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Miami County
Obituaries - The Western Spirit - 1917

Transcribed by Marc Doty from microfilm from the Kansas State Historical Society in Topeka, KS
mdcdoty@indy.rr.com


 

Obituary of David Conger. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 12, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of David Conger. - David Conger died at the home of his daughter , Mrs. G. W. Wilson, in Hillsdale, on Saturday, January 6th, 1917, at 11:30 o'clock p.m., after a week's illness.He had been failing for the past year, but had been bedfast for only a week.

The deceased was born in Zanesville, Ohio, on August 17th, 1844, removing to Missouri when a boy, where he received his education. At the age of 17 years, he enlisted in the army and fought throughout the Civil War.On August 6th, 1871, he was married to Sarah E. Price, who died on January 30th, 1916. After his marriage, he lived on a farm near Centerville, Iowa, for a year, then returned to Benton county, Missouri, coming to Kansas in 1875.He lived at various places until about twenty years ago, when he purchased a farm in Marysville township, this county and has since resided there.

Four children were born, a son died in infancy and three daughters survive: Mrs. Viola Kelly, wife of Ernest W. Kelly, and Mrs. Stella Wilson, wife of G. W. Wilson live at Hillsdale, and Mrs. Ethel Miller, wife of W. F. Miller, lives at Kansas City, Mo., also a brother, John Conger, at Wetmore, Kansas.

Mr. Conger was a member of the G. A. R. for a number of years and a staunch church worker.A sturdy pioneer, he labored unceasingly for his family and his community.

The funeral was held from the home of Mrs. G. W. Wilson last Monday afternoon, at 1:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. M. M. Sooter, interment being in the Marysville cemetery."


 

Obituary of Estella Spellman. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 12, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"A TRAGEDY - Mrs. Spellman, of West Valley, Found Dead and Her Daughter Lying Beside Her, Shot in the Head and Neck. - There was a tragedy in West Valley, about four miles south of Paola, on Wednesday, January 3rd, that was not known to the public until the following day, about 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon. Mrs. Estella Spellman, wife of Leland T. Spellman, was found dead in an abandoned barn, and beside her body was her daughter, Hazel Spellman, shot in the temple and through the neck, but not dead. The discovery was made by John Miller, who lives in the neighborhood. He went to the place to look for a hay hook that he thought had been left there when he helped Harry A. Strausbaugh to move from the premises to his present location on the Minich farm. It was about 4:00 o'clock, on Thursday evening, the 3rd inst., when Miller opend the barn door and came upon the body of Mrs. Spellman. He was so shocked that he didn't think of anything but to get away from the spot and reach home, about two miles distant. Arriving there, he telephones Ben Gifford who lives about a mile west of the barn. Mr. Gifford called J. C. Baker and they went to the premises which, by the way, are on the southeast corner where the Oldham road and the Henson, formerly Pendleton, road, intersect.There they found Mrs. Spellman dead, and the daughter living, but unconscious.

Dr. P. W. Robinson, the coroner, in Osawatomie, was notified and he brought with him R. M. Johnson, of Osawatomie, undertaker. The body of Mrs. Spellman was taken to Osawatomie, and Hazel was brought to the Van Pelt hospital, in Paola. Sheriff Stevenson and others took up the matter and a general investigation was started. The prevailing opinion is that the mother became insane over some fancied or real trouble, and, after shooting the daughter, turned the revolver, a five-chamber .32-calibre, on herself."


 

Obituary ofJohn A. Lessenden. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 12, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Sudden Death of John A. Lessenden. - John A. Lessenden, who for more than forty years has been a resident of Osawatomie township, fell over in death, about 7 o'clock, January 3, 1917, as he arose from his rocking chair to go to breakfast. His death was a shock to his many friends both in the neighborhood where he has lived ever since he came to Kansas, as well as in Osawatomie, where he has a host of close friends.

Mr. Lessenden was born in County Kent, England, August 8th, 1834, and came to this country with his parents and his brother, George, who is the only survivor of the family, and his three sisters, locating in New York state, in 1849, where the family lived one year, moving to Illinois in 1850. In 1876 they came to Kansas, and he located near the place where he died.He was married to Miss Ollie Hanson in 1856.To this union four children were born, all of whom survive. They are: Mrs. Ella McDonald, of Elgin, Illinois; Mr. Orren Lessenden, of Lincoln county, Kansas; Mr. Arthur Lessenden, of Lomax, Kansas, and Mrs. Ollie Redenbaugh, wife of J. H. Redenbaugh, who lives on the old Lessenden home place. His wife died four years ago, and he later married Mrs. Eva Patterson, of Shawnee county who, with his children and his only brother, George W. Lessenden, of this city, survive to mourn the passing of a good father, a faithful husband and brother. Mr. Lessenden was 82 years, 4 months and 25 days old at the time of his death. - Osawatomie Graphic."


 

Obituary of Columbus Ferdinand Burney. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 2, 1917, page 2, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Rantoul Pioneer Dead. - Dr. C. F. Burney, a pioneer resident of Rantoul, and well known in this county, died Friday, January 26, 1917, at his home after a month's illness of heart trouble. Mr. Burney was 75 years old. The funeral services were held from the Rantoul Presbyterian church, Sunday afternoon, Rev. F. M. Bailey, pastor of the Ottawa M. E. church officiating. The G. A. R. had charge of the last rites in the Stanton cemetery, where interment was made.

Columbus Ferdinand Burney was born March 12, 1841, at Pleasant Hill, Mo., and located near Rantoul, in 1857. He enlisted in Company D, Twelfth Kansas Regiment in October, 1862, and was discharged June 13, 1865, in Little Rock Arkansas.A year and a half later he married Julia Ann Green.

The widow, three daughters, Eva W. Furness, wife of Henry Furness, of Rantoul; Rose May Johnston, of Bemidji, Minn., and Mary Inez Springer, wife of J. M. Springer, of Rantoul, and two sons, Nicholas Allen Burney, superintendent of the Franklin county infirmary, and William Leonard Burney, of Wichita, survive.

