J-L  OBITUARIES

OF

POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY


RESIDENTS




   The following obituaries are part of the obituaries found on the Pottawatomie County, KSGenWeb Project. The size of these files have grown so an Index has been created.

   The following obituaries were contributed in hopes they would be helpful in someone's research.  I believe this is a wonderful idea and will gladly post other obituaries to this site.  As this project is growing, I will set the following rule - deceased must have been born in the 1800's.

The obituaries will be listed alphabetically on each page and have the submitter's e-mail and name at the end of the obituary.  As stated, an index has been developed and you will find a link back to the index at the end of each obituary.   Please send your obituaries to phoebehat@yahoo.com and they will posted within a few days.

Coordinator's Note: Names starting with othen then J-L are located on other page/s. Go to Index to make selection.

J

JULIEN, John

DEATH OF JOHN JULIEN February 1901 The death of John Julien, which was briefly recorded in the times of last week, occurred at his home in Wamego about eight o’clock p.m., Thursday, February 21st. he had been in failing health for about a year, but his last illness, lagrippe, was of only a few weeks’ duration. His death, while not unexpected was a source of sincere regret to a great many people for he was widely and favorably known in Pottwatomie and Wabaunsee counties. The funeral services were held Sunday morning at eleven o’clock at the first M. E. church of which Mr. Julien had been a member since 1877, and a trustee for many years. The church was crowded and many who came could not gain entrance. The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. James Beatty Bollman, and the music was by Mrs. W. D. Embly, Mrs. J. E. Stewart, J. T. Genn, J. E. Stewart, William Stewart, and the Rev Mr. Bollman. In the procession to the Wamego cemetery where the body was interred, the FAA led, followed by the AOUW, relatives, and friends. The pallbearers were W. L. Jones, Wm. Gilmore, W F Asmussen, J H Wilson, Wm Buzzard and Henry Buehman, of the FAA and George Trout, J L Prunty, Aaron Welty, A T MacMillian, WM Bechwith, and John Regnier of the AOUW. John Julien was born in Willancourt province of Luxembourg, Belgium, November 10, 1839. In 1858 he came to America and settled in Ohio. He served with the Federal army in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting at Cincinnati in Co G of the 5th Ohio regiment of US Volunteers. His army service extended over a period of three years and three months. When the war was over he was married to Miss Eleanor Snowhilll, at Vera Cruz, Brown Co., OH. Mr. and Mrs. Julien spent the first six years of their married life at Indian Hill, Hamilton Co, OH moving from there to Butler county, Ohio where they lived for five years. In 1877 they came to Kansas and settled on their farm in Wabaunsee (county) where they lived until November of last year. At that time they came to Wamego to occupy a new home which Mr. Julien had just built on Poplar street. Mr. Julien was the father of five children of which a daughter and two sons are living. Mrs. Julien also survives him, and he has a sister and two brothers living in Belgium. His daughter is Mrs. Frances Julien-Perine of Louisville and his sons are William Wesley Julien, and Lewis Elmer Julien, who live a few miles south of Wamego in Wabaunsee. Mr. Julien also survives him and he has a sister and two brothers living in Belgium. Mr. Julien left considerable property. When Mr. Julien came to America in 1858 he was accompanied by six others, all from his home in Belgium -- his brother the late Peter Julien, of Wabaunsee, Joseph LaFontaine, also of Wabaunsee, and four others. Mr. LaFontaine is the only survivor of the party. CARD OF THANKS We desire to thank our kind neighbors and many friends, also the fraternal orders in which he was a member, for their kindness and sympathy during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father. MRS. ELEANOR JULIEN AND FAMILY Source: Unknown Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner, Olpe KS
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JULIEN, John Peter

