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Biographical Sketch
of
James H. Garside
Atchison County, Kansas

 

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The following transcription is from a 750 page book titled "Genealogical and Biographical Record of North-Eastern Kansas, dated 1900.  These have been diligently transcribed and generously contributed by Penny R. Harrell, please give her a very big Thank You for her hard work!

Gold Bar

James H. Garside. Mr. Garside is the local frieght agent for the Santa Fe and the Rock Island Railroads at Atchison, and is perhaps the best known business man in the city, his duties in connection with the above mentioned position bringing him into contact with merchants, farmers, grain dealers and shippers of all classes of freight during the eight years in which he has held the post. His uniform courtesy and obliging manner have won him high regard, and his life record well deserves a place in this volume.

Mr. Garside was born in Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, January 26, 1848.  His parents were Joshua and Anna (Cox) Garside, and his father, a native of England, emigrated to the United States in 1836.

He became a member of the banking firm of Maple, Stipp & Garside, at Canton, and subsequently went to Nebraska City to open a bank for S. F. Nuckolls.  In 1864 the family removed to Atchison and the father became a member of the firm of A. S. Parker & Company, forwarding agents and also agents for the Star Line of steamers plying between St. Louis and St. Joseph.  Later the firm became Garside & Son, and did an extensive business in forwarding freight to Denver, Salt Lake and Montana.

There was at time a large number of boats plying the river and a vast amount of grain was supplied by them; a single boat sometimes took on from three to ten thousand bushels of grain in sacks and lay at the levee two or three days in loading.  James H. Garside is the eldest of nine children, two sons and seven daughters.  He was educated at the public schools of Nebraska City, Nebraska, and in the high school in Atchison.

He was for many years in business with his father as mentioned above.  Prior to the completion of the bridge at Atchison a transfer boat named "Wm. Osborn" was used in transferring cars from the Central Branch and Santa Fe Lines and Mr. Garside had charge of that business. 

At the completion of the bridge he was with the Hamilton & Flint Transfer Company, which transferred freight with teams from one side of the river to the other.

He entered the service of the Santa Fe road in 1881, which position he now occupies.  Prior to his engagement with the Santa Fe, he was an agent for the Continental Fast Freight line, the Commercial Express line and the Star Union line.

In 1872 Mr. Garside was married, to Miss Mattie H. Preston of Canton, Illinois.  They have one son, named for his grandfather, William Preston.  Mr. Garside is a member of Washington Lodge, No. 5, A. F. & A. M., of Washington Commandery and of the Mystic Shrine.

He has been a member of the board of education for the past twelve years.  He is one of the charter members of the Atchison Flambeau Club and also of the Atchison Gun Club.  He belongs to the Congregational Church, of which he is one of the trustees.

He is a very busy man but is genial in his disposition, accommodating and courteous in his dealings with the public, and is much esteemed by all who know him.

  Gold Bar

Last update: Wednesday, January 11, 2006 02:19:09


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