
Haley, his mother and two of his daughters.
Webb, W.B.
Sentinel, November 25, 1875
DELPHOS ITEMS
Mrs. A.J. Bumgarner, of Sumnerville, received a
telegram Saturday morning announcing the painful news
of the death of her father, Mr. W.B. Webb, of LaMonte,
Missouri, who was thrown from his wagon and instantly
killed. Mrs. Bumgarner went at once to attend the
funeral. Mr. Webb was an exemplary Christian man,
aged about sixty years, and raised a large family, who
were all taught to reverence God. His tragic death will be
mourned by a large number of friends and relatives.
Whitehouse, S.M.
Sentinel, December 9, 1875
The funeral of S.M. Whitehouse took place on Tuesday
last, and the remains were escorted to the grave by the
Masonic brethren. He was formerly of the state of
Virginia, and has lived in this county about four years.
3 Sentinel, 1875
4 Sentinel, 1875
Allen, Mrs.
Sentinel, March 2, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Allen, an aged lady who emigrated from Missouri
to this county last week, took sick quite suddenly, and
died on Tuesday.
Coffman, Lovell
Sentinel, June 1, 1876
FROM FOUNTAIN
Mr. Lovell Coffman, who has been lying very low for a long
time, died on the evening of the 11th inst., and was buried
on the 13th. Sermon by Rev. Joshua Feather. His funeral was
quite largely attended by his friends and neighbors.
Cornwell, Mrs. Mariah
Sentinel, March 23, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Geo. W. Strickler and Mrs. James Clark received
the sad news a few days since, that their mother, Mrs.
Mariah Cornwell, living near Etna, Ill., is dead.
Gentry Sr., Winston
Sentinel, November 16, 1876
Winston Gentry, Sr., who lived near town, and who
moved to Illinois one year ago, died a short time since.
Glennie, George
Sentinel, September 7, 1876
MASONIC BURIAL
The last sad ceremonies over the remains of Mr. Geo.
Glennie, who departed this life on last Friday morning,
was performed in a most becoming and affecting
manner. The body of the deceased was removed from the
Valley House, where he died to the Masonic Hall, where
in the afternoon the members of that fraternity gathered
together and formed themselves into a procession with
the Minneapolis Brass Band in the front, and as they
marched slowly and solemnly to the church, the band
played a suitable march for the occasion. As the
procession marched into the church the choir sung a very
beautiful hymn. The services in the church were
conducted by Rev. H.G. Miller, the Presbyterian minister
of this place. His text was, "He giveth his beloved
sleep," from which he delivered a very beautiful and
thrilling discourse. The procession in the same manner
as before, with a large number of spectators, proceeded
to the grave where the body was interred according to
Masonic custom. The scene at the grave touched the
hearts of all and will long be remembered by many.
Hankinson, Manning
Sentinel, February 10, 1876
DIED. On Tuesday, Feb. 1, 1876, Manning Hankinson,
(son of Elias and the late Rachel Hankinson) aged 14
years, 1 month and 1 day.
This leaves Mr. H. doubly afflicted by the hand of
death, his wife having departed this life on the 2d day of
last month, notice of which appeared in this paper.
5
1876
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT & THOS. MIDGLEY
Hankinson, Rachel
Sentinel, January 20, 1876
DIED. On Sunday, Jan. 2nd, 1876, Rachel, wife of Mr.
E. Hankinson; aged _3 years.
Hare, child
Sentinel, November 23, 1876
Adaughter of Wm. Hare, aged six years, died a few days ago.
Leslie, Mrs. J.Q.
Sentinel, November 23, 1876
The wife of J.Q. Leslie, of Culver township, died last
Saturday morning, Nov. 18th, of consumption. Mrs. Leslie
was a most estimable lady, a devoted wife and mother, and
a kind and pleasant neighbor. Her remains were deposited
in the Minneapolis Cemetery on Sunday last.
FROM CULVER
I.Q. Lesley, since the death of his wife, has concluded to
move back to Illinois.
Lewis, Mr. R.
Sentinel, September 21, 1876
FATAL ACCIDENT
We are called upon to chronicle the sudden death of Mr.
R. Lewis, who formerly lived near Culver post office in
this county, which occurred on Monday, 13th inst. The
particulars are as follows: Mr. Lewis had just been into
his garden with a double-barreled shotgun and killed a
hawk, and upon returning to the house he proceeded to
reload the barrel just discharged at the hawk, when in
some unaccountable manner the other barrel exploded,
sending the contents, wad, shot and powder through the
left cheek, backwards and upwards into the brain,
causing almost instant death. Mr. Lewis leaves a wife
who is almost distracted at her husband's death, and the
entire community, in which he was regarded with the
greatest esteem, to mourn his sudden and untimely
demise, and deeply sympathize with the heart-broken
wife.
Markley, Harrison H.
Sentinel, January 20, 1876
DIED. On Sunday, Jan 16th, 1876, Harrison H., oldest
son of Watson and Elizabeth Markley, aged 4 years and
8 months.
We love to remember him as our dear boy gone to Jesus' arms.
"Sorrows humanize our race;
Tears are the showers that fertilize this world;
And memory of things precious keepeth warm
The heart that once did keep them." H.C.B.
Martin, Mr.
Sentinel, April 13, 1876
A son of Mr. Martin, whose father and family have been
stopping with their relative, Mr. E.W. Branch, near this
place was taken suddenly, though it was thought not
seriously ill about noon on Wednesday last, and upon
getting a little worse requested that a physician be
procured. The young man's father started in haste for Dr.
McHenry, who arrived just in time to see the patient
breathe his last. Mr. Martin is lately of Riley county, and
his family have been stopping with Mr. Branch while the
former has been seeking a location for a home. The
deceased was about eighteen years of age, had been
plowing the day before, and in the morning previous to his
illness was apparently well and hearty. The Doctor thinks
his death was caused by one of the species of croup.
McHenry, William
Sentinel, March 16, 1876
Dr. James McHenry has received the sad news of the
death of his aged father, Mr. William McHenry, in
Sparta, Ill., on the 9th inst. He was one of the pioneers of
Southern Illinois.
Richards, Olive A., and David L.
Sentinel, March 2, 1876
A letter from J.G. Richards, dated at Henryville, Oregon,
February 14th, who left this place about a year ago,
states that death has taken away two of his youngest
children: Olive A., a little girl about two years of age,
and David L., a boy of about four years. We are sure that
he has the sympathies of his old friends here. Mr. R.
6 Sentinel, 1876
states he is employed by a coal company at $4.00 per
day and board, and that he will write us a letter, telling
the plain facts in regards to that country. Our readers will
be glad to hear from him.
Rowson, Laura
Sentinel, November 23, 1876
Mrs. Laura Rowson, sister of Mrs. A.J. Bumgarner,
postmistress of Sumnerville, died on the 3d inst. After a long
illness, in Santa Barbara, Cal., where she went last spring.
Shepard, Mrs.
Sentinel, July 20, 1876
DIED. On Monday morning July 17th, 1876, Mrs.
Shepard, wife of O.H. Shepard, of heart disease, aged
about 49 years.
Sist (Sisk), Nancy
Sentinel, April 20, 1876
DIED. On Monday, April 3d, 1876, in Fountain
Township, Nancy, wife of Andrew Sist, aged 35.
Smith, Ada Arabell and Ida Isabell
Sentinel, August 31, 1876
DIED. On Sunday, July 16th, 1876, at Grover in this
county, Ada Arabell aged 5 weeks, and on Thursday,
August 17th, 1876, Ida Isabell, aged 2 months and two
weeks, twin daughters of Mr. And Mrs. J.L. Smith.
Go thy rest fair child,
Go to thy dreamless bed.
While yet so gentle, undefiled
With blessings on thy head.
Stearns, Emily A.
Sentinel, June 8, 1876
DIED. On Sunday, June 4th, 1876, in Minneapolis,
Emily A., wife of T.B. Stearns, aged 35 years, 4 months
and 7 days.
Strickler, Mrs.
Sentinel, January 20, 1876
We learn in a note from Geo. W. Strickler, that his
mother, on account of whose illness he was summoned
away, departed this life and that he was obliged to
accompany the remains to Indiana.
Thompson, Mrs.
Sentinel, April 27, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Thompson died, near Glasco, a few days since;
funeral preached by Rev. N. Bracken.
Waddell, Mrs. Thos.
Sentinel, November 23, 1876
RESOLUTIONS OF CONDOLENCE
Adopted by Minneapolis Lodge No. 143, A.F.&A.M., at
Minneapolis, Kan., Nov. 22d, 1876: WHEREAS, we have
learned of the death of the beloved wife of our Brother
Thos. Waddell, at Calistoga, California,
RESOLVED, While we mourn our death we humbly bow
to the will of Him "who doeth all things well," and look
with faith to our meeting with her in the goodly land of
Beulah.
RESOLVED, That in her death our beloved brother Thos.
Waddell has lost an estimable wife and dear companion,
her children a devoted and affectionate mother, and
society a kind and amiable member.
RESOLVED, That we tender to our bereaved brother our
sincere and heartfelt sympathy in this his dark hour of
affliction, and "looking unto Jesus" may be lead to say
"Thy will be done".
RESOLVED, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to our
bereaved brother and family spread upon our lodge
records, and published in the MINNEAPOLIS SENTINEL.
C.D. CLARK, F.M. SEXTON, W.A. JOHNSTON; Comm.
Wedgewood, infant
Sentinel, January 6, 1876
DELPHOS ITEMS
DIED, last week after a lingering illness, infant of Mr.
and Mrs. H.F. Wedgewood, funeral preached by Rev. N.
Bracken.
7 Sentinel, 1876
Yockey, child
Sentinel, March 9, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
William Yockey's child died on Monday last.
Yockey, child
Sentinel, July 27, 1876
FROM DELPHOS
Died, last week, a son of Daniel Yockey, Sr., aged about
5 years. The little fellow was running, and became
overheated which caused its death in two or three days.
August 3, 1876
Rev. Joy Bishop preached the funeral sermon of Daniel
Yockey's son last Sunday.
8 Sentinel, 1876
Barnum, child
Sentinel, April 12, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Ebb. Barnum's child, aged one year, died last week.
Bennett, Henry
Sentinel, September 21, 1877
Rev. H.R. Gouldin informs us of the recent death of
three little children in his neighborhood: Rosa, daughter
of Robert Gregg, aged 15 months, on the 6th inst.;
Henry, son of David Bennett, aged 15 months, on the
13th inst.; infant son of R.H. Leslie, on the 14th.
Bishop, Mrs. Spencer
Sentinel, November 2, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
DIED. - Last Saturday morning, Mrs. Spencer Bishop, of
consumption, with which she was afflicted when coming
here about one year ago. The funeral sermon was
preached in the church, Sunday, at 2 p.m., by Rev. Joy
Bishop, to a large and sympathizing congregation, after
which her body was deposited in the cemetery east of
town, there to await the resurrection morn.
Buffington, child
Sentinel, March 29, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We have three deaths to record that occurred in the
vicinity of Delphos the past week: W.C. Scott's child,
Friday last, aged about six months; Samuel Buffington's
child, Sunday morning last, aged about six months; Rev.
L. Tallman preached the funeral at their residences. Mrs.
Cordie Dinwiddie, wife of James Dinwiddie, died
Sunday morning, aged about 40 years, but had been able
to be about until a week before she died, since which
time she suffered much, until death relieved her Sunday
morning at 1 o'clock. Mrs. D. had never publicly
professed faith in Christ, but during her illness, the week
before she died, became greatly interested in her soul's
salvation, and was resigned to depart. She was baptized
by sprinkling just before she died, by Rev. N. Bracken.
She was followed to the grave Monday by a large
number of sympathizing friends of the family. Mrs. D.
and Mrs. S's child were both buried at the same time.
G.W.S.
Chapin, Nelly
Sentinel, December 7, 1877
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED. On the 4th inst. of diphtheria, little Nelly, daughter
of Nelson Chapin, aged about 5 years. Charlie, an older
brother, is very low with the same disease. It is said
diphtheria is prevalent in many localities at present. Too
much caution against undue exposure cannot be
exercised.
Chappel, Katie
Sentinel, April 12, 1877
DIED. Katie, a little two year old child of Wm. Chappel's,
six miles southeast of this place, this (Thursday)
morning April 12th, of diphtheria. Was sick but a few
hours.
9
1877
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
Clark, William D.
Sentinel, November 2, 1877
DIED. At the residence of the deceased in this place on
Saturday, the 27th ult., 12 o'clock p.m. of congestion of
the heart and lungs, William D. Clark, in the 63rd year
of his age.
The funeral was held Sunday afternoon, about 4 o'clock,
services conducted by Rev. S.A. Green, Pastor of the M.E.
Church, after which nearly all the congregation followed
the remains to their last resting place.
Mr. Clark had been seriously ill for several weeks
previous to his sudden taking off, but had recovered, as
many thought; and on Saturday evening, a few hours
before his death, was on the street, engaged in cheerful
conversation with friends. In answer to congratulatory
remarks in regard to his recovery, said he was gaining
slowly; "They tell me I am too old to gain strength
rapidly"; and in answer to the next very natural question,
said he was 62. "But", he added smilingly, "I cannot say
that I am well; I have but a little while to stay, at all events."
The deceased has been a resident of this place for quite
a number of years, and was well known to most of our
readers. He had for many years been a faithful member of
the Methodist Church, was highly esteemed by all who
knew him, and at the time of his death was President of the
Board of Trustees of the M.E. Church. In his death his
family, a wife and little girl, lose an affectionate husband
and kind father and his church an inestimable brother. In
her bereavement the widow has the sympathy of the entire
community.
Compton, child
Sentinel, July 12, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Ad. Compton's daughter, aged about three years, was
buried on the 4th.
Compton, child
Sentinel, September 21, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Ad Compton's little girl, two years old, died Tuesday,
funeral Thursday, conducted by Rev. L.A. Tallman. This
makes two children Mr. C. has lost very recently.
Cunningham, infant
Sentinel, November 16, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Wm. Cunningham's little girl, about two years old, died
last week.
Cunningham, infant
Sentinel, November 23, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Wm. Cunningham lost another child last week.
Dinwiddie, Cordie
Sentinel, March 29, 1877
Granville Dinwiddie went to Minneapolis last Friday
morning after Dr. Dunn to come and attend to his
mother. He took sick while going and was not able to
return home, and his mother died without seeing him
again. At this writing he still lies in Minneapolis.
FROM DELPHOS
We have three deaths to record that occurred in the
vicinity of Delphos the past week: W.C. Scott's child,
Friday last, aged about six months; Samuel Buffington's
child, Sunday morning last, aged about six months; Rev.
L. Tallman preached the funeral at their residences. Mrs.
Cordie Dinwiddie, wife of James Dinwiddie, died
Sunday morning, aged about 40 years, but had been able
to be about until a week before she died, since which
time she suffered much, until death relieved her Sunday
morning at 1 o'clock. Mrs. D. had never publicly
professed faith in Christ, but during her illness, the week
before she died, became greatly interested in her soul's
salvation, and was resigned to depart. She was baptized
by sprinkling just before she died, by Rev. N. Bracken.
She was followed to the grave Monday be a large
number of sympathizing friends of the family. Mrs. D.
and Mrs. S's child were both buried at the same time.
G.W.S.
Dodge, Mrs. H.S.
Sentinel, October 19, 1877
Mrs. H.S. Dodge, wife of the editor of the GARNETT
PLAINDEALER, died on the 4th inst. after a protracted
illness.
10 Sentinel, 1877
Douglas, child
Sentinel, March 8, 1877
A little child of D.L. Douglas died on Monday last, and
was buried on Tuesday. The funeral services were
conducted by Elder Geo. J. Root.
Dupont, infant
Sentinel, February 15, 1877
Mr. and Mrs. Dupont lost an infant child this week, this
making the second child they have lost, leaving them
with no children.
Foster, Mrs. Geo.
Sentinel, February 15, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Geo. Foster, who left here some three years ago and
went to Illinois, died a short time ago.
Granger, Hale
Sentinel, January 11, 1877
FROM BENNINGTON
Hale, son of J.C. Granger, of Coal Creek, died on
Sunday morning of scarlet fever. His parents have the
sympathy of all. He was an only child, and gave promise
of a bright intelligent manhood.
Gregg, Rosa
Sentinel, September 21, 1877
Rev. H.R. Gouldin informs us of the recent death of
three little children in his neighborhood: Rosa, daughter
of Robert Gregg, aged 15 months, on the 6th inst.;
Henry, son of David Bennett, aged 15 months, on the
13th inst.; infant son of R.H. Leslie, on the 14th.
Haley, Mr.
Sentinel, October 5, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Grandfather Haley, some eighty years old, west of town,
died Monday morning last, and was buried Tuesday at
Minneapolis.
Hankinson, E.
Sentinel, June 14, 1877
FROM BENNINGTON
Agloom was cast over this neighborhood on Wednesday
evening by reason of a sad accident which occurred in
the Solomon River at Markley's Mill near this place,
whereby one life was lost and another almost so. It
appears that Messrs. E. Hankinson and P.K. Biles
endeavored to cross the river at the mill in a boat that is
used for that purpose, when the water is too high to form
the dam. As the current was quite swift, Mr. Hankinson,
who paddled the boat, lost control of it and it swept
toward the damn. Probably not fully comprehending the
danger they were in, neither man left the boat until
almost on the dam. They then jumped out, but were
unable to prevent themselves being carried over. They
were carried under by the current immediately and as
both were fully dressed and had on heavy boots, the fight
for life was one against great odds. Mr. Biles finally
reached the by great exertion, exhausted and almost
insensible, but poor Hankinson sank to rise no more. His
body was carried downstream and is supposed at the
present writing to be caught in a drift some distance
below the mill. Efforts will be made to recover it today.
The sympathy with his afflicted family is universal. He
was a man who stood well in the community, a good
neighbor and friend, his loss is deplored. Mr. Biles,
although he saved his life, yet feels the effects of the
narrow escape, and is very weak, but will, it is hoped, be
fully recovered in a few days. G.P.P.
Harvey, Mrs. Wm.
Sentinel, September 7, 1877
Information reaches us that Mrs. Harvey, wife of Mr. Wm.
Harvey of Logan township, died Tuesday evening last.
Hemenway, Almond
Sentinel, September 7, 1877
We learn that Mr. Almond Hemenway, son of Wm.
Hemenway, living 4 miles northeast of this place, died
on Wednesday night last, of dropsy, aged 22 years.
September 28, 1877
IN MEMORY OF ALMOND HEMENWAY
BY A FRIEND
11 Sentinel, 1877
Why do we weep and mourn to know
Another dear one's gone to rest?
Safe from all pain and care and woe,
Safe in the 'region of the blest'.
Why do we think of aching hearts,
Of a loving voice, to us so still,
A joyous face, a vacant chair,
A void that time can never fill?
Why do we weep, oh, why these tears?
We know that it is better thus;
Yet, could we pierce the great unknown,
With faith supreme we'd hope and trust.
Ah, mourner, dry those falling tears!
Look up! Whatever is, is right.
You soon must pierce the great unknown-
Behind the darkest cloud is light.
Why weep, when the loved angel form
Is near thee as in days before?
Oh, let him be a beacon light
To guide thee to the other shore.
We must all follow soon, you know
Wouldst thou recall to suffer o'er?
"All's well, weep not," a dear voice says,
I am not lost, but gone before.
J.M.B.
Hollis, infant
Sentinel, November 23, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
J.S. Hollis lost an infant child last week.
Ingalls, infant
Sentinel, September 14, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
H. Ingalls lost an infant child last week.
Ingalls, Mrs. H.
Sentinel, September 14, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. H. Ingalls, sho has been lying very low the past
week, died on Wednesday night. Her father, who lives in
Wisconsin, was telegraphed for, but arrived too late to
see her alive. She will be buried at West Hope, Mitchell
County, today, Friday.
Kilbourn, child
Sentinel, September 21, 1877
We learn that Mr. Kilbourn's youngest child died about
12 o'clock last night.
Knight, Mrs. Richard Jr.
Sentinel, October 12, 1877
FROM BENNINGTON
The wife of Richard Knight, Jr., died on the morning of
the 9th inst. of typhoid fever.
Kreskie, infant
Sentinel, January 11, 1877
The infant child of J.H. Kreskie, living about four miles
south of town, died suddenly on Wednesday night last.
The afflicted parents have the sympathy of many friends.
Krone, child
Sentinel, February 1, 1877
Mr. Krone's little girl, aged about five years, died a few
days ago with diphtheria and was buried Sunday.
Krone, child
Sentinel, July 12, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Wm. Krone's little girl, aged about two years, died week
before last. Was buried week before last in the new
Catholic Cemetery northwest of town.
Lamborn, child
Sentinel, March 29, 1877
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. J.M. Lamborn, of Coal Creek, lost his oldest child
by scarlet fever. Misfortunes seldom come singly. In this
case it was so at least. Next day after the death of his
child the prairie fire burned his stable, about fifteen
hogs, hay, straw, chickens, and all the smaller farming
utensils about the place. He had a good fireguard on all
sides, but the force of the head fire was so great and the
sparks were carried such a distance that all his efforts to
save his property were fruitless. In addition to this loss
12 Sentinel, 1877
by the fire are the following: Mr. Geo. W. Edwards lost
a Marsh Harvester, two cows, several hogs, all his corn,
chickens and smaller farming tools, also his stable, hog
pen &c. Mr. Valentine Eisenhaner lost all his grain,
consisting of several hundred bushels, corn crib with all
his corn, a large quantity of beef and bacon, farming
utensils, hay, straw, &c. We have rumors of other losses,
but as they are not corroborated we do not note them.
LaPlant, Daisy
Sentinel, October 19, 1877
IN MEMORY OF DAISY LAPLANT
Do not weep that little Daisy
Is taken from a world of sin,
For she wandered to the portals,
And the angels let her in.
Listen! Don't you hear the little voices
Singing from afar?
For the angels, in their gladness,
Left the golden gates ajar.
Do not grieve because she left you
In the brightness of the morn,
'Ere she wearied with the journey,
'Ere her feet had pressed a thorn
Now she's safe beyond the shadows,
With the angels all around;
You will know her when you meet her
By the brightness of her crown.
Then be patient, sorrowing mother,
Till your mission here is done;
For a little angel's waiting,
At the portals, with a crown.
PIPE CREEK, KANSAS, OCT. 12, 1877
Leslie, infant
Sentinel, September 21, 1877
Rev. H.R. Gouldin informs us of the recent death of
three little children in his neighborhood: Rosa, daughter
of Robert Gregg, aged 15 months, on the 6th inst.;
Henry, son of David Bennett, aged 15 months, on the
13th inst.; infant son of R.H. Leslie, on the 14th.
Lill, child
Sentinel, October 5, 1877
Quite a sad event, the sudden and almost simultaneous
death of two children occurred at the house of Mr. Alex.
McLain, of Logan township last week. One was the child
of Mr. McLain, a little boy about six years of age, and the
other a little son of Mrs. McLain's sister, Mrs. Lill, who
is here on a visit from Illinois. The children were playing
together on Sunday, the 23d ult. On Sunday evening they
became ill, and on the following Thursday Mr. McLain's
child died, and Mrs. Lill's on Friday.
Look, John
Sentinel, November 2, 1877
DIED. At his residence about ten miles up Salt Creek, Mr.
John Look, of typhoid fever, on the 30th of Oct, 1877,
aged 60 years, 8 months and 13 days. He leaves a wife
and seven children to mourn his departure.
McCarger, William
Sentinel, November 2, 1877
IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM MCCARGER, LINDSEY CREEK
BY BIRDIE
One more weary, careworn traveler
Reached the other side at last,
Pain and sorrow, joy and gladness,
Grief and tears forever past.
Aged traveler, art thou happy
In those heavenly mansions bright,
Looking down with eyes of pity
On your earthly friends tonight?
On the tender, dear heart mourning,
At her lonely fireside;
In bright girlhood's early springtime
She became your cherished bride.
Hand in hand you've walked together
Up life's hillside, rugged, steep,
Flowery paths all joy and gladness,
Thorny paths to make men weep.
But we cannot cease to sorrow
When dear ones are called away.
Why does not God give us power
To realize a brighter day?
Why can we not be submissive
When we know they suffer not?
Could we hear the dear voice chanting,
"Oh, my friends, weep not, mourn not,"
Think you then we'd be submissive,
Bow beneath the chastening rod?
Ah friends, judge not; though our hearts faint,
Yet we all must trust in God.
Every day the white-robed angel
Calls some dear one from their home
And we hear them chanting sweetly,
"Mourn not, friends, ye all must come.
"Ah, yes, dear ones, we all know this,
13 Sentinel, 1877
Let us seek the home of light.
Love our neighbor, trust our Saviour,
God is love and all is right.
McLain, child
Sentinel, October 5, 1877
Quite a sad event, the sudden and almost simultaneous
death of two children occurred at the house of Mr. Alex.
McLain, of Logan township last week. One was the child
of Mr. McLain, a little boy about six years of age, and the
other a little son of Mrs. McLain's sister, Mrs. Lill, who
is here on a visit from Illinois. The children were playing
together on Sunday, the 23d ult. On Sunday evening they
became ill, and on the following Thursday Mr. McLain's
child died, and Mrs. Lill's on Friday.
McLaughlin, Mrs. John
Sentinel, August 9, 1877
Mrs. McLaughlin, wife of Mr. John McLaughlin, of
Brook's neighborhood, departed this life Tuesday, July
31st, at the age of about 64 years. A large concourse of
friends followed the remains to their last resting place
the following day. She was highly esteemed by all who
knew her, and having lived an exemplary Christian life
her friends are sure she entered the spirit land justified.
August 17, 1877
FROM FOUNTAIN
The death of Mrs. John McLaughlin, noticed in your last
issue seems to call for more than a mere passing
mention. Mother McLaughlin had been confined to her
house (most of the time to her bed) for over a year. Her
disease was of a scrofulous character. Her sufferings
were at times terrible. She bore them with remarkable
fortitude. Her remains were followed to the grave by a
far greater number of mourners than her immediate
relatives and friends, for she was loved and revered, and
is sincerely mourned by all who knew her.
McLean, child
Sentinel, August 31, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Thos. McLean's child, aged about seven years, died
Sunday morning last.
McNemers, child
Sentinel, March 22, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Phillip McNemers' child died Tuesday morning of this
week, aged six years.
March 29, 1877
P. McNemers, whose child died last week, was absent on
a trip to Iowa. He returned in time to see it buried.
Monaghan, John
Sentinel, December 7, 1877
Mr. John Monaghan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Uriah
Monaghan, of this place, departed this life on Friday, the
23d ult., after quite a lingering illness.
December 14, 1877
Rev. H. Bushnell will preach the funeral sermon of John
Monaghan, who died Friday the 23d ult., at the
Presbyterian Church, next Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
He will also preach in the evening at the usual hour.
Oard, child
Sentinel, April 26, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
B.T. Oard's child, aged about three years, died last week,
of diphtheria. Funeral was preached Sunday by Rev.
L.A. Tallman at the residence.
Packard, infant
Sentinel, August 24, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We forgot to state that I.A. Packard last an infant child
week before last.
Paige, A.F.
Sentinel, September 7, 1877
Mr. A.F. Paige, of Ottawa township, died on Saturday last of
typhoid fever. Mr. Paige was, before migrating to the county,
a resident of New Haven, Ct., from whence he came in
1871, since which time he has been a most respected citizen
of Ottawa. He leaves a wife and two children.
14 Sentinel, 1877
Payne, Gertie
Sentinel, May 24, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Gad Payne received a telegram last week saying his
wife, who has been spending the past winter in Greeley,
Iowa, was lying at the point of death. He started to her at
once, but before leaving Solomon City he received
another dispatch saying she was dead. The people of this
country will all remember Gertie, who was young and
full of life, and will sympathize with the husband in
mourning her untimely death.
Sentinel, June 14, 1877
Gad. W. Payne has just returned from his trip to Greeley,
Iowa, where he went to attend to the funeral of his wife.
Rankin, Mr.
Sentinel, November 9, 1877
Mr. Rankin, father of Mrs. Joy Bishop, Jr., and Mrs. H.B.
Goodwin, living near Beloit, died last week, at an
advanced age. His children attended his funeral.
Sawen, Stewart
Sentinel, June 7, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Stewart Sawen, son-in-law of D.L. Hare, living north of
town, died on Monday night of this week. The funeral
preached on Wednesday by Elder Geo. J. Root.
Scott, child
Sentinel, March 29, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We have three deaths to record that occurred in the
vicinity of Delphos the past week: W.C. Scott's child,
Friday last, aged about six months; Samuel Buffington's
child, Sunday morning last, aged about six months; Rev.
L. Tallman preached the funeral at their residences. Mrs.
Cordie Dinwiddie, wife of James Dinwiddie, died
Sunday morning, aged about 40 years, but had been able
to be about until a week before she died, since which
time she suffered much, until death relieved her Sunday
morning at 1 o'clock. Mrs. D. had never publicly
professed faith in Christ, but during her illness, the week
before she died, became greatly interested in her soul's
salvation, and was resigned to depart. She was baptized
by sprinkling just before she died, by Rev. N. Bracken.
She was followed to the grave Monday be a large
number of sympathizing friends of the family. Mrs. D.
and Mrs. S's child were both buried at the same time.
Serviss, D.A.
Sentinel, December 14, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We are sorry to announce the death of Mr. D.A. Serviss,
who departed this life last Thursday night, after a very
brief illness, of typhoid fever - being sick only a few
days. He was a very kind, clever, industrious man. He
had a new house in process of erection at the time of his
death. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church
before coming to Kansas, and brought his church letter
here, we learn, but had not identified himself with any
church, since coming here. His funeral sermon was
preached Saturday by Rev. L.A. Tallman and his body
was followed to the grave by a very large procession of
sympathizing neighbors and friends.
Simmerson, Mr.
Sentinel, May 31, 1877
Just as the SENTINEL was going to press last week we
learned that a man by the name of Simmerson, who was
a tenant of the farm of Mr. T.C. Marks, was drowned
while attempting to cross a creek about ten miles south
of this place. The Salina Journal gives the particulars as
follows: "Mr. Simmerson left Mr. Srack's farm about 2
o'clock Friday afternoon, 18th inst., swam the Saline
River at Garver's branch, and stopped at Mr. Solomon
Smith's house. Mr. Smith endeavored to persuade Mr.
Simmerson to remain all night; but the latter objected
saying he could go home without trouble, and wished to
be home that night. When he reached the creek he threw
his boots to the further bank, and commenced swimming
across. His wife and a Mr. Gloss were standing in the
yard, watching his movements. The creek was about 30
ft in width. Soon after entering the stream it is supposed
he was taken with cramp, for he suddenly disappeared
after giving three loud shrieks. Mr. Gloss, when he
reached the edge of the bank, saw only Simmerson's hat
floating away. Simmerson was recently from Maryland,
and formerly a soldier in the regular army. He leaves a
large family.
15 Sentinel, 1877
Slater, Matt
Sentinel, May 24, 1877
We are informed that a Bohemian by the name of Matt.
Slater was drowned on Friday last, May 18th, at his place
on the east branch of First Creek. He was attempting to
rescue some stock that were in danger of being carried
away by the rapidly rising stream, and was crossing it, at
the time, when a huge wave struck him, carried him
under, and he was not seen afterwards. He is said to have
been a good swimmer, but the water being cold
undoubtedly chilled him. His wife and children were on
the bank nearby, but were unable to render any aid. At
last accounts his body had not been found, and fears are
entertained that it has been carried into Salt Creek.
Sentinel, May 31, 1877
We are informed by Mr. Jas. Lean that the body of Mr.
Slater, who was mentioned in this paper last week as
having been drowned in First Creek while attempting to
rescue some of his stock, was found several hundred
yards below the place of drowning, nearly covered with
mud and debris.
Smith, child
Sentinel, March 15, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
A child of Mr. Smith, living northwest of town, died the
other day from being scalded several days before with
boiling water.
Smith, child
Sentinel, March 15, 1877
A complaint which has been prevalent for some time
amongst the children in other neighborhoods in this part
of the state has reached this vicinity. We are informed the
disease is termed 'epidemic' influenza, of a croupy and
diptheritic nature' and is proving fatal in a number of
cases. The little child of Mr. Presley Smith, which had
been sick for some time, died on Saturday last.
Stelter, infant
Sentinel, September 14, 1877
Henry Stelter lost an infant child last week.
Strickler, Rhoda J.
Sentinel, July 12, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We received the sad news a few days ago of the death of
Mrs. Rhoda J. Strickler, of Indiana, sister of Mrs. Geo.
Strickler and Mrs. Jas. Clark.
Swerman, child
Sentinel, January 4, 1877
Frank Swerman lost his third and only child last week,
the other two having died in September last.
Traugh, Belinda
Sentinel, October 5, 1877
We received the intelligence, a few days ago, that Mrs.
Belinda, wife of P.M. Traugh, died at the residence of the
family last week, the 24th ult. She died very suddenly,
though quite subject to spells of illness. Her son, Mr.
M.M. Traugh, who is teaching in the south part of the
county, did not arrive until after the death. She was born
in 1814, and was therefore about 62 years old.
Trimble, child
Sentinel, September 7, 1877
J.R. Trimble's little twin child, which Olney Disney had
adopted, died Tuesday last, of cholera infantum.
Trimble, Mrs. John
Sentinel, July 12, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. John R. Trimble died last week. She leaves twin
daughters. The funeral was preached in town Friday, by
Rev. L.A. Tallman.
Troup, infant
Sentinel, August 9, 1877
The recently born infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Troup
died on Wednesday morning.
16 Sentinel, 1877
Vanmeter, Mary
Sentinel, April 12, 1877
Mr. and Mrs. Vanmeter, of Fountain Township, are
mourning the loss of their little daughter Mary, aged
about five years, who died this (Thursday) morning, at 3
o'clock, of scarlatinal dropsy.
Vosh, Peter
Sentinel, September 28, 1877
Peter Vosh died last Thursday, with hasty consumption;
was buried in the new Catholic Cemetery.
Watson, Louisa Ann
Sentinel, July 12, 1877
DIED. Louisa Ann Watson, wife of J.H. Watson, in
Minneapolis, July 11, 1877, of typhoid pneumonia and
consumption, aged 46 years.
In another column:
As is recorded in the proper column in this paper, Mrs.
Watson, wife of J.H. Watson, departed this life on
Wednesday morning last. After an unusual day's work
she was taken ill a few weeks ago, since which time she
suffered from an affection of the lungs. The funeral took
place at the church on Wednesday afternoon, 4 o'clock,
conducted by Revs. Bushnell and Green. The remains
were buried in the beautiful Highland Cemetery, where
her Sunday School class strew flowers in her grave, and
with the assistance of friends, sang 'Over There'. This is
the third friend whose last remains Mr. Watson has
followed from his house within the past thirteen monthsfirst
a daughter, then a grandchild, and lastly his wifeand
now he is quite alone. He has the sympathy of the
community in his sore bereavement.
Webster, child
Sentinel, August 24, 1877
FROM DELPHOS
We neglected to mention last week the death of R.G.
Webster's little child, aged about one and a half years.
17 Sentinel, 1877
18 Sentinel, 1877
Arseno, Mr. and Mrs.
Sentinel, November 29, 1878
Mr. A.J. Willis, of this county, has handed us a letter
lately received from Memphis, which will be of interest
to the many friends and acquaintances of Mr. W. and
family. The letter brings the intelligence of the death of
Mr. and Mrs. Arseno, the parents of Mrs. Willis, who
were refugees from Memphis, and had returned,
thinking that danger from yellow fever had passed.
Theirs has been the fate of many others under similar
circumstances, and shows that past experiences will not
suffice in guarding against this dreadful disease, for
notwithstanding heavy frosts have occurred, it is yet
quite unsafe to migrate to the infested district. The
question naturally arises, where will the end be?
Botsford, Lucius W.
Sentinel, July 19, 1878
DIED. - Wednesday evening, July 17th, 1878, Lucius W.,
infant son of Mr. Chas. L. and Mrs. Nettie L. Botsford,
aged 10 months. Services were held at the residence the
next day, in which Revs. Root, Bushnell and Moys took
part, after which the remains of the little one were
deposited in the cemetery. The parents desire to return
thanks for the kind attention of sympathizing friends,
whose heartfelt sympathy they have in this sore
bereavement - the untimely taking off of their first born.
Weep not father, mother, friend
He who taketh by him is given
The severed ties of this fair land
May reunited be in heaven.
Brownlee, Elizabeth
Sentinel, August 9, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
Died at the residence of her son, T.S. Brownlee, on
Saturday, the 3d inst., Mrs. Elizabeth Brownlee, aged 75
years. The deceased, although having reached the above
age, leaves one brother and three sisters older than
herself surviving. She was born in Venango County,
Pennsylvania, and was a resident of this county about
seven years. Although for some time previous to her
death she was in poor health, the illness which was the
immediate cause of death was of short duration. Mr.
Walter W. Walker, Jr. conducted the funeral services
which took place on Sunday last at this place, and was
largely attended.
Burr, infant
Sentinel, May 3, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. N.M. Burr has been lying very sick the past week
or more. Achild was born unto her last week, which died
soon after. Mrs. B. is getting better.
Chapin, Alice
Sentinel, January 4, 1878
Mrs. Alice Chapin died at 10 o'clock p.m. Christmas
night. Three times has death visited this once united and
happy home in a few weeks. First Nellie, then Charlie,
two bright children, were called away, and now the stern
decree has come, calling from our midst the true wife
and loving mother. It is needless to say that Mr. Chapin
has the deep sympathy of all in this dire affliction. May
our loving Father be his comforter and give him that sure
19
1878
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
and certain hope of a reunion, in the land where parting
shall be no more.
Colton, Lydia A.
Sentinel, July 19, 1878
We learn from the MODESTO (Cal.) HERALD (Chas.
Maxwell, editor), that Mrs. Lydia A. Colton, wife of
Frank H. Colton, and sister of Mrs. Maxwell and H.H.
and J.W. Tucker of this county, died at Bakersfield, Cal.,
on the 2d inst. Mr. and Mrs. Colton were formerly of this
county. The following from the HERALD is applicable
here as in the county where she has recently lived: A
woman of lovely character in all the relations of life, a
consistant Christian, a devoted wife and mother, as
daughter, sister, friend, without reproach, Mrs. Colton's
death will be mourned in many homes and leave in many
hearts an aching void that never can be filled. She leaves
a fond husband and six bright lovely children, together
with mother, sisters, brothers, and numerous friends to
mourn her loss.
Corlis, Emma
Sentinel, January 4, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED. Of diphtheria, on the 31st of December, Emma,
youngest daughter of Mr. Washington Corlis. There are
several more cases in this neighborhood.
Cunningham, Mr.
Sentinel, March 8, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
A man named Cunningham, who was employed in
grading the railroad, died on the morning of the 1st inst.,
of paralysis, at this place.
Dale, Anna
Sentinel, January 11, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED. On Saturday, the 5th inst., of diphtheria, Anna,
youngest daughter of Mr. J.C. Dale. The funeral sermon
was preached by Rev. H. Bushnell, Jr.
Dinwiddie, child
Sentinel, September 13, 1878
Rev. N. Bracken will preach the funeral sermon of A.J.
Dinwiddie's child, that died recently, on next Sunday at
11 a.m.
Doty, child
Sentinel, November 1, 1878
A child of Mr. and Mrs. John Dodo, aged 2 years, was
buried Monday, Oct. 28, services conducted by R.N.
Smith, at Minneapolis.
November 8, 1878
A child of Mr. and Mrs. John Doty, aged 2 years and 8
months, died on Saturday the 26th ult., and was buried
on the 28th. A notice handed us last week, by mistake
gave the name Dodo, and so it appeared. There has been
considerable sickness in Mr. Doty's family of late.
Foote, Mrs. Milton W. & child
Sentinel, July 5, 1878
WATERY GRAVE
THE WIFE AND LITTLE DAUGHTER OF MILTON W. FOOTE
DROWNED IN THE ATTEMPT TO FORD THE SOLOMON RIVER
Intelligence concerning one of the saddest mishaps that
has occurred in this part since the days of the Indians,
reached the ears of the people on last Saturday
afternoon. Immediately after dinner on that day Mr.
