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Kansas State Board of Agriculture
First Biennial Report

Montgomery County

1878

Map of Montgomery County - 1878

First settlements: Louisburg township, June 16, 1869, by John Hanks; Rutland township, 1869, Thomas Woods; Caney township, 1869, E. Trotter; Sycamore township, 1866, B. White - he was driven off by Indians and his house burned; Independence City, 1869, Frank Bunker; settlements were made in all the townships in 1869. - First church buildings: Independence City, 1870, Baptist; the Presbyterians, Methodists, Congregationalists, Catholics, Episcopalians, Lutherans and United Brethren also have buildings in the same city: there are also church edifices in Coffeyville, Cherryvale and Havana. - First school building: Independence City, 1869. - First business established: trading post, at Old Claymore, 1867, by G. L. Canada. - First marriage: James Donahue and Catharine Vassar, May, 1868 - First birth: - Northrop, January, 1868, at Claymore. - First post office: Claymore, in Cherokee township, 1868.

The county was organized in 1869.

Population in 1870, 7,564; in 1875, 13,017; increase in five years, 5,453, population in 1878, 16,468; increase in eight years, 8,904. Rural population, 12,351; city or town population, 4,117; per cent. of rural to city or town population, 75.

* POPULATION of 1878, by Townships and Cities.
TOWNSHIPS AND CITIES. Pop. TOWNSHIPS AND CITIES. Pop. TOWNSHIPS AND CITIES. Pop.
Caney 1,018 Cherry 1,912 Cherokee 838
Drum Creek 809 Fawn Creek 1,109 Independence City 3,023
Independence 1,466 Liberty 982 Louisburg 1,628
Parker 1,291 Rutland 1,053 Sycamore 1,339

* West Cherry township has been organized since census was taken.

Face of the Country. - Bottom land, 25 per cent.; upland, 75 per cent.; forest (Government survey), 10 per cent.; prairie, 90 per cent. The rivers run in deep channels. There are few low bottoms, general slope of the water sheds, southward. An extensive proportion of the surface is gently rolling land, some level, interspersed with the mounds peculiar to this section of the State.

Timber. - The timber belts vary in width from one mile to a mere fringe along the smaller streams; there are a few groves of limited extent on the uplands. A large number of farmers have small tracts of cultivated trees, varying in extent from one-fourth of an acre to one acre. The trees make a rapid growth, and the varieties are cottonwood, soft maple, black walnut, elm and ash.

Principal Streams. - Verdigris river flows southward. Elk river and Onion creek, southeast. Drum creek, southwest. Duck and Sycamore creeks, southward. Big Hill creek, southwest. There are numerous other small streams. The springs are not numerous; well water obtained at an average depth of 25 feet.

Coal. - Coal has been exposed in localities extending over one-third of the area of the county. Thickness of veins, one to two feet, found on the surface and at the base of elevations; quality rather inferior; improves as the mines extend beneath the surface; use limited, as yet, to local, domestic and manufacturing purposes. Well-drillers have made discoveries in almost every township, and a company has been organized at Independence for the purpose of boring for coal.

Building Stone, etc. - Excellent stone is found in abundance. Varieties: sand, lime and flag-stone. Pottery clay has been found wherever there is coal. There are two salt springs reported - one in Louisburg township, at Elk City, and one in Sycamore township; no analysis has yet been made.

Railroad Connections. - The Leavenworth, Lawrence & Galveston Railroad enters the county near its northeast corner, and traverses the eastern part of the county in a southwesterly direction. Stations: Cherry Vale, Liberty and Coffeyville. A branch extends from Cherry Vale, a little south of west, to Independence.

Agricultural Statistics. - Acres in the county, 407,040; taxable acres, 378,548; under cultivation, 168,188.19; cultivated to taxable acres, 44.43 per cent.; increase of cultivated acres during the year, 35,167.32.

STATEMENT showing the Acreage of Field Crops named from 1872 to 1878, inclusive.