Three sisters, Mrs. Ada B. Rodman, of Ottawa; Miss Nettie Burney, of Kansas City, and Mrs. H. T. Smith, of Ottawa, and four brothers, Judge Clarence A. Burney, of Kansas City; E. A. Burney, of Osawatomie; J. C. Burney, of Rantoul, and R. E. Burney, of Rocky Ford, Colo., also survive."


 

Obituary of Hattie May Six. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 23, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Joseph Six Dead. - Mrs. Hattie May Six died at the home of her mother, Mrs. John Grady, one and one-half miles southeast of Fontana, at 4:00 o'clock a.m., Wednesday, February 21st, 1917, after a lingering illness, having been confined to her bed for the last two months, with tuberculosis.

The deceased was born in Fontana, Kansas, on April 26th, 1881, spending all her life in Osage township.She attended school there and was married on March 2nd, 1905, to Joseph Six. They resided on a farm, one and one-fourth miles northeast of Fontana. Two children were born, Walter, nine years old, survives, and Lorinne, aged three, died on February 5th, 1916. Two brothers also survive, George Huniston and Fred Huniston, both of Fontana; also her mother, Mrs. Lora Grady.

Funeral services were held from the Grady home, yesterday, at 1:30 p.m., conducted by Reverend Howard, and burial was in the Fontana cemetery."


 

Obituary of Rosella (Minor) Roady. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 9, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Roady Dies Suddenly. - Mrs. Rosella Roady, widow of the late O. M. Roady, Sr., died very suddenly Tuesday, March 6, 1917, at the Harvey place, five miles west of town, where she and her son, Alva Reezer, made their home. She arose that morning, prepared her son's breakfast and seemed in her usual health and spirits. When he went out to feed his stock, she was getting ready to do the family washing, but when he returned about an hour later, he found her lying across the bed, dead.

Rosella Minor was born in Pennsylvania, May 4th, 1843, so she was almost 74 years old. She was married to Mr. Reezer in Illinois, and came with him to Butler county, Kansas, in 1873. Four daughters and a son were born to them, but the daughters and husband died many years ago.About thirty-three years ago she was married to O. M. Roady, Sr., who died ten years later. She had no children by this marriage, but leaves the following step-children: O. M. and S. C. Roady, of Paola; William and Frank Roady and Mrs. Laura Spore, in Colorado; Mrs. Bernice Hanlin, of Independence, Kans., and Myrtle, in Pattonsburg, Mo. Rev. Guy H. Wimmer conducted the funeral services from the home last Wednesday afternoon and burial was in the Mannen cemetery."


 

Obituary of Nellie (Casida) Wilson Meyers. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 23, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. A. L. Meyers died at St. Mary's hospital last Saturday, March 17, 1917, where she had been taken for an operation.The body was brought to Paola Sunday to the home of her mother, Mrs. Isaac Casida.

Nellie Casida was born in Cass county, Missouri, August 11th, 1874, and removed to Miami county with her parents, when one-year-old, to a farm, northwest of Paola, residing in this county practically all her life. At the age of seventeen she was married to Frank Wilson, who lived north of Paola, and four children were born.Clarence, Orrie, Lloyd and George, who survive. Mr. Wilson died about four years ago and she was married to A. L. Myers, two years ago. Other survivors are: Her mother, Mrs. Isaac Casida, five sisters, Mrs. W. F. Elliott, Mrs. J. H. Holman, Mrs. Jacob Reimal of this county, Mrs. S. G. Jordan, of Linn county, and Mrs. Frank Flanders, of Wilcox, Ariz., two brothers, J. W. Casida and Fred Casida, of Miami county.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon conducted by Benj. E. Ogden, pastor of the Christian church.Interment was in Oak Grove cemetery."


 

Obituary of Agnes Conner. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 23, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Miss Agnes Conner Dead. - Death came, a soothing messenger, to Agnes Barbara Conner, last Friday, the 16th inst., at the home of her sister, Mrs. Ella M. Lyon, wife of Charles T. Lyon, five and one-half miles north-west of Paola.

Miss Conner had been sick for a year with that incurable malady, cancer of the stomach. She suffered intensely, and she was but a shadow of her former selfÉ

Born on the old John Conner homestead, about five miles north-west of this city, on March 4th, 1866, she was 51 years old a few days before her death. Only a half a mile, or a little more from the spot of her birth, she died, and yet her life was as eventful and useful as though she had traveled the world over. Her father, John Conner, died when she was 10 years old, and she became her mother's staff. Her two sisters, Mary J. and Ella M., both married, the one to William Maloney and the other to Charles T. LyonÉ

Besides the sisters named, one brother, James Conner, survives, the other, Charles F. Conner, having died last yearÉ"


 

Obituary of George Washington Quimby. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 23, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Captain George Washington Quimby died at the home of his son, S. E. Quimby, 610 South Silver street, Paola, Kansas, on Sunday morning, 6:00 o'clock, March 18th, 1917, aged 80 years, 6 months and 10 days. Burial was in the Paola cemetery under the direction of McCaslin Post, No. 117, G. A. R., religious services being conducted by Reverend G. W. Braden, at the Quimby home, 2:00 p.m., on Monday, the 19th inst.

É Both of his grandfathers served in the Revolution, and his father was a member of a New Jersey regiment in the war of 1812. George was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, September 8th, 1836, and when he turned 21 he was married to Miss Caroline Van Dorn. This was in 1857. A year later, with his wife, he came to Kansas and settled on a claim in Lyon county, near Emporia.

When the Civil was broke out in the spring of 1861, Mr. Quimby, then 24 years of age past, organized a company and was made Captain of itÉ

In 1867 he moved with his family to Paola and engaged in the grocery businessÉ Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Quimby, three of whom survive: Steven E., of Paola; Matt Quimby, of Chanute, and Charles C. Quimby, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A daughter died from burns in this city when she was quite young, and Mrs. Quimby died here, too, January 8th, 1908.

Captain Quimby was the youngest and the last of his family. The brother next to him, Dr. Isaac N. Quimby, died a few years ago in New Jersey.He, too, was a soldier in the Union armyÉ"

Note: Cemetery records show additional children: Minnie, 1866-1867; Willie, 1869-1869 and Carrie Belle, 1870-1876.