APRIL 15, 1892 JULIEN - died in this city Wednesday, April 13, 1892 at 3:50 pm. John Peter JULIEN aged 55 years. Deceased was born at Willancourt, Belgium in May 1837. He came to American in 1855 and located at Milwaukee. Soon after, he moved to Cincinnati and remained in the vicinity of that city until the breaking out of the war in 1861. He enlisted with his brother John for three months service under the call for 75,000 men. The two brothers were assigned to Co G 5th Vol. Both re- enlisted under the second call for 300,000 men and both were reassigned to the same company and regiment. The deceased was identified with the engagements at Winchester, Port Republic, Antietium, Cedar Mountain, Chancellorsville, two Battles of Bull Run and Gettysburg. After the latter battle, Mr. Julien’s regiment was detached for one month on the Old Baltic expedition and sent down to New York to enforce the draft. After a month the regiment was returned to the main army along the Rapidan river and after three days was detached with General Joe Hober and 30,000 men at the end of a nine day journey on a train to Bridgeport. At the latter place he was taken sick with exposure and put in the Chattanooga hospital. After three weeks he again joined his regiment, though far from well. In the spring of 1864 when the start was made on the march to Atlanta under Sherman, Mr. Julien was so ill that it became necessary for his brother John and comrades to carry him on the march. When the army reached Chattanooga, Mr. Julien was placed at Nihiserville Hospital. Still sick, he rejoined his regiment June 28, 1864 to be mustered out of service. Returning to Ohio, Mr. Julien made his home at Madisonville. The following spring (1865) Mr. Julien married Miss Jennie Mary Hamilton of Circleville, Ohio and followed farming in Butler County until the fall of 1870 when he came to Kansas. Mr. Julien and his brother John both purchased 100 acres two miles south of Wamego, and while building his home lived in the Beckwith house. As a Kansas farmer, Mr. Julien prospered. To his original purchase, he added a 40 and then a 60. He continued to farm and enjoyed his two hundred acres until the first of last month, when in failing health he rented his farm to his son-in-law, Joseph (Joel) Crouch and moved to his town property in this city. Deceased leaves an affectionate wife and five children, three brothers and one sister to mourn his loss. All of the children were at their father’s death bed. Charles, at home, Sallie, wife of Frank Oliver, Wichita, Eva, wife of J Crouch of the home farm, Omie, youngest daughter at home. The brothers, Joseph and Frank, also the sister Christina still reside at the home town in Belgium. His brother, John well known here, resides in Wabaunsee township. The parents, Frank and Frances Julien are dead. Deceased was universally respected and beloved. He was a most excellent husband and father, brother, citizen, and friend. He was an active and enthusiastic member of O P Morton Post and an attendant at the Presbyterian Church. In midnight of their gloom the afflicted wife and family have the sympathy of this entire community. The funeral was held this morning at 10:00 from the Methodist Episcopal church, in charge of the G.A.R., Rev. Mr. Shockley officiating. Interment was made in the family lot in the Wamego cemetery, where two children are buried. Source: Unknown Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner, Olpe KS
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JULIEN, Naomie Adelle

OBITUARY Naomie Adelle Julien, daughter of Mrs. Mary J Julien died at her home in this city last Saturday evening, June 15 1895 at 10:30 aged 12 years 9 months and 16 days. The deceased was born in Wabaunsee County October 24, 1882 and moved to Wamego with her parents in 1892. She was a regular attended at the Presbyterian Sunday School and in the advanced class in room No 6 in the public school. The funeral services were held at the residence of Mrs. Julien, being prostrated with grief was unable to leave her bed. The service was preached by Rev. W. L. Morris, Revs Coffey and Johnson assisting in the exercies. Her classmates of room No 6 attended the last sad rites in a body. "Oma" was loved and respected by all and her death was a terrible blow not only to her mother and relatives but to her numerous friends. Her remains were buried in the city cemetery. The mother, in her second sad affliction, has the heartfelt sympathy of the community. The following were the pall-bearers. R R Bittman, Harry Hathaway, Lester Jennings, Hary Burkholder, Ed Simpson and Walter Walkley. Mrs. Frank Oliver of Wichita came up last Sunday to attend the funeral of her sister, Oma Julien. She returned home yesterday. Source: "The Wamego Times", Wamego, Pottawatomie County, KS 21 June 1895 Submited by: Gayle Woods Gardner
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JULIEN, Victors S.

VICTOR S. JULIEN The death of Victor S. Julien occurred at his home two miles south of Wamego, Saturday morning, November 17th, 1923. He was born in Hamilton, Ohio, February 17th 1868, and had attained the age of 55 years and 9 months at the time of his death. He was the eldest son of J. P. and Mary Julien. The family moved from Ohio to Kansas in 1871 and settled on the farm south of Wamego where they continued to reside all the rest of their life and, except for a few years after he was first married, Victor Julien had never lived anywhere else than on the old home place ever since he came to Kansas. On January 30th, 1893, he was united in marriage to Isabelle Gabot. To this union two sons were born, Edgar J., of Wamego, and Charles Leroy, of Davenport, Washington. Because of his long residence in this community, Mr. Julien was well known to a very large circle of acquaintances and friends. He was a man who made friends readily and held them in high esteem. He was a hard working man and was always busy, but never too busy to take time to help somebody else if he saw they needed him. It had been repeatedly said of him that he (was) much better to other people than to himself. He never wanted anybody to sympathize with him or pity him. He always felt able to look out for himself and care for his own interests. It was one of the pathetic phases of his illness to see him get up out of bed and go out and try to do his daily tasks when he ought to have been resting quietly. He simply did not want any one to wait on him. It moved him to very deep appreciation when the Odd Fellows of Wamego Lodge NO. 80, of which he was a distinguished member, went over in large numbers and with the assistance of some of his neighbors gathered his corn for him one day recently. He wished he might repay them in some way, but if the good brother only knew it, they were repaying him for his many acts of kindness rendered to the poor and needy in the days of his life when he was strong and able to do it. He was a man among men, and his memory will linger long with those who knew him and loved him. Besides his wife and two sons mentioned above, he leaves one daughter- in-law, one granddaughter, one sister, Mrs. J. A. Crouch of Topeka, and one brother, Charles of Wamego, other relatives and a host of friends to mourn his untimely departure. Besides his father and mother, two sisters have preceded him in death, Oma and Mrs. F. J. Oliver. Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the M. E. Church of Wamego, conducted by Rev. L. B. Pruitt. The members of the Odd Fellows Lodge attended in a body and had charge of the burial services at the grave. He was also a member of M.W.A. Lodge NO. 1219. The funeral services were largely attended and the floral offerings were many and beautiful. Burial was in the family lot in the cemetery at Wamego. Source: "The Wamego Times", Wamego, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, Friday, November 23, 1923, page 1 Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner
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J

