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Kansas State Board of Agriculture
First Biennial Report

Products of Kansas

FARM ANIMALS.

1878

The entire year has been remarkably favorable for live stock, a high average condition having been sustained throughout, as the following average conditions will fully explain:

Months. Cattle.

Work
Animals.

Horses
and Mules.
Sheep. Swine.
January 104 105 104 100 106
February
March
105 106 106 101 106
April 107 104 105 104 107
May 109 103 104 105 105
June 107 104 104 103 104
July 105 102 102 103 105
August 106 103 102 103 105
September 104 101 102 102 107
October 102 102 102 102 106
November 102 101 102 102 105
December 101 101 102 101 104






Average 105- 103- 103+ 102+ 106-


The decrease of 1873, as shown by the assessors' returns, was more than accounted for by the omission from said returns of large flocks, which had made their appearance within a short time.

The increase also shows most encouragingly, proving that our people have a keen eye to the future, and do not propose to be left in an impoverished condition when wheat is no longer king.

But nine counties in the State show a decrease in the number of horses, while the increase of the State as a whole is something over 33,000, or nearly 13 per cent. In 1873 the increase was 11 per cent.; in 1874, 13 per cent.; in 1875, 2 per cent.; in 1876, 3 per cent.; in 1877, 11 per cent.; an aggregate increase in the seven years of 75 per cent.

There is a decrease of mules and asses in but a single county of the State, while the increase in the State as a whole is nearly 8,000, or 19-1/2 per cent. Like horses, the increase of mules and asses has been steady and strong, no year since 1872 showing a decrease. In 1873 it was 11 per cent.; in 1874, 19 per cent.; in 1875, 11-3/4 per cent.; in 1876, 13 per cent.; and in 1877, 18-1/4 per cent.; an aggregate increase in the seven years of 61 per cent.

Eleven counties show a decrease of milch cows, but the increase in the other counties aggregates upward of 27,000, leaving a net increase of 24,599, or 8-1/2 per cent. The number of milch cows in the State has fluctuated somewhat since 1872. It increased steadily from that year to 1875, when it dropped, and for a year showed but little change. This year, however, it is 45,000 more than in 1874. In 1873 the increase was 13-1/2 per cent.; in 1874, 19 per cent.; in 1875 there was a decrease of 6-3/4 per cent.; in 1876, an increase of less than 1 per cent.; in 1877, an increase of 13 per cent.; an aggregate increase in the seven years of 38-1/2 per cent.

Sixteen counties show a decrease of other cattle, but the increase in the other counties aggregates 73,666, leaving a net increase of 66,656, or 11-1/2 per cent. Like milch cows, other cattle in numbers have fluctuated, rising uniformly to 1875, then falling and remaining almost stationary the next year. This year, however, the number is greater by upwards of 77,000 than in 1874. In 1873 the increase was 13-1/2 per cent., and in 1874, 15-1/2 per cent. In 1875 there was a decrease of 6 per cent.; in 1876, an increase of a trifle over 1 per cent.; and in 1877, an increase of nearly 9 per cent.; an aggregate increase during the seven years of 37 per cent.

While twenty-six counties return a decrease in the number of sheep, the remaining counties show an aggregate increase of upwards of 54,000, leaving the net increase in round numbers of 38,000, or 15-1/2 per cent. With the single exception of 1873, sheep since 1872 have in numbers shown a regular and substantial increase. In 1873 the decrease* over 1872 was 27-1/4 per cent.; in 1874 the increase was 38-1/2 per cent.; in 1875, 20 per cent.; in 1876, 26-1/4 per cent.; and in 1877, 30-1/4 per cent.; an aggregate increase during the seven years of 245-1/2 per cent.

But two counties in all the State report a decrease of swine, while the increase in other counties shows the enormous aggregate in round numbers of a half million, being a net increase of 490,182, or 69-1/2 per cent. Like most other stock in the State, swine in numbers advanced steadily from 1872 to 1875, then fell off heavily, and the following year showed but little improvement. This year, however, the number is one hundred per cent. greater than in 1874. In 1873, the increase was 15 per cent.; in 1874, 31-1/2 per cent.; in 1875, the decrease was 90 per cent.; in 1876, the increase was 11-1/2 per cent., and in 1877, 113 per cent. - an aggregate increase during the seven years of 370-3/4 per cent.