Milton W. Foote, wife, little daughter - six years of age
- and his sister, a young lady of about 16 years, who
lived some eight miles from this place on Salt Creek,
started for town with a team and farm wagon. When the
water is low the usual route from Mr. Foote's farm is by
the way of what is known as Pierce's Ford, which is
situated about 6 miles above this place, and by the
channel of the river some 15 miles. We understand that
Mr. Foote had crossed the ford in low water, but as he
had been in this country only a short time, probably did
not take particular notice of the stage of water necessary
to a safe transit. This ford is constructed, as most western
people know, by placing rock across the head of the river
at a sufficient height to keep a wagon bed out of water at
an ordinary stage. At the time Mr. F. and family
attempted to cross, the water is said to have been 7 feet
20 Sentinel, 1878
above the bed of the ford, it being unusually high, and
running very swiftly. This being the case, the very
thought of going into it with women and children fills
one with horror, and it would seem only necessary to
state the number in the vehicle to tell the result. The
banks and approaches on either side of the stream, as is
universally the case on the Solomon, were very steep,
and no sooner had they emerged into the rushing river it
was plain that they might just as well have plunged into
it at any other point. The horses attempted to swim for a
distance, but were soon dragged down by the heavy
wagon. Mr. F. thinks his wife immediately jumped out
and clung to one of the horses. The wagon went down,
and the bed had a tendency to float, but by some means
soon overturned. The despairing father with one hand
seized his sister, and with the other what he supposed to
be his little girl, but which he soon discovered to be only
a blanket, and let it go. He swam to shore with his sister,
just how he hardly knows, and just what transpired at
this time it is difficult to ascertain. Some say it was half
an hour or more before Mr. Foote made known what had
happened, and then it was at a house nearby. When
assistance arrived Miss Foote was found setting upon the
bank, and had evidently been in a state of
unconsciousness. The distressed man was half crazed by
the disastrous termination of his perilous adventure and
it is presumed he did not know what he was doing. He
says he thought he saw his wife clinging to one of the
horses as they were swept down the current, but about
this is not, we are informed, very certain.
The news soon spread, and in a short time many people
were at the scene, ready to render the assistance which
remained available, but up to present writing - Monday -
neither of the bodies have been found, though the dead
horses, various parts of the wagon, harness, &c have been
recovered, and quite a number of men have been dragging
the river every hour of daylight since that time.
Mr. Foote and family came to this county some time
about January last, from Canadalgua, N.Y., with Mr.
H.G. Cole, the photographer, who are old acquaintances,
the latter having taken very active part in the search. Mr.
Foote has yet left him a little boy, who did not happen to
accompany the family on this fatal journey. His parents
live in the neighborhood, who also came from the place
named at the time mentioned, as we understand. The sad
affair is one of those things which are liable to happen
everywhere, but it will doubtless make for the friends,
both here and in the east, a gloomy picture of the new
west. They all have the deep sympathy of the people of
the entire country round about in their sad and sudden
bereavment. Mrs. Foote was a lady of culture and
refinement. She had just handed in her letter at the late
quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church, of which body
she was an esteemed member.
THE BODIES FOUND
Since the above has been put in type the bodies of the
unfortunate wife and child have been found, the
particulars of which we learn through the kindness of
Mr. S.J. Powell, brother of the deceased lady. From him
we also see that some of the particulars detailed above
are incorrect in slight degree.
About one o'clock on Monday the body of Mrs. Foote
was somewhat accidentally discovered floating about
three quarters of a mile below where the drowning took
place, it having been in the water about 46 hours. It was
discovered by Mr. Henry Feather, who ran below to a
bend in the river, where the current came near the shore,
and arrested it by means of a pole, when Mr. Foote and
others were sent for. When the anxious and agonized
husband came in sight of the now deformed body of his
wife, who but a few short hours before was riding beside
him, hopeful and happy, we are told he was so overcome
that he fell prostrate in the bottom of the boat in which
they came. He was resuscitated, however, and his desires
as to further procedure consulted, when Mr. Powell, who
was present, was instructed to do as he thought best. The
remains were brought down and buried that evening in
the cemetery in the city.
The body of the little girl was found about 11 o'clock
on Tuesday, having been in the water about 68 hours.
Messrs. Powell and Geo. P. Bates of this city determined
to row down the river to see if perchance it might have
risen and lodged, which surmise proved correct, for the
little body was found, detained by a few slender roots,
about a mile and a half further down than that of its
mother. It was also brought to town, the friends notified,
and the burial took place the same day.
Mr. Powell informs us that upon coming to shore and
getting his half-drowned sister up on the bank, Mr. Foote
did not know upon which side of the river he landed,
having been underwater several times, as had also the
young lady, and started, as he supposed, down the river,
with a view of intercepting his wife and child, if
possible, but soon discovered that he was going
upstream, when he turned and ran down about a quarter
21 Sentinel, 1878
of a mile, seeing no signs of the missing ones. Mr. Foote
says the last thing his wife said was "I believe we are
going to be drowned.". The little girl remarked in
childlike confidence "We won't be drowned, will we,
Papa?" He says the wagon box sank considerably below
the water, and as his wife rose up she seemed to glide
away with the current, the upper portion of her body quite
out of the water, temporarily buoyed with the air confined
by her clothing. She did not jump out, as above stated.
It is but just here to state that no blame can be attached
to anyone. The neighbors and friends of the surrounding
country took a most active part in the search for the
bodies, there being generally more at hand than could
work to advantage. On behalf of Mr. Foote and relatives
of himself and deceased wife, we are requested to tender
their heartfelt thanks for the universal kindness and
attention shown. They have, amid scenes of sadness,
feelings of pleasure and sincere regard for the people of
Kansas. It was but a month ago that Mrs. Foote lost her
father, then living near Canandalgua, New York.
The funeral service of Mrs. Foote and daughter will
be held at Brook's school house on Sabbath, July 14, at
11 a.m. by Rev. H. Moys.
Fritz, infant
Sentinel, July 12, 1878
FROM LOST CREEK
Infant son of Mrs. Fritz died quite suddenly a week ago
last Sunday evening.
Geren, Mrs. A.D.
Sentinel, February 22, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. A.D. Geren, died last Thursday night, after a
lingering illness of consumption. Her funeral took place
on Saturday, Elder G.S. Dearborn, of Salina, conducted
the services, taking as his text 'Consider my afflictions,
and deliver me.' He preached a very able, interesting and
affecting sermon, portraying very forcibly all the
affliction the human is heir to, and closing with the most
heartrending description of that dire affliction, losing
friends by death. Mrs. G. was conscious that she was
nearing death's river, was reconciled to her fate, and
expressed a strong hope that she was going to the better
land. A large number of sympathizing friends followed
the remains to the grave. GWS
Goure, Mrs.
Sentinel, December 13, 1878
The funeral of Mrs. Goure, wife of Peter Goure, and
mother of the young men of that name, well known in
this place, was held at the Presbyterian Church on
Saturday last. She died very suddenly of heart disease, in
the 49th year of her age.
Gray, Mrs. Charles
Sentinel, March 22, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Charles Gray's wife, living near Glasco, shot and killed
herself last week. The suicide was caused, it is said, by
Gray beating her most unmercifully, which he had done
time after time. The last time, it is reported by those who
viewed the corpse, he beat her so inhumanly that many
scars could be seen upon the body. She shot herself
through the heart. Threats were made of lynching Mr.
Gray. Many will remember him, as having sold cider in
town at the election about one year ago.
Haley, Emma
Sentinel, September 6, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED. - On the 29th of August, Emma, daughter of Mr.
John Haley, aged four years.
Hall, Freddie
Sentinel, July 12, 1878
Freddie, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Hall, died early
yesterday morning, of the summer complaint, aged 11
months. The funeral was held at the church at 5 o'clock
p.m. of the same day, conducted by Rev. H. Moys, and
the remains buried in the city cemetery.
Heln, child
Sentinel, March 8, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. Geo. Heln's second child, aged about five years, died
of measles on the 28th of February.
22 Sentinel, 1878
Jordan, Mr.
Sentinel, May 24, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
The death of Mr. Jordan was universally regretted.
Justus, Sarah A.
Sentinel, August 23, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
We much regret to record the death of Mrs. Justus, which
occurred near this place on Saturday last, and, in
common with all who knew her, we sympathize with her
bereaved husband. Her funeral, of which we have not
learned particulars, took place on Sabbath last, at
Minneapolis.
DIED. At 9½ o'clock, Saturday, August 17th, 1878,
Sarah A., wife of G.H. Justus, in the 37th year of her age.
Funeral service was held in the Presbyterian Church,
Minneapolis, on the following Sunday, conducted by the
Rev. Pillsbury, of Manhattan, after which the remains
were interred in the city cemetery, where the services
were concluded.
Mr. Justus and family came to Ottawa County in
1870, from Schoolcraft, Michigan, since which time
they have lived in this city, and on their farm, 8 miles
southeast, in Bennington township, where they were
living at the time of Mrs. Justus' death. They had formed
many warm friendships and pleasant associations. It had
for some weeks been quite well known that the deceased
was ill, but when on last Sunday morning the funeral
was announced for the afternoon, an expression of pain
and surprise was visible on many countenances. Rev.
Stephen Pillsbury, a Baptist clergyman from Manhattan,
who happened to be in the city, kindly consented to
conduct the funeral services. A large congregation of
friends and acquaintances assembled to take part, most
of whom followed the remains to their last resting place.
The sorely bereaved husband, and the little boy and girl,
whom they had taken to raise, were the only mourners,
except many sympathizing friends. Mrs. Justus had long
been a most consistent member of the Baptist Church,
and it is the belief of everyone that she died in the
discharge of duty.
King, Myron
Sentinel, February 8, 1878
Myron King, a brother of Registrar King and one of the
oldest and most highly respected citizens of Troy, died
last night at his residence on Grand Division Street. His
father, Roger King, came to Troy from Suffield, Conn. in
1794, and lived here until 1820, occupying a residence
where St. Paul's Church now stands. Myron was born
there December 18, 1800. After the great fire in 1820,
Roger King removed to Saratoga county, but Myron
remained in Troy. He engaged in the steel and copper
plate engraving trade, and became known and
recognized as one of the best workmen in the country.
Strong inducements were offered Mr. King to remove to
large cities, but he uniformly declined. He either resided
or had an office on State Street for over seventy years.
Mr. King, although somewhat reticent, was a man of
high character, noble impulses and sterling ability. He
was a good citizen, an earnest Christian, having long
been identified with the State Street Methodist Church,
and a man most beloved by those who knew him best.
He leaves a wife and one son, the latter, George M. King,
being a resident of Kansas.-TROY (NY) TIMES
Miller, Frank M.
Sentinel, July 12, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
It is with much regret that we have to record a sad and
fatal accident which occurred on Saturday afternoon,
and by which we have lost one of our most promising
young men. We refer to the drowning of Mr. Frank M.
Miller in the Solomon River, near this place. The
particulars are as follows: Mr. Miller, in company with
Mr. Jordan, was occupied on Saturday in sawing wood
on the north bank of the Solomon River. After dinner
they went in swimming. Mr. Jordan swam across the
river and down some distance, Mr. Miller remaining
near the place where he went in. Mr. Jordan hearing a cry
for help looked back and saw Frank sink. It was for the
last time, for, although Mr. J. at once swam to the spot,
he never reappeared. On the alarm being given, a large
party of friends assembled and dragged the river for
some distance until Saturday evening, with no success.
On Sunday morning, the search was renewed, and late in
the forenoon the body was found six or eight feet from
the place where it sank. It was interred the same evening.
The funeral service, conducted by Revs. Seidel and
23 Sentinel, 1878
Bushnell, took place Monday morning. The prevailing
opinion is that the current of the river was too strong to
be overcome by deceased, and he was carried under by
its force. Mr. Frank M. Miller, with his brother Harvey,
came to this county about two years since, and last year
purchased a section of land one mile north of this place.
They had erected a fine residence, and were rapidly
improving their land. Their sister joined them this
spring. The deceased was a young man of good ability,
well educated, steady and industrious, esteemed by all
who knew him. He is a loss to the township, as he gave
promise of gaining a substantial and honorable position
in the pursuit which he had adopted from choice, that of
farming. His relatives have the deep sympathy of all in
their affliction. G.P.P.
Moffat, Mrs. Wm. (Moffitt, Rhoda)
Sentinel, March 8, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Wm. Moffat, of Sumnerville, died a few days ago,
of hasty consumption.
Monaghan, George
Sentinel, September 20, 1878
Mr. George Monaghan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Uriah
Monaghan, departed this life on Saturday last, of
consumption, after a continued illness, in the nineteenth
year of his age. This (is) the third adult member and
second son of this family that has been taken away
during the past year, and we are sure the parents and
remaining children have the sympathy of the community
in their numerous afflictions. The funeral services were
held at the house on Sunday afternoon, conducted by
Rev. H. Bushnell, Jr., after which the remains were
followed to the tomb by a large number of friends.
Monaghan, Rosetta
Sentinel, February 22, 1878
DIED on Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 12:30 a.m., Rosetta
Monaghan, daughter of Uriah and Elizabeth Monaghan,
aged about 18 years. The funeral was held at the church
on Wednesday, at 10:30 a.m. Services conducted by Rev.
H. Bushnell, assisted by Rev. S.A. Green, after which the
remains were interred in the city cemetery. A large
concourse of friends, including a large company of
schoolmates, extended their sympathies and paid their
respects by mingling with the bereaved family in the last
sad rites; and although the rain began to fall quite freely
before the ceremonies were over, many accompanied
them to the last earthly resting place of what remained of
their beloved daughter. She died very suddenly of the
typhoid fever, the same malady with which a brother near
the same age was taken away a few months ago. That the
bereaved family may be comforted, is the expressed and
unexpressed wish of the entire community.
Partch, Mrs.
Sentinel, July 19, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Partch, living some six miles northeast of town,
died last Sunday, after a lingering illness. The funeral
will be preached on Monday by Rev. Joy Bishop.
Payne, infant
Sentinel, October 11, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Dr. Payne's child, aged about 8 months, died on Friday
last. The funeral was preached on Sunday by Rev. C.K.
Jones.
Reafsnyder, Eddie
Sentinel, January 4, 1878
DIED. December 23d, of malignant diphtheria, Eddie,
son of John and Mary Ann Reafsnyder, aged 9 years, 3
months and 14 days. Mr. Reafsnyder's are highly
esteemed, and receive the sympathy of the community.
LAMAR
Savage, John
Sentinel, August 9, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mr. John Savage, of Meredith, died Monday morning of
this week. Mr. S. was an old resident of Pipe Creek, well
known as a good, honest Christian man, a member of the
M.E. Church, and died as he lived, in the triumph of a
redeeming love. Peace to his ashes. He was sick some
time.
24 Sentinel, 1878
Selders, child
Sentinel, September 27, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
W.M. Selders' little girl, aged 2 years, died last Saturday.
Funeral preached Sunday by Rev. C.K. Jones.
Simison, Jane E.
Sentinel, March 15, 1878
DIED. On Wednesday morning, 1:30 o'clock a.m. March
13th, 1878, Jane. E., wife of E.H. Simison, of
consumption, in the 35th year of her age.
The funeral will be held at the residence at 2 o'clock
this afternoon, conducted by Rev. H. Bushnell, Jr. The
remains will be interred in the city cemetery.
Mr. Simison and family came from Illinois six or
seven years ago, and have since been residents of this
county, during which time the frugal and Christian wife
has assisted in securing a beautiful homestead in the
country, having moved to town about two years ago. She
has lived a most consistent Christian life, and was a
devoted wife and mother. She leaves to mourn her
untimely loss a husband, three little girls and an infant
son, as well as all who knew her.
Soon shall we meet again
Meet ne'er to sever
Soon shall peace wreathe her chain
Round us forever.
Simison, Rolsom Everett
Sentinel, July 12, 1878
Romsom Everett, infant son of Mr. E.H. Simison, died
on last Sunday morning, after a short illness, at the age
of 3 months and 25 days, it being the length of time that
has elapsed since its mother departed this life. The
funeral was held at the residence on Monday, and the
remains interred by the side of those of the mother. Mr.
E.H. has now with him a little girl, and his brother, B.D.
Simison, and wife, who came from Illinois principally
on account of the care of the child.
Smith, Fred E.
Sentinel, October 4, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Fred E. Smith, living near Asherville, son-in-law of
W.H. Skinner of this place, died with fever on Thursday
of last week. He was a stout, robust young man, about 30
years of age. He leaves a young wife and two children.
Verily, in the midst of life we are in death.
Swope, child
Sentinel, September 20, 1878
Mr. Swope, of Decatur County, Ind., who has been here
visiting the past week, lost his father a few days before
he left home and while here received word that his child
had died during his absence here. Mr. S. returned home
Monday. He was so well pleased with our country that
he made arrangements to move back this fall, though he
has plenty of land in Indiana.
Vaught, Mr.
Sentinel, December 13, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
Mr. Vaught died quite suddenly last Friday night of
bilious colic. Mr. V. was about fifty years of age,
recently came from Iowa and was stopping at F.A.
Courtney's northeast of town, until he could find a
location. His body was sent back to Iowa.
Webster, Charley
Sentinel, May 31, 1878
A very distressing incident happened during the terrible
thunder and lightning Monday night, by which little
Charley Webster, aged about 11 years, (son of F.C.
Webster) was instantly killed. Lightning struck the
window, tearing off the facing, and setting on fire the
clothes of the bed upon which little Charley was
sleeping. The folks were at once aroused, and rushed to
put out the burning bed, where they found Charley
gasping and dying. There were no marks upon his body,
save some black streaks upon his back. The funeral took
place on Wednesday in the church, conducted by Rev. C.
K. Jones, after which his body was followed to the grave
by a number of sympathizing friends.
25 Sentinel, 1878
White, Frankie
Sentinel, January 4, 1878
FROM FOUNTAIN
We regret to learn that the second child of J.T. White,
little Frankie, died of inflammation of the lungs soon
after reaching Michigan. The parents have the sincere
sympathy of the community in this sad bereavement.
White, Mabel
Sentinel, January 18, 1878
FROM FOUNTAIN
We regret being compelled to announce the death of
another child of our townsman, Mr. J.T. White - the
eldest, Mabel. She died at the home of Mrs. White's
father, in Hillsdale County, Michigan, where the family
were spending the winter. The youngest - now their only
one - was at our last advices in a precarious condition. In
this hour of sore bereavment these stricken parents have
the warm and earnest sympathy of their neighbors and
friends.
White, William
Sentinel, November 1, 1878
FROM DELPHOS
It becomes our sad duty to record the (death of) William
White, who departed this (life after) a week's illness, on
Saturday evening, Oct. 26th. Mr. White was one of the
(most) useful and respected citizens, a ___ business man
of Delphos, and has been identified with the interests of
the _____several years. He was engaged (for) many
years in general merchandise with Mr. Seymour, and at
the time of his death (was a) senior partner in the
Delphos Mills, under the firm name of White & Kiser.
He (worked) hard to make it a good mill, and had ___
contemplation the building of a new ___ coming year.
He was the possessor of ___ property, as well as
personal worth. He was a man of retentive memory,
sound judgment, and many went to him for advice. It can
be truly said that he had not an enemy, was loved and
respected by everyone who knew him, and his taking off
is universally lamented. In his death a wife and large
family of children lose a kind and indulgent husband and
father, and the community a valuable citizen. In the
absence of Revs. C.K. Jones and N. Bracken, Rev. H.
Moys, of Minneapolis, was called to preach the funeral
sermon, which he did, from the text: "As the Lord liveth,
and as thy soul liveth, there is but a step between me and
death." I Samuel, 20:8. The discourse was effective and
interesting, portraying very vividly the sad dispensation
of Divine Providence whereby death severs the family
relations on earth, and of the great importance of all
acting their part wisely in this life, that we may be
prepared, when taken from time to eternity, to meet the
Lord in peace. Space forbids an extended comment.
After the sermon, the remains were followed to the
cemetery by the largest funeral procession ever
assembled in Delphos, to pay the last respect to one of
our most respected and useful citizens, William White.
G.W.S.
Wright, Mr.
Sentinel, June 28, 1878
Capt. John K. Wright met with a sad bereavement on
Friday last, in the sudden death of his brother at Junction
City. The latter had just arrived from Philadelphia, and
while dining at the house of Mr. Frank O'Riley, he fell
dead in his chair at the table, of heart disease. The
Captain has the sympathy of his many genial friends in
this valley.
York, Etha
Sentinel, April 5, 1878
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED-on the 2d inst., Etha, daughter of Alson York, aged
4 years and 5 months, of diphtheria.
26 Sentinel, 1878
Acley, child
Sentinel, July 11, 1879
FROM LAMAR
A child of Mr. Acley was buried on Sunday last.
Adams, Blanch May
Sentinel, July 11, 1879
FROM LOGAN AND VICINITY
DIED, of cholera morbus, on Saturday, May 21, 1879,
Blanch May, youngest daughter of Joseph and Lucy
Adams, aged 10 months. The bereaved family have the
heartfelt sympathy of the community.
Asbell, child
Sentinel, February 7, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. S. Asbell buried one of his children last week.
Ash, Mr.
Sentinel, January 31, 1879
A Mr. Ash, who moved to our town about two months
ago from Iowa, died on Thursday night of last week,
after a brief illness. The funeral service was held on
Sunday morning at the Presbyterian Church by Rev. H.
Bushnell, Jr., and the remains buried in the city
cemetery. The deceased leaves a wife and two little boys
and a nephew here to mourn the loss of the husband and
father. Though a stranger they have the sympathy of the
entire community.
Austin, George R.
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
Mr. George R. Austin, son of William R. Austin, died of
diphtheria, in Henry township, October 8th, 1879. The
funeral took place at the residence of his father October
9th, Rev. Mr. Miller conducting the services. The
deceased was 15 years old, and leaves a father and
mother, two sisters and one brother, and many
sympathizing friends and relatives to mourn his early
departure.
Though art gone to thy home,
We will no longer behold thee,
Gone with the angels in heaven to rest,
Gone where the sunlight of earth will not wake thee.
Gone to the home of the loved and the blest.
Baker, Lora J.
Sentinel, January 3, 1879
DIED.- Dec. 24, 1878, Lora J., daughter of Lewis and
Maria Baker, aged 2 years and 2 days.
Beckley, infant
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED- On the 24th inst., the infant son of Mr. John
Beckley.
27
1879
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
Bennett, child
Sentinel, August 8, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. J.C. Bennett lost a child from cholera infantum this
week.
Bledsoe, children
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Diphtheria is prevailing to some extent in this vicinity.
Two children, boys of Mr. Bledsoe, have died with it;
and the families of H.G. Baldwin, Wm. Baldwin and Mr.
Pollock are down with it. We have heard of no other
cases.
Boughman, Joseph
Sentinel, March 21, 1879
Joseph Boughman, residing near Delphos, who came to
this county about ten years ago, died on the 18th inst., in
the 60th year of his age.
Branch, Mrs.
Sentinel, May 23, 1879
Mrs. Branch, the mother of Mrs. Hall and the Messrs.
Branch, of this county, who was on a visit here last
summer, died a few days ago at her home in Illinois. She
was 80 years of age, and had been blind for 28 years. Mr.
Chas. Branch and wife responded to a telegram some
days ago, which stated that those who wished to see her
alive again must come soon.
Buck, Dena (Deana)
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Death has been busy among the little ones in our midst
recently. Little Alice C., only child of George and Emma
McEwen, aged 9 months and 23 days, died a short time
ago, followed in a very few days by the death of Freddie,
youngest child of J.T. and Fannie Meigell aged 10
months and 22 days. Mr. Meigell is a brother of Mrs.
McEwen. Today (the 21st) Dena, youngest child of Peter
and Dena Buck, was borne to our fast-filling cemetery.
Her age was 7 months and 20 days. The disease in all
these cases was cholera infantum. Three little graves on
a hill, three mourning mothers, sitting in their desolate
homes, with empty arms, weeping, like Rachael of old,
for their children, "because they are not."
Burr, Frank
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
No inquest was held on the body of Mr. Frank Burr, who
was found shot dead last week, as his friends are
satisfied, from the position of the body, gun and boat, as
also the nature of the wound, that it was the accidental
discharge of his gun that caused his death.
Call, A.B.
Sentinel, February 14, 1879
We learn that Mr. A.B. Call, who was canvassing for the
"Footprints of Time" in this county recently, died in
Concordia some days ago, of lung fever.
Coffield, Willie
Sentinel, April 4, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED - In this township, on Saturday March 22d, Willie,
eldest child of Elias Coffield. Willie had been ill for a
long time, his disease was of a eropsical (dropsical?)
nature. The funeral sermon was preached on Sunday,
March 23d, by Rev. H. Bushnell, of your town.
Corter, child
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
The grandchild of Mr. B.F. Corter died on Sunday and
was buried Monday.
Foot, Johnnie
Sentinel, May 16, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
On Saturday evening Johnnie Foot, son of Milton Foot,
passed away. Just before he died he was asked if he was
going to die; he pointed up and said, 'I am going home.'
The funeral was held on the 5th, conducted by Rev. W.
28 Sentinel, 1879
Whitney. Although only four years old he acted and
talked like one of riper years. To the bereaved father who
within a year has laid away a wife and two children, we
can but say, cherish a hope to meet them 'where parting
is no more.' Dear little Johnnie:
Thou wast a flower too fair to bloom
In this dark world of sin and gloom;
And was transplanted to realms above,
Where all is peace and joy and love.
Foote, May
Sentinel, May 23, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
It becomes our sad duty to again record the visit of the
death Angel in our midst. Miss May Foote died of
diphtheria, Sabbath evening, the 18th. The deceased,
though young in years, was a soldier of the Cross, she
having joined the Church at the age of fourteen. She
evidently rests from her works, as she said before she
died, "I am going home to glory." We extend the
sympathy of the community to the bereaved and
mourning friends.
Foster, Mrs.
Sentinel, March 21, 1879
Miss M. Foster was called suddenly away a few days
since by the announcement that her mother, who had
been quite ill for some time, was momentarily expected
to pass away. Miss Foster started on Monday morning of
last week and arrived at her destination, near Maquon,
Illinois just in time to hear the last hymn of the funeral
service sung, and take a "long last look" at the remains
of her departed mother. We are informed of the
remarkable fact that her mother died on the 63rd
anniversary of her wedding day and that the husband and
father is still living though quite feeble. On account of
her ardent and incessant labors in educational
institutions for many years, Miss Foster's health is
declining, and she will not be likely, we are informed, to
return soon, which her many friends here regret to
realize.
Furgison, Mrs.
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
Mrs. Furgison, daughter of Abram Butler, and relative of
Mr. John Henry, died near Glasco on Tuesday morning,
and was buried in that place on Wednesday. The
deceased was ill for some time previous to her death.
Garrett, J.E.
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
We regret to chronicle the death of Mr. J.E. Garrett, of
Coal Creek. He has been ailing for some time, but until
a week or two no fears of fatal termination were
entertained. He died on Thursday and was buried on
Saturday, the 25th inst. He was an old settler and much
respected by all who knew him. His loss will be felt by
many outside of his own family.
Garver, Jacob
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
29 Sentinel, 1879
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
Geho, child
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
FROM EAST LINCOLN
Diphtheria is raging in the neighborhood south of this
place. A son of Jacob Geho died of the disease last
Thursday night.
Geren, Samuel J.
Sentinel, September 12, 1879
IN MEMORIAM
DIED. - Near Melville, Ottawa County, Kan., August
31st, Samuel J., second son of F.M. and M.J. Geren,
aged thirteen years, five months, and seven days.
Not quite a year ago Robbie was called to God, and
now Sammy's still form is laid beside those other little
mounds in the cemetery. This is the fifth child those
sorrowing parents have been called to lay in the silent
tomb. Friday afternoon Sammy was on a load of hay.
Some jolt caused him to fall to the ground, and one tine
of a pitchfork pierced his body. He started to walk to the
house, but soon fell to the ground. He was perfectly
sensible, was conveyed to the house and his wound
dressed, but his right side was paralyzed. In a short time
he became speechless, and did not know anyone, but
was very restless, and seemed to suffer a great deal. It
was thought he received some internal injury besides the
wound of the fork. Sunday he lay perfectly still. His
breathing and a constant fluttering in his breast were the
only signs of life. At five o'clock his spirit quietly passed
to the world beyond. How sad to witness the great grief
of his parents and brothers, called so often to part with
their loved ones. Sammy was a good boy, and had many
friends who deeply sympathize with the bereaved
family, and grieve on their own account, for he will be
sadly missed from their circle.
Oh! It was hard to part with one
So dear and loving, kind and true;
But God, our Father, said "Come home,
Up here there's work for you to do."
Alas! We cried; the bitter cup
Is more than we can drink;
Our sorrow no, we cannot tell
Ah! None like ours, we think.
But Sammy, in your home above
No sorrows ever come;
No aching, broken hearts are there,
No sin, no death, no pain.
We will all try to meet you there,
In the Sweet By-and-By,
Beyond the Beautiful River,
With Jesus, up on high.
Gower, James H.
Sentinel, November 14, 1879
Mr. James H. Gower died at his home in Lawrence on
Wednesday. Mr. G. owned about 5,000 acres of land in
this county, the immense water power at Lawrence, and
other extensive property interests. He was one of
Kansas' energetic men, and did much to advance the
interests of the State. His sudden taking off will be
universally regretted.
Haley, Ines E.
Sentinel, April 25, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
Died of heart disease, April 17th, Ines E., infant daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Haley, aged seven months.
Halford, Sarah
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
Mrs. Sarah Halford, wife of Henry Halford, died in
Henry township October 10, 1879, of typhoid fever. She
leaves a husband and eight children, who will feel the
sad loss of a kind and affectionate mother. The funeral
took place on the 12th, Rev. J. Courter preaching the last
farewell for the departed. The deceased was 39 years of
age.
Harshbarger, Orpha
Sentinel, March 14, 1879
FROM EAST LINCOLN
DIED - On the 10th inst., Orpha, infant daughter of Mr.
30 Sentinel, 1879
and Mrs. William Harshbarger, of this place. Sincere
sympathies are extended to the parents.
Holly, Fannie
Sentinel, November 21, 1879
Fannie Holly, daughter of Mr. Joseph Holly, and a sister
of Rev. J.E. Courter, departed this life, after a protracted
illness, Friday last, Nov. 14, 1879, in the 18th year of her
age. Consistent in life, patient in suffering, she was
beloved by all who knew her, and died with a confident
and encouraging hope of the future.
Hotchkiss, Milo
Sentinel, April 25, 1879
Mr. Milo Hotchkiss, an aged and most respected
gentleman, and for many years a citizen of the county,
died on the 10th inst. He was born in Vermont in the year
1806. Rev. H.R. Gouldin, who gave us this notice,
informs us that he has been a faithful member of the
Methodist Church since 27 years of age, during which
time he served as teacher, steward and superintendent of
Sunday School.
Huey, Martha
Sentinel, April 18, 1879
Mrs. Martha Huey died at the house of Mr. E.G.
McKeen, on Monday last, after a painful illness of
several days. The funeral was held on the following day,
at the M.E. Church, by Rev. W. Whitney. Mrs. H. was a
sister of Mrs. A.L. Corson. She left three children, two
boys and a girl, the youngest 6 years old. The last named
is taken in charge of by Mr. and Mrs. Jordan, and the
youngest boy by Mr. and Mrs. Weckerly, where they will
find excellent homes.
Ingraham, Benny
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
Little Benny, aged 1 year and 6 months, youngest son of
Mr. Elias Ingraham, died last Sunday and was buried in
the city cemetery Monday afternoon. This is the second
child taken from the family by the hand of death within
a short time.
Ingraham, child
Sentinel, July 18, 1879
Mr. Elias Ingraham's little girl, aged three years and six
months, died last Saturday.
James, Mrs. Irving
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Mrs. Irving James died October 24th at the residence of
her father-in-law, on Salt Creek. The funeral of the
deceased was preached by Rev. Courter. The remains
interred in the Spring Hill Cemetery.
Kimball, A.L.
Sentinel, August 15, 1879
Mr. A.L. Kimball, a much respected farmer residing near
Culver this county, died rather suddenly last Saturday
afternoon. He leaves a widow and one child.
Knight Jr., Richard;
Knight, Anna and John
Sentinel, February 7, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, of lung fever, on January 30th, Richard Knight, Jr.
On February 1st, at 5 o'clock a.m., Mrs. Anna Knight,
and at 2 o'clock p.m., same day, Mr. John Knight. The
latter couple were husband and wife, the parents of the
first named. The disease which carried off Mr. and Mrs.
Knight was somewhat of the same character as that
which proved fatal in Richard's case, combined with old
age. Mr. and Mrs. Knight were among the oldest settlers
in this part of Kansas, being here almost 20 years. They
were warmly attached to each other. The death of their
son was much felt by them, the old lady sinking rapidly
when informed of it, and on her death Mr. Knight, who
up to this illness had always braced himself up against
the infirmities of age, surrendered the struggle and
quietly passed away a few hours afterwards. They had
passed a long life together, and in death they were not
separated. Mr. Knight was almost seventy seven years
old, and Mrs. Knight almost eighty one. Mr. Richard
Knight, Jr., leaves three children orphans, their mother
having died about one year since. Richard was buried in
the cemetery at this place on Saturday, and his father and
31 Sentinel, 1879
mother on Sunday afternoon. A number of our citizens
who knew the deceased in Michigan, along with the
friends made in Kansas, accompanied the remains to
their resting place. Messrs. Daniel and C.D. Struble have
charge of the affairs of Mr. Knight, but to the present
have not full particulars as to what course will be taken
in regard to the disposition of property.
Knox, F.W.
Sentinel, April 25, 1879
The announcement of the sudden illness and later the
death of this well-known and much respected citizen
appeared in last week's issue. The funeral sermon, also
announced, was preached by Rev. W. Whitney, in the
Methodist Church, on Saturday last, the services being
conducted by the Masonic Order, of which he was an
honored member. The long solemn procession, headed
by the band, playing a solemn air, escorted the remains
to the church, and after the sermon, to the cemetery in
this place, where the members of his Lodge performed
the Masonic burial rites in a solemn and impressive
manner.
It was stated in Rev. Whitney's very feeling and
instructive sermon that Mr. Knox was 57 years of age,
had been 40 years a faithful member of the church, in
which he had held prominent positions. He was
respected most by those who knew him best, and as a
husband and father, kind and dutiful in an eminent
degree. The chief mourners were his inestimable wife,
who amid untold affliction has cast sunshine all along
his pathway while he lived; and their daughter, Mrs. T.B.
Ellison. A large circle of friends and the entire
community mourn with those who mourn.
April 18, 1879
Mr. F.W. Knox has been very seriously ill the past week.
LATER- Mr. Knox died on Friday about noon, of heart
disease. The funeral will be held at the M.E. Church
today (Saturday) at 1:00 p.m. The Masonic order, of
which he was a member, will take part in the
ceremonies.
Krone, Katie
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
Krone, Mrs. G.
Sentinel, June 27, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
The citizens of this vicinity are again called upon to
mourn the loss of a friend. Mrs. G. Krone, after suffering
for three and a half weeks from injuries received in the
cyclone, departed this life of Monday night, June 23. Mr.
Krone has lost his wife and three of his daughters by this
storm. We feel justified in tendering to him and his
family the most heartfelt sympathy of the readers of the
Sentinel, and we think of Longfellow's beautiful lines:
There is no Death!
What seems so is transition;
This life of mortal breath
Is but the suburb of the life elysian
Whose portal we call Death.
32 Sentinel, 1879
Langston, Ellen
Sentinel, October 17, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, on the 12th inst., Ellen, daughter of Mr. Joseph
Langston, aged 16 years. The family have the sympathy
of all in their affliction.
Lean, James Sr.
Sentinel, May 23, 1879
DEATH OF JAMES LEAN'S FATHER
We have received the following notice from the hand of
our fellow citizen, Mr. James Lean.
DIED - At Torquay, Devon, England, James Lean,
Esq. (late Bengal Civil Service) in his 70th year.
It will be remembered that Mr. James Lean started for
England on a visit some months ago. The above note,
with a request to publish, is all we have, and we judge by
the name and age that the deceased is none other than the
person indicated in the heading. While this is sad news
to the friends here, they will rejoice that Mr. L. Jr., was
permitted to see his aged father again before he died.
Little, Hugh R.
Sentinel, May 9, 1879
IN MEMORIAM
WHEREAS; Almighty God, in His inscrutable
providence, has seen fit to remove from our midst; by
death, our worthy and beloved brother, Hugh R. Little, and
WHEREAS; We deem it proper and right that we place
upon record this memento of his worth as a citizen and
friend, and of the high estimation in which he was held
by his Masonic brethren. Therefore,
RESOLVED; That in the death brother Little this lodge
has lost a devoted member, one who loved the timehonored
principles of Masonry, and revered its holy
teachings; his family a kind father, and his neighbors a
true and reliable friend.
2d. That we extend to the immediate friends and
relatives of our deceased brother our sincere sympathy
and condolence in their sad bereavement, and
prayerfully commend them to the watchful care of the
Supreme Master.
3d. That a copy of this record be addressed to the
children of our deceased brother, and that a copy by
forwarded to the Minneapolis SENTINEL and ABILENE
GAZETTE, for publication.
D.D. BAIRD, P.C. HULL. Solomon City, Kansas,
April 28, 1879.
McCalmot, Mr.
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
McCarty, child
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
DELPHOS NEWS
The wife of Mr. Wilcox, living a few miles north, died
last week. Also, an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. I.A.
Packard; the aged Mr. Smith, and Joseph McCarty's
child.
33 Sentinel, 1879
McDowell, Mrs.
Sentinel, February 28, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Rev. Moys, as previously announced, preached Mother
McDowell's funeral sermon and also his farewell
discourse, to a crowded house on last Sabbath.
McEwen, Alice C.
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Death has been busy among the little ones in our midst
recently. Little Alice C., only child of George and Emma
McEwen, aged 9 months and 23 days, died a short time
ago, followed in a very few days by the death of Freddie,
youngest child of J.T. and Fannie Meigell aged 10
months and 22 days. Mr. Meigell is a brother of Mrs.
McEwen. Today (the 21st) Dena, youngest child of Peter
and Dena Buck, was borne to our fast-filling cemetery.
Her age was 7 months and 20 days. The disease in all
these cases was cholera infantum. Three little graves on
a hill, three mourning mothers, sitting in their desolate
homes, with empty arms, weeping, like Rachael of old,
for their children, "because they are not."
McGlaughlin, Lettie
Sentinel, April 25, 1879
Mrs. Lettie McGlaughlin died Saturday, April 12th. The
deceased was the only child of John and Mary Feather.
During her protracted illness she exhibited that patience
and Christian fortitude which had marked her life, and
alone can prepare one for eternity. She was a dutiful
daughter, an affectionate wife, a loving and exemplary
mother, and a charitable neighbor - one whom no one
could know but to love and respect. She leaves a
husband and three small children, and her aged parents
to mourn her loss. She had been a member of the M.E.
Church for a number of years. While relatives, friends
and classmates mourn her loss, we feel that our loss has
been her eternal gain. The remains were followed to the
place of interment (Pleasant Valley Cemetery) by the
largest funeral procession we have seen in the state.
Yes, dear Lettie, thou hast gone home,
Where sorrow and death can never come;
Thou hast entered the mansions above,
Where all is life and light and love.
McKendreeldrig, Mary Ellen
Sentinel, April 4, 1879
DIED - of diphtheria, in Logan township, February 23,
1870, Mary Ellen, infant daughter of W. and Emma
McKendreeldrig aged 10 months. Funeral services were
conducted by Rev. R. Kendall, pastor in charge of
Wesleyan Methodist at Grover.
McLaughlin, Bertie
Sentinel, August 8, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Bertie, only son of W.P. McLaughlin, an adopted son of
L.G. and E. Kinsey, died Tuesday, July 29. The remains
were interred beside its mother, who recently passed
over the river.
Meigell, Freddie
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Death has been busy among the little ones in our midst
recently. Little Alice C., only child of George and Emma
McEwen, aged 9 months and 23 days, died a short time
ago, followed in a very few days by the death of Freddie,
youngest child of J.T. and Fannie Meigell aged 10
months and 22 days. Mr. Meigell is a brother of Mrs.
McEwen. Today (the 21st) Dena, youngest child of Peter
and Dena Buck, was borne to our fast-filling cemetery.
Her age was 7 months and 20 days. The disease in all
these cases was cholera infantum. Three little graves on
a hill, three mourning mothers, sitting in their desolate
homes, with empty arms, weeping, like Rachael of old,
for their children, "because they are not."
Miller, Ellie Annie
Sentinel, October 24, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Ellie Annie, daughter of John and Jennie Miller,
departed this life October 14th, aged two years and two
months. One after another our dear ones are called to the
spirit world. May we all so shape our lives that we can
meet them on the other shore.
34 Sentinel, 1879
Miller, John Henry
Sentinel, November 28, 1879
DIED - At his residence seven miles north of
Minneapolis, on the 20th of November, 1879, at one
o'clock in the morning, Mr. John Henry Miller, aged 49
years, 10 months and 13 days. The funeral services took
place on Friday, at 10:30, at the house. Alarge concourse
of people were in attendance, giving testimony to the
esteem in which Mr. Miller was held by them as a
neighbor. The funeral address was delivered by the
pastor of the Lutheran Church near Sumnerville, of
which he was a member. Mr. M. leaves a devoted wife
and many friends to mourn their loss.
