The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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seven miles from Colby in 1885, which he held down in connection with a deputyship under post master Jas. N. Fike. 

In 1889 he was given charge of the Foster Co's. Iumber yard in Norton, a position he filled very successfully until appointed receiver of public moneys at the United States land office at Colby, the Kirwin and Oberlin offices having been consolidated at that point. 

Tom has been an ardent democrat all his life, at an early stage of which he showed marked ability as a born leader.  He is looked upon as the coming young man of promise of the party in Kansas. 

Norton is still his home where now resides his father, Patrick, and two brothers, Joseph and Willie.  His only sister, May is at school in Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

John McManis was born March 9, 1837, in Adams county, Ohio.  He remained on the farm with his parents until he became of age, after which he took up the carpenter trade for an occupation.  On the 13th day of June, 1861 he enlisted in company D of the 24th Ohio volunteers, which was the first company to leave Adams county to defend the flag of the Union.  His company was ordered to the front and was soon engaged in active service.  He participated in the battle of Green Brier, Shiloh, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Nashville and several minor engagements.  At the battle of Stone River, which occurred on December 30, 1862, he recieved (sic) a severe wound from a buck shot passing through the neck between the swallow and the windpipe.  He received a second wound in the ankle at the battle of Nashville.  Mr. McManis was gradually promoted for faithful service from a private to the office of second lieutenant, which office he held at the close of the war.  He was honorably discharged from the service on October 9,1865, at Augusta, Georgia.  In the spring of 1864 Mr. McManis obtained a 80-day furlough, during which time he returned to his old home in Adams county and on the 16th day of March he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Edmisten.  When the war was ended he returned to Adams county and took up his former occupation of farming.  In the spring of 1869 he moved with his family to Henry county, Iowa.  The following fall he removed to Union county, Iowa, and purchased a farm.  Six years after moving to Iowa he sold his property and located in Mitchell county, Kansas.  Owing to poor schools and marketing facilities he sold his property at this place and located on the North Fork of the Solomon in Norton county.  Since coming to this county he has engaged principally in farming and stock raising until his death by suicide, which occurred on June 1, 1889.  He left a widow and five children.  His wife, Mary McManis, served as postmistress at Lenora, Kansas, from October 1, 1889, until April 1, 1894.  Her three oldest sons finished the course of the Park College Academy, Iocated at Parkville, Missouri, who are now engaged in fitting up a stock farm near Lenora.  Mr. McManis took an active part in all public affairs and was a staunch republican. 

Joseph Main came here from Illinois in March, 1876.  He is a blacksmith by trade and was located at Leota for some years but now resides in Lenora.  He was a member of company K, second Illinois cavalry during the war.

William A. Johnson came from Iowa in 1878; located in Lenora in 1880.  He has four children, three of them born in Kansas.  He is the popular landlord at the Valley House. 

Elijah Darnell came to Lenora in 1874 and has resided on his farm adjoining that city continuously ever since.  He has been constable of his

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