It should be borne in mind that the returns for 1878 are only to March 1st, covering the year from March 1, 1877. The exceedingly favorable weather, the bountiful increase of all crops for feeding purposes, and the strikingly uniform high condition the current year, have beyond question greatly augmented numbers, and will carry the totals of next March far beyond anything yet reached.

The advance Kansas has made of late years among the other States of the Union in aggregate value of live stock is a very interesting study, the reports of the Department of Agriculture for 1866, to and including 1876, showing in this wise: In 1866, Kansas was the 29th State in the Union, ranking only Florida, Nebraska, Delaware and Rhode Island. In 1867 she was also the 29th, with Louisiana added to the other four below in rank. In 1868, the 31st, Louisiana stepping to the 29th, and California coming in the first time and assigned 12th place. In 1869, Oregon was added to the list, and Kansas went to the 25th place, Maryland falling from 24th to 26th, Minnesota from 26th to 28th, West Virginia from 27th to 29th, South Carolina from 28th to 30th, and New Hampshire taking Kansas' old place, the 31st. In 1870, Kansas made another long jump, this time reaching the 19th place, and forcing Massachusetts, who held it, to go to the 21st. Connecticut fell from 23d to 29th, Arkansas from 21st to 22d, and Maine from 22d to 27th. In 1871, Arkansas took the 19th place, and Kansas went down a peg to the 20th, but there were still behind her several of the oldest States in the Union. In 1872, Kansas left Arkansas undisturbed in possession of the 19th place, but quietly jumped over her to the 18th place, forcing New Jersey out of it and to the 20th place. In 1873, Kansas ousted Alabama from the 16th place, and put behind her, for the first time, Mississippi and Alabama both. In 1874, though the grasshoppers did play such havoc with things generally, Kansas lost but four pegs, settling in the 20th position, New Jersey taking the 16th, Mississippi the 17th, Minnesota the 18th, and Alabama the 19th, while behind Kansas were Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, and a host of old States. In 1875, Kansas bounded over Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey and Alabama, and regained the 16th place, hugging Virginia and Georgia very close for their positions just above her. In 1876, (the latest report issued by the department,) Kansas went to the 17th place, Minnesota again creeping by her. Once more Kansas pushed the two States just ahead of her, Virginia and Georgia, exceedingly close for their places, the 16th and 15th respectively. During all these years but one - 1873 - New York was first. Illinois was fourth until 1869, when she went to third place. In 1870 she went to second place, and has remained there ever since, with the exception of 1873, when she took first place from New York.

In the eleven years from 1866 to 1876, the following changes occurred in the positions of the States: New York 1st in 1866, and also 1st in 1876; Ohio from 2d to 3d, Pennsylvania 3d to 4th, Illinois 4th to 2d, Indiana 5th to 6th, Iowa 6th to 5th, Michigan 7th to 9th, Wisconsin 8th to 11th, Kentucky 9th to 12th, Missouri 10th to 8th, Tennessee 11th to 13th, Texas 12th to 7th, Virginia 13th to 16th, Georgia 14th to 15th, New Jersey 15th to 22d, Alabama 16th to 21st, Vermont 17th to 27th, Mississippi 18th and 18th, North Carolina 19th and 19th, Maine 20th to 24th, Maryland 21st to 26th, Massachusetts 22d to 20th, Connecticut 23d to 31st, Minnesota 24th to 14th, Arkansas 25th to 23d, New Hampshire 26th to 32d, South Carolina 27th to 29th, Louisiana 28th to 30th, Kansas 29th to 17th, Florida 30th to 34th, Nebraska 31st to 28th, Delaware 32d to 35th, Rhode Island 33d to 36th. Thus it will be noted that the advance made by Kansas in the period named was beyond all question the most striking among all the States of the Union, ascending on an average to one place higher each year. Minnesota is the only State approaching her, but while she was doubling her aggregate of valuation, Kansas trebled hers, and at the end had within four million dollars the valuation of Minnesota. New York, though leading in 1876 as in 1866, had $35,000,000 less valuation. Ohio losing $17,000,000 and Pennsylvania nearly $8,000,000, Kansas had $30,000,000 in 1876 to $10,000,000 in 1866.