 

Obituary of Matilda A. (McGuire) Taylor. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 6, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"She Was An Early Settler Here. - Mrs. Matilda A. Taylor died last Tuesday evening at 8:15 p.m., April 3rd, 1917, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Deck Senate, after a week's illness of complication of diseases. The middle of last week a gathering formed in her right ear, but not until Sunday was she made bedfast. She suffered a slight stroke of paralysis on Tuesday from which she did not recover.

Matilda A. McGuire was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 26th, 1840, moving with her parents when a child to Lake county, Indiana. She was married to James Taylor, 1857, and came to Paola, Kansas, in 1866, where she has since resided. Eleven children were born, six of whom are now living. Frank, John D., Will and Mrs. Deck Senate reside in Paola, and Mrs. E. O'Harrow and Charles E. live in Kansas City, Missouri. She was a member of the M. E. church most of her life and probably one of the oldest members of the Paola M. E. church. Besides her children, she is survived by three step-brothers and two step-sisters, George Swinehart, of Paola, being a step-brother. James Taylor, her husband, died in 1898.

Funeral services were held from the Methodist church, Thursday, April 5, at 2:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. Geo. W. Braden, and burial was in Elmwood cemetery. Among the mothers of Paola, who knew the hardships of pioneer days, Mrs. Taylor stood high for the goodness of her deeds. She was brave and patient through all trials and well may her descendants honor her noble life."


 

Obituary of James Alfred Inglebret. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 20, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"J. A. Inglebret Dead. - James Alfred Inglebret died at his home on West Chippewa street, Sunday, April 15th, 1917, at 1:20 p.m., after a month's illness. He was bedfast for two weeks. He was one of the victims of the hold-up in the Frisco depot at Olathe about three months ago and since that time has gradually grown worse.

Mr. Inglebret was born January 23, 1861, at Nevada, Missouri, where he lived until he was 16 years old, when he went to Cass county, Missouri. On March 22nd, 1881, he was married to Lydia Maxwell at Archie, Mo. Five children were born, two of whom survive: Mrs. C. P. Hodgin, of Nevada, and Lucille, at home.The family has lived in Paola for six years, coming here from Olathe. The deceased was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America for a number of years and a member of the Christian church. He also had three brothers, Coleman, who lives in Arkansas; John, of Nevada, Mo., and William, of Oregon. John was here at the time of his brother's death.

The funeral was held from the home Tuesday, April 17th, 1917, conducted by Benj. E. Ogden, of the Christian church.Burial was in Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Richard Steven Hussey. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 20, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of Miami County Pioneer. - Richard Steven Hussey, son of Thomas J. and Louisa Hussey, was born in Lee county, Iowa, August 28, 1852, and died April 11, 1917, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lon Crowl, near Lane, Kansas, where he had made his home during the last eighteen months of his life. He endured a painful illness of four months and seventeen days, resulting from hardening of the arteries and complications, which caused his death at the age of 64 years, 7 months and 13 days.

When very small, Mr. Hussey removed with his parents to Boone county, Iowa, where they lived until November, 1865, when he came to Kansas, settling in Miami county, about four miles southwest of Osawatomie. On March 26th, 1871, he was married to Martha E. Averill, who died August 15th, 1895. To them twelve children were born: seven girls and five boys, of whom eight survive to mourn the loss of a kind and affectionate father, who for twenty-two long years had been both father and mother to them. Three children died in early childhood, and one daughter, Mrs. Jennie Rupe, in October, 1913. Those remaining are: Mrs. Mattie White, Garnett, Kansas; Thomas J., Cestos, Oklahoma; Richard S., Pendennis, Kansas; Bethel P., of Northfield, Minnesota; Mrs. Birdie Newton, Kansas City, Missouri; Mrs. Belle Barker, Osawatomie, Kansas; Norman C. and Mrs. Stella Crowl, of Lane. He leaves thirty-one grandchildren. On November 28, 1905, he was married to Mrs. Addie L. Martin, who also survives him.

Mr. Hussey was one of the oldest members of Granville Lodge, No. 263, I. O. O. F. Richard Hussey was the last of a family of eight children. He was a man who stood for anything that was for the advancement and upbuilding of his community, always striving to make this world a better place.

The funeral was held at the Quaker church, Friday, April 14th, at 10:00 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. S. Freed, assisted by the I. O. O. F. and burial was by the side of his wife, in the Quaker cemetery."


 

Obituary of Maggie (Petrie) Prescott. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 15, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"The Death of Mrs. Prescott. - Mrs. Maggie Petrie Prescott, wife of William J. Prescott, died at Butte, Montana, on Monday, the 11th inst., aged 53 years. She had been ailing for a year, or more, and recently underwent an operation for gall stones. She didn't recover. The body will be brought to Paola and buried in the cemetery here to-morrow afternoon, June 16th, 1917.

The deceased leaves three children, two daughters and a son, Florence, who is the wife of Mr. E. W. Renfro; Phebe and Urdin. Mr. Prescott and his family went to Butte about three years ago and he has been employed there in a state institution. Previous to his moving from this county, he was employed at the Osawatomie hospital. He bought, and still owns, one of the old Colonel Hume farms, southwest of Osawatomie, and for several years before leaving spent considerable time on this farm.

Mrs. Prescott was born just north of Paola, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. William Petrie. A brother, Lon Petrie, resides southeast of Paola. As a girl she was a favorite in both town and country and as a wife and mother she commanded the respect of all who made her acquaintance. Gentle of disposition, industrious and frugal she kept her household in order, and reared her children to be upright and true. Mr. Prescott is a son of the late U. B. Prescott, who was for many years an honored resident of Paola. Friends on every hand extend sincere sympathy."


 

Obituary of Ethlyn "Ethie" S. (Randel) Fickel. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 15, 1917, page 2, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"A Young Mother's Death. - Death in old age or in infancy carries deep sorrow but when it comes to a mother just nearing the noon of life, both grief and tears are intensified. Mrs. Ethlyn Fickel, familiarly called Ethie, wife of Henry W. Fickel, died at 9 o'clock p.m., June 13th, 1917, at the family home, a mile and a half west of Somerset, aged 38 years, 6 months and 4 days. Two weeks ago she took down with typhoid fever and neither doctor's skill nor nursing could save her life.

