From A Biographical History of Central Kansas, Vol. II, p. 893
published by The Lewis Publishing Co, Chicago & New York, 1902

H. L. GREEN

   H L Green, who is numbered among the leading farmers of Rice county, is descended from an honored pioneer family of the Sunflower state, who have ably borne their part in reclaiming the wild land for purposes of civilization and nobly performed their part in the upbuilding and development of this section of the state.  He was born in Gentry county, Missouri, October 29, 1869, and was reared to the honest toil of farming and stock-raising, receiving his education in the common schools of this state.  He is a son of H L and Mary A (Stanley) Green, natives respectively of Indiana and Ohio, and their marriage was celebrated in the former state.  The paternal grandfather, John Green, was a native of Kentucky, but became a pioneer settler of Indiana, where he followed farming as a life occupation, and there his death occurred.  His children were William, Wyatt, H L, Katie, who became the wife of J Studa; and Juda, who became Mrs Elliott.

   H L Green, the father of our subject, was reared in the state of his nativity, where he was also married, remaining there until after the birth of his eldest son.  He then removed to Missouri, locating in Gentry county, where he improved his farm, and there his five children were born.  During his residence there the Civil war was inaugurated and he loyally defended the stars and stripes as a member of the State Militia.  He was engaged in guard duty and in scouting after bushwhackers and guerrillas.  In 1872 he sold his property in Missouri and came to Kansas, casting his lot with the pioneer settlers of Rice county, locating a homestead on Cow Creek.  He improved this place, and there his widow now resides with her son, H L Green, Jr.  He gave much of his time to the raising of stock, raising horses principally, and he also followed the carpenterís trade to some extent, thus materially aiding in the upbuilding of his adopted county.  The family suffered many hardships and difficulties during the pioneer epoch, but they bore all with fortitude, and assisted nobly in the work of developing new land.  Mr Green was an active worker in the ranks of the Republican party, and, although never an aspirant for office, he filled many minor township offices, including those of trustee and assessor of Lincoln township.  In 1884, he went to California, where he followed the carpenterís trade, and his death occurred in a hospital at Fresno, that state, while undergoing an operation.  His life had been characterized by energy, perseverance and hard work, and he commanded the respect and confidence of all with whom he came in contact.

   His widow survived him until October 22, 1901, making her home at the old family residence on Cow Creek.  She was born in Ohio, in 1834, a daughter of Charles and Martha (Howlett) Stanley, the former a native of England and the latter of Virginia.  Their marriage was celebrated in the Old Dominion, and later they removed to Ohio, and in pioneer days took up their abode in Indiana, where the father died.  He followed the profession of school teaching as a means of livelihood, and was a broad-minded and intelligent gentleman.  They were the parents of six children, as follows:  James, Andrew, Thomas, Charles, Leander and Mary A.  The latter, the mother of our subject, was only three years of age at the time of the fatherís death, and her mother afterward married William Beverlin, who was a farmer and by whom she had two children, George and Frank.  Mr and Mrs Stanley were consistent and worthy members of the Methodist church.  Unto Mr and Mrs Green were born six children, namely:  John, a retired farmer of Lyons; Wyatt, a resident of Hutchinson, Kansas; James, of Nebraska; George, who died in California; H L, our subject; and Ida, the wife of M James.  The mother of these children holds membership relations with the Methodist church, and in her every day life exemplifies her Christian belief.

   H L Green, the immediate subject of this review, was only two years of age when he was brought by his parents to Kansas.  He has never lived away from the old homestead, and since his fatherís death has kindly cared for his mother in her declining years.  In addition to the raising of the cereals best adapted to this soil and climate he is also engaged in the raising of stock and in general mercantile business in Chase, having purchased the stock of H W Hedges, and he has met with a well merited degree of success in all branches of his business.  He is recognized as an enterprising and prominent citizen and he commands the confidence and respect of all who know him, his circle of friends being only limited by the circle of his acquaintances.  He has ever taken an active interest in the affairs of the Republican party and keeps well informed on the issues and questions of the day, so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument.  He has been honored with a number of positions of public trust, and in addition to many minor offices he has served on the township board for a number of years and is now filling his third term as township trustee and assessor.  February 27, 1902, he was appointed postmaster at Chase, taking possession March 18 following.

   In his social relations he is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity.  Although a young man, he has achieved a success of which he has every reason to be proud, and those who are familiar with his career predict for him still greater success in the future. 

   January 1, 1902, he was united in marriage with Edith Rintoul, of Chase, who was born in Jersey county, Illinois, in 1880, a daughter of David and Martha J Rintoul.