The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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Dr. Little was married to Louisa Yates in August, 1871.  They buried five children with scarlet fever in Norton in 1881, have lost one since and have six living.  He was elected county treasurer in 1875, as a republican, and served one term.  He is a prominent member of the Masonic order and is worshipful master of the Norton lodge at this time.  He was appointed pension examiner for this district in 1889 and holds that position yet.  He resides on a farm five miles west of Norton. 

James Henry Mittan was born in Lee county, Illinois. March 3, 1852; came to Norton county August 15, 1873, and homesteaded the land where Mr. Pippinger now lives, one mile northeast of Norton, which he sold to Ab Rogers in 1877.  He then took land three miles east of Norton and has lived there ever since.  He was married to Etta Myers September 11, 1876; four children have been born to them.  He owns 340 acres of land and feeds cattle and hogs extensively.  He is a republican in politics and was deputy sheriff under C. W. Posson.

M. J. FitzPatrick came to this county in 1873 and settled on the Sappa.  He was a cripple, had a withered arm.  He was elected county superentendent (sic) in 1874 but resigned the following winter to accept the appointment of county clerk.  He held that office until October 1880, when he forged a county warrant and was compelled to leave the country.  Fitz, as he was commonly called, was one of the most congenial and popular men that ever lived in this county, but drink caused his downfall and lost him the confidence of our people.  He forged a warrant for $114 in favor of Ramsey Miller & Co. on October 9, 1880, which he sold to M. Heaton.  A few minutes afterward Mr. Heaton noticed that the signature of A. S. Burroughs, who was chairman of the board of county commissioners, had been freshly written.  Mr. Heaton knew that Burroughs was not in town, this caused him to investigate.  Fitz, on being confronted with the facts, admitted all and refunded Mr. Heaton the money, but disappeared that evening.  Shortly after the facts became known, Jim Vining, who was sheriff at the time, offered $100 reward for his capture, but Fitz had too many friends who kept him secreted here for several days before he left the county.  He held the office of county clerk during the county seat troubles and no one knows to this day which town he voted for at the two elections, but both sides claimed him.  He was smart enough to retain the confidence of both sides and was elected three times practically without opposition.  After leaving here he' went to Montana and was county treasurer at Miles City for two terms.  He lives at Anaconda at this time and is reputed to be rich, having made his money in coal lands. 

J. S. Pool was born in the state of New Jersy (sic), Sussex county, in 1821.  He was a tanner and currier.  He was

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