Montgomery, Father and Son,
Pfaff, Isaac
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
TERRIBLE CALAMITY
THREE PERSONS BURNED TO DEATH IN A PRAIRIE FIRE
(From SALINE VALLEY REGISTER)
The prairie fire which swept the prairie on the head of
Battle Creek, 8 miles north of town, on Thursday
evening, the 13th, dealt death and desolation to every
available object in its path. It burned stock, grain,
buildings and three persons. Mr. M.N. Dams gave us the
particulars, as follows:
About four o'clock in the afternoon Mr. Montgomery,
one of the well-to-do farmers of that section of the
county, and his son, a boy of about 12, were in the field
at work when they discovered a fire coming from the
west, and they stopped their work to keep the fire from
the hedge, when the wind suddenly changed to the north,
blowing very hard and cold, and bearing before it a
second fire, which came with the fleetness of a horse. It
seems that there were two fields near, one on either side,
and seeing their danger the boy started for one field and
the father to the other. The boy was caught in the flames
and fell to the ground instantly. A neighbor, by the name
of Isaac Pfaff, who was passing near upon a mule,
galloped up to Mr. Montgomery and induced him to
mount the mule behind him, and ride to the field. Mr.
Montgomery mounted, but seeing his boy fall lost all
presence of mind, and threw his arms around Mr. Pfaff,
catching the bridle reins and holding the mule still while
they were enveloped in the flames. Both men dropped to
the ground and the fire passed over them. The mule ran
a short distance and dropped dead. The two men arose to
their feet and the wind and fire took their clothing from
them as they walked to the nearest field, about one
hundred yards distant. Mr. Pfaff's feet were so badly
burned that his boots fell from his feet as he walked.
AMr. Manning came to them from the nearest house
with a couple of quilts, which he wrapped about the two
men and carried them to the house. He then carried the
dead boy to the house. Mr. Montgomery lived until
about eleven o'clock Thursday night. Mr. M. leaves a
wife and several children, most of whom are grown. Mr.
Pfaff leaves a wife and one child, having buried two
children quite recently; one just the day previous to
losing his own life while attempting to save that of
another. They were both well-to-do and highly respected
farmers, well known and esteemed in our town and the
section of country in which they lived. Mr. Montgomery
was about 45 or 50 years of age, and Mr. Pfaff about 30.
The fire burned one mule, two horses, several head of
hogs, about two thousand bushels of corn, and
considerable other grain, belonging to Mr. M., and his
stable and house, with everything in them, the balance of
his family barely escaping with their lives.
We understand that the person who set the fire has
been put under arrest.
Murphy, Mr.
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
35 Sentinel, 1879
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
Newlan, Mrs. J.
Sentinel, May 2, 1879
FROM EAST LINCOLN
Since writing our last letter Mrs. J. Newlan has died
from dropsy and a puerperal injury combined. The
funeral procession was the largest yet seen in the
neighborhood.
O'Connor, Patrick
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
DELPHOS NEWS
The burial of Mr. Patrick O'Connor, who lived a short
distance west, took place in the new Catholic Cemetery
on Wednesday. He leaves a wife and several children.
Olson, Jane
Sentinel, January 10, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, on January 1, Mrs. Jane Olson, aged 87 years.
Packard, infant
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
DELPHOS NEWS
The wife of Mr. Wilcox, living a few miles north, died
last week. Also, an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. I.A.
Packard; the aged Mr. Smith, and Joseph McCarty's
child.
Potter, Amanda D.
Sentinel, January 3, 1879
DIED. December 29, 1878, at 11:45 p.m., Mrs. Amanda
D., wife of S.O. Potter, age 38 years.
The funeral was held at the Presbyterian Church on
the morning of the 30th, conducted by Elder Geo. J.
Root. The deceased leaves a kind husband and four
children to mourn her early taking off.
Ramey, Bertha
Sentinel, December 12, 1879
FROM LAMAR
DIED.- December 7th, of inflammation of the brain,
Bertha, daughter of Daniel and Adeline Ramey, aged 1
year, 8 months and 23 days. She was a bright child, and
the parents have the heartfelt sympathy of the
community. Words of comfort were spoken by Rev. L.S.
Cooper, from Mark 13:33.
Sweet Bertha unto earth
A little while was given
She plumed her wing for flight,
And soared away to heaven.
We loved this tender little one,
And would have wished her stay;
But let our Father's will be done-
She shines in endless day.
Rathgiber, Clara
Sentinel, May 2, 1879
Mrs. Clara Rathgiber died the 15th and was interred in
the Minneapolis Cemetery on the 17th ult. The deceased
immigrated to this State, with her parents, in 1870, and
soon after was united in marriage to Mr. Rathgiber, who,
with two children, mourn the loss of the departed one,
who was ever a kind neighbor and an indulgent mother.
The deceased was in her 29th year. There are two
brothers, the Messrs. Traugh, a sister and aged father,
who, with the husband and two children, have the
sympathy of all in this their sad bereavement.
36 Sentinel, 1879
Reafsnyder, Sadie
Sentinel, August 22, 1879
DIED - Near Grover, Kan., August 15, 1879, Sadie,
daughter of John and Mary Reafsnyder, aged 14 years,
10 months and 18 days. The deceased has been a sufferer
for some months past; but during this time has patiently
borne her afflictions, and to the last seemed resigned to
her fate. Her remains were interred in the Pipe Creek
Cemetery on the following Sunday after her death,
followed by a large concourse of sympathizing friends.
Words of comfort were spoken by Rev. L.S. Cooper,
from Revelations 3:26.
Rice, Hugh
Sentinel, December 12, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, on Sunday, Dec. 7th, Mr. Hugh Rice. Mr. Rice had
almost recovered from an attack of typhoid fever, but
premature exposure brought on a relapse from which he
died. He left a young wife and one child to mourn his loss.
Robinson, Polly
Sentinel, February 7, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Mrs. Phoebe Robinson was buried Monday from the
I.X.L. schoolhouse. Services by Rev. Courter.
Roy, Thomas
Sentinel, September 5, 1879
Mr. Thomas Roy, a much respected farmer living on the
Saline, died Thursday afternoon, and was interred today.
The funeral services were conducted by the Masonic
Order.
Schell, child
Sentinel, August 1, 1879
DELPHOS NOTES, FROM THE HERALD
Mr. Schell's child died Tuesday of this week. Rev. T.J.
Ream officiated at the funeral.
Secrist, child
Sentinel, February 7, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
The family of Mr. Henry Secrist, who recently arrived
here from Pennsylvania, are afflicted with the
diphtheria. Last Saturday a daughter 12 years old died,
and was buried in the cemetery here. The funeral sermon
was preached by Rev. Courter, at the Pleasant Valley
school house. The afflicted parents, "strangers in a
strange land", have the sympathy of the community. We
understand that other members of the family are ill with
the same disease.
Secrist, child
Sentinel, February 28, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
Another child of Henry Secrist died last week of
diphtheria. The rest of the family, we understand, are
convalescent. They have been sadly afflicted.
Shaw, Emma
Sentinel, July 11, 1879
Emma, daughter of Mr. G.W. Shaw, aged eight years,
died last Monday morning from a disease of the throat.
It is thought that the swallowing of a piece of jewelry
might have caused or irritated the disease.
Sickles, Emily
Sentinel, February 28, 1879
Mr. J.G. Sickles and family, who came here from
Michigan a short time ago, are sorely afflicted by the
loss of the wife and mother, Mrs. Emily Sickles, who
died last Monday, at the age of 39 years. The funeral was
held at the Methodist Church on Tuesday, conducted by
the Rev. H. Moys. The deceased leaves a husband and
four children, the youngest three years of age.
Simonds, A.Z.
Sentinel, April 18, 1879
Mr. A.Z. Simonds died at his home on east Third Street,
on Tuesday night last, we understand of brain fever. He
had been ailing for some time, and, in fact, never seemed
37 Sentinel, 1879
to be well. It was only a short time ago that his wife
started on a trip east with a relative, and at the time he
was given up, a telegram was sent after her, though her
whereabouts then was not, we learn, definitely known.
The remains were buried on Wednesday. The funeral
sermon will be preached by Rev. Andress on Sunday
morning next. Mr. Simonds was a brother-in-law of Dr.
J.C. Smith of this place.
Smith, Mr.
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
DELPHOS NEWS
The wife of Mr. Wilcox, living a few miles north, died
last week. Also, an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. I.A.
Packard; the aged Mr. Smith, and Joseph McCarty's
child.
Smith, Mrs. Casper
Sentinel, May 23, 1879
FROM EAST LINCOLN
The death of Mrs. Casper Smith occurred last week. The
burial was accompanied by the peculiar solemnities of
the Roman Catholic Church. Mrs. Smith will be missed
by many friends. Her life among us was a homely but
touching one of benevolent kindness.
May 9, 1879
FROM EAST LINCOLN
Mrs. Casper Smith is suffering from dropsy and
inflammatory rheumatism, which will probably prove
fatal. The physician has announced that there is no hope
of her recovery.
Stump, Emma
Sentinel, May 16, 1879
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Mrs. Emma Stump, wife of Thos. Stump and daughter of
Mr. Gale, died May 4th. The deceased was a useful
member of society. Among the mourning relatives she
leaves a husband and two young children. The funeral
was held on the 5th, conducted by Rev. W. Whitney. "In
the midst of life we are in death."
Thom, child
Sentinel, July 25, 1879
Mr. Reub Thom lost his youngest son Monday last. He
was buried Tuesday.
Van Doran, Mrs.
Sentinel, March 14, 1879
FROM BENNINGTON
The death of Mrs. Van Doran, daughter of Mr. John
Haley of this place, in your city, was much regretted. She
was a universal favorite here. Her illness was not known
here, her death being the first news.
Vohs, Anna
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
38 Sentinel, 1879
Vossman, Mrs.
Sentinel, June 13, 1879
FROM ABOVE SUMNERVILLE
A terrible cyclone visited this vicinity on Friday, May
30, about 4 p.m., a full account of which was (put in) to
last week's SENTINEL. The statement contained a few
errors which we will here rectify: The storm crossed the
Solomon River in a northeasterly course. Mrs. Anna
Vohs died on Sunday evening, not on Saturday as stated.
There were 20 persons in and around Geo. Krone's house
at the time of the disaster, whose names are as follows:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Krone and their children - Harmon,
Lena, Katie, Henry, Sophie; their eldest married
daughter, Mrs. Vohsman and her husband and child;
their youngest married daughter, Mrs. Vohs and her two
children; Mrs. Jones and her two children; T.W. Carter,
Jacob Garver and Mr. Kime. All of the above were badly
bruised. Mrs. Vohsman and Jacob Garver were killed
instantly. The following have died since:
Mrs. Anna Vose, at J.W. McLaren's house on Sunday
evening; Katie Krone, at Mr. Correl's, on Monday
morning, and Mrs. McBride's father, Mr. Murphy, on
Sunday night. Mr. McCalmot, living near Dry Creek,
was killed during the storm. Thus six persons were
removed from our midst, three of whom belonged to the
Krone family. At the present time (Monday morning) the
wounded are doing well, and it is thought they will
recover. Great loss of property has been sustained by
many persons. Besides those mentioned in the Sentinel
last week, Messrs. T. Kilbourne, J. Campbell and Harry
Gable have lost the most of their valuable timber.
Whitford, Betsy A.
Sentinel, February 28, 1879
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED - In Fountain township, on Friday evening, the 14th
inst., Mrs. Betsy A., wife of Oren Whitford, aged 76
years. Her funeral was attended by a large concourse of
friends and neighbors; sermon by Rev. John Courter. Her
remains were followed to the grave by one son and five
daughters, all settled in this vicinity but the son, who
resides in Salina. Mrs. Whitford was a sister of Mrs.
Polly Robinson (not Phoebe, as we wrote the name in
our last), who died two weeks before.
Wilcox, Mrs.
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
DELPHOS NEWS
The wife of Mr. Wilcox, living a few miles north, died
last week. Also, an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. I.A.
Packard; the aged Mr. Smith, and Joseph McCarty's
child.
Wilson, infant
Sentinel, March 28, 1879
FROM GROVER
Mrs. Elliot Wilson has returned from her visit. While
away she met with the loss of the little baby, in which the
father and mother have the sympathy of the community.
Zucker, Fransisco
Sentinel, May 23, 1879
DIED, at her late residence, southwest of this city, on
Saturday May 10, 1879, Mrs. Fransisco, wife of Jacob
Zuker, aged 71 years, 3 months and 9 days. The funeral
services took place on Sunday afternoon, Rev. W.C.
Seidel officiating. The large concourse of people
attending these services gave testimony of the high
esteem in which she was held in the community. Mr.
Zucker has the sympathy of his large circle of friends
who join him in mourning the loss of his esteemed
companion. They had lived together in the holy state of
matrimony for over 51 years.
39 Sentinel, 1879
40 Sentinel, 1879
_________, child
Sentinel, July 9, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
The child that was mentioned a few weeks ago as being
found in the school house south of town, died last
Saturday, and was decently buried in the cemetery on
Sunday, Rev. N. Bracken preaching the funeral sermon.
Adee, Arthur
September 3, 1880
Died - In Grant township, Ottawa County, August 13,
1880, of whooping cough, Arthur, only son of Richard
and Eva Adee, aged 5 weeks and one day.
Never o'er my infant head
Came the shade of doubt and fear;
Brightly my young morning fled,
For an angel called me here.
N.J.H.
Allen, Mr.
Sentinel, October 8, 1880
David E. Allen received a telegram Friday of last week
saying his father, who lived in Kinmundy, Ill., was dead,
and requesting him to come home at once. He took the
train the same day.
Baker, J.M.
Sentinel, June 4, 1880
Mr. J.M. Baker, of Salt Creek, brother of our ex-City
Marshal, departed this life at his home last Sunday. The
funeral services were held at the M.E. Church in this
place last Sunday, conducted by Rev. J.E. Courter, and
the remains were buried in Highland Cemetery.
Baker, Roy
Sentinel, July 30, 1880
One of those sad accidents which results from lighting a
fire with kerosene oil occurred near this place last
Monday evening, at the house of Mr. F. Baker (brother
of ex-marshal Baker of this place) who lives several
miles west of here. While the parents were absent a little
boy about 7 years of age attempted to light the fire with
the oil, when an explosion took place, burning the boy so
badly that he died the following day. A sister, who was
also at home, was quite seriously burned while
attempting to save her brother. We learn that the results
in the case of the girl are liable to be serious. This sad
occurrence should be a warning to those who use coal oil
for kindling.
August 6, 1880
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
A gloom has been cast over the entire community by the
sad accident which resulted in the death of little Roy
Baker, and the serious injury of the eldest sister, Miss
Alice, who, in the attempt to save her little brother, was
severely burned; at the peril of her own life she sought
to shield him, but her efforts were of no avail, the cruel
flames had done their work. He lingered until three
o'clock Tuesday morning, July 27th, when his spirit
passed away. The funeral services were conducted by
Rev. John Courter, who had been requested by the dying
child to preach at his funeral. After an appropriate and
comforting sermon from the words, "Is it well with the
child", the remains were interred in Highland Cemetery.
Naturally of a gentle, loving nature, he was loved by all
who knew him, and how much more must he have been
endeared to his family circle. The youngest of the family,
the special pet of the elder sister, the loved playmate of
the little sister and brother remaining, the idol of his
41
1880
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
parents, what words can express their anguish as they
see that loved one thus suddenly taken from their midst.
But one blessed thought remains to cheer them: death,
though coming in its most painful form had no terrors
for him. Calmly and with a thoughtfulness far beyond
his years he spoke of it and bid his friends goodbye and
the dying words of little Roy will be cherished in the
hearts of those who heard them while life remains; and
though they weep for him it is not as those without hope,
for they know that it is indeed well with their dear one;
that he is gone where there is no death, neither sorrow
nor sighing, where all tears shall be wiped away. Our
friends have the heartfelt sympathy of their neighbors
and friends in this their dark hour of affliction.
Barker, Frank
Sentinel, October 1, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Frank Barker, aged 14 years, 7 months and 27 days, son
of Wm. Barker, died on Monday morning of this week,
after an illness of about two weeks. His funeral sermon
was preached on Tuesday afternoon, by Rev. T.J. Ream,
after which the remains were followed to the Delphos
Cemetery, where they were laid away to rest. Thus, in
the bloom of life, was little Frank cut down. His many
young associates should take warning. "Remember thy
Creator in the days of thy youth."
Barnes, James
Sentinel, May 21, 1880
Archibald Barnes received a telegram one day last week,
conveying the sad intelligence of the death of his son
James, at Malvern, Ark. The deceased attempted to get
on the cars while the train was moving, and was thrown
off and instantly killed. Everybody in this vicinity will
remember Jimmie Barnes, who was employed for a long
time in Dinwiddie & McDonough's livery stable, and
left Delphos only a short time ago. He was a very quiet,
civil young man, about 20 years of age.
Barron, Geo. T.
Sentinel, January 30, 1880
Mr. Geo. T. Barron, an old and respected citizen of
Logan township, died at his residence on last Monday, at
the age of about 60 years, and was buried in Highland
Cemetery, in this place, on the following day. He came
to this county about ten years ago. He was much
esteemed by all who knew him, having been Trustee of
his township for several terms in succession. He leaves
a wife and two married daughters.
Bosanks, William
Sentinel, October 22, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - On Saturday night last, of typhoid fever, after an
illness of seven days, William, oldest son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bosanks. The deceased was a very bright boy, and
the blow falls with great severity on his parents. Rev. H.
Bushnell, Jr., preached the funeral sermon on Monday at
2 o'clock p.m., at which time the burial took place.
Bassnett, George
Sentinel, October 22, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
George Bassnett, living northeast of Delphos, died on
Tuesday night of this week, after an illness of nearly
three weeks, of bilious typhoid fever. He leaves a young
wife and child, father and mother, brothers, sister, and a
large number of relatives and friends to mourn his
untimely death. George was a hearty and robust young
man, about 22 years of age, a member of the M.E.
Church in Delphos; was married about two years ago, to
Miss Hawley. He was buried at the Bethel graveyard, but
on account of his brother Cal being absent on a trip to
Ness County, the funeral sermon was postponed until
some future time.
Berg, child
Sentinel, April 9, 1880
We learn through Rev. W.C. Seidel, of a very sad
occurrence in Salina on Wednesday last. The little son of
Wm. Berg, mayor of the city, was, by accident, drowned
in the river, and several hours effort on the part of
physicians failed to restore life, although the child
seemed to appear lifelike and blood circulated
somewhat.
42 Sentinel, 1880
Blackmer, Norton
Sentinel, April 16, 1880
DEATH OF NORTON BLACKMER
Norton Blackmer, an old and respected citizen of this
county, and a resident of Logan township, died on
Saturday last, after an illness of eight days (pleuropneumonia)
at the age of 59 years.
Mr. Blackmer came to this county about nine years
ago, from Wisconsin, where he had resided since the age
of 26, having been born in Monroe County N.Y. in the
year 1821. He was a man of extended information and
good business habits. He came here, like many others,
with limited means, and by industry and economy, had
gathered about him sufficient support for his declining
years. He had full confidence in the country, was well
known throughout the county, and as universally
esteemed.
He leaves a widow and two children (a son and a
daughter) to mourn the loss of a kind husband, father,
and wise counselor, and will be greatly missed in his
neighborhood. A large assembly of sympathizing friends
and neighbors were present on Sunday, the 11th, to pay
the last tribute of respect to their departed friend. The
funeral sermon was preached by Rev. T.C. Eaton
(Universalist) of this place.
April 30, 1880
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT AND SYMPATHY
At a regular meeting of Whittier Club, of Sherman
township, a committee was appointed to prepare a short
biographical sketch of the late Norton Blackmer, and to
draft resolutions of respect and sympathy to be presented
to the family and friends of the deceased.
The Committee submitted the following report:
The deceased was born in the state of New York, July
13, 1821. At the age of twenty-five he became a member
of the Masonic fraternity, and the following year
emigrated to the state of Wisconsin, then in its infancy.
He was appointed postmaster of Sullivan township in that
state in 1849, and held that office continuously for
sixteen years. He also filled important offices in that state
with marked ability. He was admitted to the Jefferson
county bar in 1860, and subsequently to practice in the
United States courts. He came to Kansas in 1871, and at
once took an active part in the affairs of his adopted state;
and an especial interest in the affairs of his own town and
county. He was a leading mind in the organization of the
first lyceum established in the township, and continued
an active member up to the time of his death. He was an
able and fearless debater, an excellent parliamentarian, an
honorable man and a good neighbor.
RESOLUTIONS
Whereas, the Supreme Ruler of the Universe has
removed from our midst our highly esteemed friend and
coworker Norton Blackmer: therefore:
RESOLVED, That as a society and neighborhood we
deeply feel the loss that has befallen us, and realize that
a vacancy has been caused that few men are competent
to fill.
RESOLVED, That our heartfelt sympathy is extended to
the family and friends of the deceased.
RESOLVED, That a copy of the foregoing be forwarded to
the Minneapolis SENTINEL for publication, and also a
copy to the family so sorely bereaved.
GEO. M. WALKER, SEC'Y
Boss, George
Sentinel, March 5, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
George Boss, oldest son of Samuel Z. Boss, died, on the
17th, of congestion of the lungs after a few day's illness.
He was buried in our cemetery on Tuesday last.
Burr, Mr.
Sentinel, September 24, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
N.L. Burr received the sad intelligence this week of the
death of his father, in Brockton, N.Y., aged 70 years.
Calhoun, Mary Bellis
Sentinel, May 7, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - At Beloit, Kansas, Mary, wife of Mr. J. Calhoun,
of Ottawa Township. Mrs. Calhoun (formerly Miss
Mary Bellis) was married only two or three months
since, and was on a visit to Beloit, when attacked with
pneumonia, which terminated fatally. Her remains were
brought to Coal Creek for interment, which took place
on Monday last. Her husband and sorrowing relatives
have the sympathy of all.
43 Sentinel, 1880
Carpenter, child
Sentinel, December 10, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. C.P. Carpenter's child, about 4 years, died
last week, in Glasco, at which place Mr. and Mrs. C. are
now stopping.
Carter, Jonathan
Sentinel, February 6, 1880
We are apprised of the death of Mr. Jonathan Carter, who
is the father of Mrs. Lester Hubbard and the Messrs.
Carter, of this county. We take the following from the
MAZOMANIE (Wis.) SICKLE of Jan. 17: Mr. Jonathan
Carter, one of the oldest settlers of this vicinity, whose
farm lies two miles east of Mazo, died on Thursday
afternoon, about 4 o'clock, of suppurative abscess of the
liver, induced by congestion of that organ. The deceased
was 67 years of age. He leaves a wife and nine children.
The funeral will take place on Sunday next at 10:30 a.m.
from the M.E. Church.
Casebeer, Lewis S.
Sentinel, March 5, 1880
Lewis, six years of age, son of Mr. Thomas Casebeer, of
Ottawa township, departed this life on Wednesday last,
and was followed to his last resting place on the following
day. He was a bright little fellow, beloved by all.
March 12, 1880
Lewis S. Casebeer, son of Thomas and Lizzie Casebeer,
of Coal Creek, Kan., aged 5 years, 11 months, departed
this life March 3d, 1880, for which they have the
sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement.
They will miss him from the fireside,
From the cot in which he lay,
From the vacancy at the table
Which he filled from day to day.
We shall miss him from the schoolroom,
Where he was but one week ago,
And we shall think of little Lewy
When to that schoolroom we go.
To father, mother, dear ones all,
Who knew him when on earth,
He is gone to Christ, who is all in all,
Which is far above this earth.
Mourn not for him, but rather tell
The story he has given,
That when with earth we've parted well
We'll meet with joy in heaven.
- H.M.
Clark, Amelia A.
Sentinel, May 14, 1880
Mrs. Amelia A. Clark, wife of E.E. Clark, died at their
home in this place, at 6½ o'clock last Wednesday
morning, after a brief illness, in the 34th year of her age.
Mr. Clark and family came to this place from Ogle
County, Illinois, in the spring of 1876, and the following
season built the large stone house in the northeast part of
town, where the wife and mother passed away. Although
her death was sudden, it was not unexpected, she having
been in uncertain health for a number of years, her
disease being inflammatory rheumatism, which reached
the heart, causing death. She leaves behind her a
husband, and son and daughter aged respectively 17 and
14, to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and mother, and
many warm friends to regret her untimely departure. The
funeral services were held at the residence on
Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. H. Bushnell,
Jr. The remains were interred in Highland Cemetery,
followed by a large concourse of friends.
Clark, Lucius Bradfield
Sentinel, September 10, 1880
Lucius Bradfield, son of Dr. C.D. and Mrs. Clark, died
last Sunday, Sept. 5th, aged 1 year and 15 days. The loss
of the little one, of which the parents and family were so
fond, is a severe stroke, and one which they seemed
hardly able to bear. Sympathy in this their severe
bereavement is universally expressed, and keenly felt by
many friends.
Cline, Mrs. George
Sentinel, June 4, 1880
FROM EAST LINCOLN
Mrs. George Cline, of Elk Horn, recently resident at this
place, died on the 25th inst. Her death resulted from
measles culminating in pneumonia. Mrs. Cline was an
exemplary Christian lady, and her death is much
regretted by her former neighbors here.
44 Sentinel, 1880
Clover, Harden
Sentinel, September 10, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, Sept. 2d, Mr. Harden Clover, who leaves a wife
and two children to mourn his loss. In the prime of
manhood he answered the unavoidable and irresistible
call of death. His remains were taken to his former home
near Beloit for burial.
Courtney, child
Sentinel, July 16, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. F.A. Courtney's child, aged about six
months, died quite suddenly on Tuesday of this week,
with cholera infantum.
Dalrymple, H.H.
Sentinel, April 30, 1880
Just as we are going to press we learn that Mr. H.H.
Dalrymple, of Cloud County, formerly of this county,
and brother to Thomas Dalrymple, died very suddenly
on Thursday night.
Dane, Thomas
Sentinel, April 9, 1880
FROM EAST LINCOLN
A sad accident took place on the Saline River in this
county on the 30th ult. Thomas Dane, aged 15, residing
about nine miles from this place, accidentally shot
himself dead while drawing a shotgun towards himself
by the muzzle. He had laid the gun down on the bank of
the river, and in drawing it suddenly to him to shoot at
game, it was discharged full in his breast. He lived but a
few moments. Tommy was well known here, and the
news of his sudden death was a shock to the community.
Davis, infant
Sentinel, August 6, 1880
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED - Of cholera infantum, the youngest child of W.L.
Davis, of Second Creek; also a little girl of Mr. Witt, of
the same complaint. The friends have the sympathy of
the entire community in their sad affliction. Mrs. Davis
was very low at the time her little baby died, but we are
glad to hear she is a little better at this writing.
Davis, Jane
Sentinel, October 1, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Jane Davis, wife of W.T. Davis, died in Delphos on
Friday night last week, of bilious colic, aged 65 years.
Grandma Davis, as she was called, was a member of the
M.E. Church, a very pious Christian lady, well liked by
all her neighbors. She leaves a husband and six children,
and a large number of relatives and friends to mourn her
loss. Owing to the fact that one of her children (N.W.
Davis) who lives in Virginia is coming here soon, the
funeral sermon will not be preached until his arrival. The
remains were enclosed in an elegant casket, beautifully
trimmed with nickel and silver mountings, and buried in
the Bethel Cemetery, about 8 miles north of town.
Davis, Walter
Sentinel, October 22, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Walter Davis died at the home of his parents in Beloit,
on Saturday morning last week, of a disease contracted
while on a trip south. Walter formerly lived in Delphos,
and was well known here. It will be remembered that
about one year ago he left his home in Beloit for parts
unknown to any of the family, without any cause that
anyone knew of. Ashort time ago he wrote his father that
he was sick in a hospital in Illinois, and desired to come
home. Money was sent him, and he arrived home a few
weeks ago, his health ruined, having contracted
something similar to yellow fever while in the south. He
had been in a great many different places, and at last
came home to die. Thus he was cut down early in life,
being only about 17 years of age. We extend our
sympathies to the family.
Davis, William D.
Sentinel, July 2, 1880
DEATH OF W.D. DAVIS
William D. Davis died at his residence in this place at
about 7½ o'clock on Thursday morning, July 1st, 1880,
at the age of 82 years. His death was not unexpected, as
45 Sentinel, 1880
he had been confined to his bed for several weeks. The
disease with which he was afflicted is not positively
stated, but was, as near as we can learn, an affection (sic)
of the stomach.
Mr. Davis came to Minneapolis from Princeton, Iowa,
in 1870. He engaged in business in the building which
now contains the grocery department of the store of H.S.
Barnes, dealing in hardware and stoves. From that time
to the present, although encountering a number of
financial complications, his business has steadily
increased, having within the past two years completed
one of the largest store buildings in the valley.
He leaves a wife and three little girls; among other
relatives here are two brothers, Messrs. C.B. of this
place, and J.W. Davis, of Delphos; Messrs. R., Ney, and
Chas. Bates, of Delphos, brothers of Mrs. Davis, widow
of the deceased, are in the city; Mr. Geo. P. Bates, of this
place, is also a relative of Mrs. Davis.
The funeral will be held today (Friday) at 11 o'clock,
at the residence, which will be conducted according to
the ceremonies of the order of Knights of Pythias, of
which he was a member. The sermon will be preached
by Rev. H. Bushnell, Jr. The remains will be interred in
Highland Cemetery. The widow and children have the
sympathy of the entire community in their sore
bereavement.
Denning, Mrs. B.V.
Sentinel, July 23, 1880
The COMMONWEALTH gives the particulars of the sad
death of Mrs. B.V. Denning, wife of the Pastor of the
M.E. Church of Council Grove. Her clothing caught
from the fire, which she did not notice until it was past
her control, being alone; the clothing burned from her
body, and she lived but a short time. Her husband was
absent about three miles, preaching. He is a brother of
Rev. Mr. Denning, Pastor of the M.E. Church at
Solomon City.
Disney, infant
Sentinel, October 8, 1880
SALINE RIVER GLEANINGS
Death has again entered our neighborhood, and taken
from the midst of the family circle the little babe of
Jacob and Jane Disney, aged two weeks and one day,
who departed this life Sept. 27. The funeral was
preached by Rev. T. Johnson, at the Disney school
house, Oct. 3.
Ebbarts, Sarah
Sentinel, February 20, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
Rev. Mr. Torrey, of Abilene, German Baptist, preached
the funeral sermon of Miss Sarah Ebbarts (who died here
last November), on Sunday morning last. He also
preached on Saturday and Sunday mornings.
Ebbert, Mrs.
Sentinel, July 16, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
Mrs. Ebbert died very suddenly on Tuesday, presumably
of heart disease. She was buried on Wednesday.
Elgin, Arthur
Sentinel, October 29, 1880
ACKLEY ITEMS
Arthur, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Elgin, aged 9
months and 23 days, died last Saturday morning, Oct.
23. The heart-stricken mother of that little one has her
trouble alone, her husband being away, although
expecting to return soon. She has a kind mother and
other relatives who deeply sympathize with her, but no
one could be so consoling to her as the father of her little
one. Amidst all her sorrows may she feel to exclaim:
Although the Lord has taken
Our little one away,
I know his weary feet
Will never go astray.
And the little eyes that oft have looked
So pleasantly at me
Are closed in death, to ope no more,
No evil here to see.
The little lips I oft have kissed
(I'll never kiss again)
Will ne'er on earth be heard to take
The name of God in vain.
That bud of promise dear,
Just opening to the light,
The Saviour took to bloom more full
In his own garden bright.
46 Sentinel, 1880
In heavenly radiance clothed
Like Christ he does appear;
He's joined with many friends above-
Oh! Shall we meet him there?
-M.E.
Feather, Joseph
Sentinel, December 17, 1880
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED. - On the 7th inst., of inflammation of the throat,
little Joseph, youngest child of James R. Feather. Rev.
Feather conducted the funeral services. The afflicted
family have the sympathy of the community.
Field, Mrs.
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
FROM MORTON
Mrs. Field, of St. Joseph, Mo., sister of Rev. J.M. Miller,
of this place, who was here for the purpose of improving
her health, died on the 17th, of consumption. The funeral
was preached by Rev. Johnson. She leaves two orphan
children, who are in Missouri.
Garrett, Mary J.
Sentinel, September 24, 1880
DEATH OF MRS. MARY J. GARRETT
Mary J. Garrett died September 14, 1880, at the
residence of her son Joseph W. Garrett, on Coal Creek,
Ottawa County, Kansas, aged 67 years, 3 months and 16
days. She was born in Hampshire County, Old Virginia.
About the year 1830 she was married to Thomas
Gilmore, her first husband, who died in Guernsey
County, Ohio, in 1840. Several children were born to her
by her first husband, of which but two are now living:
Samuel Gilmore and Elizabeth Dixon. In January, 1843,
she was married, in Guernsey County, Ohio, to Joseph E.
Garrett, with whom she lived in Ohio until March 1869,
when they moved to Ottawa County, Kansas, and settled
on Coal Creek. Joseph E. Garrett died at his home on
Coal Creek October 24, 1879, of ulcer of the stomach.
Mrs. Garrett had four children by her last marriage, three
of whom are living: Alexander Garrett, Joseph W.
Garrett and Hethey J. Eddy. Mrs. Garrett was a woman
of unusual vitality, and possessed a wonderful memory
as well of recent events as those which transpired in her
early life. Her last illness continued for six months. She
was afflicted of a tumor, and bore her suffering patiently,
keeping her mind during her illness. She selected two
hymns to be sung at her funeral, also the text, Prov.
21:21, desiring that Rev. Denning, of the M.E. Church at
Solomon, should preach her funeral. She made full
arrangements for her funeral, as one going on a pleasant
journey, and that she should be buried at Romic school
house, by the side of her husband, Joseph E. Garrett, all
of which arrangements were fully carried out. She was
prepared to leave the world, and gave good advice and
left her blessing on her children. Mother Garrett will
long be remembered by those who knew here.
Gentry, Charley
Sentinel, November 19, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Charley Gentry, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Gentry, died
on Tuesday of this week, in the 12th year of his age, after
a lingering illness, of bilious typhoid fever. Charley was
a quiet, intelligent hard-working young man. His parents
will sadly miss him, being their mainstay in doing the
labors of the farm. May the untimely death of Charley be
a warning to other boys and young men that death is
taking the young as well as the old. On account of the
illness of Mr. Gentry, the preaching of the funeral
sermon was postponed to some future time.
Gilson, Mrs.
Sentinel, February 20, 1880
Mr. N. Chapin received the news of the death of his
mother, Mrs. Gilson, in Oregon, on January 18th. Mrs.
Gilson removed from this place to Oregon five years
since, and the news of her death will be received with
regret by her many friends here.
Gouldin, Sadie
Sentinel, July 2, 1880
PAWNEE GAP
The funeral services of Mrs. Sadie Gouldin will be
preached at H.R. Gouldin's grove, July 11th, at 11
o'clock a.m. On that day there will be no preaching at
Tripp's or Ohio Grove.
47 Sentinel, 1880
July 16, 1880
Quite a large audience listened to the funeral sermon of
Mrs. Alice Goulden, at H.R. Goulden's grove, last
Sabbath. Rev. Maxon delivered an address that will be
remembered by many who heard it. He chose for his text
Hebrews 3:15.
Graves, Richard E.
Sentinel, April 2, 1880
DIED. On the 24th inst., at his residence on Second
Creek, Lincoln County, at 3 o'clock, Richard E. Graves,
in the 45th year of his age.
Farewell, kind friend, and calm be thy rest,
In the stillness of that dreamless sleep;
No grief can disturb thee, no danger molest,
In that chamber so silent and deep.
He's left a companion in sadness to mourn,
With three children that stand by her side;
Blest hopes to the widow, a God then will be,
And for the fatherless thou will provide.
AUNT LOUIS
Halderstadt, Mr. (Halberstadt?)
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Jerome Halderstadt received a telegram on Monday,
announcing the death of his brother, in Illinois, by an
accident. We learn he went to attend the funeral.
Hall, child
Sentinel, July 2, 1880
PAWNEE GAP
A sad affair occurred at Mr. Pat Hall's, 14 miles south of
Minneapolis on the 21st. Mr. Hall's boy, aged 12, had
been riding a horse in a lead team to a self-binding
harvester. In attempting to mount the horse the boy lost
his hold, fell and the team starting at that moment ran the
iron point in the dividing board in his side killing him
instantly. The team continued to run two or three miles
farther, completely demolishing the machine.
Hall, L.
Sentinel, April 9, 1880
DELPHOS NEWS
Many old friends and acquaintances in this county will
regret to hear of the death of Dr. L. Hall, for many years
a physician and druggist of Junction City. He died
recently in California, whither he went in search of
health.
Halley, child
Sentinel, July 30, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Halley's little boy aged about eight
years, took suddenly ill on Wednesday evening and died
the same night. The cause of this sudden death has not
been learned at this writing.
Hawkey, child
Sentinel, December 10, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Miss Hawkey, aged about ten years, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Hawkey, who live about 6 miles south of
Delphos, died on Saturday last, of typhoid fever, and
was buried on Sunday in the Delphos Cemetery.
Heald, Charles S.
Sentinel, March 12, 1880
DIED- Charles S. Heald, on Saturday, March 6th, 1880,
at 6 o'clock p.m., in the 47th year of his age.
The event above recorded took place just as our
citizens were finishing the labors of the week; and
although by no means unexpected, it cast a gloom over
the community, and in less than an hour the sad
intelligence had reached almost every ear in town and
immediate vicinity.
The deceased came to Kansas in June, 1873, and to
Minneapolis the following autumn, since which time he
was engaged in business here as a merchant. We
understand that he contemplated building a new stone
store this season; he had but a short time since
completed one of the best residences in the city. In his
untimely taking off his family not only loses a kind and
indulgent husband and father, but the community one of
its most valuable citizens. Like all such men, his true
48 Sentinel, 1880
value is not fully realized until he is gone.
The funeral was held in the Presbyterian Church the
following day, Sunday, at 3 o'clock p.m., presided over
by Rev. Joy Bishop, of Delphos, who delivered a very
beautiful and encouraging discourse, which was listened
to by a crowded house, many retiring for want of room.
Revs. Root and R.N. Smith assisted. The music, in
charge of Mr. Snodgrass, Prof. Vincent at the organ, was
very melodious and appropriate. After the solemn
services the remains were taken to Highland Cemetery
for interment, followed by a long line of carriages.
Those who more particularly mourn the loss of our
fellow citizen are a wife and only daughter; an aged
mother; two brothers; Messrs. Amos and F.A. Heald; Mr.
R. Middleton (brother of Mrs. H.) and wife - these, we
believe, are the only near relatives in this country. In
their bereavement they have the sympathy of a large
circle of friends of the deceased.
Henry, child
Sentinel, April 16, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
The little child of Mr. and Mrs. James Henry, living
north of Delphos, died on Wednesday evening, from a
cold contracted with the measles.
Hochstrasser, Walter
Sentinel, September 10, 1880
FROM FOUNTAIN
Being acquainted with Mr. Walter Hochstrasser, we
deplore his untimely death, and are amazed at justice in
Colorado, which allows a murderer to depart
unmolested. His family have the deepest sympathy.
Hoover, Menina
Sentinel, April 23, 1880
FROM LAMAR
Died, April 18th, at the residence of Mr. Setzer, Menina,
wife of C.E. Hoover, aged 20 years. They were on their
way to Mitchell County and stopped overnight at the
house of Mr. S., and at five o'clock the next morning she
died of dropsy. They were very destitute, but through the
kindness of the neighbors were kindly cared for. Words
of comfort were spoken by Rev. L.S. Cooper, from 1st
Corinthians. There were quite a number of people who
followed her remains to the grave. She was a true
Christian and a member of the Wesleyan Methodist
Church for the past four years.
She has gone to the land where the weary
Enjoy the sweet rapture of sacred repose;
She has quitted forever this wilderness dreary,
And bid farewell to time and its woes.
While on earth she was loved, and we deeply deplore her;
But shall a murmur escape from our breast?
Do you ask how she lived? She set heaven before her,
Do you ask how she died? In the faith of the blest.
Hopkins, Wilbor H.
Sentinel, July 2, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Many of our people will be sorry to read the following
notice. The subject of the sketch, it will be remembered
was in Delphos a few weeks about one and one-half
years ago, a robust young man, full of life, who bid fair
to live for many years. He was to have been married in a
short time, but alas! How often are human expectations
blasted! By request we gladly insert the following notice
by Mrs. C.K. Jones, his sister, who formerly lived in
Delphos.