JULIEN, John

DEATH OF JOHN JULIEN February 1901 The death of John Julien, which was briefly recorded in the times of last week, occurred at his home in Wamego about eight o’clock p.m., Thursday, February 21st. he had been in failing health for about a year, but his last illness, lagrippe, was of only a few weeks’ duration. His death, while not unexpected was a source of sincere regret to a great many people for he was widely and favorably known in Pottwatomie and Wabaunsee counties. The funeral services were held Sunday morning at eleven o’clock at the first M. E. church of which Mr. Julien had been a member since 1877, and a trustee for many years. The church was crowded and many who came could not gain entrance. The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. James Beatty Bollman, and the music was by Mrs. W. D. Embly, Mrs. J. E. Stewart, J. T. Genn, J. E. Stewart, William Stewart, and the Rev Mr. Bollman. In the procession to the Wamego cemetery where the body was interred, the FAA led, followed by the AOUW, relatives, and friends. The pallbearers were W. L. Jones, Wm. Gilmore, W F Asmussen, J H Wilson, Wm Buzzard and Henry Buehman, of the FAA and George Trout, J L Prunty, Aaron Welty, A T MacMillian, WM Bechwith, and John Regnier of the AOUW. John Julien was born in Willancourt province of Luxembourg, Belgium, November 10, 1839. In 1858 he came to America and settled in Ohio. He served with the Federal army in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting at Cincinnati in Co G of the 5th Ohio regiment of US Volunteers. His army service extended over a period of three years and three months. When the war was over he was married to Miss Eleanor Snowhilll, at Vera Cruz, Brown Co., OH. Mr. and Mrs. Julien spent the first six years of their married life at Indian Hill, Hamilton Co, OH moving from there to Butler county, Ohio where they lived for five years. In 1877 they came to Kansas and settled on their farm in Wabaunsee (county) where they lived until November of last year. At that time they came to Wamego to occupy a new home which Mr. Julien had just built on Poplar street. Mr. Julien was the father of five children of which a daughter and two sons are living. Mrs. Julien also survives him, and he has a sister and two brothers living in Belgium. His daughter is Mrs. Frances Julien-Perine of Louisville and his sons are William Wesley Julien, and Lewis Elmer Julien, who live a few miles south of Wamego in Wabaunsee. Mr. Julien also survives him and he has a sister and two brothers living in Belgium. Mr. Julien left considerable property. When Mr. Julien came to America in 1858 he was accompanied by six others, all from his home in Belgium -- his brother the late Peter Julien, of Wabaunsee, Joseph LaFontaine, also of Wabaunsee, and four others. Mr. LaFontaine is the only survivor of the party. CARD OF THANKS We desire to thank our kind neighbors and many friends, also the fraternal orders in which he was a member, for their kindness and sympathy during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father. MRS. ELEANOR JULIEN AND FAMILY Source: Unknown Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner, Olpe KS
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JULIEN, John Peter