CROPS. 1872. 1873. 1874. 1875. 1876. 1877. 1878.
Winter Wheat 10,255.00 10,285.00 12,866.00 22,405.50 42,124.00 34,967.00 42,211.00
Rye 313.00 312.00 177.00 389.75 844.00 142.00 166.00
Spring Wheat 60.00 227.00 253.00 19.00 6.00 ----- 42.00
Corn 33,670.00 42,028.00 35,893.00 37,639.00 40,280.00 59,845.00 59,336.00
Barley 22.00 115.00 24.00 30.00 65.00 188.00 123.00
Oats 4,393.00 6,764.00 3,765.00 3,140.25 7,935.00 5,062.00 8,985.00
Buckwheat 168.00 297.00 100.00 68.75 109.50 66.50 103.50
Irish Potatoes 635.00 1,301.00 2,506.00 785.04 1,427.40 866.00 980.00
Sweet Potatoes 50.00 117.00 210.00 108.43 109.75 26.00 74.88
Sorghum 269.00 429.00 687.00 873.95 471.75 582.00 727.25
Castor Beans 8.00 351.00 1,069.00 956.12 374.00 693.00 173.50
Cotton 2.75 116.75 325.00 423.49 112.00 75.37 3.25
Flax ----- 169.25 661.00 3,862.00 2,741.00 1,455.00 2,757.25
Hemp ----- 4.25 ----- 27.62 20.75 8.00 1.00
Tobacco 6.00 42.75 11.00 14.93 22.37 18.00 16.56
Broom Corn ----- ----- 60.00 245.37 138.00 122.00 121.25
Millet and Hungarian 97.00 403.00 375.00 757.50 1,552.00 1,800.00 1,607.00
Timothy Meadow 257.00 257.50 509.00 371.25 233.25 245.00 569.50
Clover Meadow 258.00 261.00 342.00 376.08 81.75 74.00 118.00
Prairie Meadow 14,483.00 17,469.00 9,739.00 18,821.00 9,080.00 3,082.00 16,684.00
Timothy Pasture 8.00 8.00 80.00 40.00 5.00 26.00 85.50
Clover Pasture 10.00 10.00 41.00 54.00 9.00 15.00 24.75
Blue-Grass Pasture 24.50 25.00 385.00 503.00 70.25 121.00 234.50
Prairie Pasture 45,510.00 45,510.00 21,490.00 28,149.00 37,635.00 23,542.00 33,043.00








Total 110,499.25 126,502.50 91,568.00 120,061.03 145,446.77 133,020.87 168,188.19

Increase in six years, 52+ per cent.
Average increase per annum, 8.66+ per cent.

RANK of Montgomery County in the Crops named below, as to Acreage, and in Cultivated Acreage for the years mentioned in the foregoing table.

CROPS.1872.1873.1874.1875.1876.1877. 1878.








Wheat 7 11 22 11 2 8 11
Corn 13 7 14 19 18 15 10








Total Acreage in all Crops 4 1 13 12 6 12 6

STATEMENT showing the Acres, Product and Value of Principal Crops for 1878, together with the Increase and Decrease as compared with 1877.

CROPS. ACRES IN
1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.
PRODUCT
IN 1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.
VALUE OF
PRODUCT
IN 1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.







Winter Wheat - bu. 42,211.00 7,244.00 in. 548,743.00 269,007.00 in. $362,170.38 $96,421.18 in.
Rye - bu. 166.00 24.00 in. 2,324.00 904.00 in. 697.20 228.60 in.
Spring Wheat - bu. 42.00 42.00 in. 420.00 420.00 in. 210.00 210.00 in.
Corn - bu. 59,336.00 509.00 de. 2,076,760.00 317,040.00 de. 332,281.60 98,602.40 de.
Barley - bu. 123.00 65.00 de. 1,968.00 2,732.00 de. 590.40 819.60 de.
Oats - bu. 8,985.00 3,923.00 in. 359,400.00 141,734.00 in. 57,504.00 22,677.44 in.
Buckwheat - bu. 103.50 37.00 in. 2,070.00 1,139.00 in. 1,656.00 911.20 in.
Irish Potatoes - bu. 980.00 114.00 in. 63,700.00 5,580.00 de. 35,035.00 395.00 in.
Sweet Potatoes - bu. 74.88 48.88 in. 6,739.20 3,489.20 in. 2,685.76 74.24 de.
Sorghum - gall. 727.25 145.25 in. 83,633.75 16,703.75 in. 41,816.88 8,351.88 in.
Castor Beans - bu. 173.50 519.50 de. 1,735.00 5,195.00 de. 2,168.75 4,761.25 de.
Cotton - lbs. 3.25 72.12 de. 552.50 12,260.40 de. 49.73 1,231.56 de.
Flax - bu. 2,757.25 1,302.25 in. 24,815.25 13,175.25 in. 24,815.25 12,593.25 in.
Hemp - lbs. 1.00 7.00 de. 920.00 6,440.00 de. 55.20 386.40 de.
Tobacco - lbs. 16.56 1.44 de. 12,254.40 1,065.60 de. 1,225.44 106.56 de.
Broom Corn - lbs. 121.25 .75 de. 97,000.00 600.00 de. 3,637.50 22.50 de.
Millet and Hungarian - tons 1,607.00 193.00 de. 4,821.00 771.00 in. 19,284.00 3,084.00 in.
Timothy Meadow - tons 569.50 324.50 in. 968.15 551.65 in. 4,598.71 2,620.33 in.
Clover Meadow - tons 118.50 44.50 in. 225.15 84.55 in. 1,069.46 401.61 in.
Prairie Meadow - tons 16,684.00 13,602.00 in. 30,031.00 24,483.40 in. 90,093.00 73,450.20 in.
Timothy Pasture acres 85.50 59.50 in. ----- ----- ----- -----
Clover Pasture - acres 24.75 9.75 in. ----- ----- ----- -----
Blue-Grass Pasture - acres 234.50 113.50 in. ----- ----- ----- -----
Prairie Pasture - acres 33,043.00 9,501.00 in. ----- ----- ----- -----