Ethie S. Randel, daughter of J. W. and Anna Randel, was born December 9th, 1878, at Tracy, Iowa, and came with her parents to this county in 1894. On the 22nd day of October, 1899, she was married to Henry W. Fickel, and the couple lived on a farm near Somerset ever since. To them were born two sons, Floyd, age 16, and Harry age 12, both promising youths, industrious and respected. She leaves a sister, Mabel, the wife of Howard Wise, and two brothers, Harry L. Randel, lives in Kansas City, Mo., and Carl, the other brother, hasn't been heard from for three years. Mrs. Fickel had been for many years a member of the Methodist church, in which she was an earnest worker. Only a month ago, she helped to organize a Mother's Club at Somerset, and the first regular meeting had been postponed on account of her sickness.

The funeral will be held to-day at 3:00 o'clock p.m., services conducted in the Somerset Methodist church by Rev. Mitchell and interment in the burial ground, a mile west of the village. It will, indeed, be a day of mourning in that neighborhood, because Ethie Fickel was a lovable woman, to whom old age and young were attached. Her good example will live long and memories of her useful life will live generation to generation."


 

Obituary of Minerva Jane (McGlaughlin) Gray. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 29, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death Followed Operation. - Mrs. Edwin Gray died at St. Mary's hospital, in Kansas City, Mo., Saturday morning, June 23rd, 1917, following an operation the preceding Thursday from which she never fully rallied. The body was brought to Paola Sunday morning, and the last rites were conducted at the Christian church that afternoon. Benjamin E. Odgen, the pastor, and Mrs. J. Sherman Hill officiating.Four sons of the deceased, George, William, Clarence and Albert, were the pall bearers.Burial was in Elmwood cemetery.

Minerva Jane McGlaughlin was born in Frankfort, Illinois, June 7th, 1865. She came to Kansas about ten years later with her parents, who homesteaded near Concordia, where she was married to Edwin Gray, in 1866. Nine children were born to them - Albert Charles, now in Guthrie, Okla., and George Henry, William Ira, Clarence Arthur, Elmer Theodore, Cora Emma, Sarah Marie, Virgil Leota and Ralph Leo, in Paola.

The eldest son was born in Eldorado, Mo., where Mr. and Mrs. Gray lived the first two years of their married life, but the rest were born and reared in Richmond, Kansas, all receiving their schooling from the same teacher, Miss Florence Aiken. The Grays came to this county eight years ago.

Mrs. Gray's was a strong character.Always cheerful and hopeful under the most adverse conditions, she raised a large family in the fear of God.She worked unceasingly for them, but was amply repaid by the love and respect they gave her. Beside the husband and children, the deceased also leaves an aged mother, a sister and brother in the state of Washington; a sister, in Iowa, and another in Alberta, Canada, and two grandchildren."


 

Obituary of Jasper A. Reed. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 6, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Jasper Reed Dead. - The death of Jasper A. Reed, near Louisburg, on the 28th, ult., will be deeply mourned by all old settlers of the eastern part of Miami county, as well as by many others in Paola and in Coffey county, who knew him well.

Mr. Reed was 68 years old and was the son of the late Farlow Reed. On the 21st of March, 1875, he was married to Miss Abbie Frakes and she survives along with seven sons and daughters: John and Harley live at Waskish, Minn.; A. J. Reed, Coffey county; Mrs. Riley W. Lee and Mrs. Jeff Wells, live in Louisburg. Hugh is in California and Ralph is at the old home, a mile west of Louisburg. Mr. Reed leaves four brothers and four sisters: Milton and William are in Coffey county; Farlow A., Mrs. Louise Bell and Mrs. Robert Johnson, all reside in Louisburg; Mrs. Cynthia Weedman lives at Walnut Grove, Minn.; and Mrs. Josephine Weedman is a resident of Webster City, Iowa.

Jasper Reed was a man of high character, honest, industrious and charitable. In his prime he was a man of great physical power, who was one of the hardest workers of this county. He raised a large family and leaves a good name."


 

Obituary of Jane (Collins) [Robertson] Danley. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 13, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Jane Danley Dead. - Mrs. Peter Danley died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Harris, near New Lancaster, Thursday, July 5th, 1917, age 77 years, 10 months and 27 days. After short funeral services from the home by Rev. C. C. Brannon, the body was taken to Vandalia, Iowa, for burial.

The maiden name of the deceased was Jane Collins, and she was born on August 8th, 1839, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio. She went to Indiana with her parents when quite small and lived there until the spring of 1853, when she removed to Jasper county, Iowa, living there until the home was broken up by the death of her husband, after which she made her home with her children, the last five years being spent with her daughter, Mrs. John Harris.

She was married to Elijah Robertson, June 30th, 1861, and the husband and six children born to them preceded her in death. August 15th, 1872, she and Peter Danley were married and two of the four children born to them survive. One son, Elmer Danley, lives at New Virginia, Iowa, and one daughter, resides near New Lancaster. She also leaves thirteen grand children and three great grandchildren."


 

Obituary of Lenora (Hazard) Reed. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 13, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in Her Ninety-First Year. - Mrs. Lenora Reed, who died early Tuesday morning, July 10, 1917, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles F. Emery, would have been 91 years old next December. She had suffered two strokes of paralysis and has been helpless since the first of March, but before that she retained much of her mental and bodily vigor.

For over half a century "Grandma" Reed lived in Paola, endearing herself to everyone by her cheery disposition and kindliness of heart. A good neighbor, she was also a conscientious wife and mother. She was a charter member of the Christian church here and helped to build their house of worship. She was an expert needle woman and even in her ninetieth year, turned out quantities of handmade laces and other work that will be treasured by her children for years to come.

The deceased was a daughter of William and Mary Hazard and was born December 20, 1826, in Westmoreland, Virginia. The family moved to Azalia, Ind., when Lenora was but eleven, and seven years later she was married there to Alfred Walter Reed. At this time she was also united with the United Brethren church, which faith she practiced during her residence there and in Davis county, Mo., but on coming to Kansas in the later part of the sixties, she embraced the Christian religion. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Reed, six of whom survive. Nancy, wife of Charles Emery, lives in this city, and it was with her that the mother lived continuously for the last four years, and the greater part of the time the preceding six years. A. B. and John Reed also live in Paola; Walter, in Centerville, Kans.; Emmet, in Muskogee, Okla., and Mary, in Osawatomie. Beside the six children, she leaves six grandchildren, seven great grandchildren, a brother, Joseph Hazard, in Azalia, Indiana, and a sister, Mrs. Mary Ann Swingle, in Columbus, Ohio.