DEAD, YET ALIVE
Twenty-one years ago, in Cuba, N.Y., was born Wilbor
H. Hopkins. His parents gave him to God in baptism
while yet a babe, and at sunset, June 15, 1880, in
Frankfort, Marshall County, Kansas, God called his
own. In the strength of his young manhood, in the midst
of bright plans for the future, malignant diphtheria
prostrated him for a few days, and after terrible suffering
he went calmly to sleep. There was no murmuring at the
call, but a radiant light illumined his face; such a light as
no face can wear until it sees heaven. He told us he was
going to see the baby sister who was already in heaven.
What a glad meeting it must have been! He was sensible
to the last, and his last words were: "It is all right; I am
going to the God in whom I trust." There are many
sorrowing hearts left here on earth, but we are borne up
by God's promise that we shall see him again. He was
the only son and brother, and there is a vacant place in
our family circle that can never be filled. And she who
was soon to be so near and dear to him, seeing that last
49 Sentinel, 1880
heavenly smile and hearing that glorious testimony,
mourns not as those without hope. We feel that we have
the loving sympathy of our friends in Delphos, who have
themselves passed through deep afflictions. Our hearts
go out in yearning for the young who are yet unsaved
and we pray that at whatever hour Death calls for them
they may be ready to go, as was our Wilbor.
MRS. C.K. JONES
Jones, Matilda
Sentinel, November 19, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Matilda Jones, wife of W.B. Jones and daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. B.M. Parks, living one mile south of
Delphos, died last Sunday afternoon, after a brief illness,
of fever. She was not considered dangerously ill until
Saturday night before her death, when hemorrhage of the
bowels set in, and she died in a few hours. Mrs. Jones
was in her 28th year, a kind generous woman, well liked
by all her neighbors; was a professor of religion, and a
member of the M.E. Church for 13 years. She leaves a
husband (who is at present and has been for several
weeks sick) to mourn the loss of a kind and beloved
companion; also two little boys, aged 6 and 9 years, to
mourn the loss of a kind and devoted mother. On account
of the illness of Mr. Jones, the funeral sermon was not
preached. Her remains were followed to the cemetery by
a large precession of sympathizing friends. May this
dispensation of Divine Providence cause us all to
seriously meditate upon the certainty of death and
terrible realities of eternity.
Jordan, child
Sentinel, July 16, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Jordan's child, aged one year, died on
Sunday last. The funeral sermon was preached in the
M.E. Church on Monday, by Rev. M. Smith.
Kelly, Earl B.
Sentinel, May 7, 1880
DIED. - On the third inst., Earl B., infant son of Mr. and
Mrs. J.S. Kelly, aged 7 months. The funeral was held at
the Methodist Church, at 10 o'clock on Tuesday, the 4th,
by Rev. W. Whitney. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly desire us to
return thanks for the kindly assistance of friends and
neighbors in this hour of bereavement.
King, infant
Sentinel, October 15, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. King's infant child died on last
Sunday.
Lamson, Joanna
Sentinel, August 20, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. Joanna Lamson, mother of Mrs. E.W.B. Cheever,
died at the residence of Mr. Cheever, 6 miles east of this
place, on the 16th, in the 73d year of her age. The funeral
services were held on the 18th, Rev. Milo Smith, of
Minneapolis, officiating.
Lapole, Miss
Sentinel, April 16, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Miss Lapole, aged about 16, living northeast of town,
died last Saturday. Her funeral sermon was preached by
Rev. T.R. Ream, at the Bethel schoolhouse, on Sunday.
Lewis, D.S.
Sentinel, May 7, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - At his residence at Coal Creek, on Friday, April
30, Mr. D.S. Lewis. He was much respected in his
neighborhood, and his funeral on Sunday last was
largely attended.
Mason, Mary A.
Sentinel, April 9, 1880
DEATH OF MRS. MASON
The sad news of the death of Mrs. Mary A., wife of
Henry C. Mason of Fountain township, reached this city
on last Wednesday morning. She passed away at 10½
o'clock the evening before, at the age of 36 years, 7
months and 8 days. Her death was not entirely
50 Sentinel, 1880
unexpected at this time, although until recently she was
attending to her usual life duties, her disease being
consumption. She leaves, besides a large circle of
friends, a kind husband and little daughter to mourn her
untimely departure. We understand that Mr. Mason was
contemplating a removal or trip to the mountains for the
health of his wife, and it is needless to say this
occurrence will be a sad stroke to one whose almost
every desire was to contribute to her happiness; and that
in his bereavement he has the full sympathy of their
many warm friends, as well as acquaintances.
Mrs. Mason came to this county with her husband in
the spring of 1867, being one of the early settlers, and
cheerfully bore the vicissitudes consequent upon frontier
life, ever possessing a bright, sunny temperament, which
rendered her a kind and loving wife and mother, beloved
by all who knew her. She died peacefully and happy, in
full faith of a bright future, saying Jesus was precious to
her at that hour, and requesting her husband and
daughter to meet her in Heaven.
The funeral services were held at the M.E. Church in
this place on Thursday at 2 o'clock p.m., conducted by
Rev. W. Whitney, assisted by Elder Geo. J. Root, and
Rev. Leigh, after which the remains, encased in a
beautiful casket, were followed by a large concourse of
citizens in carriages to the last resting place, in Highland
Cemetery. Dr. Campbell, a friend, very kindly and
efficiently superintended the general arrangements.
Farewell, but not forever,
We shall meet beyond the river,
Where parting never will be known,
Saved by Christ and Christ alone.
McHenry, infant
Sentinel, February 6, 1880
We unintentionally failed to mention last week, the death
of the infant daughter of Dr. and Mrs. McHenry, which
occurred on Friday, the 23d ult. The funeral was held the
following day at the residence on Fifth Street, conducted
by Rev. H. Bushnell.
McNay, Mr.
Sentinel, August 13, 1880
FROM MELVILLE
We have just received the sad intelligence of the death of
old Mr. McNay. He will be missed from among us. Our
time will come in an hour when we least expect it.
Miller, Mary A.
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
Mrs. Mary A. Miller, wife of D.L. Miller, died at their
home in the north part of town, on Monday last, aged 59
years. The funeral services were held at the Baptist
Church on Tuesday, conducted by Rev. M. Smith, after
which the remains were interred in Highland Cemetery.
Her illness was erysipelas of eight week's duration. The
bereaved husband and family have the sympathies of the
entire community.
Montgomery, child
Sentinel, December 3, 1880
PIPE CREEK NEWS
Rev. Mr. Shepardson was called to preach the funeral
sermon of Mr. Montgomery's child a short time ago.
Montgomery, Judge
Sentinel, June 11, 1880
We have the intelligence that Judge Montgomery, father
of Mrs. L.J. Dunn of this place, died at his home in
Boonsboro, Iowa, on Saturday, May 29th, at the
advanced age of ninety-six years and two months.
Morris, Thad S.
Sentinel, February 20, 1880
DELPHOS NEWS
Thad. S. Morris, departed this life last Tuesday night.
Mr. Morris was well known throughout this community.
He came to this county from Mt. Morris, Penn., in the
spring of 1871, and settled on his claim, 8 miles
northeast of Delphos, where he continued to live until
his death. He was an honest, upright man, well qualified
for business, a fine penman and accountant. About six
years ago he married Miss Bell Courtney, whom he
leaves with four small children to mourn his untimely
51 Sentinel, 1880
death. He was engaged as salesman in the Kansas Store,
in this place during the past winter, and was in his usual
good health to within a few days of his death. His death
is universally mourned. He was cut off in his prime,
being in the 36th year of his age.
Murphy, Mr.
Sentinel, December 24, 1880
SALT CREEK ITEMS
Charley Murphy was called east by the sickness of his
father, and his school temporarily suspended;
subsequently his father's death made it necessary for him
to remain, and Mr. Morris has taken charge of the school
at Pleasant Hill.
Nance, infant
Sentinel, August 13, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. W.H. Nance's boy baby, aged 14 months, who has
been ailing some time, died on Tuesday, and was buried
on Wednesday.
Nelson, Lewis
Sentinel, July 2, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
It is with the feeling of great personal loss that we record
the death of Mr. Lewis Nelson, on this (Wednesday)
morning. Three weeks since he was taken ill, but no
dangerous symptoms were apparent until Sunday, and
even up to yesterday hopes were entertained of his
recovery. His disease was typhoid fever. We entertained
a firm friendship for the deceased - in fact all did who
were acquainted with him. The more intimate the
acquaintance the firmer the feeling of friendship. A few
weeks since none seemed more likely or more fitted to
enjoy life than he; today he lies a corpse. He was an
open-hearted, generous, intelligent friend and neighbor,
with a good word for all and ill-will to none. In the eight
years that we were acquainted with him we cannot
recollect an instance where he cast a slur on anyone, but
many where he tried to smooth over faults. To his
bereaved relatives this testimony from one who knew
him well will but corroborate their own more intimate
knowledge. To say to them that their grief is shared by
all his friends but weakly represents the real facts. His
funeral services will take place tomorrow, Rev. W.C.
Scott officiating.
Nobles, W.H.H.
Sentinel, September 3, 1880
W.H.H. Nobles died on the 31st, ult., of typhoid fever.
Mr. Nobles was an old resident of the county, having
been here about 12 years. He was 56 years of age.
Packard, Mrs. L.A.
Sentinel, March 19, 1880
DELPHOS NEWS
Mrs. L.A. Packard, living north of town, died Sunday
night last. She leaves one child, about four years old, and
a husband, to mourn her untimely death.
Paige, Leona A.
Sentinel, December 10, 1880
DIED, at Eskridge, Kan., Dec. 4th, Leona A., infant
daughter of C.W. and M.R. Paige, aged 11 months and
12 days.
Patterson, infant
Sentinel, July 16, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - On July 15, the infant son of T.J. Patterson.
Phillips, Mrs. Jesse
Sentinel, March 5, 1880
DELPHOS NEWS
Rev. T.J. Ream will preach the funeral sermon of Mrs.
Jesse Phillips on Sunday next. Many of the people of
Delphos and vicinity will remember Mrs. Phillips as one
of the old settlers of this part, and who moved with her
husband and family to Washington Territory about four
years ago; and as she was formerly a member of the
M.E. Church here, the desire is that her funeral be
preached here.
52 Sentinel, 1880
Pinney, Mr.
Mr. Pinney, who went from here to Indiana last fall, died
there a few days ago.
Platenburg, child
Sentinel, September 3, 1880
FROM ACKLEY
We have just heard that a little daughter of the late
deceased James Platenburg died very suddenly on
Tuesday morning.
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, Sept. 1st, an infant daughter of Mr. Whitley. On the
same date, a child of Mr. Plattenbery, aged four years.
Plattenberg, James
Sentinel, August 20, 1880
DIED, on Saturday morning, Mr. J. Plattenberg. His
funeral took place the same afternoon. The deceased
settled near this place about one year ago. He was from
Pennsylvania. Had he lived he would have been a
successful man, having energy, and intelligence to direct
it. His neighbors speak highly of his worth as a friend
and man, and from our own knowledge we can endorse
this testimony. He left a wife and child.
August 27, 1880
FROM ACKLEY
We are sorry to record the death of Mr. James
Platenberg. He died a short time ago, of inflammation of
the stomach and bowels. He leaves a wife and two small
children. How solemn to think of Death! And yet too
many go unprepared to meet it.
Popham, Edith Ray
Sentinel, February 6, 1880
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
DIED, January 27th, Edith Ray, infant daughter of E. and
E. Popham, aged 17 days. One little sunbeam sent to
brighten the dark path of life for a little while, and then
gathered up to Heaven to shine in everlasting brightness.
She is not lost, for with a love undying,
She gently hovers over the friends left here,
And toward the pearly gate is ever striving
To draw the wandering feet of those so dear.
Oh, no, she is not lost - the loved and cherished
-She lives in Heaven to fade and die no more
And when this tenement of clay has perished
We shall greet her on the eternal shore.
The bereaved parents return thanks to the friends and
neighbors for their kindness and sympathy during their
affliction.
Potter, Bealey
Sentinel, November 5, 1880
DEATH OF BEALEY POTTER
Mr. Bealey Potter, a highly esteemed citizen of this
place, died at his home on last Tuesday morning, Nov. 2,
at the age of 56. The funeral was held at the residence on
Wednesday, conducted by Revs. Bushnell and M. Smith,
after which the remains were interred in Highland
Cemetery, where they were followed by a large number
of citizens and friends. His relatives here are two sisters,
Adeline and Alice Potter. There is a brother in Dakota,
but of course he was not present at the funeral. Mr. and
Mrs. H.O. Ball, of Salina, intimate friends, with whom
the deceased had been associated in business, were
present.
Mr. Potter was a bachelor, and being extremely quiet
and retiring, his acquaintance was comparatively
limited; but all who knew him, knew him as a very
intelligent, kind and just man. He was formerly of
Connecticut, whither he went some months ago for his
health. Came to this state six years ago, from Iowa. At
the time of his death it had been only about five weeks
since his return from Colorado, where he went early in
the season, in the hope of recruiting his health. We
understand his disease was consumption.
Powell, infant
Sentinel, September 10, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED - On the night of Aug. 18, infant son of Mrs. L.
Powell. They have the heartfelt sympathy of their
neighbors and friends.
53 Sentinel, 1880
Pruitt, S.J.
Sentinel, October 8, 1880
The news was received here on last Sunday, announcing
the death of Mr. S.J. Pruitt, of Saltville, formerly of this
place. We understand his death was caused by lightning.
Mr. P. was a most excellent citizen, and will be much
missed. He was the father-in-law of Mr. C.B. Rotrock, of
this place.
Rankin, Miss
Sentinel, August 6, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Miss Rankin, sister of Mrs. Joy Bishop, Jr., died of hasty
consumption at the residence of Joy Bishop, Jr., on
Friday night of last week, after a short illness. Her
remains were taken to Beloit, for burial beside her father.
Rush, Henry
Sentinel, October 15, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Henry Rush died on Tuesday of this week, after an
illness of several weeks, of typhoid fever. Mr. Rush was
a single man, 28 years old, a quiet, honest hardworking
farmer. He was born in Ohio, come to this country about
12 years ago, and has lived about 1½ miles south of
Delphos almost ever since. He was buried on
Wednesday, with the rites of the order, by the Delphos
Lodge of Odd Fellows, of which he became a member
about five months ago. He leaves two brothers, Ed, in
Franklin County, and Rhoda, 9 miles north of Delphos.
The latter is at present ill with typhoid fever.
October 22, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Ed Rush, now living in Franklin County, arrived here on
Sunday last, having come to see his brother Henry, who
died last week, and of whose death he was not aware
until his arrival. He will remain a few days.
Scott, child
Sentinel, May 28, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED - On Thursday of last week, Mr. and Mrs. W.C.
Scott's child, aged 20 months, from a disease contracted
from the measles. The funeral was held at the residence
Friday, conducted by Rev. T.J. Ream.
Short, David Leroy & Sarah Elsie
Sentinel, April 2, 1880
DIED - On Thursday, February 26, 1880, of diphtheria,
David Leroy, aged two years, two months and sixteen
days, also on Saturday, March 13, 1880, of diphtheria,
after a severe illness of two weeks, Sarah Elsie, aged
four years, two months and five days; son and daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Short, of New Cambria, Saline
County, Kan., grandchildren of W.A. Short, of Ottawa
County, Kan.
Sickinger, Elsie Maud
Sentinel, October 8, 1880
Elsie Maud, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sickinger,
died on Sunday night last, aged two months and two
days. We deeply feel to sympathize with the bereaved
parents.
That lovely form of that little one
Now sleeps upon the hill;
It never can return to them,
Oh, no, it never will.
This little one has gone to rest
In that bright world above;
May they always live prepared
To meet that little dove.
October 29, 1880
IN MEMORY OF LITTLE ELSIE MAUD
To Brother and Sister:
She has crossed the shining river;
She has reached the golden gate,
Where her Savior bids her welcome
And the angels stand and wait.
Our pure and loving treasure,
So soon was called away,
Though we must not murmur,
For the Lord we must obey.
She was always pleased and loving,
When she heard her papa's step;
She would prattle, coo and hollow
At the thought of being met.
54 Sentinel, 1880
When she heard her mama talking,
Or her footstep on the floor,
She would laugh and be delighted,
But her voice is heard no more.
In the midst of autumn flowers
We see the little mound
Where we know the little darling
Is sleeping under ground.
Weep not, then, oh loving parents,
Perhaps not long you'll have to wait
Until you meet your little darling
Just at the golden gate.
MISS EMMA SICHINGER
Smith, Louisa
Sentinel, December 17, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED. - Mrs. Louisa Smith, wife of Mr. L.F. Smith, in
Delphos, Dec. 13, 1880, in the 41st year of her age. She
leaves a husband to mourn the loss of a beloved
companion, and six children (one an infant) to mourn the
loss of a kind, devoted mother. Mrs. S. was much
respected by the entire community, was intelligent,
energetic and persevering in her domestic affairs. She
was not a member of the church, but she exemplified in
her everyday life that she was a Christian, and striving to
do her duty. It seldom becomes our duty to chronicle the
death of one that causes more sadness and sorrow to the
family than in this case-leaving six children who need
the care and attention of a mother. Her husband feels to
humbly submit to God's will. The funeral sermon was
preached Tuesday by Rev. T.J. Ream, from the words,
"Set thine house in order, for thou shalt die, and not
live". A large number assembled to pay their last
respects to the departed one, and her remains were laid
in the Delphos Cemetery, there to rest until God shall
say, Come forth. G.W.S
ACARD
EDITOR SENTINEL: I desire to return my sincere thanks to
the good people of Delphos and vicinity, for the kindness
shown and many favors bestowed during the great
affliction that has just befallen me. I shall ever hold them
in sacred memory, and shall ever thank God that my lot
(for the reception of this dispensation of His Providence)
was cast with this people.
L.F. SMITH
Spivey, Mary Elizabeth
Sentinel, March 26, 1880
Mary Elizabeth Spivey, wife of Jacob Spivey, living five
miles west of Minneapolis, died March 19, 1880, in the
39th year of her age, from the effect of a wound received
on the 24th day of February. The deceased leaves a
husband and two children, one of which is married. The
funeral services were conducted at the residence of the
deceased, by the Rev. John Courter.
Stelter, infant
Sentinel, December 24, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Stelter died last
week.
Strickler, Mary E.
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED. - Mrs. Mary E. Strickler, wife of T.H. Strickler, at
her home 3½ miles south of Solomon City, on Monday,
Nov. 22, 1880, after an illness of a few days, of typhoid
fever, aged 38 years and 2 months. Mrs. Strickler leaves
a husband to mourn the loss of a beloved companion,
and two little girls, 10 and 12 years old to mourn the loss
of a kind and devoted mother. She also leaves a father
and mother and several brothers and sisters. She was a
member of the Baptist Church, a good woman, kind
neighbor and consistent Christian; a zealous, energetic
worker in the church, and for all benevolent objects, she
was liked by all her neighbors for her kindness and
generous Christian qualities. Her Christian virtues and
traits were largely exemplified in her life. In the midst of
the years of her usefulness she was cut down by death.
A pleasant home which by industry and perseverance
she had helped her husband to accumulate and a once
happy family, are draped in mourning. Oh, how true that
"In the midst of life we are in death!" How sad to
chronicle the death of our friends, of loved ones, and of
relatives. May this sad dispensation of Divine
Providence cause us all to more seriously meditate upon
the certainty of death, remembering that we must all die.
On account of the illness of her former pastor, the
regular funeral sermon was postponed until some future
time. Her remains were taken to the church, and short
55 Sentinel, 1880
services appropriate to the occasion were held, including
a few touching remarks by Rev. Mr. Mendell, upon the
life and character of the deceased sister, in which he
dwelt very tenderly upon the excellence of her Christian
life and example, and saying that not only the family and
community, but the church had met with an irreparable
loss in her death. Notwithstanding the severe cold
weather that prevailed, a very large procession of
sympathizing friends followed the remains to the
Solomon City Cemetery for interment, there to await the
resurrection.
Swift, Lewis W.
Sentinel, November 5, 1880
Lewis W. Swift, after a severe illness of two weeks, died
last Sunday evening at 6 o'clock, in the 33d year of his
age. The funeral services were held in the Baptist
Church on the following day, conducted by Rev. M.
Smith, and assisted by Rev. H. Bushnell, Jr., after which
the remains were interred in Highland Cemetery,
according to the rites of the order of the Knights of
Pythias, of which the deceased was a prominent
member. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his
untimely death. Mr. Swift came here about two years
ago, from Maryland, and most of the time has been
engaged in the mammoth store of L.A. Davis, which
establishment he has had charge of since Mr. Davis'
death last July. Mr. S. was a business man of not small
capacity, and enjoyed the confidence of the extensive
establishment in which he was employed.
November 19, 1880
IN MEMORY OF L.W. SWIFT
Do hearts ever break, I wonder,
In this dreary world of ours;
Must we make no sign of sorrow
Through all life's dreary hours,
Thinking forever and ever
Of the lost one, finding peace,
Earnestly longing, oh Father,
With them to find release.
No last goodbye to a true wife,
Nor kiss for little ones dear;
No whispered word of council,
Or earnest word of cheer.
Gone without word of farewell,
Gone, forever and aye,
Can they say "all's well" oh Father,
Till they meet again by and by.
His little one dreamed of his papa,
Dear little Walter his pride,
"I saw Papa last night, he kissed me
And asked for Mama beside;
He's gone to the store now, Mamma,
He will come to Walter, he said
"Oh dear little innocent baby,
He don't think his papa is dead"
"He will come soon" oh sinless one hope on
And teach us thy perfect faith too,
That somewhere and sometime we'll see him
Ere we pass beyond the bright blue.
-A FRIEND
Swiggum, infant
Sentinel, March 19, 1880
Mr. Swiggum, a recent arrival from Wisconsin, lost an
infant child from whooping cough last week.
Thom, Mrs. Reuben
Sentinel, April 30, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - On Tuesday, the 22d inst., Mrs. Reuben Thom, of
Caledonia, near this place. Mrs. Thom has been for some
time in failing health, and her death was not unexpected.
She leaves a young family without a mother's care, and a
husband without a wife's love and sympathy. They have
the sympathy of all in their trial. The funeral services
were solemnized on Thursday, by the Rev. W.C. Seidel, a
large concourse of relatives and neighbors attending.
Sentinel, May 21, 1880
LINES ON THE DEATH OF MRS. AMANDA THOM
As the shades of night were falling,
At the close of one sad day,
Upward went a spirit shining,
In the realms of perfect day.
Friends and mourners stood beside her,
Stood beside that death bed there,
Till her eyelids gently closing,
Told that death was reigning there.
Oh, that precious loving Mother!
Wife and helpmate, oh so dear!
Can we never on earth see her?
Never hear that voice so dear?
56 Sentinel, 1880
How we miss those loving footsteps,
On the long-accustomed floor,
How we miss that dear form flitting
To and from the kitchen door.
Many were her cares and troubles,
Many were her household tasks,
But she struggled bravely onward,
With courage bore the rudest blast.
Patient sufferer now she's gone,
Gone above where angels dwell;
Gone to meet those dear ones waiting,
Dear ones loved so long and well.
Husband, children, mourn not for her,
She is with the angels blest,
Waiting till the Maker calls you
Home to that eternal rest.
There your souls will shine in splendor,
On that bright celestial shore,
And you clasp that dear hand waiting,
Waiting for you evermore.
MATE C. PECK
Thompson, Cynthia E.
Sentinel, August 13, 1880
DIED, August 5th, 1880, of cholera infantum, Cynthia E.,
only child of J.W. and H.A. Thompson, aged 7 months
and 19 days.
Sentinel, August 20, 1880
FROM PAWNEE GAP
J.W. Thompson's only child, aged eight months, died
Aug. 5th. They have the sympathies of their many
friends.
Towner, Marion
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Marion Towner took sick some time ago. Nothing
serious was apprehended until a short time since. His
illness proved to be a hasty consumption. He grew worse
rapidly, until there was no hope of his recovery. He
desired to go home to his parents in Ohio before he died.
Accordingly, on Saturday evening of last week his
brothers, H.Z. and John, started on the train with him for
Ohio, since which time we heard nothing from him.
Later - We learn that he died before reaching his home,
somewhere in Indiana.
Walker, Phoebe
Sentinel, August 27, 1880
Mrs. Walker has received news of the death of her niece,
Miss Phoebe Walker, of Danville, Wis. Miss Walker was
here on a visit last year, and the news of her death will
cause much regret amongst those who made her
acquaintance.
Warner, Hattie
Sentinel, February 20, 1880
Hattie, wife of Mr. L.C. Warner, died at their home, in
the east part of town, on the morning of the 19th. The
funeral took place at the M.E. Church on Friday. The
deceased was the daughter of Mr. Woodruff, of this
county, and was, at the time of her death, in the 21st year
of her age. Besides her husband and friends, she leaves
a babe aged two months. Mr. Warner has the sympathy
of the community in his affliction.
Welch, Ethlinda M.
Sentinel, July 30, 1880
Ethlinda M., daughter of M.J. and L.A. Fernald, who
went from here to Nevada some time ago, and was
married to Alex. Welch, died in Reno, of that state, on
the 13th of June, in the 22d year of her age.
Welch, Pardon
Sentinel, May 28, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. Pardon Welch died on Sunday last from dropsy. He
had been operated on twice for his disease, but it finally
caused his death. He was a little over 56 years of age,
and leaves a wife and several children to mourn his
death. He was buried in the cemetery here on Monday.
Whelock, Mrs.
Sentinel, September 3, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DROWNED. Andrew Whelock and wife left Scranton, Pa.,
and settled in Osborne County, Kan., about a year ago.
Misfortunes of various kinds came upon them, and they
were compelled to hunt work in the eastern part of this
state. On their way they added to their number Mr. and
57 Sentinel, 1880
Mrs. Delano. Fortune favored them until they arrived at
Sand Creek, two miles north of this place, Saturday,
about 4 p.m. Here the Death Angel was awaiting their
coming, and in less time than it takes to tell it, robbed
Mr. Whelock of his dear companion. The creek had
swollen beyond its banks, and immersed the little bridge.
Delano waded across, and Whelock, with the two
women and his two little boys in the wagon, started to
follow. It was a miscalculation, and all tumbled into the
deep, swift waters below. Mr. Delano, standing on the
bank, and seeing the struggle in the water, was paralyzed
beyond giving any help. Mr. Whelock succeeded in
saving his two children and the nearest woman, but his
wife went down amid the surge. The horses were
drowned, and the wagon, cooking utensils and clothes
were lost to them in the waves. Friends gathered to the
scene, and instituted search for the dead body
immediately. But the high water and swift current made
the task a difficult one. It was not until the next day,
about the same time of the accident, that the body was
found. The corpse was brought to town, properly
clothed, coffined and buried, by the charities of the
people, the same evening. It was a queer Sabbath for our
people, but not without a moral. How soon husband and
wife are parted, and the bright hopes of the future
blasted! Mrs. Whelock was about 22 years of age. She
leaves a husband and two little boys to mourn her
untimely end, and who are now kindly cared for by the
charitable Harvey Miller. A purse of about $50 has been
raised among our citizens to supply their present
necessities.
White, Celestia
Sentinel, April 30, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
The sad duty also devolves on us of recording the death
on Tuesday morning last of Celestia, wife of Mr. Geo.
W. White, an old resident of our township. As a large
majority of our citizens were not aware of Mrs. White's
illness, and as she was a lady widely known and
respected, the news was received like a shock among
them. Mrs. White died in her confinement, leaving a girl
baby a few hours old, four older children and her
husband, deeply bereaved. The deceased, with her
husband and family, came to Ottawa County eight years
since, and by good management and industry had now
arrived at a position where the comforts of life could be
enjoyed. Together they looked forward in the darker
hours which come to most new settlers, to the better
times to come; but as all their plans were based and
interwoven in the life and happiness of each other, it is a
matter of no wonder that the husband and father now
feels as if the weft of life was gone, leaving but the
empty warp of what might have been, to his sorrowing
heart. Mrs. White was a member of the Presbyterian
Church here. The funeral services were conducted on
Wednesday afternoon by her pastor, Rev. W.C. Scott,
and were attended by a large number of relatives and
friends, not one of whom but felt as if a personal loss
was sustained by her death, as her generous hospitality
and cheerful and kind disposition had been known and
appreciated by all. Words of comfort may now fall on the
hearts of her husband and children with but little weight,
but in the coming time, as they remember that their
sorrow was shared by all who knew her, it will be a
soothing recollection.
White, child
Sentinel, April 23, 1880
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. M. White's child, aged about six
months, died on Monday last. The funeral sermon was
preached on Tuesday, by Rev. T.J. Ream.
Whitley, infant
Sentinel, September 10, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, Sept. 1st, an infant daughter of Mr. Whitley. On
the same date, a child of Mr. Plattenbery, aged four
years.
Witt, child
Sentinel, August 6, 1880
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED - Of cholera infantum, the youngest child of W.L.
Davis, of Second Creek; also a little girl of Mr. Witt, of
the same complaint. The friends have the sympathy of
the entire community in their sad affliction.
58 Sentinel, 1880
Wittles, child
Sentinel, November 26, 1880
FROM MORTON
Mr. Wittle's child, aged about one year, died Saturday
evening the, the 20th, and was buried in the Price
graveyard.
York, Ellen
Sentinel, July 23, 1880
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, on the 16th inst., Ellen, wife of Mr. Alson York.
Her funeral was attended by a large number of relatives
and friends. The sermon was preached by Rev. W.C.
Scott.
59 Sentinel, 1880
60 Sentinel, 1880
Ager, Ira
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
AGER - On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 19th, of lung fever,
Ira, infant son of William and Anna Ager, aged nine
months and six days.
The child had been more or less sickly for some time.
The mourning parents have the sympathy of their friends
and neighbors. The child was buried on the following
Tuesday, in the Highland Cemetery. The funeral services
were conducted by the Pastor of the family, the Rev.
W.C. Seidel, who delivered an appropriate address at the
house, to the mourning assembly.
Alcorn, Wm.
The Sentinel, June 3, 1881
FROM LAMAR
Mr. Wm. Alcorn died at his residence north of Lamar,
May 30.
Bell, Mary
The Sentinel, May 13, 1881
DEATH OF MRS. WILLIAM BELL
Under the above heading we take the following from the
St. Helena (Cal.) STAR, of April 15th. The subject of the
notice was for many years a resident of this county, an
early settler of Culver township, having lived near
Windsor from 1866 till 1874:
"Mrs. Mary Bell, wife of William Bell, died at her
home on Kearney street, in this place, at a quarter to 8
o'clock, Saturday evening last, of consumption, a disease
with which she has been afflicted for three years past.
Mrs. Bell was a native of England, having been born in
Willington, Northumberland, December (1 or 18), 1836.
She came to America about 1866, and was married in the
same year, in New York City to her surviving husband,
William Bell. She came with her husband to St. Helena
about two and a half years ago, and has ever since
resided here. Though always an invalid here, she made
many friends by an amiable manner and personal
accomplishments. She (was) a member of the Episcopal
Church, and died fully sustained by a faith in the merits
of her Redeemer and a hope of a blessed immortality
beyond the dark river which she unshrinkingly entered.
She leaves no children, but a stricken husband mourns
the loss of a faithful and devoted companion, a
bereavement in which he has the sympathy of many kind
friends. Her funeral was held Monday at 2 p.m. from the
Presbyterian Church. Rev. James Mitchell preached the
funeral sermon and being assisted in the exercises by
Rev. J.A. Fisher.
Bisbee, infant
The Sentinel, November 4, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
A little babe of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Bisbee was buried last
Sunday.
Bishop, Judson S.
The Sentinel, September, 1881
ITEMS FROM BENNINGTON
DIED, in Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 1st, of typhoid
pneumonia, Judson S. Bishop, late of this county, aged
54 years. The deceased was the eldest son of Mr. Wm.
61
1881
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
Bishop, who resided for some time in Minneapolis, and
his death will be regretted by all who knew him, as he
was a young man of most exemplary character. This is
the second child Mr. Bishop has lost since he went to
Kansas City.
Blades, Brother of Mrs. H.
The Sentinel, July 22, 1881
SALT CREEK ITEMS
Mrs. H. Blades recently received the sad news, from
Wisconsin, of her brother's death. His house was struck
by lightning. He never moved from the table where he
sat writing. The other inmates of the room were thrown
violently across the floor; and several pieces of furniture,
including an organ and a bed, were utterly demolished.
Blanchard, Mrs. Joy
The Sentinel, December 23, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Resolutions of respect adopted by Delphos lodge No.
149, I.O.O.F., Dec. 17, 1881:WHEREAS: It has seemed
best ot the Grand Master above, in his infinite love and
truth, to visit and take from our brother Joy N.
Blanchard, his beloved companion, therefore be it
RESOLVED: that we extend to our afflicted brother the
tenderest sympathy, in acknowledgment of his great loss
and as a toke of submission to the Higher Lodge; and
RESOLVED: That a copy of these resolutions be given
our brother, copied in the Secretary's minutes, and given
the Carrier and the Sentinel for publication.
C.M. WHITE, JOHN EAKER, GEO. KNOWLES, COMM.
Brosseau, infant
The Sentinel, September 2, 1881
DIED - Infant child of Mr. and Mrs. L.P. Jordan, on
Friday night of last week, funeral on Saturday; also
infant of Mr. and Mrs. J. Brosseau, on Tuesday evening
of this week, funeral on Wednesday - all of this city.
September 9, 1881
CARD OF THANKS
Ed. Sentinel: - We desire through your valuable columns
to return our most sincere thanks to our neighbors and
friends for having so kindly rendered us their assistance
in the hour of our sad bereavement, and to the choir who
so kindly volunteered services. A friend in need is a
friend indeed. JOSEPH & ROSA BROSSEAU
Carpenter, Mr.
The Sentinel, March 4, 1881
Mr. J.L. Peck, of Pipe Creek, gave us a call the other day,
and while in our office learned of the death of this distant
relative and former schoolmate, Senator Carpenter, of
Wisconsin. Mr. Peck, although now well advanced in
years, has a good memory, and possesses a great fund of
anecdote, including many interesting reminiscences of
Senator Carpenter and other men who have since
become famous in politics.
Carr, Mabel
The Sentinel, September 9, 1881
DIED. - Little Mable, infant daughter of Mrs. Geo. F.
Carr, died in this city on Saturday morning last, Sept. 3,
1881. Mrs. Carr is a daughter of Mr. H.C. Sutton, of this
place, who buried her husband a short time ago at
Sutton's Bay, Mich. The funeral services were held at the
Methodist Church on Sunday last, by Rev. F.D. Baker,
and the remains depositied in the city cemetery, followed
by a large number of friends, including members of the
Sunday School. The afflicted mother has the sympathy
of the community. She has two bright children left her.
Cleveland, George
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
Geo. Cleveland, son of Mr. Jonathan Cleveland, who
lives in the southern part of this county, died in Morris
County, Kansas, on Feb. 11th, of typhoid pneumonia, at
the age of 36 years. He leaves a wife and two children.
Cox, Hannah
The Sentinel, October 14, 1881
Mrs. Hannah Cox, who lately died at Halderness, N.H., was
the oldest person in that state, and probably in New
England. Her birth occurred at Preston, Conn., July 25,
62 Sentinel, 1881
1776, and is plainly recorded in the parish register of the old
Episcopal Church at Preston. Her exact age was 105 years,
2 months and 4 days. We are informed that the above lady
was the aunt of Mr. Joseph Stanton, of Richland township.
Crapsey, Mrs.
The Sentinel, July 15, 1881
FROM FOUNTAIN
Mrs. Winnie Karns has received the sad intelligence that
her mother, Mrs. Crapsey, died in St. Paul, Minnesota on
the 27 ult. Mrs. Crapsey was a sister to Mrs. Murch, and
was a resident of Fountain about a year. Her relations
here have the sympathy of the community.
Dale, infant
The Sentinel, March 11, 1881
BENNINGTON ITEMS
Mr. and Mrs. S.K. Dale mourn the death of their infant
daughter, aged 7 months, who died on Friday, the 4th
inst. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.C.
Scott, on Sunday last; a large number of friends and
relatives attending.
Davis, James Henry
The Sentinel, February 4, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED - At the residence of his father, in Delphos, on
Thursday of last week, James Henry Davis, in the 27th year
of his age, of consumption, with which he has been afflicted
for about five years. Most of the time he has been able to be
up and around, and for about two years has been running a
grocery and confectionery store in this place. His remains
were buried in the Bethel Cemetery, by the side of his
mother, who died a few months ago. The funeral sermon
was postponed until his brother could be present, when it
will be preached by Rev. T.J. Ream, at the Bethel Church,
on Sunday, Feb. 13.
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Rev. T.J. Ream preached the funeral sermon of Henry
Davis and mother last Sunday at Bethel Church, from the
text, "Set thy house in order for thou shalt die and not live."
Davis, John S.
The Sentinel, January 28, 1881
DIED at Bennington, January 15, 1881, John S. Davis,
aged 35 years.
For some time the friends of the deceased were
expecting the sad news that was borne to us last
Saturday morning. And yet although it was not wholey
unlooked for, it struck deep into the hearts of the many
friends he has made since he made his home among us.
Mr. Davis came among us in the spring of 1879, and
influenced by the double attraction of a splendid country
and improved health, he purchased a half-section of land
and gave employment to men and teams in fitting the
raw prairie for a wheat field, since that time he had
bought and considerably improved 320 acres more of
our best land, and erected one of the finest houses in
Bennington for his residence. Soon after he came here he
took a trip to Denver for his health, but it did not agree
with him, and, after a severe hemorrhage of the lungs, he
came back worse that when he went away; since that
time he has been gradually losing in health until his
death. When he became so decidedly worse that, as a last
resort, he meditated a trip to the South, and started on his
journey thither, but he went no further than his relatives
in Warrensburg, Mo., when he became convinced that it
would not do to go farther, and returned home, and was
soon after confined to the house, where he was a great
sufferer, until God in mercy said, "It is enough, come up
higher." Mr. Davis joined the M.E. Church in early
manhood, and although not so thorough a worker in the
church as some, yet his influence was always
unmistakenly seen and felt on the side of right and
Christianity. His many admirable traits of character have
won him a large circle of friends. Unassuming in
manner, strict to his business engagements; ever doing
better than he agreed to with those who were under
contract with him, when he thought that right demanded
it. Honest and plain spoken, and with all a degree of
energy that seemed almost to fight with death, but when
the end was unmistakable he said, the day before his
death, in conversation with your correspondent. "I
dislike, of course, to leave my wife and family yet I have
suffered so long that I am willing to go and leave it all
63 Sentinel, 1881
with God." Ah, how true an evidence of a Christian
death! What more and better can any of us do that to give
our hand to God and say "I leave it all with Thee, and
trust Thee." The funeral services were conducted on
Wednesday, the 19th, by Rev. W.C. Scott, and was
largely attended. In answer to telegrams Mr. and Mrs.
Pierce, Mrs. Bates, Mrs. Grey and Major Davis, brother,
sisters and sister's husband of the deceased, came from
Iowa, and Mr. J.W. Smith, brother of Mrs. Davis, from
Warrensburg, Mo., and were in attendance at the funeral.
Mr. Davis leaves a wife to mourn his loss, and in all the
agony of sorrow that a true wife feels when in the
meridian of life the strong arm on which she has leaned
for support in life, and the heart that has so long beat
with hers, are stilled in death; and three children to fight
the battle of life fatherless.
To Mrs. J.S. Davis
Unbidden tears in blinding flow,
A new made grave beneath the snow,
Memories of past, a lock of hair,
A breaking heart, an empty chair.
A heart that aches with yearning thrill
For living words from lips that's still,
Two empty arms in empty grace,
For death hath stolen their embrace.
O tearful eyes, O heart of love,
Look through thy tears to realms above;
Look from the grave amind the snow
To where the tree of life doth grow.
A home that's fair, a throne of white,
A country where is known no night,
A home that's blest with joys untold,
A city pure with streets of gold.
A country pure from guilt or gain,
A city free from woe or pain
Where every cheek speaks out its health,
Where life is love and love is wealth.
A few more years of joy or pain,
A few more days of life or gain,
Then in that home of joy and bliss
You clasp the heart you've loved in this.
W.W.W. JR.
Davis, Mrs. Jonas
The Sentinel, November 4, 1881
SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. DAVIS
About noon on Monday last the people of Minneapolis
were startled by the report that Mrs. Davis, wife of Mr.
Jonas Davis, living in the north part of the city, was
found dead upon the floor, upon his entering the house at
dinner time. At first it was very naturally thought there
must be some mistake, but further developments proved
the report to be too true. There have been quite a number
of conflicting rumors concerning the sad occurrence and
incidents associated with it. We have taken pains to
ascertain the facts, and give the following particulars as
far as we are able to learn at the time of going to press.
