The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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was at Macon City Missouri.  Here they began to get a foretaste of the hardships of army life.  The regiment went into camp at this place of the fair grounds in snow three feet deep.

The regiment not being full it was consolidated with Missouri companies and given the name of the 7th Missouri cavalry.  This almost caused a mutiny among the Iowa and Illinois boys.  A great many left and joined the 3rd Iowa cavalry and other Iowa and Illinois regiments.  The subject of this sketch remained in the old regiment, marching to Lexington, Missouri, in the spring of 1862 where the regiment was detailed as provost marshal guard for six or eight months and participated in a guerrilla warfare along the Mississippi river in the saddles almost day and night for three or four days at a time; running such men as Quantrill, Hayes, Shepherd and the James and Younger boys.

An engagement with these chaps one morning resulted in the killing of six of the bushwhackers and wounding of one Union soldier.

Over 95 per cent of this regiment at that time were boys under 21 years of age.  Mr. Rhoades at that time being only a boy lost his health and was discharged at Sedalia, Missouri.  Returning home he entered the service again in a regiment known as the Milton Rangers.  He was elected first lieutenant, commissioned by Governor Stone of Iowa and served until the close of the war.

January 21, 1866, he married Miss Eliza Ann Hagler of Milton, Iowa, a much respected and amiable young woman.  Being left fatherless at the age of 13 she with her mother and two sisters kept the little family together until the sisters grew to womanhood.  After having completed a common school education Miss Hagler was chosen by Edward T. Rhoades to be his helpmate; and this union has proven to be a very happy one.  To Mr. and Mrs. Rhoades have been born six children, two having died in infancy, four are still living: Abigail C., William A., Frank B. and Robert A., all of whom are still at home.

In 1872 Mr. Rhoades with his family moved from Milton, Iowa to Taylor county, Iowa, remaining until 1879, when the Sunflower empire was adopted as the home, settling at Marysville, Marshall county.  In 1883 he bought what is known as Ruble, Wymore and Hill tract of land upon which land he is still living.  As a farmer and stock raiser he has been decidedly successful.  His farm at present consists of 800 acres of valley land.

In politics he has been and is a staunch republican.  He has represented his township in nearly every county convention since coming to Norton county.  Though he has often been urged to become a candidate for different

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