The husband died about fourteen years ago, and is buried in Elm Grove cemetery, and there the body of his devoted wife and helpmeet for sixty years was laid to rest Wednesday morning, following services from the Emery home. The Reverend George W. Braden officiated."


 

Obituary of George Hartley Welch. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 27, 1917, page 8, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"George Hartley Welch was born in Bloomington, Illinois, McLean county, December 30, 1840, and died in Hillsdale, Kansas, July 25, 1917. He was converted to the Christian faith about December 20, 1858, and united with the United Brethren church, at Bloomington, Illinois. He moved with his parents to Miami county, Kansas, October 8th, 1866, settled near what was then known as Old Marysville town, and has been a resident of Miami county ever since, with the exception of one and a half years, when he resided near Lund, Decatur county, Kansas. He was married to Miss Mary Lucretia Holloway, September 19, 1867. After his marriage he, with his wife, united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of which he remained a member until his death. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Mary Welch, and four sons - William M., of the home address; Charles L. and Homer, of Joplin, Missouri, and John, of Kansas City, Missouri. One brother, Sol W. Welch, resides in Paola, and two sisters, Mrs. Kate Malone, at Bonita, and Mrs. Geo. W. Seavers, of Spokane, Washington. Mr. Welch enlisted in Company F, of the 94th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, July 26th, 1862, was mustered into service at Bloomington, Illinois, August 20th, 1862, and honorably serving until mustered out, August 9, 1865, taking part in the following engagements: Siege of Vicksburg; Morganzie Landing, Louisiana; Capture of Yazoo City, Brownsville; Siege of Fort Morgan, and Siege of Spanish Fort, Alabama. Mr. Welch's illness was of only about one week's duration, his death occurring at his home in Hillsdale, about noon, on the 15th inst. He was a man of sterling qualities, liberal in his views and straightforward in his dealings. He leaves to his sons a heritage of good works and honest living and a clean record, which is worth more than riches to them."


 

Obituary of Serena (Robinson) Keitel. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 10, 1917, page 5, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in Her 68th Year. - Another early Kansas pioneer has been lost to Miami county in the death of Mrs. Jacob Keitel, at her home in Fontana, August 5th, 1917, aged 67 years, 6 months and 22 days.

Serena Robinson was born on January 14th, 1850, in Chester county, Penn., where she spent her childhood. In 1866 she came to Kansas and on May 3rd was united in marriage to Jacob Keitel. To them, eight children were born, six of whom are still living: William and Omer Keitel, of Twin Springs, Linn county, Kansas; Charley, of Beagle, Kansas; Mrs. Maggie Collins and Mrs. Ella Stark, of Twin Springs; Mrs. Laura Funk, of Fontana. She also leaves twenty-three grandchildren, besides her husband, to mourn the loss of an affectionate wife and a loving mother.

In her early married life, Mrs. Keitel joined the Methodist church, and lived a faithful Christian life. She took seriously ill on last Tuesday and died Sunday morning at 6:45. Her last words to her family were: "There is a home in Heaven prepared for me." asking them all to meet her there. Mrs. Keitel was a kind and motherly woman, thoughtful and considerate of the needs of neighbors as well as of her own family and always ready to render her tender services. She raised her children to be honorable men and women.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. George Caughron, of Fontana, were held at the Methodist church, at Twin Springs, and burial was in the Cadmus cemetery, Monday afternoon."


 

Obituary of Elizabeth (Bailey) Brandeberry. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 17, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. E. C. Brandeberry Dead. - Mrs. Elizabeth Brandeberry, widow of the late Ezra C. Brandeberry, died Wednesday night, August 8th, 1917, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. M. L. Cadwallader, near El Paso, Tex. Mrs. Brandeberry was in her 80th year and had been failing since January of this year, when she had a bad spell of pneumonia. The body was taken to Louisburg, Kans., and interred Sunday following funeral services from the home of her sister, Mrs. N. C. Parker, conducted by the Reverend O. G. Mitchell, pastor of the Methodist church.

Mrs. Brandeberry's maiden name was Elizabeth Bailey. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bailey and was born in Nova, Ashland county, Ohio, February 12th, 1838. She grew to womanhood there and was married in 1856 to Mr. Brandeberry. Fifteen years later, in 1881, they came to Miami county, locating on a farm near Louisburg, where they lived until retiring from the farm, when they moved to Paola. Mr. Brandeberry's death occurred here seven years ago, and three years later the widow and her daughter, Miss Q V, went to Texas, where they have since resided at El Paso.

The deceased is survived by four children - Gertrude, wife of M. L. Cadwallader, and Miss Q V live in El Paso, Texas; Vada, wife of T. H. Hand, is in Los Angeles, California, and Mr. Elias F. Brandeberry in Seattle, Washington. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. N. C. Parker, in Louisburg, and Mrs. Buell Peck, at Baldwin, Kansas.

Early in life, Mrs. Brandeberry joined the Methodist church, and her many friends in and around Louisburg and Paola remember her as a woman of lofty principles and broad charity. She was a lover of home, devoted to husband and children and hospitable alike to friend and the chance acquaintance at her door. She knew the privations and the toil of the early pioneer's life, but they only strengthened and refined as already lovable character. To her children and sisters, deepest sympathy is tendered."


 

Obituary of Katharina (Rehr) Dageforde. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 21, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. William Dageforde Dead. - Mrs. William Dageforde died Tuesday, September 18th, 1917, at her home in Valley township, after a lingering illness. She was in her 83rd year and had spent almost half a century in Miami county.

Her maiden name was Katharina Rehr, and she was born August 31st, 1835, in Brockhoefeda, Germany. She and William Dageforde were married in the old country August 16th, 1860, and came to America six years later. They first settled in Illinois, coming to Kansas in 1869, locating on the Valley township farm, where death claimed the wife Tuesday. Of the seven children born to this good couple, two died in infancy. The five living are J. William Dageforde, Didsbury, Alberta, Canada; Mrs. Sophia Meinig, wife of Otto Meinig, of Stanton township; Mrs. Minnie Woods, wife of Austin Woods, of Somerset, Kansas, and John and Henry Dageforde in Valley township.