It seems that Mr. Wm. Bosanko, of Bennington, was to
accompany Mr. Davis to his coal mine in Lincoln county
shortly after dinner, and was at the house at a quarter
before 11 o'clock, when Mrs. Davis told him she would
have dinner ready shortly. About 12 o'clock Messrs.
Davis and Bosanko returned and found Mrs. Davis lying
on the floor quite expired. They first placed her in a chair
and commenced to rub her, when Mr. Bosanko informs
us there was a slight movement of the eyes. He placed
his hand upon her pulse, and as it was still, said to the
husband, "Mr. Davis, she is gone," to which he replied
"that cannot be!" The form was placed upon the bed,
when all doubt was removed, no life remained. When
lifted from the floor she had in her hand an apron, and it
is thought she was driving out the flies before the last
preparations for dinner and fell just as she turned to
close the door, which was slightly ajar, which could have
occurred but a few minutes before the arrival of the
husband. There were two men working at a well near the
door, but heard nothing of it. But a short time before they
had been nortified by Mrs. Davis that dinner would soon
be ready.
Shortly after the occurrence the effect of the shock
began to tell upon Mr. Davis; he was thrown into violent
spasms, and did not recover full consciousness for some
hours; at this time, however, he is about, but troubled
with pain from rush of blood to the head.
Some time after their marriage, about 27 years ago,
Mr. and Mrs. Davis received a severe shock by lightning
while in bed, and were thought dead, since which time
neither have been very well. For some time she had been
troubled with spells of smothering or choking, and it is
probable, as we are informed, that she died of heart
disease. She was born in Ohio in 1833, and was
therefore about 48 years of age. In early youth she joined
the M.E. Church, but has been a member of the United
Brethren denomination for about 28 years. She was also
64 Sentinel, 1881
with her husband a member of the United Order of
Ancient Templars, of this place, which is to assist in the
funeral services, conducted by Rev. F.D. Baker, the
remains to be buried in Highland Cemetery.
There are four children, who unfortunately were all
absent at the time of the mother's sad and sudden death.
A married daughter living in Nebraska, where the boy of
14 was visiting; a married daughter in northern Iowa,
whom the young lady, Rachael, went to visit a few
weeks ago. All were immediately telegraphed, the first
two arrived Tuesday night, and Miss Rachael on
Thursday, the sister in Iowa being unable to come.
Mrs. Davis was a very amiable, kind hearted woman,
with all that these characteristics imply. It is hardly
necessary to state that the husband, family and friends
have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in
the direful calamity.
November 11, 1881
The funeral services on the occasion of the death of Mrs.
Jonas Davis occurred as indicated last week, Rev. H.
Bushnell taking part with Rev. F.D. Baker. The scene as
the friends took the last look was affecting in the extreme.
The remains were enclosed in a beautiful casket, the
words "At Rest" being engraved on the plate. A beautiful
floral cross and wreath were furnished by Mrs. Fairfield
and Mrs. McPherson. Mr. T.E. Babcock, the son-in-law,
of Iowa, and Mr. J. Spurrier and wife, son-in-law and
daughter of Nebraska, returned to their homes Monday.
The friends desire to return their heartfelt thanks for
kindness and sympathy, in a time of trial.
DeLong, infant
The Sentinel, November 18, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
A little babe of Jasper DeLong was buried on Tuesday.
DeLong, Lucy
The Sentinel, March 11, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED. - On Sunday night last, very suddenly, at her
residence three miles northeast of Delphos, Mrs. Lucy
De Long, wife of John De Long and daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. E. Barnum. She had given birth to a child about 6
weeks ago, and was getting along quite well. On Sundays
she was up and around as usual, and retired at 9 o'clock.
During the night her husband was awakened by heavy
breathing. He tried to wake her, but failed, when he at
once got up and lighted the lamp in time to see her
breathe twice and then expire. The child, husband,
parents, brothers, sisters, relatives and friends are left to
mourn her untimely loss. She was about 18 years of age,
of an amiable and loving disposition. The funeral
services were held at the residence of her parents,
conducted by Mr. E.B. Crew, after which her remains
were followed to the Delphos Cemetery by a long
procession of sympathizing friends.
Dempsey, infant
The Sentinel, September 9, 1881
DIED, on Saturday Sept. 3d, the infant son of Mr. and
Mrs. J.D. Dempsey. The funeral took place on Sunday.
Dillon, Vinta
The Sentinel, October 7, 1881
INMEMORY
{FOR THE SENTINEL}
To the memory of little Vinta, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.E.
Dillon, who died Sept. 22, 1881, aged 11 months and 10 days.
Little Vinta is gone - oh can it be?
Our little baby dear
His form we never more shall see,
His voice no longer hear?
Yes, he has crossed to yonder shore,
Where all is free from sin;
The golden gates were left ajar
To let our darling in.
He has passed the sunny portals
And reached the heavenly throne;
There was joy among the angels
When Jesus claimed his own.
Oh, our happy little Vinta
Up in that heavenly home.
There no more pain will suffer
And death will never come.
A few more days of sorrow
And then we'll cross the shore,
To meet our little Vinta
And never part no more.
MRS. L.V. HALL, ACKLEY, KAN.
65 Sentinel, 1881
Drake, Abraham
The Sentinel, December 9, 1881
Abraham Drake, a citizen of Ottawa County and a
member of the church of the United Brethren in Christ,
died at his residence 5 miles south of Minneapolis Dec.
5, 1881, aged 64 years and 26 days. He leaves a wife and
two children to mourn; but they mourn not as those that
have no hope, for he left a bright testimony that he was
fully prepared for the change. He was much respected by
the citizens of his community, who showed their respect
by the kindness shown and assistance rendered during
his protracted illness and at the funeral services. The
funeral was preached at the residence Dec. 6th, at 11
a.m., by the writer, to a large and attentive congregation,
text, Job 14:10. May the Lord bless the bereaved family
and grant them a happy reunion in our Father's house,
where parting will be no more. J.H. PRICE
Dunham, Hiram
The Sentinel, March 11, 1881
BENNINGTON ITEMS
News was received this week of the death, in Iowa, of
Mr. Hiram Dunham, father of Mrs. Lewis Corlis and the
late Mrs. Geo. W. White.
Ebersole, Dora
The Sentinel, August 19, 1881
SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. EBERSOLE
The people of this city were shocked on last Friday
evening to learn that Mrs. Dora, wife of Mr. S.O. Ebersole,
was dead. Although the subject of this sad sketch was in
very precarious health, her friends, who were everybody
that knew her, were shocked; because it was but an hour
before that she was seen upon the street, and at her
husband's jewelry store, assisting him about some light
duties and accompanied him to supper; and because they
were loth to give her up. Immediately after supper she said
to her husband that she was fainting, and he immediately
started for medical aid, leaving her in charge of the
housemaid; but before doctors or husband arrived her spirit
had departed for that better land for which all agree it was
so well fitted, and in almost an instant it was on the lips and
in the ears of every person in town, and many, it is said,
passed a sleepless night on account of it.
Mr. and Mrs. Ebersole came so Minneapolis three years
ago, from Coffeyville, this state, where they had a
pleasant and comfortable home, and good business, but
came here in hope of recruiting Mrs. E's health, which
met with partial success. At the time of her death they
were just on the eve of going to Colorado on a similar
mission, and the gentleman who was engaged to take
care of his business, and the lady to take care of his
household affairs during the time, do so while the griefstricken
husband escorts the last remains of his beloved
companion to lay them near where he took her from, in
life and youth, a little over ten years ago.
But a short time ago their tin wedding was celebrated
at their elegant home in this city, where on Saturday last
at 5 o'clock the funeral rites were performed, which is
still fresh in the minds of everyone. Perhaps no sadder
scene was ever witnessed here. Besides the husband
were two little children. Vivie, a bright little girl just old
enough to quite fully realize her loss, was almost
unconsolable. The same persons and organ which made
the tenth anniversary songs, chanted the funeral dirges.
The Masons, of whom Mr. Ebersole was a member,
attended upon the services. Rev. F.D. Baker, of the
Methodist Church, of which the deceased was a zealous
and beloved member, officiated, assisted by Rev. H.
Bushnell, Jr., of the Presbyterian, and Rev. M. Smith, of
the Baptist Church. After the services the remains were
escorted to the depot, and at about 7 o'clock were taken
to Fredericktown, Ohio (where both the parents of the
husband and deceased wife live) for interment,
accompanied by Mr. Ebersole and the little girl.
It is needless to say that they have the sincere
sympathy of the entire community in their great loss.
The deceased was just in the prime of life, being in her
36th year. The shock to the parents and friends may be
more easily imagined that described, a letter just having
been started that she was going to the mountains for her
health. She was born in Carroll County, Maryland, and
moved to Coffeyville, Kansas, soon after her marriage,
from Ohio, where much of her young life was spent with
her parents.
Elgin, Lucy M.
The Sentinel, September 9, 1881
ITEMS FROM BENNINGTON
Died of consumption, on Sept 1st., Mrs. Lucy M. Elgin,
66 Sentinel, 1881
wife of Mr. John Elgin, and daughter of Mr. John
Ritsman. The deceased was but 23 years of age, and
leaves two children. She had been ill about 14 months
previous to her death. For some time hopes were
entertained of her recovery, but two months since these
hopes were abandoned, and wishing to die among her
relatives, her father removed her from Jewell County,
where she then resided, to his residence near this place.
The funeral services, conducted by Rev. J.D. Bradley,
were held on Sept 2d, a large number of sorrowing
friends accompanying the remains to their last resting
place in Ackley Cemetery.
October 7, 1881
LINES
To the memory of Miss Lucy Elgin, who died of
consumption Sept 1, 1881, at the age of 23.
We saw her first when a little child
Playing around her mother's knee;
She bore a look so meek and mild,
A picture of sweet infancy.
We saw her again as time passed on,
A happy school girl mid winter cold;
She knew no foe, but every one
Was Lucy's friend, both young and old.
She grew to be a lovely maid
A sister kind, a daughter dear,
With willing heart, her parents said,
She served them both through love not fear.
When seventeen she joined in hand,
To a lover who she'd chose for life,
And ever since she proved to him
A loving, true and faithful wife.
Six years had passed, disease approached,
She felt that death was drawing nigh;
Her many friends stood around her bed
And wept to think that she must die.
She patiently bore her sufferings all
And gave each one a farewell kiss.
And prayed that they would live for Christ
And gain that happy home in peace.
She says "Oh father and mother dear,
Come clasp your own two hands in mine
And promise that you'll meet me there
Where Jesus will the sun outshine".
Then she put up her thin white arms
And clasped her husband near her heart
And said "You've been so kind to me,
But now my dear we have to part".
She requested her father and mother to take
Her two little boys to raise.
They mutually agreed and promised her
To bear with their childish ways.
She sleeps in peace beside her babe,
Her sufferings are all o'er,
And may we live so as to meet
Her on that sunny shore.
M.E., ACKLEY, KAN.
Emerson, Mr.
The Sentinel, May 20, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mr. Emerson, the popular clerk at Keables & Haggart's,
was summoned to Iowa on Saturday last, by a telegram
announcing the sickness of his brother. He was too late,
however, his brother having died before his arrival.
Feather, Nancy Jane
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
FROM FOUNTAIN
DIED - on Sunday morning Feb. 13th, of spasms, little
Nancy Jane, aged 3 months, only child of Mr. and Mrs.
John A. Feather. It is a severe blow on them, as it was
their first born. The bereaved parents have the sympathy
of their many friends and neighbors.
Ferguson, John
The Sentinel, July 8, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mr. John Ferguson, living five miles south and west of
town, whom we reported last week as dangerously sick,
died on July 4, at the age of sixty-six years. Mr.
Ferguson was an industrious, honorable well-to-do
farmer, everwhere respected for his sterling qualities. He
leaves a wife and five children to mourn the loss of a
kind father and thoughtful and loving husband. His
funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon, at the M.E.
Church, sermon by Rev. D.D. Campbell
.
67 Sentinel, 1881
Foot, Mrs.
The Sentinel, December 2, 1881
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
Mrs. Foot (commonly known as Grandmamma Foot)
died Friday, Nov. 25, and was buried in Minneapolis on
Sunday, Nov. 27. The deceased had not been in the
county quite two years yet she had followed two of her
own children and two of her grandchildren to the cold
river. She said a short time before her illness that she was
lonely and wished she could go and be with the absent
ones. She has gone and left a bright evidence behind that
she is with them. The deceased leaves a husband, son,
two daughters and a brother to mourn her loss. The
mourning ones have the deepest sympathies of all. Rev.
F.D. Baker preached the funeral services.
Gaines, infant
The Sentinel, August 26, 1881
FROM LAMAR
Died August 16th, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Gaines.
It was buried at Hall's Cemetery. The grief-stricken
parents have the sympathy of the entire community in
their sad bereavement.
Goddard, William
The Sentinel, September 2, 1881
DEATH OF WM. GODDARD
Wm. Goddard Sr., died at the residence of his son-inlaw,
sometime during Thursday, Sept. 1st, of Bright's
disease of the kidneys, with which he had been suffering
for years; his age was in the neighborhood of 70 years.
Mr. Goddard was an Englishman by birth, an old
resident of this county, a homesteader, and published in
an early day the Lindsey PIONEER, and subsequently the
Minneapolis Independent at two different intervals, the
career of which and its relation to this paper need not be
repeated. He was well informed, and had intelligent
ideas of freedom, though he did not make the best use of
their application. His virtue was that he was outspoken;
his mistakes, with those of all others, friends and foes,
dead and alive, the Sentinel prays a kind and merciful
Father may forgive, and turn to a good account.
His funeral took place at the Ayers School house. He
leaves, as far as we know, two sons, Messrs. William
Junior, and Fred Goddard, and a daughter, wife of Mr.
Arthur Bishop.
Gooch, infant
The Sentinel, February 4, 1881
Died - Jan. 27, 1881, the infant daughter of Frederic and
Emma Gooch. Funeral service were conducted by Rev.
W.C. Seidel. The bereaved parents have the sincere
sympathies of all.
Gregg, child
The Sentinel, April 1, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Gregg's little boy aged about 1½
years, died Tuesday morning of this week. The little
sufferer died on spasms, with which it had been afflicted
most of the winter.
Griffy, Brightwell
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
GRIFFY - Dec. 28, 1880, Brightwell, only child (of)
J.W. and M.J. Griffy, aged 2 months, 24 days.
Haley, Hannah Maria
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
HALEY - At the residence of her father, seven miles
north of town, Hannah Maria, second daughter of
Abraham and Mary Haley, of heart disease, on Monday
morning, Dec. 27, after a very brief illness. Aged 5
years, 10 months and 12 days.
Hannah was a child of more than ordinary interest.
Sincerely affectionate and thoroughly unselfish, she was
kind to all about her. These features made her the
attraction of all who learned to know her; and though
young in years, her attachment to friends was simply
passionate, hence she seemed beautiful even in the
embrace of death. For,
"She is not dead - the child of our affection -
But gone into that school
68 Sentinel, 1881
Where she no longer needs our poor protection,
And Christ himself doth rule.
In that great cloister'd stillness and seclusion,
By guardian angels led,
Safe from temptation, safe from sin's pollution,
She lives, whom we call dead."
The funeral service took place on Tuesday afternoon,
conducted by their Pastor, who delivered an affectionate
address, at the house, to the mourning assembly. This is
how the second child these grief-smitten parents have
laid in the grave since July last. No wonder the
separation of the parents from their beloved daughter
was so intensely painful. W.C. SEIDEL, PASTOR
Haley, infant
The Sentinel, October 21, 1881
ACKLEY ITEMS
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Haley died on the 5th.
Halleck, L.
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
FROM FOUNTAIN
Mr. L. Halleck, brother of Mr. Morris Halleck, our
Sunday School Superintendent of Ada, died on Monday,
the 14th, of consumption, at his brother's residence on
Second Creek. The funeral took place on Wednesday,
conducted by Rev. H. Bushnell, of Minneapolis. The
deceased came here some months ago from Long Island,
we believe; led by the advice of his physicians, who had
given up all hopes of his recovery, and hoping that a
change of climate might stay the fatal disease. He came
west, but without avail. Athird brother came to help take
care of him, but will soon return to the east. Mr. Morris
Halleck and brother have the sympathy of a large circle
of friends and acquaintances.
Hapeny, Mary Isabel
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
HAPENY - Dec. 25th, 1880, Mary Isabel, eldest
daughter of A.C. and Nancy Hapeny, aged 12 years, 4
months and 3 days.
Heald, Betsey
The Sentinel, September 16, 1881
Mrs. Betsey Heald, mother of Messrs. A.S. and F.A. died
at the residence of the former in this city, at 11 ½ o'clock
p.m., Thursday, Sept. 14, 1881, at the advanced age of
nearly 76 years. The funeral was held at the M.E. Church
on Friday, conducted by Rev. F.D. Baker, and the
remains interred in Highland Cemetery.
Hein, child
The Sentinel, October 28, 1881
BENNINGTON ITEMS
Mr. M. Hein lost one of his children from fever on
Saturday last. The funeral took place on Monday last at
the cemetery at this place.
Hein, Philip
The Sentinel, November 25, 1881
DIED, on Saturday, Nov. 19th, Philip, oldest son of Mr.
and Mrs. M. Hein. This is the second child Mr. Hein has
lost within a few weeks. Several more of his children are
lying quite low with typhoid fever. It is hoped the parents
will not be called upon to bear the loss of another child.
Herrington, H. Herbert
The Sentinel, April 15, 1881
DIED. - April 8, 1881, H. Herbert Herrington, son of
Frank and Ellen Herrington, in his 5th year. The parents
have the sympathy of the community in their
bereavement.
Hoag, John C.
The Sentinel, April 15, 1881
John C. Hoag departed this life at an early hour last
Sunday morning, of that fatal but lingering disease,
consumption, with which, although young, he had been
threatened for a number of years. Mr. Hoag was a cousin
of our last Postmaster, Judge David D. Hoag, and came
to this place from eastern New York over two years ago,
69 Sentinel, 1881
in the hope of regaining or improving his health, and was
for a time much encouraged. About a year ago he went
to Colorado with the same motive, but was obliged soon
to return. He was 24 years of age, and besides other
relatives and friends here, leaves a young and loving
wife to mourn his untimely departure. The funeral was
held in the Presbyterian Church at 5 o'clock Sunday last,
and the sermon was preached by his pastor, Rev. H.
Bushnell, Jr., after which the remains were shipped to his
former home, accompanied by his sorrowing wife. Judge
Hoag was summoned by telegraph, and arrived here in
time to see his cousin before he died, and accompanied
the remains as far as Kansas City, where he made every
possible provision for their safe transit to New York,
where they will be met by Mrs. Hoag's father. She
desires to return her sincere thanks to kind friends for
timely aid and sympathy. She, as well as her late
husband, had made many warm friends here. In her sore
bereavement, she has universal sympathy.
Hutchinson, Julia E.
The Sentinel, June 3, 1881
Mrs. Julia E., wife of J.B. Hutchinson, and oldest child
of Rev. T.C. Eaton, died at the residence of the latter,
near this city, on Sunday last, May 29, 1881. The
immediate cause of her death was paralysis of the lungs;
her illness was long and painful, being complicated with
a growing tumor. The deceased was born in Fredonia,
Chautauqua County, N.Y., March 13, 1840, and was
therefore a little over 41 years of age.
For three weeks before her death life was despaired
of. The unwearied watchfulness of her husband, the
most faithful nursing and skillful medical attendance,
and all that an anxious father and loving sisters could do,
proved unavailing. She bore her great sufferings with
fortitude; and while she was calm and resigned to the
will of her heavenly father, she wished to live for her
children, husband and father, who most keenly feel the
irreparable loss. She was of a most amiable disposition,
a dutiful and affectionate daughter, a faithful and
devoted wife, and a tender and loving mother, fulfilling
all the relations of life with cheerfulness, manifesting
great love and charity for all. She was sincere in her
Christian faith, believing the great doctrine of a sinless
immortal life for all mankind, where kindred spirits will
reunite, to travel on in infinite progression, assimilating
nearer and more near to that great and good Being who
holds the lives voluntarily given, and their destinies, in
the arms of infinite love.
On Monday, 30th, at 5 o'clock p.m. impressive
services were held, conducted by Rev. H. Bushnell, of
the Presbyterian Church, after which the remains were
borne by the order of Knights of Pythias to the train
which by the generous order of the noble conductor
halted near the residence long enough to receive the
friends and their precious burden, which was conveyed
to St. Joseph, Mo., where the deceased had lived for 13
years, and formed many warm attachments, to be
deposited by the side of three little children, in
accordance with her own request.
Sincere thanks are tendered to the many friends who
came to sympathize with us during the illness of Mrs. H.,
and to the large concourse of people who came to pay
their last tribute of respect at the funeral services.
T.C.E.
Irwin, W.J.
The Sentinel, April 22, 1881
Just going to press we learn that W.J., brother of Mr. J.C.
Irwin, of this county, who came here with the later from
Pennsylvania a few months ago with the hope of improving
his health, died of consumption on Friday morning, April
22d. The funeral will be held at the Fernald school house
this (Saturday) afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. F.D. Baker, of
this place, officiating. Besides the brother here, he leaves a
wife, who have the sympathy of many friends. We also
learn that a sister, whose critical health was spoken of in
connection with Mr. J.C. Irwin's visit to Pennsylvania last
winter, died about two months ago with the same disease.
May 20, 1881
SYLVAN GROVE
The many friends of Mr. J.C. Irwin sympathize with him
in his sad affliction. There were many who would have
been glad to pay their last respects to his deceased
brother, had they received timely notice of his death.
70 Sentinel, 1881
Jordan, infant
The Sentinel, September 2, 1881
DIED - Infant child of Mr. and Mrs. L.P. Jordan, on Friday
night of last week, funeral on Saturday; also infant of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Brosseau, on Tuesday evening of this week,
funeral on Wednesday - all of this city.
Keeler, Samuel
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
DELPHOS ITEMS
Geo. Keeler received the sad news a few days since, of the
death of his father, Samuel Keeler, who died in Franklin
County, Ohio, November 20th, aged 92 years and 8
months. Like a shock of corn ripe for the garner, thus one
by one those old pioneers and veterans are passing away.
Kibler, Manda
The Sentinel, November 11, 1881
Mr. and Mrs. Kibler, a week ago last Sunday morning,
awoke and found their infant daughter dead in bed. It
had apparently been as well as usual up to that time. It is
thought that it inherited scrofula from its mother, which
was the cause of its sudden death. The mother was
almost frantic with grief. The remains were buried in the
Ackley Cemetery the following Monday.
Yes, little Manda is gone -
Our darling little one,
We woke and found her cold in death
Before the rise of sun.
Her little garments are empty now,
Her cradle it is set by,
And when we often look on them
How bitterly we cry.
We know her spirit's happy now;
Safe up with Christ in heaven.
May we live to meet her there,
When all will be forgiven.
May 26, 1882
DEPARTED
TO THE MEMORY OF MY LITTLE SISTER, INFANT DAUGHTER
OF MR. AND MRS. MRS. KIBLER, WHO DIED OCTOBER 23,
1881, AGED ONE MONTH.
Seven months ago our Saviour thought it best,
To take our little darling home with him to rest.
We loved our Manda, Oh, how well!
How well no human tongue can tell,
God loved her well and thought it best
To take the little one home to rest.
Farewell, little sister, thy spirit has flown,
Where visits of death are never known.
In the springtime of life thou wast taken away
To bask in the glory of heaven's bright day.
Thy form was too fair for this valley of sin,
And the angels of Jesus have welcomed thee in,
The river is crossed and the tempest is o'er
Our Amanda is safe on that beautiful shore.
In this world of care and pain,
Lord wouldst no longer leave her to reign,
Clothed in spotless white
She now dwells with thee in light.
Oh! Lord Jesus grant that we
Where she lives soon may be
With our darling, little dove,
That thou hast taken to thee above.
Emma Kibler, aged 11 yrs.Ackley, Kas.
Kimble, Mrs. D.H.
The Sentinel, January 28, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Mrs. D.H. Kimble, on Pipe Creek, died on Friday night
last week, after several days' illness.
Kirkland, child
The Sentinel, May 13, 1881
The family of John Kirkland are the unhappy sharers of
sore bereavement of late. Their youngest child, a girl of
three years of age, died last Saturday morning. The
funeral services were held on Sunday, by Rev. H.
Bushnell, Jr., of this place. The remains were interred
here, in Highland Cemetery, the burial services being
conducted by Rev. R.N. Smith. About this time Mr.
Kirkland received the news of the death of Mrs. K's
mother, out on account of her fatigued condition in both
body and mind, it was withheld from her for a time.
They have the sincere sympathy of all in their sorrow.
71 Sentinel, 1881
Knight, infant
The Sentinel, July 29, 1881
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. E.R. Knight's infant son, who died on Friday last,
was buried here on Saturday.
Leland, Zaidee Spivey
The Sentinel, October 28, 1881
DIED Oct. 18th, after a brief illness, Zaidee Spivey
Leland, only and beloved daughter of Jacob Spivey. Her
death was unexpected, and her loss has thrown a shadow
over the community. Since she came among us three
years ago she had won all hearts by gentleness and
purity of character. The funeral services were conducted
by Rev. Miller, of the M.E. Church. She leaves a little
daughter too young to know her loss. The afflicted father
and brother have the warmest sympathy of the
community in their great affliction.
Thou art gone, dear one, to the realms of the blest
Where trials and sorrows shall cease,
There thy freed soul shall forever be at rest
In the realms of heavenly peace.
Lieberknicht, Mary A.
The Sentinel, December 23, 1881
We have the sad intelligence that Mrs. Lieberknicht, wife
of Mr. Jacob Lieberknicht, formerly of this county, but
now of Malta, Cloud County, died on the 17th. After
years of suffering she passed peacefully away to her long
home. Many warm friends of the family in this locality
deeply sympathize with Mr. L. in his loss. The remains
were interred in what is known as the Oakland Cemetery.
OBITUARY
DIED, at Malta, Cloud County, on the 16th inst., of
dropsy of the heart, Mary A. Lieberknicht, wife of Jacob
Lieberknicht, aged 48 years.
Mary A. Lieberknicht was born in Franklin County,
Virginia, in 1833, and resided there until her removal to
Illinois, where in 1869 she became the beloved wife of
Jacob Lieberknicht. They then took an extended tour
thro' the different parts of Germany, France, and
England, remaining abroad until they returned to Kansas
in 1870, intending to pass the remainder of their days in
their happy home in Kansas, when she became ill and
has been declining for the past four years. During the
past year her decline has been rapid, and through her
protracted illness, while suffering intensely, she was
sustained by an unwavering faith in her Saviour,
submitting to pain with true Christian fortitude, until
lighted across the rapid stream by the light of her
Savior's love. She has been a member of the Christian
Church since 1860, leading an exemplary Christian life,
receiving the consolation felt only by those who believe
that Christ said "Ye shall never seek my face in vain."
Marshbank, Robert
The Sentinel, April 1, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED - March 25, Robert Marshbank, aged 62 years, at the
residence of his brother, one mile southeast of Delphos.
Mr. M. was afflicted for about ten years with paralysis, but
was able to be around. He came here from Lancaster
County, Pa., last fall, in hopes of benefiting his health. We
learn the immediate cause of his death was paralytic fits.
He leaves a wife and daughter in Petersburg, Ca., and a
brother's family here, to mourn his decease. His funeral
sermon was preached on Sunday last, by Rev. N. Bracken,
from the text, "Jesus wept," to a large congregation, after
which his remains were conveyed in a beautiful casket to
the Delphos Cemetery for burial.
May, Hannah
The Sentinel, October 7, 1881
SALT CREEK ITEMS
Hannah May, aged about 40 years, died suddenly last
week at the residence of Mr. Spivey. She leaves one
child to mourn her loss.
McConnell, Mr.
The Sentinel, September 30, 1881
Mr. D.H. McConnell, of the hardware firm of
McConnell, Weckerly & Co., received the sad
intelligence of the death of his father last Friday in
Kansas City, and immediately started for that place.
72 Sentinel, 1881
Miles, Vine
The Sentinel, October 28, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mr. Vine Miles, who came here last spring from
Rossville, Kan., in hopes of health benefits, died at 4
o'clock on Wednesday morning. He has been gradually
failing since he came, and with the summer, the birds
and the flowers his life went out before the brown leaves
and chill autumn winds. His remains will be taken by the
sorrowing wife, who is a daughter of Mr. McAfee, to
Osborn, Mo., for burial. Mr. Miles was, we believe, a
member of the M.E. Church, and an honest man, the
noblest work of God.
Murch, Sarah Ann Brewer
The Sentinel, January 28, 1881
DEATH OF MRS. MURCH
After a lingering illness and much suffering, Mrs. Sarah
Ann Brewer, wife of Mr. A.B. Murch, departed this life
on last Monday morning, January 24th, 1881, at the age
of 50 years. Her disease was an internal cancer. For quite
a number of years she had been in very poor health, and
the last year suffered much, at times. A few months ago,
with that everlasting hope, she thought she was getting
better, and wished to be removed to town, where she
would be under the immediate care of her physician (Dr.
Clark), and accordingly Mr. Murch temporarily left his
home in Fountain township, and took up residence here.
Mrs. Murch came here about 9 years ago, from Ohio, her
husband having preceded her a year, and were
consequently quite early settlers of this county. Besides
him and a large circle of warm friends, she leaves a little
girl of 11 years, an adopted child, to mourn the loss of a
faithful and kind wife and mother. She was possessed of
superior intelligence, and from her youth the most
amiable and loving disposition has been worthy of
remark -
"None knew her but to love her,
None named her but to praise."
Mr. and Mrs. M. had been married about 16 years.
Her taking away is a very severe stroke to her husband,
and in his sore bereavement he has the sympathy of a
large circle of friends and acquaintances.
The funeral services were held at Presbyterian Church
on Tuesday, conducted by Rev. Bishop, of the
Universalist Church. The closing ceremonies performed
at the grave, in Highland Cemetery, by Mr. J.H. Elder, of
the Swedenborgian Church, of which the deceased was a
member. A large number paid their last respects to a
departed friend and neighbor.
February 4, 1881
The death of Mrs. Murch has cast a gloom over this
community, in which she had been a resident for nearly
nine years, and had endeared herself to all her neighbors
by her refined manners and kindness and hospitality. She
was always ready to lend a helping hand to those sick or
in affliction, and her memory will remain dear and
sacred in the hearts of her neighbors and many friends.
Although her death had been expected for some time,
still when the news came that she was no more, it filled
the hearts of all with sadness. Owing to the long
distance, bad roads and cold weather, but very few of the
neighbors went down to pay their last respects to the
departed. Mrs. Murch and their little daughter have the
sympathy of the community in their great bereavement.
Needham Sr., Isaac
DEATH OF ISAAC NEEDHAM, SR.
The Sentinel, January 14, 1881
Isaac Needham, Sr. died very suddenly at his home, two
miles east of this place, on Sunday, Jan. 9, with an attack
of epilepsy. Coming in the house about 9 o'clock in the
morning he was prostrated to his knees, and as he was
helped to the bed, expressed the conviction that his time
had come. He lingered until about 9 o'clock in the
evening, with occasional strangulation, and finally
passed away, as if in sound sleep.
Mr. Needham was an early settler (of) this county,
having homesteaded the beautiful place of his late
residence some twelve years ago. He was born in
Yorkshire, Eng., in the year 1811, and was therefore in
his 70th year at the time of his death. He removed to
Canada when 7 years old, and to Pennsylvania in 1849.
He leaves a widow in advanced age and feeble health,
and a number of sons and daughters of adult years, most
of whom live here, to mourn the loss of a kind and
indulgent husband and father. He was not only dearly
beloved by his family, but highly esteemed by his
neighbors and all who knew him, for his universal
kindness and integrity.
73 Sentinel, 1881
The funeral services were held at the residence on
Tuesday, on which occasion Rev. W. Whitney made
some very appropriate and feeling remarks, after which
the remains were interred in Highland Cemetery, whither
they were followed by a long line of carriages.
Olson, Gulbrand
The Sentinel, July 29, 1881
FROM BENNINGTON
We have this week to record the death of an old and
respected resident and neighbor, Mr. Gulbrand Olson,
who died, after a protracted illness, on Monday
afternoon. Mr. Olson came from Wisconsin almost 12
years ago, and soon became a successful farmer and
stock raiser. During his twelve years residence here he
enjoyed an enviable reputation as a strictly just and
honorable man, a reputation based not on mere rumor,
but on sterling honesty of character and a life-long course
of straightforward dealing. Expression of opinion on this
trait of Mr. Olson's character is not merely post mortem,
for during his life time his neighbors, all of whom were
his friends, frequently spoke of his sterling worth. The
disease of which Mr. Olson died was a tumor in the
stomach, from which he has been an acute sufferer for
about a year past. As the disease progressed he gradually
became unable to retain food on his stomach, and for the
last ten days of his life it may be said no food or drink
passed his lips. Mr. Olson leaves a wife and eleven
children, who feel the loss of a kind husband and
indulgent parent keenly. Their grief is shared by all who
knew the deceased. The funeral services, conducted by
Rev. W.C. Scott, were performed on Wednesday morning
at 10 o'clock, and were attended by a large number of
relatives and friends. While our friend has left his family
in comfortable circumstances, he has left them a legacy
far outweighing mere wealth, and something his children
can look upon with affectionate pride, viz.: a character of
unsullied integrity, and they can say, "at 63 years of age
our father died without an enemy."
Ostrander, Mary Jane Spicer
The Sentinel, July 22, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
The funeral of Mrs. J.A. Ostrander, who died Monday at
4 p.m., occurred Tuesday at 2 p.m., amidst a large circle
of weeping friends who had gathered to pay the last
tribute of respect to a kind friend, a generous neighbor, a
devoted wife, a Christian mother, and to sympathize
with and console as best they could, the bereaved family.
Her coffin was beautifully trimmed and covered with
flowers by loving daughter's hands. Solemn, impressive
ceremonies were observed, conducted by Rev. Milo
Smith, of whose church she was a member, and at the
age of nearly 70 the earthly remains of a consistent
Christian woman, loved and mourned by all, were laid
away to rest. The deceased was born in the city of New
York, in August, 1812, and was married to J.A.
Ostrander by Rev. Dr. Cone, of the New York Baptist
Church January 28, 1830, her maiden name being Mary
Jane Spicer. The removed to Hinsdale, N.Y., in 1839,
where they lived for nearly thirty years, removing to
Delphos in 1871, where they resided up to the time of
her death. Ten children were born to them, all save four
- Charles, in Oakland, Ca;., Mrs. Whiting, Iowa, Mrs.
Scott and Mrs. Robinson, Friendship, N.Y., being with
her during her last hours on earth. She united with the
Baptist Church of Dr. Cone in 1828, and has ever been a
useful, faithful member. The church will miss her; the
husband, with whom she has lived for fifty years, will
miss her sadly indeed; the children will miss her love
and care, and many friends will remember long and
affectionately the name of Mrs. J.A. Ostrander.
In another column:
Mrs. J.A. Ostrander, as will be seen by our Delphos
news, died on Monday last. The deceased was the
mother of Mrs. C.L. Botsford of this place. Mrs. O's
death was not entirely unexpected, and other daughters
have been tarrying at Delphos to make her last days as
happy as possible.
Parkhurst, Oliver
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
WHITE WALK AND VICINITY
DIED - On the 16th inst., Mr. Oliver Parkhurst, aged 23
years, after a brief sickness. He leaves a wife and one
child to mourn the loss of a kind and devoted husband
and father. His family started for Iowa with the remains
on the 20th.
74 Sentinel, 1881
Parsons, Enoch
The Sentinel, March 25, 1881
DIED. In Ada, March 10, 1881, Enoch, youngest son of
Thomas and Caroline Parsons, after an illness of one
month, aged 11 years and 6 months.
Departed and gone
To live with Christ,
In the mansions of heaven
Where there is no strife.
Gone to the Father
Who calleth him higher,
To dwell in the mansions
Of the heavenly Messiah.
Gone up to the Father
To dwell forever
Where there is no sin,
temptation or sorrow.
Gone to meet a sister
That went before,
Where parting scenes
Will be no more.
T.J.P.
Partch, Mrs. Valentine
The Sentinel, October 28, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Death has twice visited us this week, the first time at five
o'clock Saturday evening, and taking Mrs. Valentine
Partch to her long home. It is hardest to write of the
death of a wife and mother. The home seems lonlier, the
hours longer when mother is gone. Mrs. Partch has been
an invalid for years, and the storm which tipped their
house a few days since hastened her death. She leaves
many friends here and at the old home in Iowa who will
sadly miss her, and the bereaved husband with the
weeping children have our heartfelt sympathy.
Patterson, Harvey
The Sentinel, March 11, 1881
BENNINGTON ITEMS
From a letter recently received from Mr. T.J. Patterson,
from Missouri, we learn of the death of his brother
Harvey, on the 14th of February.
Patton, William
The Sentinel, November 25, 1881
DIED, on Saturday, Nov. 19, William, son of Mr. and
Mrs. A. Patton, aged about 20 years. The deceased had
been ill about five weeks, at times he seemed to improve
enough to warrant hopes of his recovery, but last week
the most unfavorable symptoms were developed which
terminated fatally. The funeral services, conducted by
Rev. J. Pittenger, were held on Monday, a large number
of relatives and friends attending.
Peters, infant
The Sentinel, March 4, 1881
The funeral of the infant babe of Mr. and Mrs. Peters
took place at their residence, about four miles northwest
of town, last Saturday, Rev. W.C. Seidel officiating. The
parents have the sympathy of their friends in their sad
bereavement.
Praiter, Jennie
The Sentinel, April 15, 1881
The dark-winged messenger, who has been hovering
over our neighborhood for the past few weeks descended
on March 31st, and took from among us a loved one,
Mrs. Jennie Praiter, wife of James Praiter and daughter
of Mrs. Archer. Mr. Praiter and wife were married on the
28th of last December, and the honeymoon was scarcely
over before she was among the pale-sheeted nations of
the dead. Mrs. P. has been a victim of pulmonary
consumption for the last two months. On the 30th ult.
her husband took her to the residence of Mr. Muir, near
Salina, for the purpose of being a near physician, and the
next morning she passed away. She was reconciled to
die, her only regrets being to leave her friends, and to die
away from home. She bade her friends goodbye, called
her husband to her bedside, put her arms around his
neck, and told him of her great love for him, bade him
goodbye and sweetly fell asleep in Jesus. Mrs. Praiter
was but little past seventeen years of age. The husband
and mother and friends have the consolation of knowing
that they did all in human power to promote her comfort
during her illness, and they have the sympathy of the
entire neighborhood in their bereavement.
75 Sentinel, 1881
Rader, George W.
The Sentinel, June 10, 1881
Passing away! Such are the solemn lessons of the hour;
such is the mournful intelligence as the funeral cortege
conveys one by one to the silent cemetery. George W.
Rader, of Cloud County, died of consumption, June 6th, in
the 27th year of his age. He came to Kansas two years ago,
hoping to recover his health, but gradually yielded after a
three years illness. But his Christian graces fully
demonstrated that even the cold, dark grave, surrounded by
the deep snows of winter has no terror. His remains will be
interred tomorrow in Oakland Cemetery. R.E. WILLIAMS
Reynolds, child
The Sentinel, August 19, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
A little child of Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds was buried
Sunday, with funeral services at the M.E. Church. It was
a bright little child, and the sorrowing parents have the
sympathies of a large circle of friends.
Reynolds, Henry B.
The Sentinel, February 18, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Henry B. Reynolds died on Friday night of last week,
after an illness of about 4 weeks, of a disease of the
stomach, aged a little over 39 years. He leaves a wife and
one child and father, mother, brothers, and a large
number of relatives and friends to mourn his untimely
death. Henry professed religion during his sickness. He
always lived thoughtless and unconcerned as to a future
life, believing that all would ultimately be saved without
a preparatory change of heart. While on his deathbed, in
his cool moments, when he came to realize that he could
not recover, he felt that he was unprepared to meet his
God; he began to realize that he was a great sinner and
needed the saving influence of the Holy Spirit shed
abroad in his heart; that in order to meet the Lord in
peace he had to seek forgiveness in, and through, the
merits of Christ. He looked to God for mercy and for
grace, and we are glad to know that he was converted
and died in the full hope of a blessed immortality. Before
he passed away he urged upon others the great
importance of a preparation for death, saying it would do
to live entertaining the belief he had, but it would not do
to die with it. What a timely warning this should be to
all. The funeral sermon was preached at the residence on
Sunday, by Rev. T.J. Ream, after which his remains were
conveyed to the Delphos Cemetery for burial.
Rogers, child
The Sentinel, June 17, 1881
We are informed by Mr. Fred Koster, living near Lamar,
that a little girl three years of age, only child of Mr. and
Mrs. Herman Rogers, of Cloud County, died last
Sunday, from the effects of being scalded two weeks
before. The mother had placed a kettle of hot water upon
the floor, and had barely turned around, when the child
stumbled against it and was fatally scalded. The agony
of the mother is of course great, and in their sore
bereavement the parents have the sincere sympathy of
friends and neighbors.