APRIL 15, 1892 JULIEN - died in this city Wednesday, April 13, 1892 at 3:50 pm. John Peter JULIEN aged 55 years. Deceased was born at Willancourt, Belgium in May 1837. He came to American in 1855 and located at Milwaukee. Soon after, he moved to Cincinnati and remained in the vicinity of that city until the breaking out of the war in 1861. He enlisted with his brother John for three months service under the call for 75,000 men. The two brothers were assigned to Co G 5th Vol. Both re- enlisted under the second call for 300,000 men and both were reassigned to the same company and regiment. The deceased was identified with the engagements at Winchester, Port Republic, Antietium, Cedar Mountain, Chancellorsville, two Battles of Bull Run and Gettysburg. After the latter battle, Mr. Julien’s regiment was detached for one month on the Old Baltic expedition and sent down to New York to enforce the draft. After a month the regiment was returned to the main army along the Rapidan river and after three days was detached with General Joe Hober and 30,000 men at the end of a nine day journey on a train to Bridgeport. At the latter place he was taken sick with exposure and put in the Chattanooga hospital. After three weeks he again joined his regiment, though far from well. In the spring of 1864 when the start was made on the march to Atlanta under Sherman, Mr. Julien was so ill that it became necessary for his brother John and comrades to carry him on the march. When the army reached Chattanooga, Mr. Julien was placed at Nihiserville Hospital. Still sick, he rejoined his regiment June 28, 1864 to be mustered out of service. Returning to Ohio, Mr. Julien made his home at Madisonville. The following spring (1865) Mr. Julien married Miss Jennie Mary Hamilton of Circleville, Ohio and followed farming in Butler County until the fall of 1870 when he came to Kansas. Mr. Julien and his brother John both purchased 100 acres two miles south of Wamego, and while building his home lived in the Beckwith house. As a Kansas farmer, Mr. Julien prospered. To his original purchase, he added a 40 and then a 60. He continued to farm and enjoyed his two hundred acres until the first of last month, when in failing health he rented his farm to his son-in-law, Joseph (Joel) Crouch and moved to his town property in this city. Deceased leaves an affectionate wife and five children, three brothers and one sister to mourn his loss. All of the children were at their father’s death bed. Charles, at home, Sallie, wife of Frank Oliver, Wichita, Eva, wife of J Crouch of the home farm, Omie, youngest daughter at home. The brothers, Joseph and Frank, also the sister Christina still reside at the home town in Belgium. His brother, John well known here, resides in Wabaunsee township. The parents, Frank and Frances Julien are dead. Deceased was universally respected and beloved. He was a most excellent husband and father, brother, citizen, and friend. He was an active and enthusiastic member of O P Morton Post and an attendant at the Presbyterian Church. In midnight of their gloom the afflicted wife and family have the sympathy of this entire community. The funeral was held this morning at 10:00 from the Methodist Episcopal church, in charge of the G.A.R., Rev. Mr. Shockley officiating. Interment was made in the family lot in the Wamego cemetery, where two children are buried. Source: Unknown Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner, Olpe KS
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JULIEN, Naomie Adelle

OBITUARY Naomie Adelle Julien, daughter of Mrs. Mary J Julien died at her home in this city last Saturday evening, June 15 1895 at 10:30 aged 12 years 9 months and 16 days. The deceased was born in Wabaunsee County October 24, 1882 and moved to Wamego with her parents in 1892. She was a regular attended at the Presbyterian Sunday School and in the advanced class in room No 6 in the public school. The funeral services were held at the residence of Mrs. Julien, being prostrated with grief was unable to leave her bed. The service was preached by Rev. W. L. Morris, Revs Coffey and Johnson assisting in the exercies. Her classmates of room No 6 attended the last sad rites in a body. "Oma" was loved and respected by all and her death was a terrible blow not only to her mother and relatives but to her numerous friends. Her remains were buried in the city cemetery. The mother, in her second sad affliction, has the heartfelt sympathy of the community. The following were the pall-bearers. R R Bittman, Harry Hathaway, Lester Jennings, Hary Burkholder, Ed Simpson and Walter Walkley. Mrs. Frank Oliver of Wichita came up last Sunday to attend the funeral of her sister, Oma Julien. She returned home yesterday. Source: "The Wamego Times", Wamego, Pottawatomie County, KS 21 June 1895 Submited by: Gayle Woods Gardner
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JULIEN, Victors S.

VICTOR S. JULIEN The death of Victor S. Julien occurred at his home two miles south of Wamego, Saturday morning, November 17th, 1923. He was born in Hamilton, Ohio, February 17th 1868, and had attained the age of 55 years and 9 months at the time of his death. He was the eldest son of J. P. and Mary Julien. The family moved from Ohio to Kansas in 1871 and settled on the farm south of Wamego where they continued to reside all the rest of their life and, except for a few years after he was first married, Victor Julien had never lived anywhere else than on the old home place ever since he came to Kansas. On January 30th, 1893, he was united in marriage to Isabelle Gabot. To this union two sons were born, Edgar J., of Wamego, and Charles Leroy, of Davenport, Washington. Because of his long residence in this community, Mr. Julien was well known to a very large circle of acquaintances and friends. He was a man who made friends readily and held them in high esteem. He was a hard working man and was always busy, but never too busy to take time to help somebody else if he saw they needed him. It had been repeatedly said of him that he (was) much better to other people than to himself. He never wanted anybody to sympathize with him or pity him. He always felt able to look out for himself and care for his own interests. It was one of the pathetic phases of his illness to see him get up out of bed and go out and try to do his daily tasks when he ought to have been resting quietly. He simply did not want any one to wait on him. It moved him to very deep appreciation when the Odd Fellows of Wamego Lodge NO. 80, of which he was a distinguished member, went over in large numbers and with the assistance of some of his neighbors gathered his corn for him one day recently. He wished he might repay them in some way, but if the good brother only knew it, they were repaying him for his many acts of kindness rendered to the poor and needy in the days of his life when he was strong and able to do it. He was a man among men, and his memory will linger long with those who knew him and loved him. Besides his wife and two sons mentioned above, he leaves one daughter- in-law, one granddaughter, one sister, Mrs. J. A. Crouch of Topeka, and one brother, Charles of Wamego, other relatives and a host of friends to mourn his untimely departure. Besides his father and mother, two sisters have preceded him in death, Oma and Mrs. F. J. Oliver. Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the M. E. Church of Wamego, conducted by Rev. L. B. Pruitt. The members of the Odd Fellows Lodge attended in a body and had charge of the burial services at the grave. He was also a member of M.W.A. Lodge NO. 1219. The funeral services were largely attended and the floral offerings were many and beautiful. Burial was in the family lot in the cemetery at Wamego. Source: "The Wamego Times", Wamego, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, Friday, November 23, 1923, page 1 Submitted by: Gayle Woods Gardner
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K