Mrs. Dageforde was a typical American, born in Germany, who came to this country in her youth, with her husband, and gave to the United States stalwart sons and useful daughters to help build up the West. She was a mother of rare strength, of high morals and wholesome example.Well may the family and Miami county honor her memory.

As we went to press yesterday, the funeral arrangements had not been made awaiting the arrival of William Dageforde, from Canada."


 

Obituary of Phoebe Ann (Dupont) Black. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 21, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Phoebe A. Black Dead. - The widow of the late James G. Black died at her home, in Miami township, this county, on Sunday, September 15th, 1917, in her eighty-first year. Her maiden name was Phoebe Ann Dupont, and she was born on May 20th, 1837, in New York. There she was married to Mr. Black, and, in the early sixties the couple moved to Iowa. From there they came to Kansas, shortly after the war, and settled in this county.

The sons and daughters living are: Misses Lizzie and Ida E. Black. William R. Black, the eldest son, and his two brothers, Charles N. and Alfred J. reside in Miami township. Lillie D., wife of George W. Croxton, and Mrs. Anna Hutchins live in LaCygne, and Mrs. Emma Mindeleff, in Kansas City.

The funeral was held last Tuesday, the 18th inst., interment in the New Lancaster cemetery.Rev. Bascomb, of the Methodist church, conducted the services. The neighborhood was in attendance and LaCygne, Paola, Louisburg and Drexel were represented.

Industry and economy were Mrs. Black's leading characteristics. She was a woman of rare grasp and energy and her life was one of intense activity. Work had long since become her chief pleasure and source of happiness. The death of her husband, James G. Black, forty years ago, threw upon her heavy responsibilities. The Black estate was a big one in land, and she took up the duty of managing it. Most of her children were yet young, and she saw to it that they were educated and trained to meet the practical affairs of the world. For awhile she was assisted by her brother, Nathan Dupont, but soon all the care fell upon her. Many a generation will come and go before a woman of Mrs. Black's ability and bent for toil comes again. She maintained and strengthened the family name: improved the country, paid taxes promptly and set before her children an example of virtue, morality and patience that they honor themselves in following."


 

Obituary of John Good. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 28, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Another Pioneer Gone. - John Good died at his home in Middle Creek township, on Thursday evening, September 20th, 1917, aged 76 years and three months. Mr. Good had been ailing about a year, but was up and around, having just returned the week previously from a visit with his daughter, Mrs. B. C. Hoyt, in Willmar, Minnesota. He suffered a heart attack last Thursday evening, and while surrounded by his wife and children, death came peacefully and gently about twenty minutes later.

John Good was born near Deerfield, New York, June 9th, 1841. During the later part of the Civil War he served his country in the Navy, and when peace was declared settled in Johnson county, Missouri. Here her was married March 8th, 1870, to Miss Isabelle Morrow. Five years later he brought his little family to Miami county, settling on the farm in Middle Creek township, where his death occurred. Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Good, only four survive. Charles is at home with his mother, and George lives on a farm nearby. Florence is the wife of Ed. McNelly and lives with her husband in Middle Creek township, and Lulu is with her husband, B. C. Hoyt, in Willmar, Minnesota. He also leaves thirteen grandsons, four granddaughters and one sister, Mrs. Kate Wagner, in Sacramento, California.

John Good was a man among men. He served his country in time of war, and helped to build it up in times of peace. He tilled the soil, was instrumental in erecting churches and schools and reared sons and daughters of whom any man might be proud. For twenty-eight years he was a member of the Drexel M. W. A. lodge. The funeral services Sunday were from the Miami Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Good was a faithful member. Rev. W. J. Poole, the pastor, officiated. Interment was in the Louisburg cemetery."


 

Obituary of Johanna (Arzberger) Cree. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 19, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Robert Cree Dead. - Mrs. J. R. Cree died Saturday, October 13th, 1917, after an illness of six weeks, at her home, 509 West Shawnee, street. Mrs. Cree was taken with pneumonia about six weeks ago, and then stricken with paralysis.

Johanna Arzberger was born near Paola, on January 21st, 1872, and has lived all her life in Miami county. On January 1st, 1902, she was married to James Robert Cree, five children being born, all of whom survive - Lorinne, David, Clair, George and Roberta. Her mother, Mrs. Katherine Arzberger, and four brothers and four sisters, also survive, Carl, Fred, of Willcox, Ariz.; Chris, of Larned, Kansas; Gus, of Paola; Mrs. W. A. Walters, at Block; Mrs. Lena Hamlin, and Mrs. Edith Kohlenberg, of Paola, and Mrs. Minnie Koneich, of Huntingsburg, Indiana.

Mrs. Cree was a woman of loving disposition, charitable and always bore hardships with fortitude. In the neighborhood where she has lived the past several years, her kindly acts will be missed.The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended the family in their bereavement. She was a lifelong member of the Christian church.

The funeral was held on Monday, October 15th, from the home, Benj. E. Ogden, pastor of the Christian church, conducting the service. Interment was in Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Robert S. Barnhill. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 2, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of Robert S. Barnhill. - Robert S. Barnhill died at his home Saturday, October 27th, 1917, after an illness of ten months. Last December his shoe rubbed a blister on his heel and gangrene developed, which finally caused his death. For five months he had been bedfast.

The deceased was born October 28, 1841, and had he lived another day, would have celebrated his 76th birthday. His birthplace was at Wattsville, Carroll county, Ohio, where he lived until moving to Bloomington, Indiana, in 1856.On March 8th, 1862, he enlisted in the 27th Indiana Infantry as a private. This regiment lost all but 180 men at the Battle of Gettysburg, and was combined with the 70th Indiana Infantry. He was married on Dec. 16, 1868 to Joanna Constantine.Six children were born to them, five of whom survive - A. O. and Bernal A., of Paola; John F., Superintendent of City Schools, at Parsons; Fred C., at New Lancaster, and Mrs. Florence Race, of Sedgwick, Kansas. One brother, Andrew Jackson Barnhill, lives at Altoona, Kansas. The widow also survives; as does on grandchild, Ellis Bernal Barnhill. In September, 1882, he came to Miami county, Kansas, settling in the northeastern part of the county and in 1905 removed to Paola, where he lived until the time of his death. He was a contractor and builder and during his residence at Louisburg, erected most of the buildings in that city.