Root, George J.
The Sentinel, March 25, 1881
DEATH OF ELDER ROOT
After a long and for a considerable part painful illness,
George J. Root departed this life, in the 53d year of his
age, at his late residence in this city, at 9 o'clock on last
Monday morning, March 21, 1881. It has become a
subject of remark that so many of our prominent citizens
have been taken from us by the hand of death within the
last year, and as the bell tolls, and neighbors and friends
gather at the church, the inquiry is suggested. Who will
be the next to follow? Probably the taking from us of no
other would have caused more profound and universal
sorrow than that of Mr. Root.
Elder Geo. J. Root was born in Ohio, where he spent
the early years of his life. He came to this county about
ten years ago, and was therefore quite an early settler.
Had during the time been somewhat engaged in farming,
but most of the time in the work of the ministry, for
which he was peculiarly fitted. He took an active part in
religious work, without regard to denomination, but later
became an efficient teacher in the "Church of Christ",
and was instrumental in organizing a branch of that faith
in this place; and after being laid aside by ill health was
anxious for its welfare and prosperity. He labored as
"District Evangelist" for two years; and when his health
76 Sentinel, 1881
failed, so that he could not continue his labors in that
part of the work, held meetings in various parts of this
new country, where his labors have been greatly blessed.
He preached his last sermon on Thanksgiving Day; and
like the legend of the song of the dying swan, it was one
of the best, if not the best sermon we ever heard, which
was the remark of many at the time. Since that time his
health gradually failed, and the last three months he was
a great sufferer, and bore it all with Christian patience
and fortitude. Realizing that his stay on earth was short,
he prepared his business affairs, made known his last
wishes, and then calmly waited the great change, and
died in the full triumph of the Christian faith.
The funeral rites were performed at the Presbyterian
Church, and the edifice was crowded to its fullest
capacity. After the ceremonies, the remains were buried,
by request of the deceased, for the present in his garden.
He leaves a grief-stricken wife, a son and daughter, a
brother and sister, and other friends here; and not only
are these, with other relatives, and a large circle of
friends and acquaintances, but his church, by whom he
was dearly loved, to mourn the loss of a kind,
conscientious and able teacher and leader. He leaves an
influence that family and friends will not soon forget;
and though 'tis hard to give the parting look to loved
ones here on earth, they have the assurance that "their
loss is his infinite gain." May the consistent life he
exhibited lure someone to the "better choice", that all
may be benefited, and meet where partings never come.
Smith, Marcus (Marquis)
The Sentinel, June 24, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
The funeral of Marcus Smith, who died Wednesday,
occurred Thursday at 2 o'clock p.m., at the M.E. Church.
Mr. S. was (an) old settler, having been here twelve
years. Was an honorable, straightforward, hard-working
citizen, and universally respected by all who knew him.
July 1, 1881
Marquis Smith, to whose death we briefly referred last
week, was buried Thursday, after services in the ME.
Church, conducted by Rev. D.D. Campbell, the text
being one of Mr. Smith's own choosing: "What is man
that thou art mindful of him?" Mr. Smith's disease was
consumption, with which he had been afflicted many
years, latterly confined to his bed for many months. He
leaves a wife and seven children, all save two, who are
in Colorado, being present at his death. Mr. S. was a
professor of religion, and died believing he should live
again. He was in his 57th year; came from Shelby
County, Ind., in the spring of 1871, and located on the
farm 4 miles north of town; was a hard working, honest
man, "The noblest work of God." The family have the
sympathy of a large circle of friends.
Strickler, Minnie May
The Sentinel, February 25, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
Geo. W. Strickler received the sad news this week of the
death of his sister's little girl, little May.
March 4, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
OUR DEPARTED MINNIE MAY
Died at her home in Girard, Kansas, Feb. 20, 1881, aged
3 years and 2 months.
And is she dead? Oh can it be
That Minnie May is gone from me?
Has her pure spirit taken flight
And gained the world of living light?
Yes, her dear clay is cold and chill
And her sweet tongue in death is still;
Her spirit reached the blissful shore
Where death and sorrow come no more.
Not lost, but only gone before;
Not dead, but living evermore;
She walks the gold-paved streets above,
And basks in God's eternal love;
Her voice, so sweet to mortal ear,
In earth we never more shall hear,
Nor patter of her tiny feet
Our coming home shall ever greet,
Until we reach her home above,
And share with her God's boundless love
Each arm and silken little hand,
So quick to move at love's command,
Enfold us yet in warm embrace,
And wipe the tears from sorrow's face;
Then beckon us to worlds of light
Where there is neither death nor night.
REV. WILLIS S. WEBB
77 Sentinel, 1881
Struble, infant
The Sentinel, November 18, 1881
BENNINGTON ITEMS
DIED, on Friday last, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
C.D. Struble, aged two weeks. The funeral, conducted
by Rev. J. Pittinger, took place the following day.
Temple, Mrs. C.A.
The Sentinel, December 9, 1881
We learn that the wife of C.A. Temple, of Morton
township, died last Saturday night. The funeral was held
at the residence on the 5th, conducted by the Rev. Mr.
Lawson, and a large concourse of people, friends and
neighbors, followed the departed to ther last resting
place. She leaves a kind husband and 5 children.
Thompson, Edmund Brightwell
The Sentinel, December 9, 1881
DIED, Nov. 30, 1881, Edmund Brightwell, only child of
J.W. and H.A. Thompson, aged 10 months and 10 days.
Thompson, Wm.
The Sentinel, January 7, 1881
DIED - Mr. Wm. Thompson, living west of town, died
Dec. 31st, in the 95th year of his age and was buried on
New Year's Day. It will be remembered that Mr. T. has
often been referred to as being the oldest man in the
state. He has been gradually failing for some time; like a
clock worn out, he passed away without any particular
disease. He never made any profession of religion. Short
services were held at the residence, conducted by Rev.
Geo. S. Smith, and at the grave by Rev. Joy Bishop. By
his special request no regular funeral sermon was
preached.
Trickey, Rollin A.
The Sentinel, April 29, 1881
The funeral service of the infant of Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
Trickey was held at the house of its grandfather, on
Friday morning, conducted by Rev. F.D. Baker. This is
the third death which occurred in this family circle
within the past year. In their affliction they have the
sympathy of the community.
May 6, 1916
IN MEMORY OF ROLLIN A. TRICKEY, AGED EIGHT MONTHS
Little Rollie has gone to rest
Up in Heaven among the blest;
No more pain for him to bear,
He has gone where all is fair.
He was mamma's darling joy;
He was papa's precious boy;
He was young, but pure within,
Free from guilt and crime and sin.
We watched o'er him both night and day
To keep the monster death away;
But an angel spirit did come
And bore our baby's spirit home.
His infant face we see no more
We cannot hear his cooing voice.
He is sleeping with the blest,
Little Rollin's gone to rest.
BY MRS. ELSIE TRICKEY
Trimble, Otis A.
The Sentinel, February 11, 1881
ITEMS FROM DELPHOS
DIED - Otis A. Trimble, son of John R. Trimble, on
Sunday night last, aged nearly 13 years. Otis was
severely afflicted all of his life: his limbs were deformed
and he never was able to walk. He was sent to the
infirmary at Kansas City, where he remained for some
time without receiving any benefit. He was buried in the
Delphos Cemetery on Tuesday.
Turner, Thomas
The Sentinel, March 4, 1881
It is our sad duty to record the death of Thomas Turner,
an aged and respected citizen of Chapman township. Mr.
Turner departed this life Feb. 22, 1881, at his home in
Chapman township in the 78th year of his age, of lung
fever. The deceased was born in Columbus, Franklin
County, Ohio, Nov. 22, 1803. His parents moved to
Logan County in the same state, while he was a small
boy. He was married while quite a young man. From
Logan County he emigrated to Iowa in 1849. In that state
78 Sentinel, 1881
he permanently resided until 1878, when he again pulled
up stakes, and came to Kansas, leaving behind a host of
well-wishing friends. Here he made a purchase of 320
acres of unimproved land, and he at once set to work to
convert it into a comfortable home: how well he
succeeded, his farm will show.
He leaves a wife and five grown children; of the latter,
two are in Iowa, one in Oregon, two in Kansas.
He was a good farmer, a man of iron constitution, a
devoted husband and an indulgent father. His sad and
stricken family have the sympathy of the entire
community.
His remains will be taken to Fayette County, Iowa,
for interment, where he leaves valuable property.
Veveba, Mr.
The Sentinel, November 25, 1881
FOUNTAIN ITEMS
It becomes our sad mission to chronicle the death of our
esteemed neighbor, Mr. Veveba, of Bohemian
nationality. Mr. Veveba came to this country about six
years ago, and by strict economy and good management
has made himself a food home, and was much beloved
by all his neighbors. He leaves a wife and family to
mourn his loss.
Ward, Mrs.
The Sentinel, January 14, 1881
FROM MORTON
Mrs. Ward, an old settler of Table Rock Creek, departed
this life Dec. 22. (1880).
White, Mr.
The Sentinel, May 20, 1881
EAST LINCOLN
Mr. White, father of the Messrs. White, of this township,
died on Wednesday, at his son Sam's residence, of dropsy
of the heart. Rev. H. Bushnell Jr. preached the funeral
sermon, after which the remains were taken to Fairview
Cemetery, followed by the largest procession we have
seen in Fountain, to pay the last tribute of respect to his
memory. Mr. White came from England to this country
over 20 years ago; from Missouri to this state in the
spring of 1874, and located a claim on upper First Creek,
on which he resided until within a few weeks of his
death, when he was removed to his son's. Mr. White was
an upright, industrious man, and respected by all who
knew him. He leaves an aged wife and five children here
to mourn his loss. In their affliction they have the
sympathy of the entire community.
Willis, David
The Sentinel, July 1, 1881
KILLED BY INDIANS
Mr. J.A. Willis, of this place, received the sad
intelligence a few days ago, of the death of his brother,
Mr. David Willis, formerly of this county, at the hands of
Indians in Utah last week. For some time a war with the
Utes has seemed inevitable. It seems that a band of Pah
Utes, composed of renegade bucks, had been murdering
some settlers and stealing stock, and a body of 50 men,
assisted by a company of soldiers, started in pursuit.
Scouts were sent out and did not return when the others
started on, but were decoyed and massacred by the
Indians but few stragglers getting away to tell the tale,
and Mr. Willis was among the victims. Mrs. Willis, his
wife, writes a few lines, stating that her husband's
comrades tried but could not get the bodies, as the
Indians were firing from the rocks.
Old settlers will remember that Mr. David Willis was
a fearless fighter in the Indian troubles here. He had
gone to the mountains to engage in the cattle business,
and was soon expecting to return to the Solomon Valley
to make it his home. His sudden and deplorable end is
not only a sad shock to his wife and children, but to
relatives and friends here. Mrs. J.M. Jones, of Lindsey,
is a sister, to whom the news was not broken until a day
or two after its receipt.
Wright, Dr.
The Sentinel, April 15, 1881
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Dr. Wright, whose death we announced last week, was
buried on Thursday, his daughter going to a home at her
uncle's, in Lincoln County.
79 Sentinel, 1881
80 Sentinel, 1881
Adams, John W.
The Sentinel, April 21, 1882
From the DODGE CITY GLOBE, we learn that John W.
Adams, the head brakeman on train No. 8, A.T.&S.F., in
charge of conductor J.B. Browne, was instantly killed by
his foot being caught in the frog while coupling cars, on
the 6th inst. Mr. Browne was formerly resident of this
county (now owning a farm near Bennington) who, we
learn from the Globe, was deeply grieved at the death of
his young friend, Adams, whose body was crushed to a
jelly by the accident. The verdict of the coroner's jury
exonerated all the train men from blame. Adams lived in
Ohio, where his body was taken for interment.
Bake, Ella
The Sentinel, April 21, 1882
DELPHOS ITEMS
Miss Ella Bake died at her home west of town, on
Wednesday evening, of typhoid pneumonia. She was about
17 years of age. Ella was a member of our Sunday school,
and her classmates will miss her from their number, as well
as the rest of her many friends and associates.
Beer, John
The Sentinel, August 18, 1882
Mrs. W.W. Bagnall a few days ago received the sad
intelligence of the death of an only brother, Mr. John
Beer by name, an extensive merchant of Prince Edward
Island, at the age of 66 years, which leaves Mrs. B. the
only remaining member of her father's family. The Island
is Mrs. and Mrs. B's native home. They inform us that he
died with a firm faith and hope in the Saviour's kingdom.
Barnum, infant
The Sentinel, July 7, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. John Barnum was buried
last week.
Belanger, child
The Sentinel, May 5, 1882
TRICHINA IN CLOUD COUNTY
The first case of trichinosis on record in Cloud Country
that we know of, is being treated by Dr. Bergeron, of this
city, and the family in which this dreaded disease has
made its appearance deserves much sympathy. Mr. Ignac
Belanger, one of the well-to-do farmers of Elm Creek
Valley, three miles south of Ames, being in need of meat,
went into his hog pasture and selected a hog to kill that
seemed to have not gained in flesh during the last few
weeks. Previous to that time the hog had been sick, but
was then apparently in good health, but would not fatten.
After the hog was killed, part of the meat - nearly all
lean - was taken and chopped up for sausage meat.
While the sausage meat was being mixed up, Mrs. B.,
her oldest son, aged 19, her youngest son, aged 11, and
her niece, Miss Josephine Manna, daughter of our
townsman's brother, aged 17, ate some of it in its raw
state. Last Thursday the youngest boy was taken sick
and Dr. Bergeron was sent for.
The first symptoms of trichinosis being very similar
to those of bilious fever, Dr. B., not dreaming that
trichinosis existed in the vicinity, not even among hogs,
prescribing for bilious fever and went home. Friday
morning he was called again, and found the boy in a very
dangerous condition, and the other boy and young lady
81
1882
Sentinel
EDITOR: CHARLES HOYT
following in the same way. The three being taken sick in
exactly the same manner excited the doctor's suspicions,
and he then commenced an investigation of the matter.
Upon being told the facts in the case, as above stated, he
pronounced the disease trichinosis, and treated the
parties accordingly, but it seemed that the worst must
come. The young boy died Sunday afternoon and the
oldest boy and girl are probably dead by this time. Mrs.
B. will surely recover, as the quantity of meat she ate
was quite small. We visited the family Monday with Dr.
B. The house presented a most pitiful aspect. In one
corner lay the remains of a bright boy, who, only a few
days previous, was full of health and vigor; in one bed
the mother laid, stricken down by grief, besides being
tormented by this terrible disease, in another bed was the
oldest son, groaning with excruciating pains, with death
slowly creeping upon him; and still in another bed was
the niece upon whose face could be seen that the end of
her sojourn with us was fast approaching. Mr. Belanger
and a son about 16 years old were the only two in the
family able to be about, and with the assistance of good
neighbors and relatives, did all they could to assist the
sick ones. This is a sad case, indeed, and should serve as
a warning for all time to come against eating raw meat
of any kind.
Dr. Bergeron took a piece of the meat to his office and
examined it through a powerful microscope. The little
trichina, coiled up in their cysts, are plainly visible in
almost every particle of the meat. We took a good,
square look at them and "took their word for it". We are
convinced without tasting. Parties desiring to examine
the diseased meat can do so at Dr. Bergeron's office.
Dr. B. reports his trichinosis patients a little better this
morning with hopes of saving Miss Manna's life.
CLYDE HERALD
Bennett, infant son
The Sentinel, September 22, 1882
BENNINGTON ITEMS
Died - On the 15th inst., of cholera infantum, the infant son
of Mr. and Mrs. Cal Bennett.
Billingsley, Mr.
The Sentinel, August 25, 1882
DELPHOS ITEMS
B.F. Billingsley received the sad news last Friday of the
death of his aged father. Mr. B. has been a constant sufferer
for nearly 6 months, and on Friday morning at 5 o'clock he
passed from this life to that beautiful land beyond the river.
Bishop, Delly
The Sentinel, June 9, 1882
The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, aged 8 years, died
Wednesday evening about 6 o'clock, June 7, 1882. The
little fellow had been a cripple from birth, and was well
known to all, though perhaps not by name. Little Delly
Bishop has gone to a better country. The fond parents, in
whom the ties of affection had become so strong, have the
sympathy of all. The funeral was held at the Methodist
Church on Thursday, conducted by Rev. N.S. Dickey. The
remains were interred in Highland Cemetery.
Blackburn, Mr.
The Sentinel, July 7, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mrs. Nellie Blackburn, of this place, received the sad
news from Pueblo, Colo., of the sudden death of her
husband, who was accidentally killed while working on
a railroad. We have not learned the particulars.
Boss, Samuel Z.
The Sentinel, December 1, 1882
FROM BENNINGTON
Mr. S.Z. Boss, one of the oldest settlers in this part of the
country, died on Wednesday, Nov. 29, of Bright's disease.
Boyd, Carrie M.
The Sentinel, January 27, 1882
BENNINGTON ITEMS
The many friends of Mrs. Carrie M. Boyd, who for some
years lived at this place, will feel much sorrow when
they hear of her death, which occurred at Bellvue,
82 Sentinel, 1882
Pottawattomie County, on the 16th inst. The immediate
cause of death was inflammation of the stomach. On the
12th inst. we received the news that on the previous day
a baby daughter was born. We rejoiced in the joy the
parents must have felt, but were soon called on to mourn
with the husband bereft of his dearest earthly tie.
Unfavorable symptoms set in the latter part of week
before last, and on the following Monday all that was
left of the mother, wife and friend was the cold body.
The funeral took place in Solomon City on the 18th,
conducted by Revs. Wells, Pierson and Scott. Rev. W.C.
Scott, of this place, her former pastor, preaching the
funeral sermon. Mrs. Boyd was a member of the
Presbyterian Church of this place, as she did not sever
her connection with this church when she removed.
While the sympathy of friends, however sincere and
deep, but touches the surface of a grief so deep as the
husband feels, yet in days to come he may feel that in his
grief he was not alone, and it may sooth to some extent
his sorrow. Those who knew Mrs. Boyd best are those
who sorrowed most. The greatest consolation is,
however, that in her death she was happy. Death had lost
its sting, the grave its victory. "Safe in the arms of
Jesus," as sung at the last services, fitly describes her
home and resting place. Your correspondent and other
friends at this place attended her funeral. G.P.P.
In another column:
Being called to Solomon City, on account of the sudden
death of Mrs. W.H. Boyd, our correspondent at
Bennington, Mr. Geo. P. Parker, is unable to furnish his
regular items this week.
Burnham, Nathan
The Sentinel, November 24, 1882
Judge C.S. Wyeth this week received the news of the
death of Mrs. Wyeth's father, Mr. Nathan Burnham, on
Tuesday of this week, at West Jefferson, Ohio at the age
of 79. The deceased was also father of Mrs. Hillman,
who was present at the time of her father's death. Also,
Mr. U. Monaghan received intelligence of death of his
son, James, at Silverton, Col., on the 20th. He was well
known to many of our citizens.
Clark, Mrs.
The Sentinel, April 28, 1882
Mrs. Clark, aged about 85 years, mother-in-law of Mr.
Robbins, died very suddenly on Sunday last.
Coleman, E.L.
The Sentinel, May 5, 1882
It is rumored that E.L. Coleman, formerly of
Bennington, this county, dropped dead in Pueblo, Colo.,
a few days ago; also, that his mother had started for
Denver, where she expected to meet him.
Cornue, Sarah
The Sentinel, July 28, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mrs. Cornue, wife of Jacob Cornue, died on Tuesday
morning, July 25, after only a few days illness, at the age
of 76 years. Mrs. C. had been a member of the Baptist
Church for 52 years, and was an exemplary Christian.
She died in the full triumphs of a glorious immortality.
Another mother in Israel has been fathered into the land
of the blessed, and her feet transplanted from the shores
of time to the shores of immortality. While her friends
and relatives mourn her loss, her presence and angelic
voice has been added to the innumerable throng of the
redeemed. Her funeral sermon was preached from
Psalms 39-4, by Rev. E.B. Tucker, of Minneapolis,
assisted by Revs. W.B. Hollen and Joy Bishop, Sr., of
Delphos, after which a large procession followed her
remains to the Delphos Cemetery, where her body was
laid in the silent city of the dead to await the resurrection
morn. Altho' advanced in years and fully prepared to go,
the stroke seemed almost unbearable to the immediate
friends. Besides an aged companion (to whom she was
wedded 51 years), she leaves six children, three of them
residents of this county, namely: Mr. Dan Cornue, at
whose residence, 4 miles south of town, the deceased
was living at the time of her death; Mrs. A.G. Dudley,
and Mrs. M.E. Bellows; Mr. Chas. Cornue, of Jamison,
Mo., was telegraphed and arrived in time to be
recognized by his mother; Mrs. Prime, at Kansas City,
was also notified, but illness, caused by the shock,
prevented her from coming; and Mr. Stephen Cornue,
who was too far away to be reached in time. In their
83 Sentinel, 1882
sorrow all the friends have the sympathy of the entire
community, and join in saying: "Blessed are the dead
that died in the Lord."
Crabble, Jake
The Sentinel, November 3, 1882
FROM MELVILLE
There was a terrible railroad accident on the night of the
18th, at Miltonvale. While they were making up the train
to start east, Jake Crabble, one of the brakemen, had his
leg mashed to a jelly by two cars coming together. Dr.
Fairchild took him to his home at Garrison where he met
the company's surgeons. He died on the 20th.
Cross, Mrs. Walter P.
The Sentinel, May 26, 1882
We learn that the family of Mr. W.P. Cross, living about
9 miles east of this place, is thought to be afflicted with
smallpox. There is probably no cause for alarm on
account of this, but the disease is very prevalent in many
places throughout the country, highly so in some cities,
and too great precaution cannot be taken. Mrs. Cross
died last week, we understand but there are no cases
outside the family, nor have we any authority for saying
that the disease is smallpox. The utmost precaution,
however, is advisable.
June 2, 1882
ORANGE ITEMS
DIED - On Friday, May 12, 1882, of smallpox, Mrs.
Walter Cross.
She always made home happy, what a noble record left,
A legacy of memory sweet, to those she loved bereft.
For well her cherished household knew
The victories she had won,
And they can ever testify
How well her work was done.
The smallpox is now in our neighborhood, but is not
spreading any. We understand from parties who were
within speaking distance of Mr. Cross's house, that Jack
Redy is down; also Mrs. J. King, daughter of Mrs. Cross,
but not dangerous and they will probably recover. Keep
cool. Spread no false or magnified reports.
Crow, Joseph
The Sentinel, March 24, 1882
We understand the smallpox is raging in Avoca, Iowa.
We learn that Jo Crow died of that dreadful disease on
the 17th inst. We also learned of the sad news of the
death of Mr. Perry Ritsman, who died of smallpox on the
12th inst. in Avoca. It is sad news to his friends, and most
especially his aged father, who is almost frantic with
grief, as his son went away too much against his will.
But like many young and thoughtless boys, he only
thought of making a better fortune, then return again to
his father's house. But alas! He is gone to return no
more. He died in the hands of a merciful Savior, and our
only hope is that he learned to love Jesus in a dying hour.
We deeply feel to sympathize with the bereaved family.
Dickey, child
The Sentinel, December 22, 1882
FROM EAST CULVER
It is not known what caused the death of Mr. Dickey's
boy. It cannot be possible that it was the blow from the
ball club.
Doty, Cassie
The Sentinel, July 14, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - At her home north of town, Cassie, beloved wife
of Andrew Doty. She has been a sufferer for several
months of dropsy of the heart, and Monday morning she
bid farewell to friends and loved ones and passed over to
that better land. Funeral services were conducted by
Rev. W.B. Hollen at the M.E. Church Tuesday morning
at 11 o'clock.
Doty, infant
The Sentinel, April 28, 1882
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Doty was buried
this week.
84 Sentinel, 1882
Dunn, James
The Sentinel, September 15, 1882
Mr. James Dunn, father of Dr. D.M. and Mr. L.J. Dunn,
and Mrs. N.J. Clark, died in this place at an early hour
on Wednesday morning, at the advanced age of 83 years.
The funeral services were held at the residence of Mrs.
Clark on Wednesday afternoon, by Rev. F.D. Baker,
assisted by Rev. W. Whitney. The speaker dwelt upon the
thought of being ripe for the harvest, mentioning the fact
that although the mind was impaired by age, the
deceased retained an intelligent hope for the future. He
had been a constant member of the Methodist Church for
50 years.
Eacker, George
The Sentinel, October 6, 1882
CULVER ITEMS
George Eacker, one of our highly esteemed young men,
departed this life last Tuesday, after a short but severe
illness. One week before his death, he was one of a
merry party who visited your city, and while there spoke
of making a visit to his old home in Maryland. This
month his remains will be sent back, his friend Mr. Lyon
accompanying them. George will be sadly missed by
many.
Ebersole, Minnie
The Sentinel, December 22, 1882
AVERY SUDDEN DEATH
It becomes our very unpleasant duty to record a very sad
and sudden occurrence, which took place in this city on
Wednesday evening of this week. About four o'clock it
was reported that Mrs. S.O. Ebersole was dead, and so
sudden and unexpected was the news that those not
having actual knowledge thought it must be a mistake,
though it was known to some that she had not been well
for several days. About the time indicated, a messenger
was dispatched to Mr. Ebersole's place of business,
saying that his wife had fainted, and her attendants were
unable to restore her; and upon his arrival life was
extinct. The occurrence is made much more sad and
unbearable on the part of the husband - who is
remarkable for kindness and attention to his family -
owing to the fact that his former companion was taken
away under similar circumstances about two years ago,
of heart disease, though she had long been in ill health.
The cause of Mrs. E.'s death seemed unaccountable, and
a post mortem examination was held at his request, a
note of which appears elsewhere.
The deceased was a Miss Minnie Skinner, and was
married to Mr. E. several months ago. Her mother was
keeping house for the family, and was so shocked at the
sad and sudden occurrence that for a time her mind was
impaired. It is needless to say the deceased received
every care that kind hands could bestow, though she was
not thought dangerously ill. In this sorrowful
dispensation the bereaved husband and family have the
sympathy of the entire community.
The funeral was held Friday morning at the residence,
conducted by Rev. F.D. Baker, assisted by Revs. E.B.
Tucker and N.S. Dickey. A more formal obituary notice
will appear in future.
Edwards, Leula
The Sentinel, August 25, 1882
DIED- Of cholera infantum, August 3d, 1882, little Leula,
only child of Joel and Alice Edwards, aged 5 months and
19 days.
Ah, we think of the little form
With its marble face so fair
How can our anguish find relief
How banish our despair.
But when we think of the heavenly home
On death little Leula has gained,
Why should we bow ourselves in grief?
Why should our hearts be pained.
Yes, she has gained a happy home
A home all bright and fair;
The angels came and closed her eyes
And bore our loved one there.
They took her home to Jesus
And left me here to mourn;
While we bow our heads in sorrow
We say, Thy will be done.
Hark! Hear the heavenly music
From yonder shore doth come.
Is it the angels singing
To welcome Leula home?
85 Sentinel, 1882
Ah! Our happy little darling
Has joined the heavenly band;
A shining crown is on her brow,
And angels 'round her stand.
A few more days of sorrow,
And then we'll all go home,
And join the heavenly music
That welcomed Leula home.
MRS. L.V. HALL, ACKLEY, AUG. 11
Eicholtz, Anna L.
The Sentinel, December 8, 1882
BENNINGTON
With much regret we record this week the death of Anna,
only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.B. Eicholtz. She was in
her usual health until last Thursday when she
complained somewhat. The symptoms of inflammation
of the bowels increasing, medical aid was called in, but
she rapidly grew worse, and notwithstanding all the care
which lavish affection could bestow, she died on
Wednesday morning Dec. 6, at 5 o'clock. Her brother,
John, who was absent in Illinois, was telegraphed for as
soon as all hopes of her recovery were abandoned, and is
expected to arrive in time of the funeral which will take
place on Friday. The most sincere sympathy of friends
can but touch the surface of the grief of the parents, who
have so suddenly lost the daughter on whom so much
affection was bestowed, and so many hopes centered,
just as she was at the threshold of womanhood. It is a
stunning blow to them; still that sympathy, helpless as it
is to blunt the sting of their anguish, is as widespread as
the circle of their acquaintance; for all who knew the
deceased understand how the loss of one whose
character could bring only brightness into the home must
be missed. We shall refer further next week when
recording the funeral.
December 15, 1882
DIED - On December 5th, Anna L., daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. D.B. Eicholtz, aged 16 years 4 months and 18 days.
In our items last week we stated that the deceased took
ill on the Thursday previous to her death. This was an
error. Her illness dated from Friday morning, hence
ending fatally in four days. Her funeral on Friday was
very largely attended, and was conducted by Revs. Scott
and Pittinger. Mr. John Eicholtz, brother of deceased,
arrived from Illinois Friday morning in time for the
funeral service.
IN MEMORIAM
For the Sentinel. Written in memory of Miss Anna
Eicholtz, who died December 6th, at the age of 16 years.
As the severed rosebud withers
In the stillness of the noon
With its fragrant leaves half opened
On the morning of its bloom,
So the hand of death has severed
From the hearts with sorrow filled,
Hands whose earthly work is ended,
Lips and hearts that now are stilled.
As the mist of morning rises
With the first rays of the sun.
So our young friend has left us,
In life's morning just begun.
With the hopes of life before her,
And with friends and loved ones blest,
And is taken home to rest.
Dear father, when our mission
On this earth below is filled,
And our friends shall look upon us,
As we lay all white and stilled,
Like Anna's may our virtues,
As the flower's sweet perfume
Rise and cover all our failings,
As they lay in us our tomb.
MINNEAPOLIS, DEC. 13 - WALTER W. WALKER
Eicholtz, Mrs.
The Sentinel, May 19, 1882
FROM BENNINGTON
Messrs. Eicholtz received news of the death of their
mother, at Nashua, Ill., last week. She had been ill a long
time and her death was not unexpected.
86 Sentinel, 1882
Elligan, Mrs. German
The Sentinel,August 25, 1882
FROM BENNINGTON
DIED - On Saturday last, Mrs. German Elligan. Her
funeral was conducted by Rev. W.C. Scott, and took
place on Sunday. Mrs. Elligan had but recently arrived
from Germany.
Emerson, Amos
The Sentinel, January 20, 1882
We learn that little Amos Emerson is dead, having been
taken sick soon after they reached home in St. Angar, Iowa.
Feather, John Jr.
The Sentinel, October 13, 1882
SYLVAN GROVE ITEMS
DIED - September 28, of catarrh, John Feather Jr., of
Fountain township. He leaves a wife and one child.
Ferguson, Eliza
The Sentinel, September 15, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - Saturday, September 9, 1882, Mrs. Eliza
Ferguson, aged 38 years. The deceased had long been an
invalid, suffering the effects of hereditary consumption.
Through her years of affliction she has borne up bravely,
always exhibiting a kindly Christian spirit, imparting
cheerfulness to her children and husband, and
influencing all by her own deeds to do right, gaining the
good will and respect of those who knew her. Thus she
leaves many who mourn her departure - mourn for the
tender mother, the loving wife and benevolent friend
who has gone to reap her reward in Heaven.
FROM SYLVAN GROVE
DIED- On the 9th inst., Eliza, wife of J.E. Ferguson, aged
37 years. She leaves a husband and four small children,
besides a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn
her loss. She was a faithful member of the Presbyterian
Church, and her perfect faith and trust in her Redeemer
sustained her through all her affliction. Fully realizing
that her stay with us was short, she expressed herself as
ready to go if the Lord so willed, and made all
arrangements for her burial and funeral services. Her
loss will be deeply felt by the circle in which she
mobbed, but may we all strive to emulate her many good
qualities and Christian virtues.
Fletcher, children
The Sentinel, July 28, 1882
Two children of Mr. Fletcher, living north of town, died
on Wednesday of this week: one, a boy aged 11 years,
with dysentery; and the other, a girl aged 1½ years old,
with cholera infantum.
Gaines, Mrs.
The Sentinel, October 20, 1882
LAMAR
Grandma Gaines, who made her home at Lamar last
winter, died three weeks ago last Friday. She was good
and amiable and will be much missed in her family circle.
Galpin, Mattie E.
The Sentinel, September 1, 1882
IN MEMORIAM
Mattie E., infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C.
Galpin, of Grover, Kan., died August 24, 1882.
Gone like a beautiful dream of the morning,
Dispelled by the gleam of the sunlight dawning;
Gone like the mist on the summer sea,
Gliding away o'er the distant lea.
Gone alone o'er the mystic river,
Flashes of light o'er the barque doth quiver.
As gleams from the 'Golden Gates' ajar
Guide her away to the home afar.
Gone to the gentle Shepard's fold,
Where all that's lovely ne'er grows old,
Where father and mother and kindred near
Shall meet her again in the upper sphere.
Gone to that land of light and love,
Safe in our father's home above,
Her spirit shall ever be hovering near
To give our wounded spirits cheer.
87 Sentinel, 1882
Pure and fair as the flowers of even,
Fresh with the breath and dew of heaven,
Clad in thy coffined robes of white
Truly thou looked an angel bright.
Could we but pierce the misty veil
That hides the loved from sight,
Methinks their fairy forms we'd see
In every gleam of light.
When thy little flock shall gather round,
And Mattie is missed from the old playground,
When thy tears shall fall like the summer rain,
Remember thy darling is free from pain.
Weep not for her now passed away
From thy fond and yearning sight,
Though an aching void in the breast now swells,
May the Comforter come in the heart to dwell.
MAGNOLIA, WATERVILLE, KAN., AUG. 26
Gibbs, John
The Sentinel, March 3, 1882
DIED - On Wednesday, 21st inst., at his residence in
Grover, Kan., John Gibbs, aged 71 years, 6 months and
4 days, after an illness of fifteen months.
During this time he has been a great sufferer; the
disease, though somewhat complicated, bore
resemblance to rheumatism and dropsy, starting from a
slight injury of one of the toes. Mr. Gibbs, or better
known as Uncle John, was of English birth. He
emigrated from his native land in early life, making his
home respectively in Canada, Ohio and Illinois. He has
also long been a resident of this county. In company with
his wife, these old people 12 years ago sought to make a
home in the then wilds of Pipe Creek; securing a
homestead they built the common house of the day, a
dug-out, in which they lived for several years, battling
with poverty and other obstacles familiar to early
settlers, until at last they realized the reward of their
industry, a comfortable and pleasant home in which to
spend their declining years. For several years he has
efficiently served as postmaster at the Grover office,
ever faithful in his duties. One marked feature of his life
has been, no sickness - never experiencing a sick day till
his final illness. Before passing away he assured his
companion that all was well, then selected his place for
burial and pall bearers, and made other arrangements
respecting his interment, after which, like a soldier worn
and weary, he fell asleep. He leaves a wife to mourn his
loss, who has the sympathy of all true hearts, as well as
their commendation for her faithfulness and untiring
attentions during the long weary months she has stood
by his bedside. Friday following the funeral discourse
that was delivered by his pastor, Rev. Ayers, text 1st
Chron. 29:15 the remains were then slowly and solemnly
borne to the Hall Cemetery, followed by a procession of
remarkable length. Here he was laid to rest till the Life
Giver appears to break the bands of death and set the
prisoner free. T.H.G.
MARCH 10, 1882
ACARD OF THANKS
ED. SENTINEL: - Will you allow me a brief space in your
valuable paper in which to express my sincere thanks to
the many friends and citizens of Grover for their
sympathy and neighborly kindness during the deep
affliction I have been called upon to pass through in my
husband's illness and death. Many names might be
mentioned as examples of generosity and true
friendship, but space will not permit.
RESPECTFULLY,
MRS. HANNAH GIBBS
GROVER, KAN., MARCH 6, 1882.
Gill, Leslie
September 29, 1882
The grim messenger Death has again entered out midst
and taken away one of the fair little ones from among us;
Leslie, aged 1 year 1 month and 16 days, son of Mr. and
Mrs. S.E. Gill, of Pipe Creek.
Five weeks ago last night little Leslie was taken with
spasms. Dr. Clark, of Minneapolis, was immediately
summoned and pronounced it typhoid dysentery
accompanied with teething. Leslie's sufferings were
beyond description. Everything that skillful physicians
could do was done, and after hovering between life and
death for so many days and weeks the final hour came
on the 17th, Sunday, at 2 p.m. 1882.
88 Sentinel, 1882
There is anguish in the household,
It is desolate and lone,
A fondly cherished nursling
From the parent nest has flown.
A little form is missing
A heart has ceased to beat;
The chain of love lies shattered
At the desolator's feet.
Leslie, darling, we bid thee farewell;
Thy sufferings none hath power to tell,
Though thou art gone 'tis with thee, sweet rest.
Joined the angel band, art with the blest.
From adverse blasts and lowering storms
Our darling's soul has been borne;
And with bright, angelic forms,
Shall rest till the resurrection morn.
A FRIEND
ACARD
There are doubtless times in the history of every human
life when we feel the utter poverty of words to give
expression to the feelings that struggle in vain for
utterance. To those kind friends who with warm hearts,
willing hands and words of kindly sympathy came to our
side during the five weeks' illness that preceded the final
hour of our little son, who was called to the other shore
of the dark river, and who when all of earth was over,
"buried our dead out of our sight". We can only offer the
poor recompense of our grateful thanks.
MR. AND MRS. S.E. GILL.
Greenwood, James
The Sentinel, February 24, 1882
FROM EAST LINCOLN
Mr. James Greenwood died on the morning of the 10th, after
an illness of 12 days. The community loses a good citizen.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. Jackson.
Hardesty, child
The Sentinel, September 1, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
A small child of John Hardesty's died last week with
cholera infantum.
Hobaugh, Mrs.
The Sentinel, September 15, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - September 12, Mrs. Hobough, of typhoid fever.
Rev. Hollen preached the funeral sermon.
Hollis, Bart
The Sentinel, June 9, 1882
Last Saturday Bart Hollis, son of John Hollis, was taken
suddenly ill and died that night. The deceased was a
young man about 20 years old.
In another column:
Mrs. John Hollis and others of the family who have been
quite sick are now getting better.
Jones, Henry B.
The Sentinel, April 7, 1882
DELPHOS ITEMS
Henry B. Jones, son of W.B. Jones, died on Wednesday
night, April 5, of spinal meningitis, from which he
suffered greatly for several weeks. The funeral was held
Thursday, Rev. W.B. Hollen officiating.
Joslin, Mrs. J.K.
The Sentinel, April 14, 1882
The sad intelligence reached here on Saturday last to the
effect that Mrs. J.K. Joslin, living several miles west of
here, was drowned on Friday, during a severe rainstorm.
It seems that a little girl of a neighbor's came, and Mrs.
Joslin asked her to stay with her little girl until she went
to attend to the cows that were picketed in a ravine, Mr.
Joslin being away at work on Mr. Kilbourne's place,
where he sometimes stayed for days at a time. The
neighbor lady finally came for her child, and the children
reported that Mrs. Joslin had been gone for some time.
Search was immediately instituted by neighbors but
nothing could be found that night, but the body was
incidentally found that next morning. In the mean time
the husband was sent for, but the news did not reach him
until after the finding of the body. Mrs. Joslin, it is said,
was very careful of the stock, and it supposed that she
89 Sentinel, 1882
ventured too far, or became entangled. The cows seem to
have escaped, one of the ropes being cut.
Kilbourne, Mr.
The Sentinel, March 31, 1882
Mr. F. Kilbourne received a telegram announcing the
death of a brother in Blossburgh, Pa., and started for that
place on Thursday night.
Kresky, infant
The Sentinel, February 17, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
An infant child of G.M. Kresky's was buried Sunday
afternoon.
Loudon, Mrs.
The Sentinel, April 28, 1882
D.B. Louden's aged mother died at their home west of
town Sunday evening. Aged, 60 odd years.
McIntyre, J.W.
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
J.W. McIntyre who has been sick for several years, and
some of the time confined to his bed, died Tuesday
morning. Funeral services at his residence north of town
Wednesday afternoon.
McNay, Hannie
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
A SHOCKING ACCIDENT
Last week we gave an account of the McNays having a
family reunion. We are sorry to say their joy has been
turned into sorrow on account of an accident which
resulted in the death of one of their number. On
Saturday, the 28th ult., while the party was out hunting,
H. McNay accidentally shot himself, causing instant
death. The deceased, in company with C.S. McNay and
their two sisters were in the wagon, while the remainder
of the party were hunting chickens. The hunting party
scared up a flock of chickens and C.S. and H. McNay
jumped up in the spring wagon to see where they lit. The
horses backed suddenly and threw them forward, the
hammer of H. McNay's gun striking the footboard of the
wagon, discharging the gun, the load striking him in the
left eye, passing through his head entirely blowing his
brains out and causing instant death. Hannie McNay, as
he was commonly called, was a young man near sixteen
years of age, with a character above reproach and was
the pet of the family, being the youngest. Their grief was
inconsolable. The funeral, which was well attended, took
place at the residence of J.M. McNay at 10 a.m. on the
30th, Rev. Thompson, of the American Bible Society
officiating. The remains were enclosed in a beautiful
casket and interred in the Melville Union Cemetery
alongside his father who was buried there about two
years ago. The family has the sympathy of this
community in their bereavement.