KEMP, James William

KEMP -- James W. , May 17, age 87; father of Newton, Clement, Edward and Robert, Vancouver, Louis, Clarence and David, Portland, Mrs. Grace Ellis, Portland, Mrs. Monica Nugent, Ridgefield,Washington, Mrs. Marie Iverson and Mrs. Cecilla Christenson, of Vancouver; 26 grandchildren; 37 great grandchildren; 10 great great grandchildren. Requiem mass 9 a.m. Tuesday, May 21, at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Vancouver. Interment Mt. Calvary Cemetery. Recitation of rosary 7:30 p.m. Monday evening at HAMILTON-MYLAN FUNERAL Home, Vancouver. Source: Obituary from THE OREGONIAN newspaper Micro Film Funeral Notices, Page 33, Sunday May 19, 1968 James William KEMP was the son of James Newton KEMP. He was born in Saint Marys, Pottawatomie, Kansas August 7, 1880 and died in Portland, OR. May 17, 1968 Submitted by: Lisa Johnson
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KEMP, James Newton

Death Comes to Father of War Hero Newt Kemp Retired Junk Dealer Passes To His Reward at 86 The parting of the ways came November 5 for Mr. and Mrs. .J. N. Kemp after a wedded career of 63 years. Mr. Kemp died at the age of 86, leaving among others the only Gold Star Mother in St. Marys township. Their six children and fifty-four grandchildren, great grandchildren, and great great grandchildren had included a son, Pvt. Floyd Kemp, who was killed in action in the Argonne Forrest a few days before the signing of the Armistice in 1918. In memory of him the Kemps gave the bell which is now heard from the tower of the Methodist church. The eldist of sixteen children in his family, "Newt" Kemp was born October 29, 1856 near Carthage, Tennessee--in Smith county, "just a holler or two across the mountain" from the birthplace of his bride-to-be. The retired drayman and junk dealer came to St. Mary's Mission in 1877, the year the Lutheran church was built, he always recollected. Polyanna Petross arrived here by covered wagon in 1879 and on July 17 of that year they were married. The pioneer couple became the parents of six children, one dying in infancy, Floyd in 1918 and Mrs. Laura Van Horn a short time later. The venerable Durink streeter is survived by his 81-year-old widow and three children: Jim of Portland, Oregon: Harve of Vancouver, Washington and Mrs. May Short of St. Marys. He is also mourned by two sisters: Mra. Walter Sadler of St. Marys and Mrs. Alice Spiker of Kansas City, as well as 21 living grandchildren, 30 great grandchildren and three great, great grandchildren. Mr. Kemp joined the Methodist church in 1934, from which edifice the funeral was held with Rev. C. C. French officiating. Pallbearers for the interment in St. Marys cemetery were Gordon Van Horn, Walter Sadler, Roy Perry, Everett Short, J. M. Browne, and Robert Kroft. Card Of Thanks We wish to express our deep appreciation of the many kindnesses shown during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father, J. N. Kemp.---Mrs. Kemp and children. :46 Source: ST. MARYS STAR, Thursday November 12, 1942, Front page, Micro film #S-76 Submitted by: Lisa Johnson
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KERSEY, Bert [Horace Albert]

DEATH CLAIMS BERT KERSEY It was in sadness many people throughout Pottawatomie County learned of the death of Bert Kersey, 76, who passed away at his home in Chula Vista, Calif., last Friday after several months of poor health. We understand the funeral was held Monday from The Little Church of the Roses at Chula Vista. Surviving are his wife and eight children. One of the most prominent families of a generation was that of the Kerseys in Pottawatomie County, and of which Bert was largely influential in the world of affairs. He was known as one of the most successful Sheriffs the county ever had and he also gained prominence as a member of the state legislature. His public service and his personal popularity with many citizens of the county will long be cherished in remembrance. Source: Wamego Times, July 3, 1947 OBITUARY Bert Kersey of whose death we gave notice last week, was born July 21, 1870 near Westmoreland and was 76 years 11months, and 6 days ago. He was united in marriage to Rebecca Jane Domeny Oct. 13, 1897 and to this union were born 10 children. Two preceded him in death and he is survived by his wife and Esther Bolton, Emza Grutzmacher, Ruth Hart, Sarah Strickland of California, Robert Kersey of Wamego, Fleda Dailey, Manhattan, Clara Fritzler, Holton. Two brothers, Ross and Ralph T. and one sister, Clara Brock of Wamego. Source: Wamego Times, July 10, 1947 Submitted by: Jane
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KERSEY, Clinton W.

