The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

Page 152

back

next

table of contents

 
Artie Cordelia Wallace married Clark J. Shimeal September 27, 1890.  They have one child, born December 18, 1892.

Clark Shimeal was born June 15, 1872, came to Kansas in March 1887.  He is assistant cashier of the First National bank.

Jennie E. Wallace was born August 12, 1874 and was married to George A. Smith April 2, 1893.  They have one child, born February 24, 1894.

Ednora Wallace was born May 12, 1872 and died September 14, 1873.

John Wallace came to Norton county September 15, 1876 bringing with him a steam saw mill which he set up at Leota and sawed out the lumber for the grist mill which he built at Leota in 1877.  In 1879 the creek undermined the mill so it fell into the stream.  He pulled it out and set it up on the Solomon four miles below Lenora.

In 1883 he built the Baker VanMeter mill which he sold to Edgar Page in the fall of 1883.  He leased Dave Close's mill at Norton and run it two years.  During that time he traded for the mill up the creek, now known as the VanMeter mill; he then traded it for a half interest in a mill with T. K. Hansbery at Bloomington, Nebraska, and then traded it for a farm in the same vicinity.  He then rebuilt David Close's mill at Norton putting in an entire roller plant.  After building the mill for Mr. Close he ran it by the month for two years and one month.  He then purchased the Almena burr mill and immediately changed it to a full roller mill and run it until the spring of 1891 when he left it in charge of his son A. H. Wallace.  This ends his milling career in Kansas.

He was elected justice of the peace at Leota in 1877 and elected probate judge in 1878, his opponent was George Post.  He was elected as a republican and on the county seat fight both.

In 1891 March 17, he left Norton for the coast, went to Kendrick, Idaho, and in company with his nephew, Wm. E Slate, formerly of Norton county, built the Kendrick roller mills and ran it one year, then sold out and is now located on a farm two and one half miles from town.

thompson_lh.JPG (36637 bytes) Lafayette H. Thompson, the youngest son of Mark B. and Harriette Thompson, was born on Elkhart prairie, Elkhart county, Indiana, on the 20 day of February, 1851.  He attended the district school and was ten years old when the war broke out.  He helped his father work the farm during the summer season and attended school during the winter.  He attended the Goshen academy, conducted by Professor Valois, and the Indiana State University.  He taught four terms of school in Indiana in what was known as the "Hardscrabble" district.  He learned the trades of miller and printer and clerked in a general merchandise store.  He read law for a short time with Johnston, Osborne and Herr of Goshen, Indiana.  He left Indiana in 1876 and located at Harlan, Shelby county, Iowa, where he clerked in the general merchandise store of Wyland and Wood, and upon their retirement from business again resumed his legal studies in the office of P. C. Truman of Harlan.  On the 28 of day January 1878 he was admitted to the bar after passing an examination of two days' duration, and conducted by six of the ablest attorneys at the Shelby county bar.  He immediately commenced practice for himself and continued until February 1879 when he came to Kansas, locating at Leota.  He remained there one year, when he formed a partnership with M. W. Pettigrew and located at Norton.  In 1880 he was nominated by the republicans for county attorney, without opposition, he and Judge Pratt drawing straws to determine which one should stand for the nomination.  Lafe drew the long straw

Page 152

back

next

table of contents

 


US GenWeb Home Page


KS GenWeb Home Page



Home Page for Kansas



Search  KS GenWeb Project

KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by Tom & Carolyn Ward for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.  Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page. 

web design 2003 by Ardie Grimes,
Norton County, Kansas GenWeb coordinator
Text and photos from this 1894 book are within the public domain