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Kansas State Board of Agriculture
First Biennial Report

Atchison County

1878


Map of Atchison County - 1878 The first settlements were as follows: City of Atchison, in August, 1854, by George T. Challiss; Shannon township, about July 1st, 1854, by David Fizer and Joseph Gilbert; Lancaster township, November, 1854, by Charles Wilson; Grasshopper township, September 28th, 1854, by Jacob Reese; Kapioma township, February, 1855, by R. A. VanWinkle, Thomas Wood and Abraham Cline; Center township, October, 1854, by Caleb May and Freeman Giuliani; Mount Pleasant towhship, August 20th, 1854, by James Laird and Michael Wilkins; Walnut township, June 25th, 1854, by Francis P. Goddard, - The first church edifice erected was in Mount Pleasant township, in 1857, Cumberland Presbyterian; Lancaster, Lancaster township, 1858, Methodist; Walnut township, 1858, Roman Catholic; City of Atchison, 1859, Methodist; Center township, 1864, at Monrovia, Methodist; Grasshopper township, 1868, at Muscotah, Congregational. - The first school house was erected in the City of Atchison, in 1868, the Central school building; prior to that date leased buildings were used; Shannon township, January, 1857, by the school board; Lancaster township, 1863, at Lancaster, by District No. 10; Grasshopper township, 1865, by the school board; Kapioma township, at Arington, by District No. 30; Center township, October, 1857, at Pardee, by general subscription; Mount Pleasant township, November, 1858, by the school board; Walnut township, 1855, by individual enterprise. - First business established in City of Atchison, August, 1854, by George T. Challiss, general merchandise; Lancaster township, 1857, Edson Green, blacksmithing, Grasshopper township, 1858, at "Old Muscotah," Chas. B. Keith, general merchandise; Kapioma township, November, 1857, R. A. VanWinkle and Thomas Hoopes steam sawmill; Center township, 1856, at Ocena, Crosby & Brother, general merchandise, Mount Pleasant township, at Mount Pleasant, Thomas L. Fortune, Jr., general merchandise; Walnut township, at Port William, J. M. Bradley, general merchandise. - The first marriage in City of Atchison, October 17th, 1855, J. T. Darnell and Miss E. A. Simmons; Lancaster township, November, 1857, William S. Riley and Miss S. A. Lewis; Grasshopper township, 1857, Samuel Wylie and Miss Tenitia Tenery; Kapioma townhip, June, 1858, Wm. T. Brawner and Ellen Bowser; Center township, April 26th, 1856, N. Connelly and Sophia Strauffer; Mount Pleasant township, 1854, B. F. Ross and Lizzie Graham; Walnut township, April 12th, 1855, Wm. J. Young and Martha Snowdon. - First birth: City of Atchison, Thomas Woolfolk, February 28th, 1855; Shannon township, David Dickerson, February 5th, 1855; Lancaster township, Melvina May, June, 1855; Grasshopper township, Samuel Reese, September 2d, 1855; Kapioma township, Mary Miller, June, 1856; Center township, Mary Cummings, September 8th, 1857; Mount Pleasant township, Emma Martin, June 6th, 1855; Walnut township, Thomas Terry, November 20th, 1854. - First post offices: City of Atchison, established April 10th, 1855, Robert S. Kelly, postmaster; Shannon township, Good Intent, C. M. Streeper, postmaster; Lancaster township, at Lancaster, 1857, J. W. Smith, postmaster; Grasshopper township, Alexander Sharp, postmaster; Kapioma township, 1858, Arington, R. A. VanWinkle, postmaster, Center township, 1856, Ocena, R. Crosby, postmaster; Mount Pleasant township, spring of 1855, Mount Pleasant, Thomas L. Fortune, Jr., postmaster; Walnut township, April, 1855, Port William, J. M. Bradley, postmaster.