Clinton W. Kersey Died, in Wamego July 6, 1890, Clinton W. Kersey, aged 32 years. Clinton Kersey was born near Valparaiso, Indiana, where he lived most of the time until 21 years of age. In 1879, he came to Pottawatomie county, Kansas, and at once became a teacher in our public schools. In August, 1882, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Rupert, of LaClede. After his marriage he became a farmer, teaching occasionally during winter, and living near Mt. Union. A year ago last March he became a resident of Wamego, where his sudden death occurred last Sunday morning. His disease was relapse of the measles. He leaves a wife utterly prostrated and heart-broken under the great bereavement, and four children too small to know their great loss, the youngest less than a month old. Clinton Kersey was an honest, intelligent man, very devoted to his wife and children; they were everything to him; with them he found his greatest happiness, so sought not for it elsewhere. The bereaved wife has the sympathy of all, and we trust the kind and all-wise Father will comfort and sustain her through this great trial. Source: (Wamego) Kansas Agriculturalist, dated Friday July 11, 1890 Additional Information: Clinton was the son of William Kersey, nephew of my gg-grandfather, Robert Butler Kersey, and cousin of my great-grandfather Horace Albert "Bert" Kersey. (Mary) Emma Rupert was born b: 23 JUN 1862 in LaClede, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, the daughter of Amos and Abigail (Atkinson) Rupert. Submitted by:Jane Becker
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KERSEY, Martha M. Teeter

Martha M. Teeter Kersey was born at Door Village near La Porte, Indiana on January 6, 1842 and died at Louisville, Kansas on March 7, 1920 aged 78 years, 2 months. and 1 day. She was left an orphan at an early age and made her home with an uncle for the remainder of her early life. She taught school in the early part of her life and in 1863 married Robert Butler Kersey, then a federal volunteer soldier of the Civil War. In 1868 they came to Kansas and proved up a homestead 4 miles southwest of Westmoreland. Six children were born to them and grew to manhood and womanhood in this county. George, the oldest son, died in July 1893 and Mr. Kersey, the husband and father, died in 1909. The five children living are Mrs. George Ferguson, Louisville, Kansas, Bert Kersey and Ross Kersey, Westmoreland, Kansas and Ralph Kersey. Garden City. Kansas. Grandma Kersey also leaves eighteen grandchildren and seven great grandchildren to mourn her passing. Belonging as she did to the class of early pioneers. her path was not always strewn with roses but even during the most trying periods of her life she was a faithful wife and devoted mother. She professed faith in Christ early in life and remained constant and steadfast in it to the end. She was affiliated with both the M.E. Church and Women's Relief Corps at Wamego, where she was found an active and willing worker. Her work. her influence and her love still live. Devotional services were conducted at the M.E. Church at Louisville, March 9. Rev. Burr of Westmoreland, officiating. Interment was made in the Louisville Cemetary. Source: Unknown Submitted by: Jane
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KERSEY, Rebecca Jane Domeny

Rebecca Jane Domeny was born Feb. 12, 1877 in Vinton County, Ohio. She came to Kansas with her parents at the age of nine, settling in Pottawatomie County, where she grew to womanhood. On October 15, 1899 she was united in marriage to Bert Kersey. To this union were born 10 children, one who died in infancy and Agnes Kersey who passed away on June 21, 1946. The other children remaining to mourn her passage are Emza Grutzmacher, Esther McGrath, Chula Vista, Calif., Sarah Strickland, Escondido, Calif.; Ruth Hart, Santa Monica, Calif.; Howard Kersey, San Diego, Calif.; Fleda Dailey, Manhattan; Robert Kersey, Wamego; and Clara Fritzler, Holton. She also leaves 11 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren and two sisters, Mrs. Rose Brock, Wamego and Mrs. Sarah Owens, Wamego. Mr. and Mrs. Kersey lived in Pottawatomie county until October 1929 when they moved to Chula Vista, Calif. Mr. Kersey passed away June 27, 1947. Mrs. Kersey remained in Chula Vista where she passed away September 10, 1955. Funeral services were held in Chula Vista on September 13 with interment in Glen Abbey Memorial cemetery. Source: Wamego Times, September 22, 1955 Submitted by: Jane
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KNOUSE, Rev. Henry

Kansas Agriculturist dated Friday 18, 1885 Buried from the M.E. church in Wamego, December 11, Rev. Henry Knouse, aged - 78 years. In early life he united with the United Brethren Church, and entered the ministry. For many years he was a faithful itinerant preacher. His last years were spent in Wamego, where is religiously attended worship on the Sabbath, until too feeble to get to church. He has buried two wives, three children and three grandchildren, and leaves a wife, six children, and 38 grandchildren to mourn his loss. His end was peaceful. Source: Kansas Agriculturist, dated Friday 18, 1885 Submitted by: Todd Knouse
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KOLTERMAN, Eula I.

