The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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Doniphan county. September 22, 1855 he married his second wife Miss Sunber Anderson, a cousin of his first wife: her parents had emigrated from Norway in 1846 and lived in Buchanan county, Missouri.  They moved to Doniphan county Kansas, in August 1870.  He went to Denver driving five yoke of oxen, most of them Texas steers; it took 44 days from Atchison to Denver.  He went to the mountains to dig gold but did not succeed; hired out to a company in Golden to freight from Nebraska City to Golden.  Went in the mountains again and worked in the mines until he took sick and returned home.

The war was going on and some of his friends told him he had better get over to the Kansas side as the town was full of rebels and they were securing men and boys for the rebel army.  He went home and found that three of his wife's brothers had joined the army also Ed Hooverson and John Landis.  Some time after, Jim Lane made a speech and wanted more men to join; about 200 went with Lane to Troy.

During this time he had two boys born Otto, August 28th, 1856, residence Edmond, Kansas; Marion S. April 23, 1861, residence Colorado Springs.

At Troy the recruits came in very fast; it did not take long until the regiment was full.  Dannevik was mustered into service in the 13th Kansas Infantry Co. C. Capt. Hugh Robinson.  The regiment was commanded by Col. Owen, was sent down to the Indian Territory and joined with the 10th Kansas infantry and an Indian regiment that formed the brigade; General Ware of the 10th acting as Brigade General under General Blount.  At Cane Hill they routed the rebels and followed them up, during the day they made six different stands, but drove them off every time.  They joined General Herron in the battle of Prairie Grove where their forces gained the day.  They crossed the Boston Mountain, drove the rebels across the river and took the city.  After that the command took a back track across the mountains finally coming into camp at a place called Elm Springs; there had a grand review before General Schofield, then started on a forced march night and day for Springfield, Missouri, where the rebel general Marmaduke camped, (the same Marmaduke the rebel citizens of Missouri elected for governor.)  When they arrived at Springfield Marmaduke was whipped.  When Dannevik got home his wife had a little girl born March 17,1863. Her name is Valina and is now George Jones' wife, living between Edmond and Norton.

In December 1863 he started for Leavenworth to reinlist (sic) in the 4th Kansas battery was mustered in January 1, 1894 [1864].  They made post duty for some time and was over in Plat county, Missouri chasing and killing the Bushwhackers, then after Pap Price when he made the raid into Kansas, Lieutenant Flanigan had command of the battery; in March 1865 was attached to the 16th Kansas cavalry as company M and started after the Indians; came out on the South Platte and scouring around after the redskins on the Solomon and Smokv Rivers; ran them up to Fort Kearney, from there to Fort Laramie under General Connor who was then commanding general.  One day they lay in camp, when a squad of soldiers started to get some good meat to eat and they went for the pack mules and killed six of the best they could find, of course they were reported and punished, the punishment was to be marched down to Powder river and be ducked; among them was Mr. Vassar, who used to live on Big Timber but emigrated to Oregon a few years ago.  They were ordered down to Fort Laramie and then to Fort Leavenworth to be mustered out.

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