Melville, Nov. 1, 1882
Monaghan, James
The Sentinel, December 15, 1882
DIED - James Monaghan, son of U. Monaghan, of this
place, at Silverton, Colo., November 19, 1882, of
mountain fever.
James Monaghan was born May 1, 1851, on a farm
12 miles from London, Ont., Canada. He lived and
worked on the farm where he was born until 1871, when
he accompanied his father's family to Kansas and on to
a farm his father had taken one year previous. Jim stayed
with his father on the farm here until he was 21, when he
left home and friends to seek his fortune among the
mountains of Colorado where, after sufficient
experience, he was overseer of mines. At the time of his
death he was clerk of the Walker House, at Silverton. He
died at Silverton, without a relative around him, and was
buried there among strangers. But he was not neglected.
Three physicians were employed, who did all in their
power to save him, but all in vain. He was a first class
miner, a genial, intelligent, industrious man, and
90 Sentinel, 1882
honorable man, and abstained from the use of all
intoxicating liquors. He enjoyed the warm friendship of
all who knew him.
ON THE DEATH OF JAMES MONAGHAN
Yes, James is gone, our darling son,
Our brother and our pride;
Mid mountain scenes his labors done,
He laid him down and died.
When first in infancy he came,
Our rural home to bless,
His ___ within our arms was laid,
His head upon our breast.
Through infancy and childhood's scene
He came to man's estate;
How fair of form and mild of mein
I'll dare not to relate.
All care and love he well repaid,
By loving in return.
Ah more! He all our burdens shared,
And toiled from sun to sun.
Nor yet content, he would do more,
So to that region went,
Where oft was found the golden ore,
Where mountain rocks were rent.
He toiled mid rugged mountains wild
Nor yet for self alone,
When fortune on the efforts smiled,
He shared with those at home.
Till fell disease its hand had laid
Upon his manly form
When like the flowers that bloom and fade,
He could not stem that storm.
Death calls, I'm ready, he replies,
And where his feet had trod
His body now low buried lies,
His spirit is with God.
BY H.C. SUTTON
Morris, Bertha May
The Sentinel, August 18, 1882
DIED.- Nono(a), daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. W.A.
Roberts, on Friday morning, August 11, aged 21 months.
In this city Tuesday, August 15, Bertha May, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morris, aged 4 months and 8 days.
In this city, August 15, after a long and painful illness,
William Tomlinson, aged 40 years. This man, though of
humble station, had quite a history, a sketch of which
will appear next week.
Moss, Edward
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED, Sunday, Nov. 5, at 1 o'clock, Edward Moss, oldest
son of B.M. Moss, aged 21 years. About two weeks ago
he had his foot and ankle badly crushed in the horse power
of a threshing machine. It was his wish and the wish of the
physicians to save his foot, but it was found necessary to
amputate. Dr. Chase, of Delphos, and Dr. Briarly, of
Glasco, performed the operation successfully. The patient
rallied from the effects of his chloroform and conversed
with the family, but a relapse came on and he died
suddenly of paralysis of the heart. The funeral services
were held Monday at 2 o'clock at the house. Elder G.S.
Smith, of the Christian Church officiated. Mr. and Mrs.
G.N. Nichols and Miss Ella Chase furnished the music for
the service. A great many friends of the family attended
the funeral and followed the remains to the cemetery.
Nance, infant son
The Sentinel, September 15, 1882
FROM BENNINGTON
The infant son recently born to Mr. and Mrs. W.H.
Nance died on the 7th inst., and was buried on the 8th,
the funeral service being conducted by Rev. W.C. Scott.
Overacker, Hiram
The Sentinel, November 17, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Hiram Overacker died Monday morning of
consumption.
Partch, John
The Sentinel, February 10, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Uncle John Partch passed from earthly life Sunday, Feb.
5th aged 73 years. He moved from Elkador, Iowa, about
91 Sentinel, 1882
5 years ago, and since that time has made his home in
Delphos. He was a highly respected citizen and a kind,
good neighbor. The family have the sympathy of the
entire community. Rev. Eaton, of Minneapolis,
officiated at his funeral Monday, at his residence, which
a large number attended.
Peet, child
The Sentinel, August 11, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - of cholera infantum, on Saturday, August 5th, the
youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Peet. The bereaved
family have the sympathy of this entire community.
Pendlebury, Bertha
The Sentinel, December 22, 1882
DIED - On Saturday, Dec. 16, Miss Bertha Pendlebury, of
Coal Creek, a young lady most favorably known and
respected. Rev. J. Pittinger conducted the funeral service
on Sunday last.
Penny, Ollie
The Sentinel, August 18, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
We hear that Miss Ollie Penny, formerly of Delphos,
died in Nebraska last week.
Prendergast, Jennie
The Sentinel, August 25, 1882
DELPHOS ITEMS
Little Jennie Prendergast died last Saturday afternoon
after a long spell of sickness. The remains were taken to
Abilene for interment.
Ready, John
The Sentinel, June 23, 1882
FROM BENNINGTON
Abrother of the late Mr. John Ready is here looking after
his brother's interests. D.B. Eicholtz has been appointed
administrator of the estate.
Reid, Fred
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
BENNINGTON
DIED, of typhoid fever, November 2, Mr. Fred Reid, aged
16 years. Mr. Reid had been ill for some time, but was
improving until about three weeks ago when from
incautious exposure he took a relapse which proved
fatal. His funeral services conducted by Revs. Pittenger
and Scott was largely attended.
Ritsman, Perry
The Sentinel, March 24, 1882
We understand the smallpox is raging in Avoca, Iowa.
We learn that Jo Crow died of that dreadful disease on
the 17th inst. We also leaned of the sad news of the death
of Mr. Perry Ritsman, who died of smallpox on the 12th
inst. in Avoca. It is sad news to his friends, and most
especially his aged father, who is almost frantic with
grief, as his son went away too much against his will.
But like many young and thoughtless boys, he only
thought of making a better fortune, then return again to
his father's house. But alas! He is gone to return no
more. He died in the hands of a merciful Savior, and our
only hope is that he learned to love Jesus in a dying hour.
We deeply feel to sympathize with the bereaved family.
M.E.
May 19, 1882
IN MEMORIAM
IN MEMORY OF DARLING BROTHER, PERRY RITSMAN, WHO
DIED MARCH 13, 1882, AT AVOCA, IOWA, OF SMALLPOX,
AGED 19 YEARS AND 9 MONTHS
Our hearts are torn and bleeding,
Oh, God! How can it be,
Our dear, our darling brother,
We never more shall see.
Stricken down in a land where strangers
Stood 'round his dying bed,
With no sister's hand to cool or bathe
Our darling's fevered head.
Scarce six short weeks he'd left us
When the dreadful tidings came
That our darling boy was stricken -
Oh could it be the same,
The same sweet brown-haired brother,
92 Sentinel, 1882
Who left with joyous tread?
We asked ourselves the question,
Can it be that he is dead?
The dreaded fever struck him,
He was the first to fall;
Oh can we ever give him up,
Our help, our guide, our all.
Could our brother have been with us,
Oh how we with loving care
Would have bathed his fevered forehead
And smoothed his silken hair.
His life was true and noble,
He was our help and quide;
We never dreamed how sad we'd be
If darling Perry died.
The anguished feeling in our heart
We cannot every quell,
We know 'tis true, but hard to think
He doeth all things well.
Farewell, farewell, oh brother dear,
Oh kind and faithful son,
We bow our heads and humbly say,
Oh God, Thy will be done.
MISS FANNY E. RITSMAN, ACKLEY, KAN.
Roberts, Nono(a)
The Sentinel, August 18, 1882
DIED.- Nono(a), daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. W.A.
Roberts, on Friday morning, August 11, aged 21 months.
In this city Tuesday, August 15, Bertha May, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morris, aged 4 months and 8 days.
In this city, Augyst 15, after a long and painful illness,
William Tomlinson, aged 40 years. This man, though of
humble station, had quite a history, a sketch of which
will appear next week.
Roberts, Percy DeWitt
The Sentinel, November 3, 1882
The death of Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Roberts' only boy, Percy
DeWitt, which occurred about 2 o'clock this (Friday)
morning, was a severe stroke to the fond parents, and falls
the more heavily, having lost their baby girl, Nona, but a
few months ago. Little Percy, who was about four years of
age, was first taken with malarial fever, but was taken off
with spinal cerebro meningitis. In their sorrow they have
the full sympathy of many friends in the community.
Sanders, Mrs. Geo.
The Sentinel, September 29, 1882
The wife of Mr. Geo. Sanders, colored, of this place,
died at Topeka last week of hemorrhage. The remains
were brought here, and the funeral was held Tuesday,
Rev. R.N. Smith officiating.
Setzer, child
The Sentinel, July 21, 1882
FROM LAMAR
S.H. Setzer has returned from Abilene, where he was at
work, on account of sickness in the family. The youngest
child was buried the day he arrived.
Simmons, Mrs. Frank
The Sentinel, January 20, 1882
Our community was shocked and pained last Friday to
learn of the death of Mrs. Frank Simmons. She was the
youngest daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Bishop, was well
known and highly respected, and her death, sudden as it
was, leaves a kind husband and four children to mourn
the loss of a faithful wife and mother. Mrs. Simmons was
born in Vermont, came west with her parents, was
married to her husband and has lived here since. She was
buried Saturday in the cemetery a mile east of town.
Smith, Florence A.
The Sentinel, January 13, 1882
Departed this life, Dec. 9th, 1882, Florence Adela, daughter
of Enoch and Jane Smith, near Grover, Ottawa County,
Kansas, of quick consumption, aged 18 years, 10 months
and 14 days. She was born in Lake County, Ill., and with
her parents moved to the place where they now live about
three years ago. The funeral was held on the 11th, at the
Hall school house, conducted by Rev. Mr. Ayers and Mr.
N.J. Hawley, and was attended by a large concourse of
sympathizing friends. The music was led by singers of the
old Union Sabbath School of Grover, of which the
deceased, with her father, mother, 5 sisters and 3 brothers
were members (the oldest sister now living in Illinois).
Adela was always cheerful and happy, and trying to
make others so; kind and obedient to her parents,
93 Sentinel, 1882
affectionate and loving to her brothers and sisters, and
always ready and glad to give a kind word or helping
hand to her associates. She bore affliction with great
patience and Christian fortitude, being conscious almost
to the last, bidding father, mother, brothers and sisters
goodby, and then signifying she was ready to go up
higher, where there will be no more parting, no more
pain; where all the loved ones will clasp the clasping
hands and bright angels will lead her on in the bright
hereafter.
The family of the deceased have the sympathy of a
large number of friends in their affliction, and may this
affliction cause one and all to say with these words:
Nearer the crystal river's tide,
Nearer the tree on either side,
Nearer the holy angel throng,
Nearer to sing the glad new song.
Nearer the great millennial joy,
Nearer the life without alloy,
Nearer, still nearer, my God to thee,
Nearer to all eternity.
In another column:
Florence Della, daughter of Enoch and Jane Smith, living
one mile north of Grover, died about six o'clock on last
Monday evening, January 9, 1882. This is a sad stroke to
the fond parents, who have the deepest sympathy of
many friends and acquaintances. The deceased was in the
prime of life, being in her 20th year. Less than two years
ago she was in apparent robust health, but has been ailing
for several months. About two hours before her death she
called her parents and the little ones to her, bid them an
affectionate farewell, expressing the belief that she would
no live through the night. The funeral was held at the Hall
school house on Wednesday, further particulars of which
may be found elsewhere.
Smith, George
The Sentinel, May 12, 1882
We learn that a sad, though not unusual accident
occurred in Mitchell County, about 30 miles northwest
from here, on the farm of Martin Smith, May 3d. His son
George, aged 14, lost his life by the accidental discharge
of a revolver, in the hands of his brother James, aged 18.
Of course the thing was not loaded, but it went off "all
the same," shooting George through the head, from
which he died in 15 minutes. Both were examining the
revolver at the time in went off. It is said that James has
been raving with grief since the accident, and that fears
are entertained that he will lose his reason.
St. Clair, child
The Sentinel, April 21, 1882
Mrs. Jack Davis received the sad news from Decatur
County last week that her youngest brother, a child of 9
years, had just died with the croup. Mr. St. Clair's family
moved there from here a short time ago.
Stansil, Maggie Bell
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
DIED, near Hepler, Kansas, Wednesday, October 25th,
1882. Maggie Bell, daughter of J.F. and C.M. Stansil, aged
two years and eleven months.
Dear Maggie's gone to Jesus' arms-
From sin and sorrow freed;
With him she rests from earth's dread harms-
She's happy, but we're sad indeed.
Stockel, C.H.
The Sentinel, March 24, 1882
BENNINGTON ITEMS
On Wednesday morning Mr. C.H. Stockel was found
dead on the floor of his house. In another place in this
column is noticed the sale of Mr. Stockel of his farm to
Mr. Gegeler. For some few weeks Mr. Stockel has been
ailing, but as he refused to have a doctor called his
neighbors did not consider his illness as severe as it was.
Mr. Gegeler attended to him during the day, but no
person stayed with him at night. Mr. Emanuel Binns
visited him daily and tried to induce him to call medical
aid, and in many ways tried to relieve him. On
Wednesday morning, on Mr. Gegeler going to Mr.
Stockel's he found him lying on the floor dead.
Apparently he had been up and was unable to get back
to bed. When found he was in a sitting position. Mr.
Stockel was an old settler and a bachelor, and lived quite
alone for many years. He was an honest man and good
94 Sentinel, 1882
neighbor, and is regretted by all who knew him. His
funeral took place Thursday at 10 o'clock, at this place.
Thompson, F.C. "Eck"
The Sentinel, May 19, 1882
A telegram received here on last Saturday morning that
F.C. Thompson, who went from here to Colorado two
years ago, died (of typhoid pneumonia) at Santa Fe,
N.M., on Friday, the 11th. At the time of the receipt of
the telegram, Mr. W.D. Thompson was in attendance
upon U.S. District Court at Topeka, to whom the sad
intelligence was forwarded, and on Monday he started to
the place where his brother died. The deceased, who was
familiarly known as "Eck Thompson," had many warm
friends here, whose regrets are mingled with sympathy
in behalf of the relatives.
May 26, 1882
W.D. Thompson, Esq., returned on Wednesday morning.
He informs us that he spent two days at Santa Fe, where
he went on account of the death of his brother, mentioned
last week. Mr. F.C. Thompson was taken sick on the 26th
ult., and died on the 12th inst., and was buried on the
13th, it being impossible to longer delay interment. He
received every care and attention at the hands of the Odd
Fellows, of which he was Noble Grand, as will be seen
by resolution which we copy from the SANTA FE NEW
MEXICAN. At the time of his death, Mr. Thompson was
engaged with the Santa Fe Progress and Improvement
Company, of which he held stock. W.D., Esq., has taken
out letters of administration of the estate.
Thompson, Gertrude
The Sentinel, August 25, 1882
Little Gertie (Gertrude), one of the twins of Hon. R.F.
Thompson, died last Sunday, August 20, 1992, about 10
o'clock a.m. at the age of about one year. The funeral
was held the following day at about the same hour, at the
residence.
Tolley, infant
The Sentinel, September 1, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tolley died
Wednesday morning of cholera infantum.
Tolley, Louisa
The Sentinel, December 8, 1882
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
We neglected to mention in last week's items the death
of little Louisa, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Tolley, aged about 11 years.
Tomlinson, William
The Sentinel, August 25, 1882
DIED. - In this city, August 15, after a long and painful
illness, William Tomlinson, aged 40 years.
The deceased was born in Yorkshire, England, and
was for a number of years a soldier in the British Navy.
During the late war of the Rebellion in the United States
he enlisted in the Ninth Regiment New York Cavalry and
served with them in many battles until they were cut up.
He then served in other regiments, until captured and
held in Libby Prison, 7 months. He was married
November 22, 1865 to Miss Alice B. Herbage, at
Rockford, Illinois. For a time they resided in Chicago;
then for a number of years in Michigan, and later in
Iowa, and for some time past in Kansas. He received
severe wounds in battle, from which he finally diedcausing
paralysis. During his long illness his wife
largely supported the family, but recently the county had
provided a nurse and necessary provisions, and meets
the expense of burial. Mr. Tomlinson leaves a wife and 4
small children. He was undoubtedly entitled to a
pension, but was never able so to present his case as to
secure it, and but for the labors of his faithful wife and
help from friends and the family would have suffered
want. At the last he professed faith in Christ, but his
mind was so impaired by disease that he seemed hardly
to realize his condition.
Vantine, Mr.
The Sentinel, November 10, 1882
We learn that since Mr. Chas. Vantine of this county
went to Duchess County, N.Y., his aged father died very
95 Sentinel, 1882
suddenly, in which loss he has the sympathy of many
friends here.
Walters, Mrs.
The Sentinel, October 27, 1882
Mr. S.K. Walters started on Wednesday evening for
Detroit, Mich., whither he was summoned by telegram,
on account of the death of his mother.
Witt, Mrs. J.W.
The Sentinel, January 20, 1882
FOUNTAIN ITEMS
We are called upon to record the departure to the
unknown world of Mrs. J.W. Witt, who was dearly
beloved by all who knew her. She leaves a husband and
one child to mourn her loss. She was followed to her last
resting place by a large concourse of mourning relatives
and friends. Mrs. Witt with her husband came to this
place about four years ago, and in her short sojourn here
has made many lasting friends who tender to the
bereaved family their heartfelt sympathies.
Young, Joanna
The Sentinel, March 31, 1882
At this writing we learn that Mrs. R.J. Young's condition
is very critical. Later - Just going to press, the sad
intelligence is received that she died on Friday morning.
The funeral will be held at the M.E. Church this
(Saturday) morning, at 10 o'clock, conducted by Rev.
F.D. Baker. Mrs. Young was 57 years of age. More
extended notice will appear next week.
April 7, 1882
As was briefly announced in these columns last week,
the funeral of the late Mrs. Young, wife of Maj. R.J.
Young, was held at the M.E. Church on Saturday last,
Rev. F.D. Baker officiating. The services were taken part
in by the Equitable Aid Union, of which order the
deceased, and also her husband, were members. Mrs.
Joanna Young was born in County Cork, Ireland, May
21, 1825, and died at her home in this city March 31,
1882, aged 56 years, 10 months and 9 days, having
removed to this country in 1840. A number of years
after, while on a visit to her native country, she met and
married Mr. Young, and soon after returned to the United
States. About four years ago they came to Minneapolis,
from Hiawatha, this state. Of the near friends here the
deceased leaves besides her husband a daughter, wife of
Mr. Jas. Joslin, who have the sympathy, in the loss of a
noble wife and mother, beloved by all who knew her. At
the time of her death she was a faithful member of the
Disciple Church, formerly of the United Presbyterian.
The remains were interred in Highland Cemetery.
96 Sentinel, 1882
Ackerson, Joseph
The Sentinel, March 16, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINTY
Joseph Ackerson, living west of town, died last week,
after a few weeks sickness of typhoid fever. The remains
were interred in the Delphos Cemetery.
Allen, Mr.
The Sentinel, January 12, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
S.D. Allen received the news the other day of the death
of his father in New York state in his 78th year.
Anderson, Mrs.
Minneapolis Sentinel, September 24, 1883
Newton Baldwin of Ada informs us that Mrs. Anderson,
L.A. Wood's mother-in-law, died last Tuesday at the
advanced age of 80 years. She was taken dangerously
sick about a week ago.
Baker, Peter J.
The Sentinel, June 15, 1883
DIED, June 7th, 1883, at the house of his son, Franklin
Baker, in Garfield township, Ottawa Co., Kan., Peter J.
Baker, aged 62 years, 6 months and 18 days, of
erysipelas of the face and throat. On account of the
absence of his wife, in Ohio, no funeral services were
held at present.
June 29, 1883
SYLVAN GROVE
DIED, June 7th, Mr. Peter J. Baker, of erysipelas at the
home of his son Frank of this place, his remains were
taken to Minneapolis for burial.
Baufman, George
The Sentinel, March 9, 1883
DIED, at his home south of town, Friday night, February
2d, of consumption, George Baufman, age 26 years.
Funeral services were held in the M.E. Church, Saturday
afternoon, conducted by Rev. W.B. Hollen.
Bigby, Daniel
The Sentinel, February 2, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - Saturday night at 10 o'clock, of dropsy, Daniel
Bigby, father of Leroy and John Bigby. Burial Sunday
afternoon at 2 o'clock.
Bissell, Angie Eva
The Sentinel, March 9, 1883
DIED, February 25th, of pneumonia, Angie Eva, only
child of James and Nellie Bissell, aged 20 months. The
bereaved parents have the heartfelt sympathy of
neighbors and friends.
IN MEMORY OF BABY BISSELL
We knelt beside our baby's bed
Just at the close of day,
97
1883 (to September 20)
Sentinel/Minneapolis Sentinel
EDITOR: CHAS. HOYT
D.M. DUNN TOOK OVER ON JULY 20: RENAMED MINNEAPOLIS SENTINEL BEGINNING AUGUST 3
The Sentinel and Index merged to become the Minneapolis Messenger starting September 27, 1883
And saw the sunshine of her life
Forever pass away.
Just as the last glow of the day
Flamed up the Western sky,
And the Auroral light,
And baby passed into the land
Where there is no more night.
Her blue eyes closed in death's long sleep,
God bore her soul away,
And at the close of day it passed,
Into a perfect day.
Blades, Harry Clark
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
PASSED AWAY
Harry Clark Blades, aged 5 years, died of pneumonia, April
3d. He was the third son of Harrison and Thirza Blades. He
was a lovely child, endeared to all who knew him.
A blossom lost from out of the skies
Is seen no more by mortal eyes,
But blooms again in Paradise.
Blair, Judson R.
The Sentinel, June 15, 1883
DIED, Sunday, June 10, 1883, Judson R., infant son of
Henry J. and Malinda J. Blair, aged 10 months. Funeral
services were held on the following day, at the residence,
6½ miles south, conducted by Rev. N.S. Dickey. The
remains were interred in Highland Cemetery in this city.
Bush, Rhoda
The Sentinel, February 9, 1883
DIED, of consumption, at his home north of town, Rhoda
Bush, aged 2 years. Funeral services held in the M.E.
Church Thursday afternoon, Rev. Hollen officiating.
February 16
The types made us say that Rhoda Bush was 2 years of
age. It should have said 28 years.
Chevrie, Frank
Minneapolis Sentinel, September 7, 1883
DIED. - August 30th, of inflammation of the bowels, Mr.
Frank Chevrie, aged 44 years. He leaves a wife and four
children. The Masons took charge of the funeral
services, which were held in the M.E. Church Friday
morning. The bereaved family have the sympathy of this
entire community.
Cool, Joseph
The Sentinel, February 2, 1883
DIED - At his home near Cool, Kan., Monday afternoon,
January 29, Hon. Joseph Cool, aged about 68 years. Mr.
Cool was an old and highly respected citizen, well
known to this entire community. He leaves a wife and
quite a large family of children to mourn his loss. The
funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mrs. Gillett, of
the Universalist Church, at Bethel Church Wednesday
afternoon at 2 o'clock. The remains were interred in
Bethel Cemetery with the honors of the I.O.O.F., of
which he was a worthy member.
Cornue, infant daughter
The Sentinel, January 19, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
In infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Cornue was buried
Monday evening.
January 26, 1883
Mr. and Mrs. George Cornue lost their first born, a
daughter, on the 15th inst., it having lived only a few
days. It was the grandchild, and not the child, of Mr. Dan
Cornue, as erroneously reported in THE CARRIER.
Courtney, Mrs.
The Sentinel, February 16, 1883
Mrs. Courtney, living near Bethel, died Sunday morning
of asthma. Mrs. Courtney has lived in this vicinity for a
great many years, and has a wide circle of friends who
will be sorrowed to hear of her death. She is the mother
of Mrs. John Bassnett, F.A., S.S., Joe and Sumnerville
Courtney. Her remains were interred in Bethel Cemetery.
98 Sentinel, 1883
Cummins, Sarah
The Sentinel, April 27, 1883
Mrs. Sarah Cummins, wife of J.P. Cummins, Esq, died
on Sunday morning, April 22d, 1883, near Richland, Ind.
It will be remembered that a few weeks ago Mrs.
Cummins, accompanied by her husband, left this place
for Indiana, in the hope of regaining her health. After the
return of Mr. C. word was received to hold himself in
readiness, as she was liable to pass away at any time.
On Saturday evening last a summons by telegraph was
received, but not until a few moments after the train had
departed, and there being but one train a day on this line,
Mr. Cummins started for Solomon Sunday morning, to
get the next main-line train. Arriving Tuesday he
telegraphed that she died Sunday morning. At this
writing, Friday, no further word has been received, and
it is supposed that the remains were interred at the place
of her death, her early home.
Sarah Lutes was born Jan. 19, 1846, and was therefore
37 years of age. She has been a member of the Methodist
Church since her childhood. She was married to J.P.
Cummins in 1862. They removed to Iowa about 1867,
and came to Kansas in 1875. The deceased leaves
besides her husband, seven children, the youngest a
babe. To say that she was a kind and devoted wife and
mother would not be a matter of form. She was a faithful
and devoted Christian, beloved by all who knew her. The
broken family have the sympathy of the entire
community in their sad bereavement.
Donigan, Joseph
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 10, 1883
DELPHOS ITEMS
Sad was the scene of the bereft father and mother, Mr.
and Mrs. T.F. Donigan, returning home Monday with the
lifeless form of their beloved little one, Joseph, who died
last Thursday in Ottawa, Ill., where the parents were
visiting a few days on their return from Philadelphia.
The body was interred in the Catholic Cemetery. May
the mourning household and friends find solace in the
promises of the All Wise.
Donnecker, James
The Sentinel, July 6, 1883
FATAL SHOOTING AT GLASCO
On last Saturday night, June 30, a man by the name of
James Donnecker was shot and killed by James Haddock
under the following circumstances: About 11:00
Donnecker, who was quite a strong man, and somewhat
under the influence of liquor at the time, went into the
store where young Haddock was clerking, accompanied
by three young men. Donnecker said he wanted a hat, and
Haddock, who was putting on a shirt, said he would wait
upon him as soon as he got his shirt on, but the man was
very impatient, and evidently wanted a fuss. Haddock
said nothing but that he would wait upon him as soon as
he could, but Donnecker seemed determined to take it as
an insult, and in answer to his repeated questions,
Haddock told him he could take it as he wished,
whereupon Donnecker struck him, hitting him on the
shoulder and staggered him toward the bed, where laid
his revolver, where it had been placed in readiness for the
night. Haddock got hold of the weapon, and by this time
had received the third blow. About this time the other
young men took a part, and were trying to straighten
matters out, when the revolver, which is a self-cocker,
accidentally discharged, the ball entering Donnecker
about the hip, ranging downward. He stepped backward
a few feet, fell and expired in about 40 minutes. He did
not say anything about blaming Haddock. The
examination was held Tuesday, and the evidence elicited
the above facts, which we have take pains to ascertain.
Mr. R.F. Thompson, of this city, was employed on the
defense. Rumors of somewhat different import have been
afloat. Haddock is a young man of good reputation, and
not only did the court, but the community exonerate him
from blame. The deceased came from Iowa about 11
months ago, and would probably have had no trouble, but
for the influence of liquor.
Gage, Ambrose
The Sentinel, July 6, 1883
DIED, at the residence of Henry Payne, 12 miles east of
town, June 30, Ambrose Gage, aged 46. Mr. Gage came
to Kansas last spring to try this climate for his health,
and was so pleased with the country and his improving
health, he purchased a half-section of land and was
improving it at the time of his decease, preparatory to
99 Sentinel, 1883
moving his family from Iowa soon. In his death Ottawa
County loses a good and energetic citizen, who had
many friends during his short stay among us. His wife
and son were sent for during his illness. The sympathy
of the community is extended to his family. The remains
were interred in Highland Cemetery.
Gibson, infant
The Sentinel, April 27, 1883
A small child of Mr. Gibson's, of Pipe Creek, was buried
last week.
Goss, John Sr.
The Sentinel, January 12, 1883
SALT CREEK ITEMS
John Goss, Sen., for several years a resident of Henry
township, died recently at St. Genievie, Mo., where he
went with his sons. The deceased was over 80 years old.
He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Eliza Tipton, in this county.
Hall, Mary
The Sentinel, January 5, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mrs. Mary Hall, aged mother of Mrs. C. McDonough
and James Dinwiddie, died at the Pacific House Tuesday
night. Funeral services Thursday afternoon at the M.E.
Church conducted by Rev. W.B. Hollen.
Harmon, S.
The Sentinel, March 30, 1883
ACKLEY ITEMS
Mrs. P. Leech has received the sad news of the sudden
death of her sister, Mrs. S. Harmon, of Clay County, Ind.
There is considerable sickness there, which reminds Mrs.
L. that they had better live in Kansas awhile longer. They
have given up the idea of going to the Hoosier state.
Harris, child
The Sentinel, February 9, 1883
LINCOLN CENTER NOTES
The youngest child of Treasurer Harris died last week of
lung fever. The funeral services were conducted at the
residence by the Rev. H.C. Bradbury. The extremely
cold weather prevented a large audience.
Heald, Clare
The Sentinel, March 23, 1883
Clare, infant son of Frank A. and Mantie Heald, died
Thursday, 4 o'clock, March 22d, of brain fever, at the age
of 5 months. The funeral services were held at the
residence, 18 miles northeast, Friday, and the remains
interred in Highland Cemetery, in this city. In their sad
bereavement the parents and relatives have many
sympathizing friends.
Henry, Raul
The Sentinel, June 15, 1883
SALT CREEK ITEMS
The funeral services of little Rual Henry, on the 3d inst.,
was largely attended. Rev. F.D. Baker officiated. The
bereaved parents have the sympathies of the entire
community.
Hoskins, Thomas
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED - April 5, at his father's home east of town, after a
lingering illness, Thomas Hoskins, aged 27 years. He
leaves a wife, parents, brothers and sisters to mourn his
loss. This family have the sympathy of the entire
community in their time of bereavement. Mrs. H., who
was east, was telegraphed but did not arrive until after
his death. Funeral services were held at the M.E. Church
Sunday morning, Rev. Hollen officiating.
100 Sentinel, 1883
Hoyt, Mrs. C.
The Sentinel, June 8, 1883
BENNINGTON
Mr. S. Grant received a letter on last Tuesday morning,
informing him of the death of Mrs. C. Hoyt, at Kinsley,
Kansas. Mrs. H. accompanied them here from the east
and resided here with them for some time after their
arrival. She leaves one daughter, Elva, who is at present
with Mr. Grant. Mrs. Hoyt was well and favorably
known in this neighborhood and much regret is felt at
her early death, she being but twenty-two years of age.
Kibler, Rosie
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
DIED - March 29, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kibler,
aged 7 weeks and 2 days. It was buried in the Ackley
Cemetery. The parents of the little one have the heartfelt
sympathy of all. Their grief is the more unbearable, as it has
only been a short time since they buried an infant daughter.
And now little Rosie is gone
We mourn for one so dear.
With tearful eyes we look around,
But see no baby near.
Her little clothes are laid away,
Her empty cradle is set aside,
How can we bear to look at them
Since dear little Rosie died.
Her little form sleeps in the tomb
Beside its sister dear,
Where lovely flowers in spring will bloom,
For we will plant them there.
We know they're safe in Jesus' arms,
And beckoning us to come;
Oh may we live to meet them there,
Safe in that happy home.
Our two dear loving little ones
We cherished with delight;
The Savior took to bloom in full
In his own garden bright.
In heavenly radiance clothed,
Like Christ they will appear,
And when we enter Heaven's gate,
We know we'll meet them there.
April 20, 1883
ACKLEY ITEMS
DIED - March 29, Rosie, infant daughter of Martin and
Avorilla Kibler, aged seven weeks.
Kinsey, Catherine
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
SYLVAN GROVE
DIED; April 1st of spinal affection, aged 22 years, 8
months and 27 days, Catherine, wife of H.C. Kinsey.
The deceased leaves a husband and three children who
will sadly miss her, as an affectionate and faithful
mother. She united with the M.E. Church on this charge
about three years ago and lived an exemplary Christian
life until her death. The bereaved family have the
sympathy of all in their sad loss.
Knight, Elizabeth
The Sentinel, April 20, 1883
ACKLEY ITEMS
We recently learned of the death of Mrs. Elizabeth
Knight, who went to Oregon some three years ago for
the benefit of her health.
Kresky, G.M.
The Sentinel, June 15, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DEATH OF G.M. KRESKY UNDER PECULIAR AND
MYSTERIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES
One of the saddest occurrences that ever took place in
Delphos, is the death of G.M. Kresky, our agent, which
took place on Tuesday morning of this week, about 9
o'clock, under circumstances that seem at this writing
very mysterious. Mr. K. was in his usual health the day
before, save he complained slightly that he thought he
was going to have another attack of the erysipelas with
which he was so severely afflicted a few months ago.
During the night he complained of a severe pain in the
stomach and took a dose of morphine (which he usually
kept in the house, for relief). He grew worse and Dr. S.B.
Boyer was summoned, who by persistent effort and skill
caused him to rally. Mr. D. told Dr. B. and his family that
during the evening some one had given him a drink of
gin which made him feel sick immediately after drinking
it; and remarked that he believed the gin had poison in it
and thought the morphine would relieve him. He became
so much better that he was considered out of danger, he
went off into a doze from which he could not be rallied
to consciousness. Great excitement prevails and the
101 Sentinel, 1883
community is greatly shocked at this sad affair. Mr. Kresky
was a very accommodating, good business man, a good
agent and operator, attending strictly to business and was
well liked by our business men and community. His family
consisted of a wife and mother-in-law who had a pleasant
home, and lived happily. His position paid him a very nice
salary. His wife is almost crazed over the terrible tragedy,
requiring attendants watching over her continually. Mr. K.
was about 30 years of age, thus cut down in the midst of
life. His funeral took place Wednesday afternoon in the
M.E. Church, conducted by the Masonic Lodge, of which
he was a member and was buried in the Delphos Cemetery.
At this writing Coroner Bush with the physicians of town
and an impaneled jury are holding a post mortem
examination, the particulars of which cannot be given until
next week.
June 22, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
The excitement attending the tragic death of G.M. Kresky
last week, has about subsided. The testimony given before
the Coroner's inquest and post mortem examination, clearly
and very plainly showed and proved beyond a doubt that
the cause of his death was caused by taking too much
morphine to allay a severe pain, and the supposition
entertained by a few that he did it intentionally to end his
life, is entirely groundless, and, we trust, for the sake of his
family and for the sake of his memory, who valued life
dearly, that all such thought will be dismissed. It is a sad
thought to know on his thus being cut down in the midst of
life, when everything bid fair for a long and happy life, to
be cut off without any warning.
Leslie, J.Q.
The Sentinel, July 6, 1883
Mr. J.Q. Leslie, quite an old citizen of this county, who has
been in poor health for some time, died at his home near
Culver, last Sunday evening at 7 o'clock. He was a citizen
who will be missed, as he was highly esteemed by all who
knew him.
Marshbank, J.D.
The Sentinel, February 9, 1883
J.D. Marshbank died very suddenly of heart disease on
the afternoon of Jan. 31st. The masons took charge of the
funeral services, and he was buried in accordance with
the rites of that order. The services were held in the M.E.
Church, Friday, Feb. 2. The deceased leaves a wife and
four children to mourn the loss of a kind and loving
husband and father.
McLean, Thomas
The Sentinel, April 6, 1883
Thomas McLean died of pneumonia at his home near
Meredith, Monday.
Mercer, George Sr.
The Sentinel, May 4, 1883
We take the following from the Utica (N.Y.) DAILY
OBSERVER of March 16. The subject of the sketch was the
father of Mrs. B.F. King, of this county, a brief notice of
whose death appeared in this paper a few weeks ago.
The many friends of Mr. George Mercer, Sr., were pained
and surprised to learn of his death which occurred on
Sunday afternoon, at the age of 72 years, 6 months and
18 days. Mr. Mercer was born in Kent, England, August
21st, 1808. He came to America in 1840, at the age of 32
years. At first he settled in New Jersey but came to Oneda
County in 1867, where he has since resided. He had been
troubled with heart disease for some time but his sudden
death was not expected, as he and his friends had been
very hopeful of recovery. He dined with his family on
Sunday as usual, and very soon after was suddenly taken
worse and expired in a short time. Mr. Mercer leaves a
wife and six children to mourn their loss, some of whom
were too far away to be present at the funeral ceremonies.
Thomas, the eldest son, resides in Colorado; Walter in
Minneapolis, Kansas; George in Waterville, N.Y., and
William in Deansville. The daughters are Mrs. Benjamin
King, of Minneapolis, Kansas, and Mrs. R.R. Stebbins, of
Oriskeny Falls. M. M. having resided 18 years in this
vicinity, was well known as an industrious, honest and a
good citizen, esteemed and beloved as a friend and
neighbor, genial in his own home, and in every respect an
upright, moral and worthy man.
102 Sentinel, 1883
Merrifield, Jane
The Sentinel, March 16, 1883
Mrs. Jane Merrifield, wife of J.P. Merrifield, died at their
residence about five miles north of this place on
Wednesday night, March 14th. She had been in feeble
health for some time. The funeral was held on Friday,
and remains interred in Highland Cemetery, in this city.
Merryfield, James O.
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 3, 1883
James O. Merryfield died Wednesday morning at his
father's house, of consumption, age 27. many relatives
and friends mourn his loss.
Middleton, William
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 10, 1883
DIED. Middleton - At the residence of his eldest son R.
Middleton, near Ada, Ottawa Co., Kansas, July 26, 1883,
William Middleton, aged 79 years, 11 months and 26
days. He was the third son of the late Thos. Middleton of
the Chappel Lawn, Clunbary, Shropshire, England.
Deceased came with his family to this country in 1850,
and was one of the first settlers of Delaware Co., Iowa,
where he resided until four years ago, when he removed
to Kansas. He was loved and respected by all who knew
him, and he leaves a wife, three children and six grand
children to mourn his loss. The remains were followed to
the grave by a large concourse of sympathizing friends.
Father thou art sweetly sleeping
While around thy friends are weeping.
Sleep on, Father take thy rest;
'Tis hard to part, but God knows best,
Not lost to us, but only gone before
To wait our coming on the other shore.
Miller, Guy O.
The Sentinel, June 29, 1883
A SAD AND FATAL ACCIDENT
The news of a very sad and fatal accident reached this
city Thursday afternoon, which occurred about 5 miles
southeast, the particulars of which are as follows. Mr.
Guy O. Miller, who was occupying what is known as the
Bishop place, started out after dinner with team and
header box on the wagon, and as he attempted to mount
an elevated seat in front, the horses started; Mr. Miller
lost his footing and fell upon the whiffletrees, his head
was held between the box and wheel, the spokes playing
upon the back of his head (as near as is known) crushing
his skull. He was taken into the house, and breathed but
a few times afterward. In the meantime, his brother-inlaw,
young Mr. Startzman, came to town, not waiting to
positively learn the result, and Drs. Clark and Miller
repaired to the scene, finding the situation as above
stated. The team ran but a short distance after the
accident, and its fatal result seemed to be only from the
exceedingly unfortunate position of its victim.
The deceased was a son-in-law of Mr. Henry
Startzman, who lives in the vicinity. He was a young
man, and well thought of in the community, and the
news of the sad occurrence cast a gloom over our
citizens, being quite well known in this place, though
having lived here (from Iowa) but a few years. He leaves
a wife and young child.
Moore, John D.
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
John D. Moore, whose death was briefly announced in
the columns last week, was born in Jackson County,
Ohio, April 29th, 1844. He enlisted as private in the 53d
O.V.I. in 1861; was promoted to first Lieut., and
Adjutant of the Regiment, and afterwards to Capt. And
A.A.A. Gen'l., on staff of Gen. Wells S. Jone,
commanding Brigade 2d Div. 15th Army Corps, and
served in that position until the close of the war. He
came to Kansas, at Ottawa, Franklin County, in 1869,
where he married his wife, Miss Annie M. Kinnear, in
1871. They came to Minneapolis, March, 1879, and
soon after Mr. Moore was employed in the mercantile
house of A. Bloch. In 1881 he was elected Sheriff of this
county, but resigned soon after, on account of poor
health, and was employed again by Mr. Bloch, which
position he held until his last sickness.