Total 168,188.19 35,167.32 in. ----- ----- $983,338.98 $116,544.90 in.

HEAVY YIELD. - Statement by D. C. Crone, of Independence:

Winter Wheat. - Fultz and Mediterranean varieties. I planted 52 acres of wheat on Section 22, Township 31, Range 15, being bottom land, about half of it having been timber land. I planted in September from the 17th to the 24th, and harvested from June 4th to 24th, the wet weather causing delay in harvesting. I used 1 1/8 bushels of seed to the acre and harvested 34 bushels, costing about $9 per acre. The land was ploughed in July and August, and harrowed about the 1st of September, the seed being drilled in east and west.

Value of Garden Produce, Poultry and Eggs Sold during the Year. - Garden produce, $5,856; poultry and eggs, $8,476.75.

Old Corn on Hand. - Old corn on hand March 1, 1878, 230,885 bushels, or an average of 70 bushels to each family.

Dairy Products. - Cheese manufactured in 1875, 6,820 lbs.; in 1878, 4,690 lbs.; decrease, 2,130 lbs. Butter manufactured in 1875, 178,574 lbs.; in 1878, 294,529 lbs.; increase, 115,955 lbs.

Farm Animals. - Number of horses, in 1877, 4,643; in 1878, 4,851; increase, 208. Mules and asses, in 1877, 1,116; in 1878, 1,012; decrease, 104. Milch cows, in 1877, 4,858; in 1878, 4,557; decrease, 301. Other cattle, in 1877, 7,501; in 1878, 7,234; decrease, 267. Sheep, in 1877, 2,149; in 1878, 4,175; increase, 2,026. Swine, in 1877, 18,732; in 1878, 25,746; increase, 7,014.

Sheep Killed by Dogs. - Number of sheep killed by dogs, 64; value of sheep killed by dogs, $192.

Wool. - Clip of 1877, 4,478 pounds.

Value of Animals Slaughtered. - Value of animals slaughtered and sold for slaughter during the year, $112,819.60.

Horticulture. - Number of acres nurseries, 437. Number of trees in bearing: apple, 45,503; pear, 467; peach, 205,766; plum, 2,167; cherry, 7,008. Number of trees not in bearing: apple, 145,394; pear, 2,916; peach, 59,386; plum, 5,973; cherry, 16,380.

Herd Law. - The herd law has been in operation since 1872. A majority of the farmers are reported as being in favor of its continuance, but there is a diversity of opinion concerning it. It retards fencing and hedge growing, and stimulates the raising of grains more than of stock. It is urged in its favor that it permits a larger population than could live in a new country without it; against it, that it drives out stock men, and keeps capital away.

Fences. - Stone, 9,857 rods; cost, $14,785.50. Rail, 272,357 rods; cost, $367,681.95. Board, 27,219 rods; cost, $38,923,17. Wire, 9,900 rods; cost, $7,128. Hedge, 412,276 rods; cost, $206,138. Total rods of fence, 731,609; total cost, $634,656.62.

Apiaculture. - Number of stands of bees, 343; pounds of honey, 3,003; wax, 76.50.