The following tables contain an enumeration of live stock for the years 1877-8, and the increase and decrease during the year.

COUNTIES.  1877  1878 INCR. DECR. COUNTIES.  1877  1878 INCR. DECR.
Allen 3,127 4,122 995 ----- Lyon 5,592 6,377 785 -----
Anderson 2,789 2,984 195 ----- Marion 2,664 3,242 578 -----
Atchison 4,811 4,339 ----- 472 Marshall 4,530 5,304 774 -----
Barbour 188 527 339 ----- McPherson 3,961 4,863 902 -----
Barton 1,286 2,434 1,148 ----- Miami 5,943 7,239 1,296 -----
Bourbon 6,031 6,162 131 ----- Mitchell 3,038 3,837 799 -----
Brown 6,037 6,354 317 ----- Montgomery 4,643 4,851 208 -----
Butler 4,970 6,007 1,037 ----- Morris 2,371 2,650 279 -----
Chautauqua 3,067 3,467 400 ----- Nemaha 4,653 5,350 697 -----
Chase 2,511 2,385 ----- 126 Neosho 4,744 5,187 443 -----
Cherokee 3,839 5,423 1,584 ----- Norton 326 695 369 -----
Clay 3,530 4,301 771 ----- Osage 5,473 5,229 ----- 244
Cloud 3,233 4,501 1,268 ----- Osborne 1,786 2,829 1,043 -----
Coffey 3,548 3,766 218 ----- Ottawa 2,564 3,081 517 -----
Cowley 4,501 5,160 659 ----- Pawnee 534 930 396 -----
Crawford 4,589 4,962 373 ----- Phillips 1,327 1,782 455 -----
Davis 2,606 2,466 ----- 140 Pottawatomie 6,127 6,784 657 -----
Dickinson 4,826 4,922 96 ----- Reno 2,235 3,241 1,006 -----
Donipihan 4,413 4,142 ----- 271 Republic 3,711 4,481 770 -----
Douglas 7,012 6,945 ----- 67 Rice 1,621 2,070 449 -----
Edwards 187 353 166 ----- Riley 3,962 4,244 282 -----
Elk 2,755 3,088 333 ----- Rooks 283 440 157 -----
Ellis 498 557 59 ----- Rush 373 835 462 -----
Ellsworth 1,197 1,665 468 ----- Russell 1,023 984 ----- 39
Ford 54 334 280 ----- Saline 3,930 4,244 314 -----
Franklin 4,852 5,382 530 ----- Sedgwick 4,511 4,585 74 -----
Greenwood 4,080 4,118 38 ----- Shawnee 6,101 6,421 320 -----
Harvey 2,426 2,754 328 ----- Smith 2,473 3,452 979 -----
Jackson 4,445 4,970 525 ----- Sumner 3,386 4,748 1,362 -----
Jefferson 5,861 6,319 458 ----- Wabaunsee 3,470 4,021 551 -----
Jewell 3,831 5,030 1,199 ----- Washington 3,374 4,448 1,074 -----
Johnson 6,588 6,236 ----- 352 Wilson 4,452 5,163 711 -----
Labette 5,295 5,514 219 ----- Woodson 2,006 2,545 539 -----
Leavenworth 5,825 6,470 645 ----- Wyandotte 2,550 2,181 ----- 369
Lincoln 1,741 2,108 367 -----




Linn   4,922   5,850 928 ----- Total 241,208 274,450  35,322  2,080

Transcribed from First Biennial Report of the State Board of Agriculture to the Legislature of the State of Kansas, for the Years 1877-8 embracing statistical exhibits, with diagrams of the agricultural, industrial, mercantile, and other interests of the state, together with a colored outline map of the state, and sectional maps, in colors, of each organized county, showing their relative size and location, railroads, towns, post offices, school houses, water powers, etc., etc. Topeka, Kansas: Kansas State Board of Agriculture. Rand, McNally & Co., Printers and Engravers, Chicago. 1878. Transcribed by April Conder, March 2002.


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