VIEW OF ATCHISON.
(From Harper's Special Geography of Kansas)

The first Board of County Commissioners, elected by the Territorial Legislature, August 25th, 1855, held its first session Monday, September 17th, 1855. At that session the county was divided into three townships, Grasshopper, Mount Pleasant and Shannon. Through subsequent changes, from time to time, the number of townships was increased to seven, with boundary lines as defined on the county map. The Atchison Town Company was organized July 27th, 1854, Col. P. T. Abell, president, Dr. J. H. Stringfellow, secretary, Col. J. N. Burnes, treasurer. The town of Atchison was incorporated by act of the Territorial Legislature, August 30th, 1855, and the City of Atchison, February 14th, 1857. The first survey of the original town was made in September, 1854, and the first sale of lots occurred September 21st, of the same year. Various additions have been made to the area of the city, extending it from 480 to about 1,500 acres. The first hotel was the "National," erected in the spring of 1855. The "Massasoit House" was opened by Col. Thomas Murphy, September 1st, 1858, and was destroyed by fire September 3d, 1873. The city was first lighted by gas December 20th, 1870. - The only Seventh Day Baptist settlement in Northern Kansas, was made in Center town. ship, south of Pardee, in October, 1857, the location having been made in June of that year, by Dennis Saunders and S. P. Griffin. A church was organized in September, 1863, by Rev. A. F. Randolph, from Crawford county, Pennsylvania; the other settlers were from Fulton and Peoria counties, Illinois.

The county was organized in 1855.

Population in 1860, 7,729; in 1870, 15,507; increase in ten years, 7,778; population in 1875, 20,187; increase in five years, 4,680; population in 1878, 20,600; increase in eighteen years, 12,871. Rural population, 8,240; city or town population, 12,360; per cent. of rural to city or town population, 40.

POPULATION of 1878, by Townships and Cities.*

TOWNSHIPS AND
CITIES.
POP. TOWNSHIPS AND
CITIES.
POP. TOWNSHIPS AND
CITIES.
POP.
Atchison City 10,400 Center 1,900 Grasshopper 1,500
Kapioma 1,050 Lancaster 1,050 Mount Pleasant 1,500
Shannon 1,700 Walnut 1,500    

* Estimated

Face of the Country. - Bottom lands, 15 per cent.; upland, 85 per cent. ; forest (Government survey) 10 per cent.; prairie, 90 per cent. Average width of bottoms from one-fourth of a mile to two miles; general surface of the country undulating, with bluffs along the Missouri river.

Timber. - Average width of timber belts not given. Varieties: cottonwood, oak, walnut, elm, maple, sycamore, ash, basswood and hickory. Acres of cultivated timber reported: cottonwood, 112; soft maple, 28; black walnut, 21; other varieties, 2 1/2. There are many other small groves of from 1 1/2 to 3 acres, principally of cottonwood, soft maple and black walnut. The numerous streams are liberally skirted with natural timber, such as cottonwood, burr oak, walnut, hackberry, elm, etc. The farmers who have planted and cultivated cottonwoods, soft maple and black walnut, report their experience as having been most successful, and specially recommend the cultivation of hard timber, walnut, ash, mulberry, etc.

Principal Streams. - In dependence creek runs east, and empties into the Missouri river; Delaware river, south, and empties into the Kansas river; Little Delaware, south, and empties into the Delaware; Deer creek, east, and empties into Independence creek; Walnut creek, east, and empties into the Missouri river; Camp creek, Little Stranger and Big Stranger, southeast, and empty into the Kansas river. The county is well supplied with springs, and good well water is reached at a depth of from twenty to thirty feet,

Coal. - Strata of coal have been discovered in many localities, but none mined for market, except in Grasshopper township, near Muscotah, and there only in a Small way. No systematic effort has been made for the development of this mineral. The quantity mined in Grasshopper township during the year was from 15,000 to 20,000 bushels.

Building Stone, etc. - Sandstone, white, blue and grey limestone, abound throughout the county; fire clay has been developed to a limited extent in Lancaster township, and mineral paint is supposed to exist in large quantities in the same township, but no organized effort has been made for its development; also an inexhaustible quantity of pottery clay, said to be very good; in Grasshopper township, blue shale is found underlying the drift deposit, or subsoil, which, when ground, makes an excellent quality of hydraulic cement.

Railroad Connections. - The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad commences at Atchison, on the Missouri river, and runs through the county in a southwestern direction; the central branch of the Union Pacific Railroad runs through the county in a direction a little north of west; the extension of the Missouri Pacific reaches Atchison via the west bank of the Missouri river; and the Atchison & Nebraska Railroad, starting front Atchison, runs northward through the county; the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad follows the opposite bank of the river, with a station at Atchison; Atchison is also one of the termini of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, and of the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad; and an iron bridge has been built across the Missouri at Atchison.

Agricultural Statistics. - Acres in the county, 261,360 ; taxable acres, 266,539 under cultivation, 106,989; cultivated to taxable acres, 40.14+ per cent., increase of cultivated acres during the year, 3,298.75.

