The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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Orleans on the old Continental steamer, which was a huge river boat about 350 feet long.  After reaching New Orleans they went into camp at Carlton, a small town on the river near New Orleans.  Here they received orders to go to Alexandria, Lousiana (sic), and join General Banks' army, which lay at Shreveport, up the river from Alexandria.  In this locality the cavalry and infantry had done considerable fighting.  The entire land forces marched to New Orleans, Louisiana, immediately after the regiment arrived it was sent to Donaldsonville.  At this place the person who is the subject of this sketch was taken sick with a malarial fever, known in the south as "break bone fever."  He was sent to the United States hospital at Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  As soon as he recovered he was detailed by special order to remain at the hospital and was put in charge of the drug and dispensing department of the hospital. 

He soon became a favorite among the physicians and surgeons of the hospital staff, who spared no pains in giving him pointers in the study of medicine and surgery.  At this place he resumed the study of medicine and has never ceased its study from that time up to the present time, about thirty years.  He remained in the hospital there until the middle of June, 1865, when he was ordered back to Camp Butler, Illinois, to join his regiment, and was mustered out of Uncle Sam's service on June 25, 1865.  He at once returned home and entered the medical department of the Michigan University, where he received a thorough training in all the departments of medicine and surgery.  After the closing of the commencement exercises of the college in the spring of 1868, he returned to his home in Pittsford.  In July of the same year he commenced the practice of medicine and surgery at Isseo, Hillsdale county, Michigan.  He was married to Miss Mary E. Brown in November, 1868.  Here he made many friends and his practice grew very rapidly.  In 1872 he became a partner in a drug store. In February, 1874, a son was born to him.  In the spring of 1875 he removed to Blissfield, Michigan, and there built up a large practice.  In 1876 his wife died with internal cancer.  He was again married on December 16, 1878: this proved to be an unhappy marriage, and separation was the result.  One child, a girl, was borne him by his second wife.  In 1881? he came to Kansas, finally chose Norton as his future home, where on April 16, of the the same year, he resumed the practice of medicine.  The doctor took up, in connction (sic) with his practice, the study of geology, and in 1889 made some valuable discoveries in Norton county.  Subsequently he was assisted in the work by Prof. Robert Hay, of Junction City.  They made a number of valuable finds.  By them the rocks of this county were classified and named. 

About this time the doctor organized the first cornet band that this county ever had.  In November, 1888, Mr. Turner was elected coroner for the first time.  In the summer of 1884, he became dissatisfied with the future outlook of Norton county and like many others, thought he would seek another field for the future.  He removed to Rice county, Kansas, but in December, 1884, he returned and took up the practice of medicine again.  He was again elected coroner at the next election, which office he has held continuously ever since.  He has held the following inquests: R. G. Orr, October 8, 1886; John Gaffney, February 4, 1888; C. W. Shumway, July 1 and 2, 1888; Philip Herron, October 16,1889; Peter Tschudi, April 22, 1890; John O'Bright, May 5, 1890; Joseph Murphy, July 15, 1890, and Nathan Grey, February 12, 1889. I n October, 1885, he was appointed assistant
 

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