The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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kelly_h.JPG (34346 bytes)came west in 1878 and settled in Nebraska.  He came to Norton in July, 1879, and has lived here continuously ever since.  He is one of the finest mechanics in the country, and as a jeweler he has no superior.  At this time he is member of the firm of Kelly & Graves jewelers, they are operating two stores, one here the other at Oberlin, Kansas. 

Dr. E. M. Turner was born in the township of Hudson, Lenawa county, Michigan, October 10, 1841, at which place he lived with his parents on a farm until he was fourteen years of age.  His parents then moved to Pittsford, Hillsdale county, Michigan, where he resided until the age of nineteen.  During this time he succeed in getting an education besides doing farm work.  The doctor during the last three or four years previous to the breaking out of the rebellion commenced the study of medicine.  In December, 1861, he enlisted in company D, 12th Illinois cavalry, which was then stationed at Camp Douglas, Chicago.  He remained there until about February, 1862, from which place the regiment was ordered to Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois, where it remained a few weeks and received their horses and arms.  After the regiment was drilled in all the necessary manuvers (sic) known in the practice of turner_dr.JPG (31920 bytes) warfare it was ordered to the front via railroad.  The regiment first set foot on rebel soil in the Shenandoah valley, Virgina, (sic) at the little town of Martensberg, where it spent several weeks looking after the interest of the celebrated Mosby, of whom all are quite familiar.  While the regiment was stationed at this point it captured Belle Boyd, the famous rebel spy, and sent her to Washington, D.C.  When General Lee made his raid in Pennsylvania, the regiment was ordered to Harper's Ferry, Maryland.  This famous band of cavalrymen marched into that historical city in advance of Lee's army, where it remained and fought that mighty host of rebels until it was completely surrounded and "sacked" like so many cats in a bag.  On the night of the third day of its sojourn in the city surrounded by high and lofy (sic) hills and rebels, this regiment and a New York regiment and one belonging to Maryland were hastened together by the officers of the regiments. A  consultation was held and it was decided that these three regiments of cavalry should at the dead hours of night cut their way through the lines of Gen. Lee's main army to a place which would be more congenial to the liberty of a union soldier than to remain and be taken prisoner.  It was at 11 o'clock that night this handful of men crossed the Potomac on the pontoon bridge to the Maryland side.  As soon as the horses trod upon firm footing they started on a gallop march.  The command soon came to the rebels pickets and gave them a friendly salute and kept a force march up all night.  At daybreak the

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