The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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years, during Loomis' term of office: he then engaged with A. K. Mills.  Loomis' successor for the same office, as his deputy and served in this capacity till June 15, 1887, at which time he was township taken down sick and was seriously ill 
for five months.  At the request of his friends Mr. Beck became a candidate for register of deeds as an independent candidate and was endorsed by the labor party, and still being sick he was unable to do any canvassing - he was defeated by A. K Mills.  He has been in the reform movement ever since it began.  He was a greenbacker and is now a populist.  He worked on the farm and at herding cattle till March 15, 1892, when he procured a position with Greenleaf & Baker of Atchison, Kansas as their agent to buy grain at Densmore, this county and the next day the postmaster at that place moved to Hill City and left him as his assistant.  He secured the appointment as postmaster and in the fall of 1893 he was elected to the office of justice of the peace; on same month he was appointed by the Missouri Pacific Railroad company as station agent and is serving at present in all these different capacities and in addition is notary public.

Dorrell Wood moved here in March, settling on his farm in Emmett township.  He was born in New York state August 11, 1805.  He was married to Ida Bright, October 7, 1887; to them were born two children, Lillie and Marvin.  His father-in-law, Dan Bright, came here in 1879 and settled near there in but now lives in Logan county.  John Bright came at the same time and now lives at Almena.

David Heise came to Norton county in May 1878 settling in Leota township on the farm he now occupies six miles west of Norton.  He was born in Pennsylvania November 14, 1845.  He moved to Powshiek county, Iowa, in 1876, where he farmed for two years.  In 1890 he was married to Eliza Jane Nix. They have no children. 

On May 23, 1881 a petition signed by 65 citizens of town 4, range 22, asked to be set off as a municipal township which was granted, and the township was named Sand Creek. 

Among the earliest settlers of this township are Wm. Dobbie who came in 1887; John Taylor who was the first trustee came in 1875 but went to eastern Kansas in 1882.  Daniel Joseph came in 1877 and now lives in the Colony.  John Tate came in 1879; J. S. Farmer in 1889; Henry Stahl in 1886; H. A. Sleffel came in 1888; J. D Thompson in 1885; W. M. Hammond came here in 1879; Mr. Wamock came in 1874, he died at Logan last year, and Walter Lennis came in 1877.

Edwin Burnap and his brother George came here in 1879, the latter left in 1886.  Ed is now living in Almena, where he runs a store.  Charence Burnap came here in 1881; he is a strong prohibitionist and has been frequently placed the ticket for county office.  Winfield Scott Burnap and his brother Morse came here in 1884.  All live here at present.

The Fourth of July, 1881, was celebrated in this city in great style, securing for the orator of the day Samuel McElroy of Oberlin; Miss Emery, since married to Charles H. Fry, read the Declaration of Independence. 

The republican county convention which met that fall, was the scene of considerable contention. It was run in a high-handed manner by such arch parliamentarians and politicians as Hooverson and James Lobsitz of the Solomon. 

Preacher Clark, as he was called, from Lenora, was chairman of the convention and ruled the destinies of motions with an iron will.  The convention was inaugurated upon the cry of low salaries for county offices; and as 

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