ONAGA - Mrs. Eula I. Kolterman, 85, Onaga, died Friday, Oct. 5, 1984 at the home of a daughter in Topeka. She was born Nov. 5. 1898, on a farm near Onaga, the Daughter of Herman and Christena Winkler Hartwich, and lived in the Onaga community all her life. Mrs. Kolterman was baptized and confirmed in St. Paul's Lutheran Church at Duluth and was a member of the Ladies Aid and Parents Club at the church. She also was active in community and public affairs. She was married to Henry Carl Kolterman December 24 1917, at Duluth. He died Aug. 18, 1972. Survivors include three daughters, Mrs. Jeanette I. Tadlock, Norman, Okla., and Mrs. Linda Carson and Mrs. Greta Anderson, both of Topeka; nine grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday Oct. 8 at St. Paul's Lutheran Church. Burial will be in St. Paul's Lutheran Cemetery at Duluth, Ks. Mrs. Kolterman will lie in state from 7 until 9 p.m. today and from 8 until 9 a.m. Monday at Tessendorf Funeral Home in Onaga. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Paul's Lutheran School Heating Fund or to The Lutheran Hour radio program. Submitted by: Greta Anderson
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KOLTERMAN, Henry

Henry Carl Kolterman, 80, of Onaga passed away Friday, August 18, 1972 at his home at Onaga. He was born November 2, 1891 near Onaga and lived his entire life in the Onaga community. He was the son of Ernest Kolterman and Emma Henneberg. He was preceded in death by a sister, Mrs. Ida Hartwich, of California and a brother Walter Kolterman of Onaga. Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Eula Kolterman at home; three daughters Jeanette Tadlock of Norman, Oklahoma; Linda Carson, 3415 N.W. Pipkin and Greta Anderson, 3548 SW Oak Parkway, both of Topeka and a sister, Mrs. Gertrude Witt, 929 Broughton Way, Woodburn, Oregon and 6 grandchildren and one great grandchild. He was baptized and confirmed in St. Paul's Lutheran Church. He was united in marriage to Eula Hartwich December 24, 1917. He was a very devoted husband and father and had many friends. He was a retired farmer and he and his wife operated the Henry's Motel in Onaga. Mr. Kolterman was a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Duluth, Kansas. Services were held Sunday at the St. Paul's Lutheran Church with burial in St. Paul's Cemetery at Duluth, Ks. The Rev. J. W. A. B ecker officiating. Tessdendorf Mortuary of Onaga was in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions were made to the Lutheran Braille Workers Fund. Honorary casket bearers were Arnold Teske, Marvin Cottrell, Arthur Honig, Richard Abitz, Julian Perez, August Wrosch, Raymond Zabel and Roland Honig. Caster bearers were Ivan Platt, Jerry Tadlock, Kenneth Kufahl, Roger Brunkow, Wayne Tadlock and Evan Kolterman Submitted by: Greta Anderson
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LEACH, Ella Leamon (Mrs. L. B.)

The following is the obit of Mrs. L.B. Leach, which was published in the Advance Reporter, Waldron, Scott county Arkansas. It was wrote by her husband Louis B. Leach. "Ella Leamon was born in Croton, Ohio, Mar 12, 1862 and spent her happy girlhood there. Mrs. L.B. Leach died at Evergreen place hospital, in Leavenworth, Kansas, August 29, 1906. She came to Kansas and located near Humboldt, about the year 1880. She taught school in that vicinity until the year 1885, when she with two sisters and an aunt came to Wamego and laid the foundation for a business which was afterwards known as the Opera House Store, which she successfully conducted until the year 1891, when on the 12th day of December, she was married to L.B. Leach and the have made their home continously in Wamego ever since. Of family she leaves her husband and little daughter, Virginia, now 8 years old. Her father, Judge Sylvester Leamon, of Croton, Ohio, and a brother, Warren Leamon, now of Scott county Arkansas, one sister, Mrs. Nora Kellum, living at Greenup Illinois, besides many friends and relatives who are scattered all over the World. Mrs. Leach wa an educated person. She was a great reader and had surrounded herself with a library of books embracing standard history almost universal, and nearly all that is known of many sciences together with volumes of humor and general information. She was thoroughly converseant with her books, which she regarded as her excellent friends. Few persons are blessed with so exact a memory. She was able at all times, in a wonderful degree to call up all facts that she had ever learned. Mrs. Leach had traveled extensively, visiting many of the most popular and interesting centers of Europe, Asia and Africa, besides her own native North America, which she liked far better than any other country. She visited Palestine spending some time in the city of Jerusalem and its most interesting surroundings, being entertained while she was in the Holy Land by the Franciscan Monks, a Roman Catholic order, whose kindness and consideration for strangers knows no bounds. Mrs. Leach's religious belief was not without cheer. She fully believed in individual existence after this life and that refining influences which would surround the individual in the life to come would, in proper time result in salvation and happiness for each one. And now I, myself, not being in condition to write or think well, give to the public this information with my heart full of reverence and affection to the memory of my lameted wife, who for many years with faithful, hearty interest in me, has been my teacher, my greatest loved friend and my best support. Louis B. Leach Mrs Leach had property interests here and took great interest in the future development that will come to Scott county (Arkansas). " Source: Published in the Advance Reporter, Waldron, Scott county, Arkansas. It was wrote by her husband Louis B. Leach. Submitted by: Edsel Richmond"
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LEDINGTON, William Alvia