The funeral services, which were largely attended, were held from the Congregational church, Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. O. B. Thurston, assisted by Rev. Geo. W. Braden. The interment was in the Oak Grove cemetery. The floral offerings were many, some being received from the Rotary Club, Chamber of Commerce, Board of Education, Parsons city schools, and the Christian church, of Parsons, as well as the liberal offering from Paola and vicinity."


 

Obituary of Promley W. Conkling. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 9, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"P. W. Conkling Buried at Hillsdale. - Promley W. Conkling, aged 56 years, died at the German hospital, in Kansas City at 4:00 o'clock Monday morning, November 5th, 1917. He was the husband of the late Mrs. Mollie Hanna Jordan-Conkling, who died last June. Mr. Conkling had been in poor health for several years and had returned to his home in Kansas City only a short time before from a six months stay in Excelsior Springs, Mo., where he had gone in the hopes of being benefitted by the waters and hot baths.

After his return home he suffered a stroke of paralysis. Following this he was taken to the German hospital, where his death occurred. The funeral services were held in Kansas City, on Wednesday afternoon, and the body was brought to Hillsdale for burial beside the body of the wife, who preceded him in death about five months. Seven automobiles filled with relatives and friends from Kansas City accompanied the body here and the grave was heaped high with flowers, so numerous were tokens of respect and love. Mr. Conkling is survived by three stepchildren - Wilbur and Lester Jordan, of Kansas City, and Mrs. Ina Morgan, of Great Falls, Montana."


 

Obituary of Frances Elizabeth (Aukland) Sharp. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 9, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of Mrs. John Sharp. - Mrs. John Sharp died at her home, 208 West Chippewa street, on Thursday, November 1st, 1917, after a lingering illness of two years, of a complication of diseases.She had been confined to her bed the last month.

Frances Elizabeth Aukland was born at Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, on November 27th, 1837. On December 16th, 1862, in London, England, she was married to John Sharp, who survives her. In 1868 they came to America, living in Chicago, Illinois, until 1878, when they moved to Kansas, settling near Stanton, where they lived until moving to Paola, eight years ago. Twelve children were born, four of whom died during infancy. A son, Alfred Sharp, was drowned at Quenemo, Kansas, four years ago. The eight surviving are: Mrs. C. T. Ricketts, of Paola; John B. Sharp, at Emmett, Idaho; Mrs. W. B. Newlon, Mrs. E. H. Day, Mrs. E. R. Newlon, of Pueblo, Colo.; Mrs. O. W. Mills, of Stanton, and Mrs. C. W. Mills, of Fowler, Colo.

She was a life long member of the church of England, and lived a consistent Christian life. The mother of a large family, she devoted most of her time in caring for them and in looking after her home, but still found time to help in all projects for the betterment of her community. Charitable, broad-minded and devout, her life was one of self-sacrifice, and her memory will be revered and honored by all who knew her.

The funeral was held from the home last Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. Geo. W. Braden reading the Episcopal service. Interment was in Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Willis C. Buck. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 9, 1917, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died From Typhoid Fever. - Willis C. Buck died last Wednesday, November 7th, 1917, at his home, west of Fontana, after a three weeks' illness of typhoid fever. The body was taken to Sabetha, Kansas, where the burial took place.

The deceased was born in Cambridge, Illinois, November 6th, 1863, and was 54 years old the day before his death. He came to Kansas in 1874. He was married to Madge Stahl and two children were born, Willis and Mildred, who, with the widow survive. He is also survived by three brothers and four sisters.

Willis Buck, the son, is dangerously ill with typhoid fever and was taken to a hospital in Kansas City, yesterday."


 

Obituary of Henry O. Sheldon. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 23, 1917, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mr. Henry O. Sheldon Dead. - Mr. Henry O. Sheldon died at his home a mile southwest of Fontana, on Thursday night, November 15th, 1917, after a four months' illness of Addison's disease. He was 51 years, 8 months and 8 days old; his premature death cutting off a useful, busy life in its prime.

All his life Mr. Sheldon lived in Osage township. He was born there March 23rd, 1866. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Dudley M. Sheldon, and when he was married to Miss Anna Tipton April 29th, 1891, two of the strongest and best families of Southern Miami county were united. Of the seven children born to them, six survive, one dying in infancy. They are: Lincoln Howard Sheldon, of Kansas City, Mo.; Charles Sheldon, at home; Mrs. Nona McDaniel, wife of Ora McDaniel, of Fontana; Bertha, Nellie and Jay, at home.Beside the widow, three sons and three daughters, he also leaves one brother, E. J. Sheldon, of Paola.

Henry Sheldon was a counterpart of Winfield Sheldon in charitable makeup. He had a heart for helping others. In him were blended honesty and simplicity. He was of the class of men who made their living with their hands and whether on the farm of carrying United States mail, he was the same industrious, reliable person. The example of his father, Dudley Sheldon, was ever before him. His boyhood, his marriage day and his mature life were all of the same cloth and his life added credit to the family name.

The funeral on Saturday afternoon was a large one, the Methodist church being filled to overflowing. The Reverend W. H. Howard was in charge of the services and interment was in the Fontana cemetery.

The following out-of-town relatives were here for the last rites: Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ticknor and Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Ticknor, Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Sheldon, of Kansas City, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Sheldon, of Medicine Lodge; Mr. Arthur Sheldon, of Osawatomie."

Note: Marriage Book I, Miami Co., Kansas, page 55, lists Henry O. Sheldon & Annie Ticknor.


 

Obituary of Ami Norman Gruver. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 30, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"A. N. Gruver Dead. - Ami Norman Gruver, who died in a Kansas City hospital, Monday evening, November 26th, 1917, was born in old Marysville, December 24th, 1871, and spent his boyhood days in Hillsdale. He moved to Kansas City about twenty years ago.He was married there, his wife preceding him in death. He is survived by one son, Harold Gruver, of Kansas City; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis N. Gruver, in Hillsdale; a brother, William H. Gruver, and a sister, Mrs. Menzie Schwartz, both of Kansas City. Mr. Gruver had been sick about three weeks of bronchial pneumonia. He was taken to the hospital ten days ago and seemed to be improving, his death coming as a great shock to relatives and friends. The burial was in Hillsdale last Wednesday, a short service at the grave being read by the Rev. B. F. Coburn."


