Transcribed from College Symposium of the Kansas State Agricultural College Topeka, Kansas: The Hall & O'Donald Litho Co. 1891.


WE RESPECTFULLY DEDICATE
THIS LITTLE VOLUME
TO ALL WHO, BY THEIR HEARTY CO-OPERATION,
HAVE RENDERED
ITS PUBLICATION A POSSIBILITY.
EDITING BOARD.
  4 6 2 1 3 7 5

EDITING BOARD.
1. PHIL S. CREAGER,
  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF.
2. JOHN O. MORSE,
3. HERMAN W. AVERY,
  LITERARY EDITORS.
4. ALFRED MlDGLEY,
  HISTORICAL EDITOR.
5. SAMUEL L. VAN BLARCOM,
  STATISTICAL EDITOR.
6. HARRY E. MOORE,
  ART EDITOR.
7. KARY C. DAVIS,
  BUSINESS MANAGER.
GENERAL VIEW OF COLLEGE GROUNDS.

GENERAL VIEW OF COLLEGE GROUNDS.

PREFACE.

Although the Kansas State Agricultural College has been in active operation for nearly a quarter of a century, its students have not heretofore attempted to follow the example set by their eastern contemporaries in the publication of a "college annual," or kindred work. But the increasing number of students and the growing importance of this College as an educational institution has led seven members of the senior class to attempt the publication of a book, which, for lack of a better name, they have called THE COLLEGE SYMPOSIUM.

We have labored under many disadvantages. The idea of preparing such a book, was not conceived until late in the college year, consequently our work has all been done in great haste, and you will doubtless find in it many imperfections, for which we beg charitable consideration. We have done our best, and hope that we have succeeded in compiling something that will be of interest, and value to all of our subscribers.

We are indebted to various members of the faculty for valuable assistance, and especially to Prof. J. D. Walters, who has furnished us with the college history, and who has given us great assistance in the work of designing and executing our drawings. We also acknowledge indebtedness to the faculty committee charged with the tedious task of correcting copy and reading proof. To these and the many others who have materially aided us in our labors, we extend our heartfelt thanks.

THE PUBLISHERS.

JUNE 3, 1891.

BOARD OF REGENTS.

HON. MORGAN CARAWAY, (1892,)* President.
  GREAT BEND, BARTON CO.
HON. R. W. FINLEY, (1893,) Vice President,
  GOODLAND, SHERMAN CO.
HON. JNO. E. HESSIN, (1892,) Treasurer,
  MANHATTAN, RILEY CO.
HON. T. P. MOORE, (1893,) Loan Commissioner,
  HOLTON, JACKSON CO.
HON. A. P. FORSYTH, (1894,) LIBERTY, MONTGOMERY CO.
HON. JOSHUA WHEELER, (18941) NORTONVILLE, JEFFERSON CO.
PRES. GEO. T. FAIRCHILD, (ex officio), Secretary.

I. D. GRAHAM, Assistant Secretary. MANHATTAN.

*Term expires.

MANHATTAN.

Location has very much to do with the success of an educational institution. The conditions that insure good health and afford pleasure to the student, as well as to the professor, are potent factors in the upbuilding of a school.

Manhattan was wisely chosen among the many tempting locations offered to the settlers of Kansas "in the fifties," and the selection of a college site in this vicinity, on the choicest of its numerous hills, was the work of wise builders. The winding Kaw, that flows in from the northwest, through many a mile of tortuous and treelined course, met at its most abrupt turns by precipitous bluffs, grass-clad and beautiful in summer, sere and solemn in the autumn; gathering into its bosom the waters of the Blue, which rolls in rapid current down the beautiful valley from Nebraska, our neighbor on the north; thence departing eastward through a broad and fertile plain, leaving a band of brightness in its path that narrows to nothing in the distance; these are the main features of the landscape that spreads out before the student or the visitor as he stands on the college campus, or as he looks out from the main building.

Manhattan is one of the choicest spots in Kansas, and not one surpasses it in the elements of beauty that go to make up the surroundings of hill and stream, of wood and road and valley. The combinations that make favorable conditions for health are found here in large degree; but this is not all. Looking across the valley southeasterly from the college Manhattan lies in full view just at the base of the hill on which are grouped the college buildings. Manhattan, a city of pleasant homes, where a full dozen churches rear their spires heavenward, or summon to Sunday service by many pealing bells.

Out from the midst of the city the railroads run in five diverging lines, like the spokes of a wheel. These afford easy access to the hundreds of students and their friends who gather annually at the Kansas State Agricultural College which is to them "a thing of beauty and a joy forever."

"All roads lead to Manhattan."

GENERAL VIEW FROM MAIN BUILDING NORTH.
GENERAL VIEW FROM MAIN BUILDING NORTH.


College Symposium - Index
Introduction, History, 1863 to 1873, 1873 through 1878, 1878 and 1879, through 1879, Experiments and Experiment Station, Philosophy, Chemistry, Horticultural, Botanical, Mathematics, Industrial Art, Telegraph, English, Home Economics, Sewing, Mechanical, Music, Printing, Law, Farm, Military, Physics, Veterinary, Faculty and Assistants, Faculty Biographies, Alumni, Classes, College Organizations, Ionian #1, Ionian #2, Ionian #3, Hamilton #1, Hamilton #2, Hamilton #3, Alpha Beta #1, Alpha Beta #2, Alpha Beta #3, Webster #1, Webster #2, Webster #3, Webster #4, Editors and Church Directory, Advertisements#1, Advertisements#2, Advertisements#3

Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

tcward@columbus-ks.com

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