Logan County: Crescent News, Tuesday, November 1, 1910 Day Unknown William Alvia LEDINGTON A Soldiers Last Roll Call One more old soldier has passed away after many years of suffering. He served his country 8 years and 1 month in a Kansas regiment. William LEDINGTON was born in March 1828 and died November 30th, 1910, aged 82 years and 9 months. He came to Oklahoma in the settling of this county, taking a claim in section 11, Cedar township, in Logan county, and had lived there ever since. His companion had gone on before him. He leaves four daughters and two sons, 29 grand-children and 13 great grand-children. There were present 2 daughters, 2 sons, 19 grand-children and 5 great grand- children at the funeral, which was preached at his home by the writer, and the remains were taken to the Crescent Cemetery and there paid our last respects to the one faithful soldier. Submitter's Note: William's grand-daughter, Dorothy Ledington Anderson, states that the birth year is wrong. She says he was born in 1832. William Ledington lived in Pottawatomie County from 1858 to ca. 1900. Source: Logan County, OK, Crescent News, Tuesday, November 1, 1910 Submitted by: Sherry Fleischer
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LILLEY, Anna

Mrs. J. J. Lilley Annie, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gebhardt, Sr., was born near Winkler, Kansas, July 26, in the year 1877. There she likewise attended school and resided in the parental home until her marriage to Mr. J. J. Lilley of the same community on Mar. 16, 1896. They established their home there, where for many years he and his brother engaged in threshing, blacksmith and handling of implement. They became the parents of 6 children all of whom grew to maturity and are here today. In due time they decided to change residence and to take up farming more extensively and in the year 1928 they moved to Center Hill to live on what was known as the Martinson farm. There they remained for about 12 years when a decision was made to purchase a farm 5 miles north of Wheaton, Kans., which has since been the family home. In 1946 they reached their fiftieth year of wedded life and were priviledged to celebrate this event to which they had looked foward with anticipation. Mrs. Lilley was one of those mothers and companions who found her contentment in the home duties and the association of husband and children. This was her chosen place in life and her activities centered around it. As the children left the home to establish their own, she continued to find satisfaction in the companionship which had reached and passed the half century mark. Also the visits of children and grandchildren were sources of happiness and joy. In fair health most of the time it had been noticed that her strength had failed to a little extinct of late, but death came suddenly and unexpectedly on Monday morning at the age of 72 years, 8 months and 14 days. With the sorrowing husband there are also the six children, Mrs. Mae Cope of Bellflower, California, Mrs. Myrtle Hedren of Randolph, Riley of Vliets, Theodore of Topeka, Mrs. Edna Tillotson of Waterville and Elsie Gordon of VanCouver, Washington. These with their families also include 16 grandchildren and 17 great grand- children. Surviving are also three sisters, Mrs. Mary Bachmann of Topeka, Mrs. Bertha Ferguson of Wamego, Mrs. Minnie Blaske of Waterville and one brother, Herman Gebhardt of Green. The dark clouds of death which hover over mankind at these times will in due time be dispelled by the brillance of the sunrise of the resurrection promises. The funeral service was held in Randolph by Mr. J. W. Chelander at 2 p.m. Thursday April 13, 1950, in the Chelander Eshbaugh Chapel and burial completed in the Peach Grove Cemetery. MOTHER O we miss her coming footsteps, We miss her everywhere, Home is not what it used to be Since our Mother is not there. This kind and patient Mother Was called to her reward: Fearlessly she answered, "Ready," For she trusted in her Lord. Death has come and claimed our Mother Whom we loved and cherished dear; It was Mother, yes, dear Mother We can't help but shed a tear. She is done with pain and sorrow; She is done with toil and care. Why should we wish to recall her When we know she's happy there? - Unknown- Source: Randolph Enterprise, April 17, 1950 Submitted by: Julie Hatesohl
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LILLEY, Neff

NEFF LILLEY DEAD. Neff Lilley, 82, died at a hospital in Westmoreland, Wednesday, April 4, 1945, after a short illness. Mr. Lilley was a long time resident of Riley County and moved to a farm near Wheaton, with his brother, J. J. Lilley and family, with whom he made his home. Funeral services will be held in Chelanders Chapel Saturday, April 7, at 2:00 o'clock. Burial will be in Peach Grove cemetery. Source: Randolph Enterprise, April 5, 1945, pg 1 Submitted by: Julie Hatesohl
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Coordinator's Note: Names starting with othen then J-L are located on other page/s. Go to Index to make selection.

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Julie Hatesohl / phoebehat@yahoo.com /
Pottawatomie County Coordinator

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