The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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them still living.  Mr. Page was born in Colorado, came to Norton County in 1873 and has lived here ever since.

George D. Hillmon was born in 1867; he left here in 1887 and resides in Union county, Oregon, at this time. Emma Hillmon was born in 1865.  Some years ago she became an enthusiast in the Free Methodist church.  She was sent as a missionary to South Africa and has been since that stationed at Natal or Bethany Mission.  Since her arrival there she has married a minister of her church who went over with her.

William H. Hillmon was born in October 1873; he resides on the Sappa.

Dick Hillmon came here May 9, 1874 and took land two miles west of Devizes.  In the spring of 1886 Mr. and Mrs. Hillmon separated.  Mrs. Hillmon became a devout member of the Free Methodist church.  Mr. Hillmon was addicted to the use of tobacco and was a Free Mason both of which were objectionable to her and the church.  This led to a separation and division of property.  Mr. Hillmon settled at Wilsonville, Nebraska, secured a divorce in Furnas county, Nebraska, and in 1885 was again married.

Mrs. Hillmon, his divorced wife, died March 1, 1894, and was buried in the Devizes cemetery.

Lewis Henry Button was born in Medicine county, Ohio, October 4, 1848; he was raised on a farm and moved with his parents to Lafayette county, Wisconsin in 1854, lived there 12 years then moved to Cass county, Iowa, stayed there six years and then moved to Norton county in April, 1874.  He was married to Emeline Wilson at Atlanta, Iowa, December 26, 1870.  They reside at this time at Edmond.  Six children have been born to them.

Orin Button, his father, came here in 1879. He lives on a farm near Edmond.

peterson_ev.JPG (34914 bytes) E. V. Peterson the subject of this sketch was born in Lodi, Seneca county, New York, June 1, 1835.  He spent his youth on his father's farm, assisting his father at his work and attending the district school.  That was before the free school system prevailed in this country, except perhaps in some of the New England states.  The grade system of school and school books were not then in use.  Those were the days of Webster's spelling book, Dayball's arithmetic and Peter Parley's geographies, goose quill pens, poke berry ink.  Mr. Peterson earned his first wages as a school master; he commenced at the age of 14; teaching school in a district near where his father lived for $14 a month and board - boarding around as it was called, one week at a time at each of the patrons of the school; the master was expected to go all around no matter how poor the accommodations.  If any were neglected it caused jealousy and hard feelings.

The second year Mr. Peterson taught in his father's district he received $24 per month.  In the spring of 1854 he entered the academy at Charlotsville,

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