STATEMENT showing, the Acreage of Field Crops named from 1872 to 1878, inclusive.

CROPS.
1872.
1873.
1874.
1875.
1876.
1877.
1848.
 
Winter Wheat
8,411.00
8,051.00
13,519.00
7.374.00
7,350.00
9,613,00
14,971.00
Rye
504.00
504.00
611.00
1,183.80
4,014.00
2,106.00
1,896.00
Spring Wheat
1,139.00
1,139.00
2,379.00
508.20
859.00
251.00
1,017.00
Corn
35,624.00
35,624.00
37,657.00
52,592.00
40,947.00
51,801.00
40,832.00
Barley
1,180.00
1,150.00
568.00
417.60
983.00
530.00
282.00
Oats
11,449.00
9,402.00
8,386.00
8,451.20
11,650.00
9,404 00
8,953.00
Buckwheat
92.00
150.00
36.00
156.00
187.00
70.00
38.00
Irish Potatoes
674.00
861.00
908.00
1,051.00
1,272.00
1,071.00
1,069.00
Sweet Potatoes
5.00
5.00
49.00
35.00
19.00
48.00
24.00
Sorghum
53.00
38.00
105.00
285.00
235.00
203.00
124.00
Castor Beans
4.00
1.00
44.00
6.00
52. 00
Cotton
.12
32.00
54.25
Flax
1,579.00
2,527.00
1,628.00
3,124.00
1,140.00
2,488.00
Hemp
228.00
186.00
43.00
.56.00
114.00
373.00
17 00
Tobacco
19.00
8.00
1.50
41.00
78.00
17.00
7.00
Broom Corn
50.00
173.00
491. 00
116.00
65.00
Millet and Hungarian
350.00
905.00
1,148.00
893.00
1,649.00
1,529. 00
789.00
Timothy Meadow
872.00
872.00
1,669.00
1,072.80
663.00
1,281.00
3,116.00
Clover Meadow
461.00
461.00
590. 00
116.40
46.00
457.00
435.00
Prairie Meadow
8,779.00
7,919.00
9,780,00
12,896.00
15,151.00
11,789.00
14,036.00
Timothy Pasture
66.00
63.00
145.00
168.00
218.00
216.00
333.00
Clover Pasture
54.00
82.00
274.00
45.00
12.00
155.00
141.00
Blue-Grass Pasture
875 00
717 00
1451.00
1,713.00
1,751.00
2,245.00
8,428.00
Prairie Pasture
5,575.00
6,545.00
13,403.00
10,213.00
9,565.00
9,169.00
12.928.00
 
Total
76,410.12
76,292.00
95,300.50
101,113.00
109,384.00
103.690.25
106,989.00

Increase in 6 years, 40+ per cent. Average increase per annum, 6.66+ per cent.

RANK of Atchison County in the Crops named below, as to Acreage, and in Cultivated Acreage
for the years mentioned in the foregoing table.
CROPS. 1872. 1873. 1874. 1875. 1876. 1877. 1878.
Wheat 10 17 13 34 49 34 38
Corn 10 12 11 10 12 20 27
Total Acreage in all Crops 16 14 10 18 15 24 29

 

STATEMENT showing the Acres, Product and Value of Principal Crops for 1878, to ether with the Increase and Decrease as compared with 1877.

