The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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command was so far out of danger from the enemy in the rear that they thought themselves comparatively safe and could do more as they pleased.  Just as they emerged from a dense forest from behind a hill the sound of heavy wagons was heard.  An advance guard was sent out to ascertain what it all meant.  It was thought at first that Lee had headed them off with his entire force of artillery and they would be called upon to give a strict account of what had happened during the night after leaving Harper's Ferry.  After the advance guard had taken in the situation he returned and reported to the officer in command and an order was given to charge.  The charge was made; the enemy was easily captured.  It was the wagon train of Lee's entire army.  The train was wheeled about and put on a double quick march.  At noon the whole outfit was run safely into Green Castle, Pennsylvania, where the entire force remained a few weeks for rest.  His regiment returned to the front via Williamsport; went into winter quarters at Dumfires on the Potomac, where they scouted about the country and had several encounters with the bushwhackers.  About February, 1863, they abandoned the camp and went to Bellplain, near Fredricksburg.  During the line of march they had several engagements, but met with no great loss of men or horses.  In April. 1863, the entire union army of the Potomac was reviewed in front of Fredricksburg by President Abraham Lincoln.  A short time afterward the greater portion of the cavalry was ordered to Richmond, Virgina, (sic) under the command of General Stoneman.  After marching for three or four days toward Richmond a small detachment of the cavalry was ordered to return to Chancellorville, Virginia.  The doctor at that time was quartermaster sergeant, and ordered back with others holding the same position in the brigade, to return with their pack train to Chancellorville and remain under cover of Hooker's army.  In June, 1863, at this locality the greatest three-day and night fight took place that ever occurred in the history of the rebellion.  It was on the third day that Stonewall Jackson was killed while leading his men in a charge with the avowed purpose of breaking the union lines. 

During the summer the regiment was engaged principally, after their return from Richmond, in scouting.  In November, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Washington, D. C.  There it was decided by a vote that they should re-enlist, getting a thirty day furlough.  They arrived in Chicago about the last of the month, was discharged and re-enlisted; taking in some recruits, then spent the month of December at home.  By the middle of January, 1864, the boys were all back at Chicago, and in February the regiment was ordered to St. Louis where It remained until navigation opened up in the Mississippi river.  From there they went to New 

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