The History of the Early Settlement of Norton County, Kansas

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Portland, Oregon; he afterward moved to Redding, California, and died there in 1890, where his family now reside.  His eldest son, Charlie, married Miss Viola, daughter of John Price at Portland, Oregon, in 1881; he died of mountain fever in 1884; his widow afterward married Will Crawford, son of Ben Crawford, who was well known here in early days. 

On election day in the fall of 1880 a stranger from Missouri, whose name escapes all our memories now, had been visiting some relative here and was telling a story in more than dramatic style.  Uncle Johnny Green stood by and became intensely interested in the recital.  He edged closer and closer to the stranger and when the latter finished his story Uncle Johnny without a word of warning or explanation began kicking the rear joint of the stranger's trousers - kicked and kicked.  The stranger without making any resistance leaned towards the door (this was upstairs in the old court house) and while Johnny kicked, the stranger moved away, and went down the stairway kicked continuously - Johnny followed him still kicking while the noninterfering bystanders were struck with consternation.  The stranger made a hasty exit out of the town and was never heard of or seen here since.  When Uncle Johnny returned he explained that the stranger was an old Missouri rebel and bushwhacker who did him some injury years ago and Uncle Johnny then swore to kill him if he ever again met him.  But the charity of Johnny got the better of him and instead of death instantaneous, thought an application of his number twelve boot sufficient retribution for the former injury.  Many of the present citizens will remember this episode in the peaceful city.

Charles B. Lough settled in June 1872 just east of Almena; his homestead papers are dated Aug. 15, 1872, on the NW 1/4 of SE 1/4 and W 1/2 NE 1/4 and NE 1/4 NW 1/4, S 18, T 2 S, R21, and according to the records was the second homestead entry made in Norton county.  Lough has been unfortunate financially, sold his farm, spent the money, and now lives in rented property in Almena, a Leota man always.

Captain William D. Jarvis, William Jones and Robert Hutchinson came in July 1872.  Robert Hutchinson was a brother of Mrs. Jarvis, he never took up any land; was badly afflicted with asthma; he remained until 1878 and then returned to his old home in Illinois where he died in 1891.

William Jones took the land now owned by G. H. Griffin, west of town, known as the Island.  He was the first clerk of school district No. one, and took an active part in voting the school bonds that afterward caused Norton so much trouble.  A contract was let to him to build a school house but it was never built; he sold out and went to Washington Territory in 1880.  He now resides in Portland, Oregon and is engaged in the lumber business.

William D. Jarvis settled on the land now owned by G. H. Griffin, east of the Jones farm, or the Island.  He came here in broken health caused by his army service; he enlisted in Company E 72 Regiment Illinois Infantry, Aug. 1, 1862 at Lemont, Clark county, Illinois, as a private, but was made corporal early in 1863.  He was in the following engagements: Grand Gulf, Raymond, Jackson, Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, besides several skirmishes, all in Mississippi. In the summer of 1863 he went to Ohio to raise some recruits.  At the time John Morgan made his famous raid in that state, Jarvis, accompanied by a small squad of volunteers, intercepted Morgan in the

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