The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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the Kansas division made a most satisfactory growth, and was handed over by him to his successor in splendid condition.  He also represented this state in the national encampments at St. Joseph, Missouri, and Minneapolis, Minnesota.  In 1892 he received the republican nomination for county attorney of Norton county by acclamation and was elected at the following election by forty four majority over L. H. Wilder, the then incumbent, who was elected in 1890 over L. H. Thompson by about 330 majority. 

jones_lucy.JPG (29478 bytes) Lucy Reed Jones was born in Urbana, Ohio, March 17, 1850.  At the age of three years she was taken with her father's family to Monticello, Indiana.  At the age of seven she was left motherless.  Her father, Hon. A. F. Reed, soon attained prominence as a lawyer, but when the call for defenders of our Union came he layed (sic) aside his books and briefs and entered his country's service as captain of company K, 20th Indiana regiment.  During the fight before Richmond her father and her brother, Will, then sixteen years of age, were badly wounded and taken prisoners to gloomy Libby prison.  The brother died in prison, and the father having been exchanged returned home a mere skeleton.  In the fall of 1863 he was elected to the state senate and after serving one session of the senate, he resigned and accepted a commission in March, 1864, as lieutenant colonel of the 12th Indiana cavalry and was finally discharged November 10, 1865.  He returned to his home and practice and was soon afterward elevated to the judicial bench of his district by appointment of Governor Baker to fill a vacancy.  He was twice elected to succeed himself.  Judge Reed died in 1874 at the age of forty-nine.  Mrs. Jones' sister, Lodie, resides in Indianapolis, where for twelve years she has served as state Secretary of the W. C. T. U. and is editor of the State Organizer.  At the age of seventeen Mrs. Jones united with the Methodist church, in which she has been a consistent and effective worker.  She possesses musical talent of a high order.  She has always been greatly devoted to her family and home, to care for which has always been her pride.  Mrs. Jones has reached prominence in the W. R. C.  Three times in succession has she been elected president of Captain Jarvis corps No. 149, at Norton.  In 1852 at Atchison she was elected junior vice president of the Kansas department of this noble order, and in 1893 at Pittsburg she was elected department president, and her administration as such president is recognized to be one of the most active and successful this department ever had, evidencing her splendid executive ability.  She represented Kansas in the national encampment of the W. R. C. at Washington in 1892 and at Indianapolis in 1893. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones have five children living: Lulu D., Grace W., Caleb R., Maude and Helen.  They have buried three children; Amy, William and

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