Poetry of Kansas
 

One Evening.

I stood upon a hillside brown and bare,
And watched to see the evening glories 
      fade, 
With bated breath, as I were half afraid 
No right was mine to gaze on scene so fair. 
 
Such beauty could m be for tear-dimmed
      eyes; 
And so I watched to see swift-coming night 
Throw her black mantle o'er the radiance 
      bright, 
Ere half fulfilled its glorious prophecies. 
 
Not so, the flame-tint which the waiting
      east 
Caught from the sun behind the western 
      hills, 
Grew ever brighter__sped with roseate
      thrills 
Up to the zenith, glad to be released. 
 
Then, when all lands within the shadow
      lay. 
 
Save whereupon the loftier summits' 
      height 
The sunshine lingered, bidding them good 
      night,__
There flamed the splendor of the dying 
      day. 
 
And yet it seemed the pageant mocked
      my grief, 
Nor gold, nor rose, nor ruddy flame the 
      hue, 
Nor 'painter from his palette ever drew 
Such union of the tints, nor brought relief. 
 
But, as my eye forsook the exulting west, 
Rose through the blue, so tender from 
      afar, 
So silver, large, and calm, the evening star, 
That all my troubled soul was lulled to rest. 
___Mary Alice Manley
 
Sunflowers
Selected by Arthur Richmond Marsh
(Lawrence: Journal Publishing Co. 1888)
Pages 132-133
 
September 5, 2001 / John & Susan Howell / Wichita, Kansas / howell@kotn.org

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