Some months ago Mrs. Moore went to Michigan for
her health, and was absent when Mr. Moore was taken
sick. His case becoming serious, he too went to
Michigan for relief, but was there told that nothing could
be done for him, and husband and wife returned to
Minneapolis; and after a few weeks of kind care and
103 Sentinel, 1883
watchfulness, he passed away on the morning of April
2d, 1883, of dropsy.
The deceased will be materially missed from business
and social circles, being highly esteemed by everyone
for his integrity and genial qualities. In her bereavement
the widow has the sincere sympathy of the entire
community.
May 4, 1883
CAPT. JOHN D. MOORE
THE FOLLOWING EXTRACT IS TAKEN FROM THE
CINCINNATTI ENQUIRER OF APRIL 22D:
TO THE EDITOR OF THE ENQUIRER:
The announcement of the death of Captain John D.
Moore, late of the Fifty-third Ohio Volunteers, at
Minneapolis, Kansas, on the 2d of April last, will be read
with sorrow by many patrons of THE ENQUIRER.
When but seventeen years old, Moore enlisted as a
private soldier in Company E of the Fifty-third Ohio
Regiment. His quick apprehension, promptness in
obeying orders, knowledge of his duties and faithfulness
in performing them soon drew the attention of his
superiors, and he was detailed as a clerk at regimental
headquarters. In February, 1863, he was appointed
Sargent-Major to fill the first vacancy which occurred.
After the fall of Vicksburg, General Sherman was
authorized by the Secretary of War, through General
Grant, to select six young men from the Fifteenth Army
Corps as cadets at West Point from the state of
Mississippi. Sargent-Major Moore, after a rigid
examination of many candidates, conducted by General
Sherman in person, was selected as one of the six. The
Secretary of War finally ratified but three, those from the
First, Second and Third Divisions of the corps, leaving
out Moore, who represented the Fourth Division. When
General Sherman heard of it he sent for Moore, and
explained the matter to him, gave him a furlough and
wrote a letter to the Governor of Ohio urging him in the
strongest terms to appoint Moore to one of the vacant
Lieutenancies in the Fifty-third Ohio Regiment. But that
regiment had seen hard service; its numbers were below
the minimum. The Governor refused the commission
asked for, but offered him a Lieutenancy in a new
regiment. This Moore refused to accept, preferring
stripes under the flag he had followed so long to straps
under another. His well earned and long merited
promotion did not come until Atlanta had fallen, when
he was made First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the
regiment. In January, 1865, he was promoted to Captain,
and for a time acted as Adjutant-General on the staff of
General Wells S. Jones.
Who that ever knew Johnny Moore in the army will ever
forget him? He was never tired or out of humor. He had no
equal as a forager. He obeyed orders with a literal exactness
that often confounded those who gave them. He was always
ready for any duty. He never shrank from danger.
John was one of five brothers who served in the
Union Army. All enlisted as private soldiers. Four were
commissioned for good conduct at the front. The
remaining one was but eighteen when mustered out at
the close of the war.
A short time after the war Captain Moore removed to
Kansas, where he engaged in merchandising with varied
success. In 1871, he married Miss Annie M. Kinner, of
Ottawa. In 1881 he was elected Sheriff of the county in
which he lived, but his failing health compelled him to
resign.
Moss, Louisa
The Sentinel, April 13, 1883
DIED - At her home east of town, Sunday morning, April
8th, of heart disease, Mrs. M.B. Moss. Mrs. L. had been
sick for several seeks, but was supposed to be much
better, and hopes were entertained of her recovery, when
she was taken suddenly worse and died. A husband and
five children are left to sorrow for a kind and dutiful wife
and loving mother. The funeral services were held at the
house on Monday afternoon, conducted by Elder G.S.
Smith, of the Christian Church, of which she was a
member. The remains were followed to the cemetery by
a large company of friends, who do heartily sympathize
with this sorrowing family in their great affliction.
Oleson, Mr.
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 24, 1883
DELPHOS ITEMS
Considerable amazement and wonder over the suicide
committed Monday night by Mr. Oleson, a young man
living between here and Glasco. No particulars save that
the deed was done by hanging.
104 Sentinel, 1883
Overacker, Asa
Minneapolis Sentinel, September 7, 1883
DELPHOS ITEMS
Asa Overacker died of consumption at his home, west of
town, Sunday, at 2 o'clock, aged 66 years. Funeral services
were held at the Universalist Church, Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. Daniel Yockey came up from Topeka, Tuesday, to
attend the funeral of her father, Mr. Overacker.
Peet, Emma J.
The Sentinel, January 5, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
We have to record this week the sudden death of Mrs.
Peter Peet, which occurred Friday, the 22nd (Dec 1882).
She leaves a husband and one child (a little girl about 14
years old) to mourn the loss of a loving companion and
kind, good mother.
Proe, infant
The Sentinel, April 6, 1883
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Proe died last week
of lung fever. The remains were taken to Carson's Grove
for interment.
Richter, Amilia
The Sentinel, May 11, 1883
Ferdinand Richter, and wife, and August Glaeser and
wife, desire to return their sincere thanks to the people
and the school of Bennington for their kindness toward
them in their time of affliction, by the loss of their child
and grandchild, Amilia Richter, on the 10th inst.
Robbins, child
The Sentinel, May 4, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
A small child of Henry Robbins was buried Monday.
Scott, Fannie
The Sentinel, January 19, 1883
DIED - At her residence north of town, of heart disease,
on Friday night, Fannie, wife of Wilber C. Scott. Mrs.
Scott's sudden death was a shock to this entire
community. She leaves a husband and three children to
mourn her loss. The family have our sympathy in their
sore bereavement.
Smith, Mary Ann
The Sentinel, May 4, 1883
DIED, at Grover, Kan., April 29th, Mary Ann, wife of
Patrick Smith, aged 52 years. The deceased had been in
feeble health for several years, and was confined to her
bed about four weeks and finally passed away at 2
o'clock on Sunday morning last, of consumption. The
family desire to return thanks to kind neighbors for
attention in their trying hour.
Spence, child
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 10, 1883
A child of J.H. Spence, age 6 months was buried in our
city cemetery last Monday.
Stone, Aaron
The Sentinel, February 9, 1883
The funeral services of Mr. Aaron Stone were held in the
M.E. Church last Thursday, Rev. J. Pittinger assisted by
Rev. W.C. Scott officiating. The deceased was over 65
years of age, and was a resident of this state for about
four years. He leaves a widow and several children. He
was very much respected by all who knew him, as his
character was estimable, and his loss will be felt in the
community in which he lived.
Teed, Gracie
The Sentinel, January 26, 1883
DIED - Monday morning, of pneumonia, Grace Teed, aged
9 months, youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Teed. Gracie was
a bright child, a perfect sunbeam in the home circle. The
105 Sentinel, 1883
sorrowing family have the sympathy of this community.
The funeral services were held in the M.E. Church
Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. W.B. Hollen.
Teed, Hezekiah
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 3, 1883
Hezekiah Teed, the man who shot himself in the back of
the head with a revolver last Saturday, died Saturday
night. He lived alone west of Delphos, was a farmer, a
widower, 62 years of age, owned his farm, had $170 in
money. Said he was lonely and no one cared for him,
wished he was dead, bought a pistol, made his will, and
ended his trouble. Coroner Bush held an inquest; verdict
of jury, that the deceased came to his death as the result
of a pistol shot inflicted by himself intentionally.
Tolley, Harry
The Sentinel, February 16, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Harry Tolley, oldest son of Joseph Tolly, died of the
fever at his home on Monday night. Burial services
Tuesday afternoon. This is the third child that has died
out of his family since their arrival here.
Tolley, Jimmie
The Sentinel, March 30, 1883
DIED - Friday morning, March 23, of typhoid fever, Jimmie
Tolley, aged 14 years. Burial services Saturday afternoon.
Tolley, Mrs. Joseph
The Sentinel, March 16, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
DIED, Monday evening, March 12th, of typhoid fever,
Mrs. Joseph Tolley, aged 48 years. She leaves a husband
and six children to mourn her loss. Funeral services were
held in the M.E. Church, Tuesday afternoon. This family
has been sorely afflicted since coming to America. Three
children and a mother taken away within a few short
months. Two more of the family are sick in bed with the
same fever.
Wilson, John
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 24, 1883
Mr. John Wilson, near Cool, Kan., passed from this life
of woe very suddenly last Thursday, at 5 o'clock in the
afternoon. At four he was at the village store as hale as
one of his age could be. He walked home a distance of
near a mile, and shortly after reaching the house expired.
His exact age we know not.
Wood, child
Minneapolis Sentinel, August 10, 1883
The little ten year old son of Mr. L.A. Wood living near
Ada, was killed in a very shocking manner last
Wednesday a week ago. It seems the boy was herding
cattle, was off his pony and had tied the halter rope
around his wrist. From a cause unknown, the pony
became frightened dragging the boy by the wrist the
whole distance of a 40 acre corn field, across a section
of land to his home where the frightened beast and boy
were seen by the mother. The rope was just long enough
to permit the boy to remain out of the reach of the pony's
heels but the rapid motion of the pony would cause the
boy to be thrown in the air every few rods. The scalp was
torn from the skull, the wrist broken and many bruises,
It was a sorrowful sight. The family have the sympathy
of all.
Yockey, Mrs. Daniel
The Sentinel, January 12, 1883
DELPHOS AND VICINITY
Mrs. Daniel Yockey, formerly of Delphos, died at her
home in Franklin County a short time ago. Her husband
died a few weeks before.
106 Sentinel, 1883
107 Sentinel, 1883
108
Index of names
*Indicates death notice/obit
109 Sentinel Obits, 1875-1883
NO LAST NAME
child 41*
Ackerson
Joseph 97*
Acley
child 27*
Adams
Blanch May 27*
child 1*
Geo. H. 1
John W. 81*
Joseph 27
Lucy 27
Adee
Arthur 41*
Eva 41
Richard 41
Ager
Anna 61
Ira 61*
William 61
Alcorn
Wm. 61*
Allen (Allan)
David E. 41
infant 1*
Mike 1*
Mr. 41*, 97*
Mrs. 1, 5*
S.D. 97
Anderson
Mrs. 97*
Andress
Rev. 38
Archer
Jennie 75*
Arseno
Mr./Mrs. 19*
Asbell
child 27*
S. 27
Ash
Mr. 27*
Austin
George R. 27*
William R. 27
Ayers
Rev. 88, 93
Babcock
T.E. 65
Bagnall
W.W. (Mrs.) 81
Bake
Ella 81*
Baker
Alice 41
F. 41
F.D. (Rev.) 62, 65, 66,
68, 69, 70, 78, 85, 100
Franklin 97
J.M. 41*
Lewis 27
Lora J. 27*
Maria 27
Peter J. 97*
Roy 41-42*
Baird
D.D. 33
Baldwin
H.G. 28
Newton 97
Wm. 28
Ball
H.O. (Mr./Mrs) 53
Barker
Frank 42*
Wm. 42
Barnes
Archibald 42
H.S. 46
James 42*
Barnum
child 9*
E. (Mr./Mrs.) 65
Ebb. 9
infant 81*
John (Mr./Mrs.) 81
Barron
Geo. T. 42*
Bassnett
Cal 42
George 42*
John (Mrs.) 98
Bates
Chas. 46
Geo. P. 21, 46
Mrs. 64
Ney 46
R. 46
Baufman
George 97*
Beckley
infant 27*
John 27
Beer
John 81*
Belanger
child 81-82*
Ignac 81
Bell
Mary 61*
William 61
Bellis
Mary 43*
Bennett
Cal (Mr./Mrs.) 82
child 28*
David 9
Henry 9*
infant son 82*
J.C. 28
Berg
child 42*
Wm. 42
Bergeron
Dr. 81, 82
Bigby
Daniel 97*
John 97
Leroy 97
Biles
P.K. 11
Billingsley
B.F. 82
Mr. 82*
Binns
Emanuel 194
Bisbee
infant 61*
Roy (Mr./Mrs.) 61
Bishop (103)
Arthur (Mrs.) 68
Delly 82*
Joy Jr. (Mrs.) 15, 54
Joy (Rev.) 8, 9, 24, 49,
54, 73, 78, 83, 93
Judson S. 61-62*
Spencer (Mrs.) 9*
Wm. 61
Bissell
Angie Eva 97-98*
James 109
Nellie 109
Blackburn
Nellie 82
Mr. 82*
Blackmer
Norton 43*
Blades
Harrison 98
Harry Clark 98*
H. (Mrs.) 62
Thirza 98
Blair
Henry J. 98
Judson R. 98*
Malinda J. 98
Blanchard
Joy N. (Mrs.) 62*
Bledsoe
children 28*
Bloch
A. 103
Boss
George 43*
Samuel Z. 43, 82*
Bosanko
Wm. 64
Bosanks
William 42*
Botsford
Chas. L. 19
C.L. (Mrs.) 74
Lucius W. 19*
Nettie L. 19
Boughman
Joseph 28*
Boyd
Carrie M. 82-83*
W.H. 82
Boyer
S.B. (Dr.) 101
Bracken
N. (Rev.) 1, 2, 3, 7, 9,
10, 15, 20, 26, 41, 72
Bradbury
H.C. (Rev.) 100
Bradley
J.D. (Rev.) 67
Branch
Chas. 28
E.W. 6
Mrs. 28*
Brewer
Sarah Ann 73*
Briarly
Dr. 91
Brosseau
infant 62*
Joseph 62
Rosa 62
Browne
J.B. 81
Brownlee
Elizabeth 19*
T.S. 19
Buck
Dena 28*
Buffington
child 9*
Samuel 9
Bumgarner
Mrs. A.J. 3, 7
Burnham
Nathan 83*
Burr
infant 19*
Frank 28*
Mr. 43*
N.L. 43
N.M. (Mrs.) 19
Bush
Coroner 102, 106
Rhoda 98*
Bushnell
H. Jr. (Rev.) 14, 17,
19, 20, 24, 25, 27, 28,
42, 44, 46, 51, 53, 56,
65, 66, 70, 71, 79
Butler
Abram 29
Calhoun
Dr. 51
J. 43
Mary Bellis 43*
Call
A.B. 28*
Campbell
D.D. (Rev.) 67, 77
Dr. 51
Mr. 30
Carpenter
child 44*
Mr. 62*
Mr. and Mrs. C.P. 44
Casebeer
Lewis 44*
Lizzie 44
Thomas 44
Carr
Geo. F. (Mrs.) 62
Mabel 62*
Carter
Jonathan 44*
Messrs. 44
T.W. 29
Chappel
Katie 9*
Wm. 9
Chapin
Alice 19-20*
Charley 9, 19
Nelly 9*, 19
N. 47
Nelson 9
Chase
Dr. 91
Ella 91
Cheever
Mrs. E.W.B. 50
Chevrie
Frank 98*
Clark
Amelia A. 44*
C.D. 7, 44
Dr. 73, 88, 103
E.E. 44
Lucius Bradfield 44*
Mrs. 83*
Mrs. James 5, 16
N.J. (Mrs.) 85
William D. 10*
Cleveland
George 62*
Jonathan 62
Cline
Mrs. George 44*
Clover
Harden 45*
Coffield
Elias 28
Willie 28*
Coffman
Lovell 5*
Coleman
E.L. 83*
Colton
Frank H. 20
Lydia A. 20*
Compton
A.D. 10
child 10**
Cone
Rev. Dr. 74
Converse
Mr./Mrs. 2
Cole
H.G. 21
Cool
Joseph 98*
Cooper
Rev. L.S. 36, 37, 49
Corlis(s)
Emma 20*
Lewis (Mrs.) 66
Washington 20
Cornue
Chas. 83
Dan 83, 98
George 98
infant girl 98*
Jacob 83
Sarah 83-84*
Steven 83
Cornwell
Mariah 5*
Correl
Mr. 29
Corson
Mrs. A.L. 31
Corter
B.F. 28
child 28*
Courter
Rev. John E. 30, 31,
37, 39, 41, 55
Courtney
Bell 51
child 45*
F.A. 25, 45, 98
Joe 98
Mrs. 98*
S.S. 98
Sumnerville 98
Cowan
Mr. 1
Cox
Hannah 62-63*
Crabble
Jake 84*
Crapsey
Mrs. 63*
Winnie 63
Crew
E.B. (Mrs.) 65
Cross
Walter P. (Mrs.) 84*
Crow
Joseph 84*
Cummins
J.P. 99
Sarah 99*
Cunningham
infant 10**
Mr. 20*
Wm. 10
Dale
Anna 20*
infant 63*
J.C. 20
S.K. (Mr./Mrs.) 63
Dalrymple
H.H. 45*
Thomas 45
Dane
Thomas 45*
Daniel
Mr. 32
Davis
C.B. 46
infant 45*
Jack (Mrs.) 94
James H. 63*
Jane 45*
John S. 63-64*
Jonas (Mrs.) 64-65*
J.W. 46
L.A. 56
Major 64
Milton 1*
N.W. 45
Rachael 65
Walter 45*, 56
W.
William D. 45-46*
W.L. 45, 59
W.T. 45
Dearborn
G.S. 22
Delano
Mr./Mrs. 58
DeLong
infant 65*
Jasper 65
John 65
Lucy 65*
Dempsey
infant 65*
J.D. (Mr./Mrs.) 65
Denning
B.V. 46
Mrs. B.V. 46*
Rev. 46, 47
Dickey
child 84*
N.S. (Rev.) 82, 85, 98
Dillon
Vinta 65*
W.E. (Mr./Mrs.) 65
Dinwiddie
A.J. 20, 42
child 20*
Cordie 10*
Granville 10
James 10, 100
Disney
infant 46*
Jacob 46
Jane 46
Olney 16
Dixon
Elizabeth 47
Dodge
H.S. (Mrs.) 10*
Donigan
Joseph 99*
T.F. (Mr./Mrs.) 99
Donnecker
James 99*
110 Sentinel Obits, 1875-1883
111 Sentinel, 1875-1883
Doty
Andrew 84
Cassie 84*
child 20*
infant 84*
Mr./Mrs. John, 20
Douglas
child 11*
D.L. 11
Drake
Abraham 66*
Dudley
A.G. (Mrs.) 83
Dunham
Hiram 66*
Dunn
D.M. (Dr. 85)
Dr. 10
James 85*
L.J. 85
Mrs. L.J. 51
Dupont
infant 11*
Eaker
George 85*
John 62
Eaton
T.C. (Rev.) 43, 70, 92
Ebbarts
Sarah 46*
Ebbert
Mrs. 46*
Ebersole
Dora 66*
Minnie 85*
S.O. 66, 85
Vivie 66
Eddy
Hethey J. 47
Edwards
Alice 85
Geo. W. 13
Joel 85
Leula 85-86*
Eicholtz
Anna L. 86*
D.B. (Mr./Mrs.) 86, 92
John 86
Mrs. 86*
Eisenhaner
Valentine 13
Elder
J.H. 73
Elgin
Arthur 46*
John 67
Lucy M. 66-67*
Mr./Mrs. J. 46
Elligan
German (Mrs.) 87*
Ellison
Mrs. T.B. 32
Emerson
Amos 87*
Mr. 67*
Fairchild
Dr. 84
Fairfield
Mrs. 65
Feather
Henry 21
James R. 47
John 34
John A. (Mr./Mrs.) 67
John Jr. 87*
Joseph 47*
Joshua (Rev.) 5, 47
Mary 34
Nancy Jane 67*
Ferguson
Eliza 87*
J.E. 87
John 67*
Fernald
L.A. 57
M.J. 57
Field
Mrs. 47*
Fisher
J.A. (Rev.) 61
Fletcher
children 87*
Foote (Foot)
child 20-22*
Johnnie 28-29*
Milton W. 20, 21, 22,
28
May 29*
Miss 20, 21
Mrs. 68*
Mrs. Milton 20-22*
Foster
Fred 76
Miss M. 29
Mrs.. 29*
Mrs. Geo. 11*
Fritz
infant 22*
Mrs. 22
Furgison
Mrs. 29*
Gable
Harry 30
Gage
Ambrose 99-100*
Gaines
B. (Mr./Mrs.) 68
infant 68*
Mrs. 87*
Gale
Mr. 38
Galpin
Mattie E. 87-88*
Wm. C. (Mr./Mrs.) 87
Garrett
Alexander 47
Hethey 47
Joseph E. 29*
Joseph W. 47
Mary J. 47*
Garver
Jacob 29-30*
Gegeler
Mr. 94
Geho
child 30*
Jacob 30
Gentry
Charley 47*
R.A. (Mr./Mrs.) 47
Winston Sr. 5*
Geren
F.M. 30
M.J. 30
Mrs. A.D. 22*
Robbie 30
Samuel J. 30*
Gibbs
Hannah 88
John 88*
Gibson
infant 100*
Gill
Leslie 88*
S.E. (Mr./Mrs.) 88, 89
Gillett
Rev. Mrs. 98
Gilmore
Samuel 47
Thomas 47
Gilson
Mrs. 47*
Glaeser
August 105
Glennie
George 5*
Gloss
Mr. 15
Goddard
Fred 68
William 68
William Sr. 68*
Gooch
Emma 68
Frederic 68
infant 68*
Goodwin
Mrs. H.B. 15
Goss
Eliza 100
John Sr. 100*
Gouldin
Alice 48*
H.R. 47, 48
H.R. (Rev.) 9, 13, 31
Sadie 47-48*
Goure
Mrs. 22*
Peter 22
Gower
James H. 30*
Granger
Hale 11*
J.C. 11
Grant
S. 101
Graves
Richard E. 48*
Gray
Mrs. Charles 22*
Green
S.A. (Rev.) 10, 17, 24
Greenwood
James 89*
Gregg
child 68*
Geo. W. (Mr./Mrs.) 68
Robert 11
Rosa 11*
Grey
Mrs. 64
Griffy
Brightwell 68*
J.W. 68
M.J. 68
Haddock
James 99
Halberstadt
(Halderstadt)
Jerome 48
Mr. 48*
Hale
Mrs. E. 1*
Haley
Abraham 68
child 1*
Emma 22*
Grandmother 2*
Hannah Maria 68-69*
Ines E. 30*
infant 69*
J. (Mr./Mrs.) 69
James 2*
John 22, 38
Lizzie 2*
Mary 68
Mr. 11*
Halford
Henry 30
Sarah 30*
Hall
child 48*
Freddie 22*
L. (Dr.) 48*
L.V. (Mrs.) 65, 86
Mary 100*
Mrs. 28
Pat 48
W.P. (Mr./Mrs.) 22
Halleck
L. 69*
Morris 69
Halley
child 48*
Thomas (Mr./Mrs.) 48
Hankinson
E. 11*
Elias 5, 6
Manning 5*
Rachel 5, 6*
Hapeny
A.C. 69
Mary Isabel 69*
Nancy 69
Hardesty
child 89*
John 89
Hare
child 6*
D.L. 15
Wm. 6
Harman
Albert 2
infant 2*
Mary 2
Harmon
S. 100*
Harris
child 100*
Harshbarger
Orpha 30-31*
William 31
Hartig
Mr. 2*
Harvey
Mrs. Wm. 11*
Hawkey
child 48*
Mr. & Mrs. Richard 48
Hawley
Miss 42
N.J. 93
Heald
Amos 49, 69
Betsey 69*
Charles S. 48-49*
Clare 100*
F.A. 49, 69, 100
Mantie 100
Hein
child 69*
M. 69
Philip 69*
Heln
child 22*
Geo. 22
Henry
child 49*
John 29
Mr. & Mrs. James 49
Raul 100*
Hemenway
Almond 11-12*
Wm. 11
Herbage
Alice B. 95
Herrington
Ellen 69
Frank 69
H. Herbert 69*
Hillman
Mrs. 83
Hoag
David D. 69
John C. 69-70*
Hobaugh
Mrs. 89*
Hochstrasser
Walter 49*
Hollen
W.B. (Rev.) 83, 84, 89,
97, 98, 100, 106
Hollis
Bart 89*
infant 12*
J.S. 12, 89
Holly
Fannie 31*
Joseph 31
Hoover
C.E. 49
Menina 49*
Hopkins
Wilbor H. 49-50*
Hoskins
Thomas 100*
Hotchkiss
Milo 31*
Hoyt
C. (Mrs.) 101*
Elva 101
Hubbard
Mrs. Lester 44
Huey
Martha 31*
Hull
P.C. 33
Hutchinson
J.B. 70
Julia E. 70*
Ingalls
infant 12*
Mrs. H. 12*
Ingraham
Benny 31*
child 31*
Elias 31
Irwin
J.C. 70
W.J. 70*
Jackson
A. (Rev.) 89
James
Mrs. Irving 31*
Johnson
T. (Rev.) 46, 47, 57
Johnston
W.A. 7
Jone
Wells S. (Gen.) 103
Jones
Henry B. 89*
Matilda 50*
Mrs. 29
C.K. (Mrs.) 49, 50
C.K. (Rev.) 24, 25, 26
W.B. 50, 89
Jordan
child 50*
infant 71*
J.H. (Mr./Mrs.) 50
J.M. (Mrs.) 79
L.P. (Mr./Mrs.) 71
Mr. 23*, 23, 24, 31
Joslin
Jas. (Mrs.) 96
J.K. (Mrs.) 89-90*
Justus
G.H. 23
Sarah A. 23*
Karns
Winnie 63
Keeler
Geo. 71
Samuel 71*
Kelly
Earl B. 50*
Mr. & Mrs. J.S. 50
Kendall
Rev. R. 34
Kibler
Avorilla 101
Emma 71
Manda 71*
Martin 101
Rosie 101*
Kilbourn
child 12*
Kilbourne
F. 90
Mr. 89, 90*
Mr. T. 30
Kimball
A.L. 31*
Kimble
D.H. (Mrs.) 71*
Kime
Mr. 29
King
Benjamin (Mrs.) 102
B.F. (Mrs.) 102
George. M. 23
infant 50*
J. (Mrs.) 84
Myron 23*
Roger 23
Wm. (Mr./Mrs.) 50
Kinnear (Kinner)
Annie M. 103, 104
Kinsey
Catherine 101*
E. 34
H.C. 101
L.G. 34
Kirkland
child 71*
John 71
Kizer
Mr. 26
Knight
Anna 31-32*
Elizabeth 101*
E.R. 72
infant 72*
John 31-32*
Mrs. Richard Jr. 12*
Richard Jr. 31-32*
Knowles
Geo. 62
Knox
F.W. 32*
Kreskie
infant 12*
J.H. 12
Kresky
G.M. 90, 101-102*
infant 90*
Krone
child 12**
Geo. 29, 32
Henry 32
Lena 32
Katie 32*
Mrs. G. 32-33*
Harmon 32
Sophie 32
Wm. 12
Lamborn
child 12-13*
J.M. 12*
Lamson
Joanna 50*
Langston
Ellen 33*
Joseph 33
LaPlant
Daisy 13*
Lapole
Miss 50*
Lawson
Mr. (Rev.)
Lean
James Sr. 33*
Jas. 16, 33
Leech
P. (Mrs.) 100
Leigh
Rev. 51
Leslie
infant 13*
J.Q. 102*
Mrs. J.Q. 6*
R.H. 13
Lewis
D.S. 50*
Mr. R. 6*
Lieberknicht
Jacob 72
Mary A. 72*
Lill
child 13*, 14
Mrs. 13, 14
112 Sentinel, 1875-1883
113 Sentinel, 1875-1883
Little
Hugh R. 33*
Look
John 13*
Loudon
D.B. 90
Mrs. 90*
Lutes
Sarah 99*
Lyon
Mr. 85
Manna
Josephine 81, 82
Manning
Mr. 35
Markley
Elizabeth 6
Harrison H. 6*
Watson 6
Marks
T.C. 15
Marshbank
J.D. 102*
Robert 72*
Martin
Mr. 6*
Mason
Henry C. 50
Mary A. 50-51*
Maxon
Rev. 48
Maxwell
Mrs. 20
May
Hannah 72*
McAfee
Mr. 73
McBride
Mrs. 29
McCalmot
Mr. 33*
McCarger
William 13-14*
McCarty
child 33*
Joseph 33
McConnell
D.H. 72
Mr. 72*
McDonough
C. (Mrs.) 100
McDowell
Mrs. 34*
McEwen
Alice C. 34*
Emma 34
George 34
McGlaughlin
Lettie 34*
McHenry
Dr. James 2, 6, 51
infant 51*
James C.S. 2*
Mrs. A.V.S. 2
William 6*
McIntyre
J.W. 90*
McKeen
E.G. 31
McKendreeldrig
Ellen 34
Mary Ellen 34*
W. 34
McLain
Alex 13, 14
child 14*
McLean
Thomas 102*
McLaren
J.W. 29
McLaughlin
Bertie 34*
Mrs. John 14*
W.P. 34
McLean
child 14*
Thos. 14
McNay
C.S. 90
Hannie 90*
J.M. 90
Mr. 51*
McNemers
child 14*
Phillip 14
McPherson
Mrs. 65
Meigell
Fannie 34
Freddie 34*
J.T. 34
Mendell
Rev. Mr. 56
Mercer
George 102
George Sr. 102*
Thomas 102
Walter 102
William 102
Merrifield
James O. 103*
Jane 103*
J.P. 103
R. 103
Thomas 103
William 103*
Middleton
R. 49, 103
Thos. 103
William 103*
Miles
Vine 73*
Miller
D.L. 51
Dr. 103
Ellie Annie 34*
Frank M. 23-24*
Guy O. 103*
Harvey 24, 58
Jennie 34
John 34
John Henry 35*
Mary A. 51*
Rev. H.G. 5, 27
Rev. J.M. 47
Mitchell
James (Rev.) 61
Moffatt
Wm. (Mrs.) 24*
Wm. 24
Monaghan
Elizabeth 24
George 24*
James 90-91*
John 14*
Rosetta 24*
Uriah 14, 24, 90
Montgomery
child 51*
Father 35*
Judge 51*
Son 35*
Moore
Annie 103
John D. 103-104*
Morris
Bell 51
Bertha May 91*
Mr. 52
Robert (Mr./Mrs.) 91
Thad S. 51-52*
Moss
B.M. 91
Edward 91*
Louisa 104*
M.B. 104
Moys
Rev. 19, 22, 26, 34, 37
Muir
Mr. 75
Murch
A.B. 73
Mrs. 63
Sarah A. Brewer 73*
Murphy
Charley 52
Mr. 35-36*, 52*
Nance
infant 52*, 91*
W.H. (Mr./Mrs.) 52,
91
Needham
Isaac Sr. 73-74*
Nelson
Lewis 52*
Newlan
Mrs. J. 36*
Newsam
Wessley 2-3*
Nichols
G.N. (Mr./Mrs.) 91
Nobles
W.H.H. 52*
Oard
B.T. 14
child 14*
O'Connor
Patrick 36*
Oleson
Mr. 104*
Olson
Gulbrand 74*
Jane 36*
O'Riley
Frank 26
Ostrander
Charles 74
J.A. 74
Mary J. Spicer 74*
Overacker
Asa 105*
Hiram 91*
Packard
I.A. 14, 36
infant 14*, 36*
Mrs. L.A. 52*
Pace
child 3*
John, 3
Paige
A.F. 14*
C.W. 52
Leona A. 52*
M.R. 52
Parker
Geo. P. 83
Parkhurst
Oliver 74*
Parks
Mr. & Mrs. B.M. 50
Parsons
Caroline 75
Enoch 75*
Thomas 75*
Partch
John 92*
Mrs. 24*
Valentine (Mrs.) 75*
Patterson
Harvey 75*
infant 52*
T.J. 52, 75
Patton
A. (Mr./Mrs.) 75
William 75*
Payne
Dr. 24
Gad 15
Gertie 15*
Henry 99
infant 24*
Peck
J.L. 62
Mate C. 57
Peet
child 92*
Emma J. 105*
Peter (Mr./Mrs.) 92,
105
Pendlebury
Bertha 92*
Penny
Ollie 92*
Peters
infant 75*
Pfaff
Isaac 35*
Pierce
(Mr./Mrs.) 64
Pierson
Rev. 83
Phillips
Mrs. Jesse 52*
Pillsbury
Rev. Stephen, 22
Pinney
Mr. 53*
Pittenger
J. (Rev.) 75, 78, 86,
92, 105
Plattenberg
(Platenberg,
Platenbery)
child 53*
James 53*
Pollock
Mr. 28
Popham
E. 53
Edith R. 53*
Potter
Adeline 53
Alice 53
Amanda D., 36*
Bealy 53*
S.O. 36
Powell
infant 53*
Mrs. L. 53
S.J. 21
Praiter
James 75
Jennie 75*
Prendergast
Jennie 92*
Price
J.H. 66
Prime
Mrs. 83
Proe
infant 105*
Jas. 105
Pruitt
S.J. 54*
Rader
George W. 76*
Raefsnyder
Eddie 24*
John 24, 37
Mary Ann 24, 37
Sadie 37*
Ramey
Adeline 36
Bertha 36*
Daniel 36
Rankin
Miss 54*
Mr. 15*
Rathgiber
Clara 36*
Ready
John 92*
Ream
T.J. (Rev.) 37, 42, 50,
52, 54, 55, 58, 63, 76
Redy
Jack 84
Reid
Fred 92*
Reynolds
child 76*
Henry B. 76*
Rice
Hugh 37*
Richards
David L. 6-7*
J.G. 6
Olive A. 6-7*
Richter
Amilia 105*
Ferdinand 105
Ritsman
Fanny E. 93
John 67
Perry 92-93*
Robbins
child 105*
Henry 105
Mr. 83
Roberts
Nono(a) 93*
Percy DeWitt 93*
W.L. (Mr./Mrs.) 93
Robinson
Mrs. 74
Polly 37*, 39
Rogers
child 76*
Herman (Mr./Mrs.) 76
Root
Geo. J. 11, 15, 19, 36,
49, 51, 76-77*
Rotrock
C.B. 54
Rowson
Laura 7*
Roy
Thomas 37*
Rush
Ed 54
Henry 54*
Rhoda 54
Sanders
Geo. (Mrs.) 93*
Savage
John 24*
Sawen
Stewart 15*
Schell
child 37*
Scott
child 15*, 54*
Fannie 105*
W.C. (Rev.) 15, 52,
54, 58, 59, 63, 64, 74,
83, 86, 87, 91, 92, 105
Wilber C. 105
Secrist
child 37**
Henry 37
Seidel
W.C. (Rev.) 23, 39,
42, 57, 61, 68, 69, 75
Selders
child 25*
W.M. 25
Serviss
D.A. 15*
Setzer
child 93*
S.H. 93
Sexton
F.M. 7
Seymour
Mr. 26
Shaw
Emma 37*
G.W. 37
Shepard
Mrs. 7*
O.H. 7
Shepardson
Rev. 51
Short
David L. 54*
Mr. & Mrs. Edward,
54
Sarah E. 54*
W.A. 54
Sickinger (Sichinger)
Elsie M. 54*
Emma 55*
Sickles
Emily 37*
J.G. 37
Simison
B.D. 25
E.H. 25
Jane E. 25*
Rolsom Everett 25*
Simmerson
Mr. 15*
Simmons
Frank (Mrs.) 93*
Simonds
A.Z. 37-38*
Sist
Andrew 7
Nancy 7*
Skinner
Minnie 85*
W.H. 25
Slater
Matt 16*
Smith
Ada Arabell 7*
Casper (Mrs.) 38*
child 16**
Enoch 93
Florence A. 93-94*
Fred E. 25*
George 94*
Geo. S. (Rev.) 78, 91,
104
Ida Isabell 7*
James 94
Jane 93
J.C. 38
J.L. (Mr./Mrs.) 7
J.W. 64
L.F. 55
Louisa 55*
Marcus (Marquis) 77*
Martin 94
Mary Ann 105*
Mr. 1, 38*
Milo (Rev.) 50, 51, 53,
56, 66, 74
Patrick 105
Presley 16
R.N. (Rev.) 49, 71, 93
Solomon 14
Snodgrass
Mr. 49
Spence
child 105*
J.H. 105
Spicer
Mary Jane 74*
Spivey
Jacob 55
Mary Elizabeth 55*
Spurrier
J. 65
Srack
Mr. 15
Stansil
C.M. 94
J.F. 94
Maggie Bell 94*
Stanton
Joseph 63
Startzman
Henry 103
Mr. 103
St. Clair
child 94*
Stearns
Emily A. 7*
T.B. 7
Stebbins
R.R. (Mrs.) 102
Stelter
Henry 16
infant 16*, 55*
Herman (Mr./Mrs.) 55
Stockel
C.H. 94-95*
114 Sentinel, 1875-1883
Stone
Aaron 105*
Strickler
George W. 7, 77
Mary E. 55-56*
Minnie May 77*
Mrs. 7*
Mrs. George W. 5, 16
Rhoda J. 16*
T.H. 55
Struble
C.D. (Mr./Mrs.) 32, 78
infant 78*
Stump
Emma 38*
Thos. 38
Sutton
H.C. 62, 91
Swartz
Mr. 2
Swerman
child 16*
Frank 16
Swift
Lewis W. 56*
Swiggum
infant 56*
Swope
child 25*
Mr. 25
Tallman
Rev. L. 9, 10, 14, 15,
16
Teed
Gracie 105*
Hezekiah 106*
Temple
C.A. 78
C.A. (Mrs.) 78
Thom
Alice 57*
Amanda 56-57*
child 38*
Reuben 38, 56
Thompson
Cynthia E. 57*
Edmund B. 78*
F.C. 95*
Gertrude 95*
H.A. 57, 78
J.W. 57, 78
Mrs. 7*
R.F. 95, 99
Rev. 90
W.D. 95
William 78*
Tipton
Eliza 100
Tolly
child 3*
Harry 106*
infant 95*
Jimmie 106*
Joseph (Mr./Mrs.) 95,
106
Joseph (Mrs.) 106*
Louisa 95*
Wm. 3
Tomlinson
Alice 95
William 95*
Torrey
Rev. 46
Towner
H.Z. 57
John 57
Marion 57*
Traugh
Belinda 16*
Messrs. 36
M.M. 16
P.M. 16
Trickey
Geo. (Mr./Mrs.) 78
Rollin A. 78*
Trimble
child 16*
John R. 16, 78
Mrs. John R. 16*
Otis A. 78*
Troup
infant 16*
J.L. 16
Tucker
E.B. (Rev.) 83, 85
H.H. 20
J.W. 20
Turner
Thomas 78-79*
Van Doran
Mrs. 38*
Vanmeter
Mary 16*
Vantine
Chas. 95
Mr. 95-96*
Vaught
Mr. 25*
Veveba
Mr. 79*
Vincent
Prof. 49
Virtue
John A. 3*
Vose (Vohs)
Mrs. Anna 38*
Vohsman (Vossman)
Mrs. 39*
Vosh
Peter 16*
Waddell
Mrs. Thos. 7*
Walker
Geo. M. 43
Phoebe 57*
Walter W. Jr. 19, 86
Walters
Mrs. 96*
S.K. 96
Ward
Mrs. 79*
Warner
Hattie 57*
L.C. 57
Watson
J.H. 17
Louisa Ann 17*
Webb
W.B. 3*
Willis S. 77
Webster
Charley 25*
child 17*
F.C. 25
R.G. 17
Weckerly
Mr./Mrs. 31
Wedgewood
H.F. (Mr./Mrs.) 7
infant 7*
Welch
Alex. 57
Ethlinda M. 57*
Pardon 57*
Wells
Rev. 83
Whelock
Andrew 57
Mrs. 57-58*
White
Celestia 58*
C.M. 62
child 58*
Dr. 79*
Frankie 26*
Geo. M. 58
Geo. W. 58
Geo. W. (Mrs.) 66
J.T. 26
Mabel 26*
Mr. 79*
Sam 79
William 26*
Whitehouse
S.M. 3*
Whiting
Mrs. 74
Whitley
infant 58*
Whitford
Betsy A. 39*
Oren 39
Whitney
W. (Rev.) 29, 31, 32,
38, 50, 51, 74, 85
Wilcox
Mrs. 39*
Williams
R.E. 76
Willis
A.J. (Mr./Mrs.) 19
David 79*
J.A. 79
Wilson
infant 39*
John 106*
Mrs. Elliot 39
Witt
child 58*
J.W. (Mrs.) 96*
Wittles
child 59*
Wood
child 106*
L.A. 97, 106
Woodruff
Mr. 57
Wright
Dr. 79*
John K. (Capt.) 26
Mr. 26*, 79*
Wyeth
C.S. (Mr./Mrs.) 83
Yockey
child 8**
Daniel (Mrs.) 105,
106*
Daniel Sr. 8
William 8
York
Alson 26, 59
Ellen 59*
Etha 26*
Young
Joanna 96*
R.J. 96
Zucker
Fransisco 39*
Jacob 39
115 Sentinel, 1875-1883

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