CROPS.
ACRES IN
1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.
PRODUCT
IN 1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.
VALUE OF
PRODUCT
IN 1878.
INCREASE
OR
DECREASE
FROM 1877.
Winter Wheat - bu.
14,971.00
5,358. 00 in.
269,478.00
134,896. 00 in.
$191.329 38
$56,747.38in
Rye - bu.
1,896 00
210 00 de. 34,128 00
4.644.00 in.
10,238.40
81.00 de
Spring Wheat - bu.
1,017.00
766.00 in.
11,187.00
8,175.00 in.
5,369 76
2,809 56 in
Corn - bu.
40,832.00
10,969 00 de.
1,633,280.00
438,760.00 de.
326,656.00
191,354.00de
Barley - bu.
248.00 de.
6,486.00
5,704.00 de.
3,761.88
870 32 de
Oats - bu.
8,953.00
451.00 de.
295,446.00
33,694.00 de.
47,271.36
8,682.44 de
Buckwheat - bu.
38.00
32.00 de.
532-00
448.00 de.
425.601
358.40 de
Irish Potatoes - bu
1,069.00
2.00 de.
106,900.00
34,072.00 in.
42,760 00
8.219. 00 de
Sweet Potatoes - bu:
24.00
24. 00 de.
2,400.00
3600.00 de.
2,040.00
6,960 00 de
Sorghum - gall
124.00
79. 00 de.
14,260-00
9,085.00 de.
7,130.00
4,542 50 de
Castor Beaus - bu
52.00 de
624,00 de
624. 00 de
Cotton - lbs
4.25 de
9.222.50 de
922 25 de
Flax - bu.
2,488.00
1,348.00 in.
29,856.00
19,596.00 in.
29,856 00
19,083 00 in
Hemp - lbs.
17.00
356.00de.
15,640.00
327.520.00 de.
938 40
19,651.20 de
Tobacco - Ibs.
7.00
10.00 de.
5,180.00
7,400.00 de.
518 00
740. 00 de
Broom Corn - lbs.
65.00
51.00 de.
52,000-00
40,800.00 de.
1,950.00
1,530 00 de
Millet and Hungarian tons
789 00
740.00 de.
2,367.00
1,455.50 de.
11,835.00
7,277 50 de
Timothy Meadow - tons
3,116.00
1,835 00 in.
5,297.20
3,119.50 in.
31.783 20
18,717 00 in
Clover Meadow - tons
435.00
22.00 de.
1,087.50
55.00 de.
6,525.00
330. 00 de
Prairie Meadow - tons
14,036.00
2,247.00 in.
18,247.00
2,921.30 In.
72,988.00
11,685.20 in
Timothy Pasture - acres
333.00
117 00 in
Clover Pasture - acres
141.00
14.00 de
Blue-Grass Pasture - acres
3,428 00 1,183 00 in
Prairie Pasture - acres
12,928.00
3,759.00 in
Total
106,989-00
3,298.75 in.
$793.381.98
$143,095.07 de

A GOOD YIELD. - Statement of W. M. Walker, of Effingham:

Wheat. - Fultz variety: grown on section 21, township 6, range 18, four acres sown September 16th, 1877, harvested June 27th, 1878. Soil was old ground and upland. The ground was plowed about August 1st, and left until seeding time, when It was sown with a drill. Yield was thirty-five bushels per acre; cost of producing crop was as follows:

Plowing
.75
Drilling
.25
Cutting
.65
Binding
1.00
Stacking
.40
Threshing
2.10
   Total cost per acre
$5.15

The seed I procured from Western Pennsylvania, it being a favorite In that locality. I see that it is raised extensively in the southern part of this State.

Value of Garden Produce, Poultry and Eggs Sold during the Year. - Garden produce, $9,948; poultry and eggs, $6,762.

Old Corn on Hand. - Old corn on hand March 1st, 1878, 290,677 bushels, or an average of 71 bushels to each family.

Dairy Products. - Cheese manufactured in 1875, 6,350 lbs.; in 1878, 24,091 lbs.; increase, 17,741 lbs. Butter manufactured in 1875, 179,487 lbs.; in 1878, 226,024 lbs.; increase, 46,537 lbs.

Farm Animals. - Number of horses, in 1877, 4,811; in 1878, 4,339; decrease, 472. Mules and asses, in 1877, 818; in 1878, 981; increase, 163. Milch cows, in 1877, 4,951; in 1878, 4,638; decrease, 313. Other cattle, in 1877, 9,815; in 1878, 10,271; increase, 456. Sheep, in 1877, 1,572; in 1878, 1,625; increase, 53. Swine, in 1877, 14,238: in 1878,17,976; increase, 3,738.

Sheep Killed by Dogs. - Number of sheep killed by dogs, 62; value of sheep killed by (logs, $186.

Wool. - Clip of 1877, 4,173 lbs.

Value of Animals Slaughtered. - Value of animals slaughtered And sold for slaughter during the year, $241,715.15.

Horticulture - Number of acres nurseries, 13. Number of trees in bearing: apple, 65,986; pear, 1,622; peach, 72,853; plum, 2,099; cherry, 15,705. Number of trees not in bearing: apple, 87,344; pear, 1,659; peach, 21,308; plum, 980; cherry, 6,157.