 

Obituary of Mary (Schuster) Klassen. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 21, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Klassen Dead - Death came as a gentle messenger to Mrs. Mary KLASSEN, 608 East Peoria street, Paola, on Tuesday morning, December 18th, 1917. She had been sick a long time and in her conscious hours she frequently said that death would be a welcome visitor at her bedside. Her body was worn with toil and her once rugged constitution broken with pain. For over fifty-six years she had lived in the same place, a resident of this city. Born near Berlin, Germany, on the 25th day of April, 1839, she came to America with as older sister when 13 years of age. Her family name was SCHUSTER. From New York she went to Chicago and there she and Mathias Klassen were married on the 17th day of October, 1854. The young couple came on West and settled in Kansas City, Missouri, where they lived for four years.

In the spring of 1861 Mr. and Mrs. Klassen came to Paola. Mr. Klassen joined the army and the good wife settled down for duty, looking after family affairs in the little frame house in the east part of town. In this spot, consecrated by her work, her wifely care, and family devotion, she lived to rest under the shade of trees that her hands planted. Their only son, Lou Klassen, died many years ago in Kansas City, Kansas, and their oldest daughter, Mrs. Katy KOEHLER, died in 1916 in New York City. The surviving daughters are: Mrs. Nettie TODD, wife of William Todd; Mrs. Libbie MARCHUM, wife of William H. Marchum; Mrs. Jodie GRAY, wife of Frank H. Gray, all of Paola. Also there are Mrs. Mary CONFLANS, wife of Rock Conflans, of Fort Scott, Kansas, and Mrs. Myrtle CAMPBELL, wife of T. V. Campbell, of Topeka, Kansas. Besides her own, she was a mother to Will, Ella, Frank and Julia FORNER, who, with their father, William Forner, went to live with the Klassens when their mother died. Of course, Mr. Forner met all the expenses, but the care of the little ones fell to Mrs. Klassen. They grew to useful manhood and womanhood, all ever loving, and loyal to the good woman who cared for them as though they were her own.

Mr. Klassen died in the spring of 1915 [sic] and yesterday the body of Mrs. Klassen was laid by his side in the Paola cemetery, after funeral Mass was chanted by Rev. Father Kinsella at Holy Trinity Catholic church, in this city. There was a large assemblage of town, and country people at the burial. Of her 78 years of life, Mrs. Klassen had lived for nearly three score years in our midst. She was loved by all who knew herÉShe is the last of her generation, brother, John Schuster, aged 89 years, having died in Chicago, on the 1st day of December, 1917. One sister-in-law survives, Mrs. Kate Neighoff, Mr. Klassen's sister, whose home is in Chicago. There are fourteen grand children and eight great grandchildren, who will ever keep her name in memory."

Note: Mathias Klassen died April 8, 1916, and his sister's name is probably Katherine Niehoff.


 

Obituary of Dodd Volna Watkins. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 21, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"D. V. Watkins Dead. - Mr. Watkins, of this city, died suddenly at his home, South Silver street, Paola, Kansas, at 1:00 o'clock p.m., on Monday, December 17th, 1917, aged about 62 years. He had been in failing health for two years, but his friends didn't think his condition was serious and they were surprised to hear of his sudden taking off. He had been afflicted with heart trouble and other complications for a long time.

Dodd Volna Watkins was born at Kaneville, Illinois, on February 28th, 1856 so he was within about two months of being 62 years old. He leaves a sister, Pauline E. Dickson, of this city; a niece, Miss Volna Barker, who has made her home with him since the death of her mother and now attending a business college in Kansas City, Missouri; a brother, Frank O. Watkins, of Joplin, Mo.; his stepmother, Mrs. S. J. Watkins, two half sisters, Miss Lila F. Watkins and Mrs. Elmer H. Bachman, of Paola, and two half brothers, Earl B. Watkins, of Ft. Bliss, Texas, and Emerson L. Watkins, of the First National Bank, of Coffeyville, Kansas. His father, H. B. Watkins, a well known citizen of this county, died many years ago, as did his mother, sister and brother, Effie and Charles.

The funeral was held on Wednesday, afternoon, the 19th inst., services being conducted by Rev. J. Sherman Hill, of this city. H. M. Dickson, of Saint Louis, Mo.; Frank O. Watkins, and Miss Barker, with other relatives, were here attending the funeral.

Dodd Wilkins was of a quiet turn and was popular with all who knew him. His business standing was good and he had friends in every part of Miami county."


 

Obituary of Heinrich Rodewald. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 28, 1917, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in His 77th Year. - Mr. Heinrich Rodewald died at his home near Block, on Christmas Day, 1917, and will be buried to-day, December 28th, in the cemetery at the Lutheran Holy Trinity church, in East Valley township, services conducted at the Rodewald home by Rev. F. Droegemueller.

Mr. Rodewald is survived by his wife, Dora Rodewald, two sons, William and John Rodewald; one daughter, Mrs. Doris Prothe, wife of John Prothe, all of this county. Also one step-son, Henry Koerner, and thirteen grandchildren.Born in Doerverden Province, Hanover, Germany, May 23rd, 1841, the deceased came to America in 1867 and settled in Illinois. Two years later he came to East Valley, this county, bought the land which is now known as the Rodewald Homestead and lived there most of the time ever since. He was married in 1871 to Mary Wilkins, sister of John and Fred Wilkins. She died here in 1884. Six years later Mr. Rodewald and Mrs. Dora Koerner were married. No children were born to this union.

The Rodewald family are extensively known and highly respected. Heinrich was of the colony of frugal Germans coming here in 1869, who have added so much to the material, moral and patriotic strength of Miami county. They took out naturalization papers and became true Americans from the very start. Sympathy is extended to the widow, the sons, the daughters and the grandchildren. Well may they lament the passing of a man who did so much for them and so much for the welfare of the community in which he made his home."


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