Value of Agricultural Implements. - Amount invested in agricultural implements, $78,534.

Manufactures. - Cherry township: steam flouring mill, capital, $4,000; harness manufactory, capital, $500; steam saw mill, capital, $3,000. Independence township: steam saw mills, 2, capital, $3,000; steam flouring mill, capital, $4,000; water flouring mill, capital, $8,000; pottery, capital, $500. Liberty township: steam saw mill, capital, $1,000; water-power flouring mills, 2, capital, $19,000. Louisburg township; water and steam saw mill, capital, $5,000; water and steam flouring mill; water and steam woolen mill. Parker township: steam saw mill; steam flouring mill; water-power flouring mills, 2. Sycamore township: water-power flouring mill, capital, $4,000; steam saw mills, 2, capital, $5,000.

Valuation and Indebtedness. - Assessed valuation of personal property, $331,571; railroad property, $209,747.19; total assessed valuation of all property, $2,368,089.19; true valuation of all property, $3,946,815.32. Total indebtedness of county, township, city and school districts, $435,022.73, per cent. of indebtedness to assessed valuation, 18+.

Newspaper History. - The Independence Pioneer, established September 4, 1869, by Trask & Steel. In 1870, the name was changed to Independence Republican, and published by T. H. Canfield; afterwards by L. M. Andrews, who was succeeded by Capt. Parker, and he by John Q. Page. The press was removed to Howard county in 1874.

The Westralia Vidette, started at Westralia, by McConnell & McIntyre, in the spring of 1870.

The Parker Record, by G. D. Baker, at Parker, June, 1870.

The Kansas Democrat, at Independence, by M. V. B. Bennett, December, 1870.

The South Kansas Tribune, by Humphrey & Yoe, at Independence, March, 1871.

Ross' Paper, by E. G. Ross, at Coffeyville, April, 1872.

Coffeyville Circular, by E. W. Perry, at Coffeyville, May, 1872.

Coffeyville Courier, by Chatham & White, Coffeyville, 1873.

Cherryvale Herald, started at Cherryvale, in the summer of 1873.

Southern Kansan, by W. H. Watkins, at Independence, in the fall of 1873.

Osage Chief, by Vangundy & Clark, at Independence, in the spring of 1874.

Elk City Courant, by Abe Steinberger, at Elk City, in the summer of 1874.

Independence Courier, by J. J. Chatham, at Independence, 1875.

Coffeyville Journal, by W. A. Peffer, at Coffeyville, 1875.

Cherryvale Leader, at Cherryvale, in 1877.

The publication of the South Kansas Tribune is continued by W. T. & C. Yoe.

The Southern Kansan has been changed to Independence Kansan, and is published daily and weekly by Will. H. Warner.

The Independence Courier is published daily and weekly by Frank C. Scott.

The Coffeyville Journal is still published by W. A. Peffer.

All the other papers named above have been discontinued.

Schools. - Number of organized districts, 102; school population, 6,212; average salary of teachers, per month, males, $38.25; females, $28.33. School houses built during 1878, 4; frame, 2; brick, 1, stone, 1. Total number of school houses, 100; log, 4, frame, 90, brick, 4; stone, 2. Value of all school property, $101,817. A few of the districts have had their grounds ornamented by planting shade trees, but as a general thing very little has been done.

Churches. - Baptist: organizations, 12; membership, 487; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $1,500. Congregational: organizations, 1; membership, 33; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $3,000. Episcopal: organizations, 1; membership, 20; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $2,500. Methodist Episcopal: organizations, 22; membership, 593; church edifices, 2, value of church property, $10,400. Presbyterian: organizations, 6; membership, 200; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $7,300. Roman Catholic: organizations, 4; membership, 1,000; church edifices, 2; value of church property, $1,000.

Transcribed from First Biennial Report of the State Board of Agriculture to the Legislature of the State of Kansas, for the Years 1877-8 embracing statistical exhibits, with diagrams of the agricultural, industrial, mercantile, and other interests of the state, together with a colored outline map of the state, and sectional maps, in colors, of each organizaed county, showing their relative size and location, railroads, towns, post offices, school houses, water powers, etc., etc. Topeka, Kansas: Kansas State Board of Agriculture. Rand, McNally & Co., Printers and Engravers, Chicago. 1878. Transcribed by Kyle Ogle and Jacob Edmondson, November 2001.


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