Herd Law. - The herd law is not in force in this county. It is urged in favor of the law that it would be less expensive than to build and maintain fences. Against it, that it would be unjust to settlers who have their lands already fenced; that the stock raiser should take care of his stock, the grain-grower of his grain, and that good fences are necessary for the protection of both; that the law operates against stock-raising, the most profitable branch of farming in Kansas, and which should be encouraged, not retarded.

Fences. - Stone, 15,517 rods; cost, $27,154.75; rail, 31,201 rods; cost, $42,121.35; board, 149,252 rods; cost, $209,852.80; wire, 83,000 rods; cost, $58,100; hedge, 167,941 rods; cost, $67,176.40. Total rods of fence, 446,911; total cost, $404,405,30.

Apiaculture. - Number of stands of bees, 954; pounds of honey, 15,468; wax, 166.

Value of Agricultural Implements. - Amount invested in agricultural implements, $37,712.

Manufacture. - City of Atchison; steam flouring mills, 3; capital invested, $58,000; steam furniture factory, capital, $15,000; wagon and agricultural implement manufactories, 3; capital invested, $12,500; steam breweries, 2; capital invested, $30,000; cigar manufactories, 2; capital, $8,000; steam foundry, capital, $30,000; steam oil mill, capital, $10,000; brick manufactory, capital, $1,000; soap factory, capital, $1,000. Center township: steam and wind flouring mill, capital, $2,500. Grasshopper township: steam saw mill, capital, $1,000; steam and water flouring mill, capital, $5,000. Kapioma township: steam and water flouring mill, capital, $5,000. Lancaster township: horse power grist mill, capital, $500. Walnut township: steam saw and grist mill, capital, $2,500.

Valuation and Indebtedness. - Assessed valuation of personal property, $669,530; railroad property, $462,665.49; total assessed valuation of all property, $4,356,985.49; true valuation of all property, $7,201,642.48. Total indebtedness of county, township, city and school districts, $902,991.44; per cent. of indebtedness to assessed valuation, 20+.

Newspaper History. - The Squatter Sovereign, a Democratic, pro-slavery sheet, was the first newspaper published in Atchison county. It was established in the city of Atchison, February 3, 1855, by Robert S. Kelly and Dr. John W. Stringfellow. In the spring or early summer of 1857, it was purchased by a company composed of S. C. Pomeroy, Robert McBratney and Frank G. Adams, and was converted Into a Free-State paper. Subsequently, and during the same year, Mr. Pomeroy became the sole owner. In the fall of 1857, he sold the establishment to O. F. Short, who, In February, 1958, sold the same to John A. Martin. On the 20th of that month, the paper appeared under the name of the Atchison Champion, which has ever since remained under the same ownership, and has been edited by Col. Martin, except during the time he was absent in the army. The Daily Champion was first issued March 22, 1865, and has ever since been conducted under the same management. The Champion os Republican In politics.

The Sumner Gazette was first issued at Sumner, September 12, 1857, by Cone Brothers, and survived until August 27, 1859. A daily edition was commenced in September, 1857, and continued through the memorable campaign of that fall, warmly supporting the Free-State cause and its leading advocates.

The Western Spy was established at Sumner, in 1859-60, by Henry Baxter and Samuel McBride, the office and material being rented from the Gazette establishment. The Spy existed but a few weeks, and the material, lying idle until 1863, was during that year removed to Seneca, and employed in printing the first paper issued in Nemaha county.

The Kansas Zeitung, a German weekly paper, was established in Atchison in July, 1857, by Dr. Charles F. Kob, who, early in 1859, sold the establishment to L. Sussman, who shortly thereafter removed it to Leavenworth.

The first number of the Union was issued at Atchison by G. O. Chase, June 4, 1859. It was purchased by Adams & Stebbins in the winter of 1861, and during the succeeding winter was sold to Cochran Brothers. By them it was transferred, early in 1863, to Leland & Marion, who published the paper for about a year, when it was started for Platte City, Missouri, but the entire material was capsized in a creek on the way.

A Polish printer, named Pfeifer, established a small weekly in 1859, printed half in English and half in German. It existed only a few months.

The Atchison Bulletin, a Democratic paper, formerly the Lecompton Democrat, was published by Driggs, Faris & Moore, the first number being issued June 20, 1861. Its publication continued until December of the same year, and early in 1862, the material was removed to Leavenworth, where it was employed in establishing the Leavenworth Inquirer.

The Union Banner was issued as a Republican daily campaign paper, by John A. Martin, of the Champion, during an exciting canvass for city officers in 1861.

