The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

Page 228

back

next

table of contents

 
There was not a disagreeable event happened during the day.  The dinner, which was free, and placed on the long tables in such quantities as to tax their strength severely, and in reach of every one, while barrels of lemonade with huge chuncks (sic) of ice in them, were placed in conveient (sic) stations on the grounds, and everything passed off in the happiest and enjoyable manner.  I have always remembered l that occasion with pleasure.  If I had the time I would like to write you of the different persons who took the leading interest in preparing for the celebration and conducting its ceremonies, so far as there was any formality in them, and who made it their duty to leave nothing undone that they might consider conducive to the pleasure and complete enjoyment of every one on the grounds.  Mr. Bill Rogers, as we always familiarly called him, and his good wife kept the only first class hotel in your city at that time, and these two worthy people perhaps did more than any like number, of the actual work in attending to the wants of the people and rendering their visit pleasant; continuing their duties until the wee sma hours of the night. 

My wife and I stopped at their hotel and I remember quite an amusing incident that took place at the west door of the house about 3 o'clock in the morning of the 5th.  Some stock man on his cayuse came to the door after all had retired, and rapped sharply on the door with the butt end of his quirt, at the same time hallooing.  Uncle Bill answered from the front room, dining room, sitting room, etc., "What do you want?"  The stock man replied: "I want to stay here all night." "Well, says Uncle Bill, "why in hell don't you stay?" But, says the stockman. "I want to get some place to sleep and put my cayuse!  "All right," says Rogers, "just rope him out there north of the house anywhere, it all belongs to me for 17 miles out in that direction and lay down on the grass," and with this answer he again went to sleep and we knew nothing more of the stockman. 

I wish I had time this afternoon to write you more fully of this day's fun, which in fact it was to everybody, but as you desired an answer by return mail I send you this hurried statement. 
Yours Truly, 
W. C. DON CARLOS.

Leota also had a large celebration that day.  They erected a bowery in the center of the public square, which was attended by a large crowd, many coming 50 miles.  The celebration wound up with a dance at night.  Ingalls' famous string band furnished the music. 

The county convention met in Norton August 6, 1876, to nominate county officers and elect delegates to the congressional convention that met in Abilene.  Both factions claimed the majority of the delegates.  Every delegate had been seen and canvassed by both sides before the convention met.  There was a contesting delegation from Almena township and both factions were anxious to get the temporary organization, as the result of the contest from Almena would change the result of the convention. 

Lewis Logan called the convention to order.  A motion was made to make Dr. Green chairman, Logan declared him elected although the storm of yeas and nays were so near equal that no one could have been certain which had it.  The Norton fellows at once congregated in the northeast corner of the room and elected Henry Oliver chairman; so two conventions were held at the same time.  The Leota fellows elected Dr. Green at the head of the congressional delegation and instructed them for General Guthrle for congress.  The Norton convention elected John Landis who went to the convention and was seated.  He supported Col. Phillips, who was nominated.

Page 228

back

next

table of contents

 


US GenWeb Home Page


KS GenWeb Home Page



Home Page for Kansas



Search  KS GenWeb Project

KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by Tom & Carolyn Ward for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.  Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page. 

web design 2003 by Ardie Grimes,
Norton County, Kansas GenWeb coordinator
Text and photos from this 1894 book are within the public domain