The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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the guard house for getting something to eat from other sources than the commissary department, he never applied for a pension and it is his boast that he don't want one.  Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton raised a family of seven children; five boys and two girls: Frank M. their eldest son is now a painter by trade and lives in Norton; their second son, Thomas Morton was born in hamilton_tm.JPG (31968 bytes) Fremont county, Iowa. September 18 1868; came to Norton county in 1874 with his father's family, attended the schools of Norton in 1884 and 1885 then went to the Indian Territory with John C. Brown to purchase Indian ponies; became quite a pony rider.  In 1889 he attended Hastings College at Hastings, Nebraska, for one year after which he read law in his father's office until September 18, 1893 when he was admitted to the bar.

Forest A. was born in 1871, now lives at Walla Walla, Washington, employed as a teamster, Charles A. was born in 1873, is a barber and lives at Norton.  Their other three children Ella M. born in 1875, Walter L. born in 1878 and Ruth born in 1884, live at home with their parents.

John R. Hamilton first came to Norton county in 1873 with the Iowa colony; he took the land now owned by McClusky in Leota township; but did not return until June 1874 when he found his claim had been taken by other parties.  He settled at Norton and at once began the practice of law, and remained here continuously ever since.  The county seat fight came on about the time of John's arrival; he took an active part on behalf of Norton, and has continued as a leader in everything socially, materially and politically ever since.  He was elected county attorney in 1875 but resgined (sic) as soon as he qualified; he was elected to the legislature in 1876, defeating Dr. S. L. Green.  During the session of this legislature which met in January 1877, Hamilton took a prominent part in the senatorial contest; he espoused the cause of Preston B. Plumb who was elected.  He succeeded in passing a bill in relieving Norton county of the $5000 aid bonds which had been voted in 1874.  The Norton County Bee of March 12, 1877, then published by A. F. Harmer, published the following on Hamilton's return from Topeka:

"It is glorious! The Bee more than takes pleasure in informing the taxpayers of Norton county that J. R Hamilton and Senator Carpenter have succeeded in releiving (sic) them of those five thousand dollar bonds.  The state has now cancelled the debt, and we are free; free to boom along the path of progress with renewed energy and zeal.

Immediately upon receipt of the news, guns were fired, and a huge bonfire was started near the square.  A committee was appointed to wait on Mr. Hamilton at his residence and request his appearance before the assembly.  Round after round of applause went up for the taxpayers of Norton county and their champions.

The meeting was called to order with

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