The Atchison Anti-Jayhawker, a Democratic daily campaign sheet, was published by Cochran Brothers during the city canvass in the spring of 1862.

The Democratic Standard, published by W. J. Marion, was first issued November 29,1862, but was continued only for three months.

The Atchison Free Press, a Republican daily paper, first appeared May 5, 1864, published by F. G. Adams. In April, 1865, Frank A. Root became a partner in the enterprise. L. R. Elliott became assistant editor with Mr. Adams in September, 1866, and editor and joint proprietor with Mr. Root in April, 1867. He disposed of his interest February 10, 1868. August 11. 1868, the Free Press was consolidated with the Champion, Martin & Root being the publishers of the consolidated journal, Mr. Adams retiring. Mr. Root retired in the spring of 1869.

Die Fackel, a German weekly, was removed from Wyandotte to Atchison, January 1, 1868, and was published there until January, 1869, by H. W. Kastor, when it was removed to St. Joseph, Missouri, and consolidated with the Valksblatt.

The Atchison Patriot, a Democratic daily and weekly paper, was established by Nelson Adams, October 25, 1867. In September, 1868. it passed into the hands of H. Clay Park & Co., the firm being composed of H. Clay Park, B. P. Waggoner, and Nelson Abbott. In October of the same year, it was sold to C. F. and C. P. Cochran, and subsequently the ownership returned to Nelson Abbott, who continued the publication until December 1, 1875. The paper was then purchased by Park & Vandergrift. Afterwards, E. W. Beall was admitted into the firm, and the paper is now published by them under the firm name of H. Clay Park & Co.

The Globe, a Republican daily and weekly paper, was established by a stock company, and the first number was issued April 27, 1873. Its publication continued until December 14. of the same year. Among the editorial writers employed at intervals during the existence of the Globe, were A. W. Wagenhals, John B. Dutton, Rev. E. Cooper, R. F. Smith and F. G. Adams.

The Courier, a German weekly, was started by Edward Fleischer, editor and proprietor, February 14,1874. In January, 1878, the material was removed to Topeka, since which time two editions of the paper have been issued, one dated at Topeka, the other at Atchison.

The Little Globe, a small local daily paper, independent in politics, published by Howe & Co., was first issued December 8, 1877, and has been continued to the present time.

The Atchison Banner, a German weekly, was established March 1, 1878, by C. F. Kurth & Co., C. F. Kurth, editor, and is still continued.

Of the six dailies, not including campaign editions, which have been established in the county, three survive - the Champion, Patriot and Little Globe. Of the fifteen weeklies (ten English and five German) that have been published in the county since its organization, there still exist four - Champion and Patriot (English), and Courier and Banner (German).

Schools. - Number of organized districts, 68; school population, 7,466; average salary of teachers, per month, males, $41.25; females, $33.63. School houses built during 1878, frame, 5. Total number of school houses, 72; log, 2; frame, 52; brick, 6; stone, 12. Value of all school property, $128,567. The majority of the grounds are not yet ornamented with trees. Some, however, are shaded naturally, oak and hickory being the varieties. A few schools have begun planting trees, cottonwood and soft maples being principally used. The question has been brought to the notice of all, and a growing interest has been excited.

Churches. - Baptist: organizations, 8; membership, 700; church edifices, 3; value of church property, $10,000. Congregational: organizations, 4; membership, 216; church edifices, 2; value of church property, $15,000. Episcopal: organizations, 1; membership, 115; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $18,000. Lutheran: organizations, 2; membership, 60; church edifices, 1; value of church property, $4,500. Methodist Episcopal: organizations, 7; membership, 315; church edifices, 5; value of church property, $30,000. Presbyterian: organizations, 4; membership, 350; church edifices, 4; value of church property, $19,800. Roman Catholic: organizations, 7; membership, 5,000; church edifices, 5; value of church property, $50,000.

Transcribed from First Biennial Report of the State Board of Agriculture to the Legislature of the State of Kansas, for the Years 1877-8 embracing statistical exhibits, with diagrams of the agricultural, industrial, mercantile, and other interests of the state, together with a colored outline map of the state, and sectional maps, in colors, of each organizaed county, showing their relative size and location, railroads, towns, post offices, school houses, water powers, etc., etc. Topeka, Kansas: Kansas State Board of Agriculture. Rand, McNally & Co., Printers and Engravers, Chicago. 1878.


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Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward


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