The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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and has spent most of his life in Norton county. He married Emma Greenwood; they have one child.

Joseph L. Neville came here from Iowa in 1876 and settled on the Solomon west of Edmond and has lived continuously on the same land ever since.  His eldest child is Mrs. J. W. Vining; his eldest son, William O. Neville lived here for several years, he lives at Morrison, Colorado at this time.  Mr. Neville's youngest child Minnie, is well known in Norton; she is clerking at this time in Vining Bros'. Oyster Parlor. 

Volney Wheeler was born April 14, 1826 in western New York.  He was married to Louisa Bushee September 10, 1846; three children were born to them two girls and one boy. Mary, the eldest, born January 8, 1846, married A. C. Sherwin she lives at Lamont, Iowa. Eunice, born June 30. 1849; she married Albert Sherwood they live in Chicago.  Byron was born November 11, 1850. 

Mrs. Wheeler died December 1, 1862.  Volney Wheeler came to Iowa in 1857 and settled in Clayton county and remained there until he came to Norton county which was in the fall of 1878: he was married to his second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Luken September 12, 1857 at Forestville, Iowa. 

When he came here he took land eight miles southwest of Norton, where he lived as farmer until August, 1891, when, on account of failing health he moved to Norton and made his home until his death which occurred May 26, 1893.  He was stricken down with heart disease very suddenly without warning.  He had been out riding with Byron and while unhitching the team sank down and expired without being able to reach the house.  Mr. Wheeler had been a member of the Methodist church in his early days but became dissatisfied with what he called the dogmas or discipline of the orthodox church and after coming to Kansas never affiliated with any church organization.  He was a member of the Masonic lodge from his early manhood and was buried with ceremonies of that organization.  He was a believer in the fatherhood of God and brotherhood of man, the immortality of the soul, that all men were to be saved and none damned and that Masonry was good enough religion for him.  In speaking of himself he was often heard to say: "This world is my country, and to do good is my religion."  In polities he was an independent, but in National politics always voted the democratic ticket.  No man ever lived in Norton county who had fewer enemies or was more highly respected wheeler.JPG (27854 bytes) than Volney Wheeler.  His only son, Byron V. Wheeler, came here in the spring of 1879 and took the homestead beside his father's.  He was born in Forestville, Chautuqua (sic) county, New York, November 11, 1850, he settled in Norton county June 9, 1879, he lived on his farm for three years and in 1882 moved to Norton and opened a barber shop and has continued in that business permanently ever since.  He was married to Eve Chesley at Strawberry Point, Iowa, November 25, 1873; they have had three children, their eldest, Hattie E., was born at Forestville, February 22, 1875; a son, born and died at Forestville, November 25, 1879; Beatrice was born in Norton, July 18 1885. Hattie was married at Norton, November 25, 1892, to Bert S. Shimeall, of Chicago, where they now live. 

Mrs. Eva Wheeler was born in Sherman, Chautauqua county, New York, November 25, 1855.  She is an accomplished musician and has spent considerable time in giving lessons in instrumental music.  She takes an active part in all social and charitable work; she is a member of the Presbyterian church and a member of the order of Eastern

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