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Miami County
Obituaries - The Western Spirit - 1916

Transcribed by Marc Doty from microfilm from the Kansas State Historical Society in Topeka, KS
mdcdoty@indy.rr.com


 

Obituary of Isaac Hamlin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 7, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Isaac Hamlin Died in Kansas City. - The death of Isaac Hamlin, which occurred January 1st, 1916, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Crossan, 1214 West 20th st., in Kansas City, Mo., marked the passing of another Miami county pioneer. Mr. Hamlin had declined rapidly in health in the past few years, and a short time before his death, suffered a series of paralytic strokes.

He was born October 23rd, 1827, in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and was reared to manhood on a farm in that state. In 1852, he was married to Mary A. Rumberger, of Centre county, Pennsylvania, who died several years ago in Kansas City. In the last year of the Civil war. He enlisted as a private in Company B., 91st Pennsylvania volunteers and served his country until the close.

Mr. Hamlin emigrated to Kansas in March, 1869, with his family, and settled on a farm in Miami township, this county. He was frugal and industrious during his life on the farm, and acquired a number of other farms in Miami county, at one time being owner of 935 acres. In the early years of his residence here, he gained the respect and admiration of all who knew him, and served as Justice of the Peace in Miami township for a term of four years, later being elected County Commissioner, an office which he held during 1878-79 and '80.

Mr. Hamlin retired from the farm in 1893, move to Paola, residing here until 1906, when he went to Kansas City, to make his home with his daughter.

He is survived by two sons - George W. Hamlin, of Long Beach, California, and Harvey Hamlin, of Miami township, this county, and three daughters - Mrs. Kate Gamber, wife of James Gamber, of Goldfield, Nevada; Mrs. Nina Grabendike, wife of Leslie Grabendike, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and Mrs. Crossan. Interment was in the Elmwood cemetery, in Kansas City, yesterday (Thursday) afternoon at two o'clock. "


 

Obituary of Louisa Jackson Post. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 7, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Henry Post Dead. - Had Mrs. Henry Post lived until the 27th of this month, she would have been 94 years old. She died at her home in Osawatomie, Kansas, on the 29th of last month. Born in Somerset county, New Jersey, January 22, 1822, she was married to Alexander Jackson, in her native state when she was 22 years old. Two sons were born to this marriage - A. Jackson, who died in infancy, and Ira A. Jackson, who now lives in Osawatomie. After the death of her husband, in 1858, she was married to Henry Post in the spring of 1860.

In 1871 Mr. and Mrs. Post came to Kansas and settled at Somerset, Kansas. J. D. Post, of this county, is the surviving son of the second marriage. Mr. Post died many years ago. He was widely known, and one winter represented this county in the state legislature, leaving a clean record for honesty and general usefulness.

[Note: There is more to this obituary, but it is unreadable. A cemetery transcription has her first name as Louisa, and she is buried in the Somerset Cemetery, next to Henry Post. ]


 

Obituary of Hannah Rickets. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 4, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Hannah Ricketts Dead. - Mrs. Hannah Ricketts, widow of the late Samuel T. Ricketts, Sr., and for many years a resident of Stanton township, died after a long illness, at her home at Sedan, Kansas, Friday morning, January 28th, 1916. Mrs. Ricketts was 84 years of age, and had been an invalid for the last 30 years.

Hannah Lamond was born in Ohio, April 1st, 1832, and went to Illinois with her parents, when a girl.   In that state she became the wife of Mr. Ricketts, in 1858, coming to Kansas with him six years later, and settling on a farm south of Stanton, in this county. Mr. Ricketts died in 1879, and the widow remained on the farm until 1893, when she went to California, and spent six years before going to Sedan, to make her home with her son, M. D. Ricketts.

She is survived by four sons, Rude Ricketts, of California; C. B. Ricketts, who lives in Oklahoma; James S., of Colorado; and M. D., of Sedan. Three step-daughters, Mrs. Phenie Minor, who lives with her daughter, Mrs. Geo. B. McDaniel, in Paola; Mrs. Carolina Scott, of California, and Mrs. Mary Gwin, of Jefferson, Kansas; and two step-sons, Harvey and Frank Ricketts, both of Spokane, Washington, also survive. "


 

Obituary of Preston Howard Grimes. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 4, 1916, page 1, with photograph, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"P. H. Grimes, Paola's Oldest Druggist, Passed Away Last Wednesday Night, at His Home Here. - The death of Preston Howard Grimes occurred at his home in this city, Wednesday evening, February 2nd, 1916, at six o'clock, following an illness that began last October. Thinking the medicinal waters of Excelsior Springs would benefit his condition, Mr. Grimes recently spent three weeks there, but no decided improvement resulted and he came home to spend Christmas with his family. On December 27th, 1915, accompanied by his brother-in-law, Fred Schmitz, Mr. Grimes went to Kansas City, Missouri, undergoing an operation two days later at the German hospital. Three weeks afterward the sick man was brought home. Under the care of a trained nurse, every attention was given him, but the malignant disease made such rapid progress that his weakened condition gave little encouragement for his ultimate recovery.

Born in Cambridge, Guernsey county, Ohio, June 13th, 1856, the young man began to shift for himself early in life. When about twenty years old he came to Kansas for a visit with his cousin, Charles Grimes, who lives near Somerset, and while here secured a position in J. W. Price's drug store. The work suited Howard and in November, 1878, he formed a partnership in the drug business with W. Humphrey, which continued until the following September. In the summer of 1885 Mr. Grimes and the late Dr. J. L. Porter bought Warren Price's interest in his drug store, conducting it under the firm name of P. H. Grimes & Co. Two years later Dr. Porter disposed of his share to Mr. Grimes, who was sole owner of the business from that time up to the present day, occupying the same room, on the north side of the square, in the Oyster building, which property the deceased bought several years ago.

On November 11th, 1866, Mr. Grimes and Miss Minnie McLaughlin, daughter of Orlando F. McLaughlin, were married in this city, and to them was born a daughter, Mary Elizabeth, who next to the good wife, has been the idol of his heart. No father was ever more devoted to his own than was Howard to Beth, and no child has more richly deserved the love and affection of a parent than she. …"

[Note: The next two paragraphs tell of his life and character, and apparently is continued to the next column, which was regrettably not copied. ]


 

Obituary of Samuel Douglas Condon. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 4, 1916, page 1, with photograph, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"DEATH OF SAMUEL D. CONDON. - Former Paola Citizen Was One of the Town's Earliest and Highly Honored Residents. - Samuel Douglas Condon died at his home, 2604 Benton Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo., January 30th, 1916, aged 72 years, 11 months and 9 days. He had been in ill health for several years, but declined rapidly from the hardening of the arteries during the past month. Mr. Condon was surrounded by his wife and children when death claimed him shortly after the noon hour last Sunday. The body was brought to Paola last Monday evening from Kansas City, services being held at the decedent's residence there that afternoon, conducted by Reverend Spencer, editor of the Christian Advocate. Reverend O. B. Thurston had charge of the funeral rites here, which occurred last Wednesday afternoon at the old Condon homestead, 210 East Peoria street, at 2:30 o'clock. Burial was in Oak Grove cemetery. As a mark of respect to his memory, all the banks of Paola closed during the funeral hour. Mr. Condon was one of the directors of the Miami County National Bank.

The deceased was born in Barnesville, Ohio, February 21st, 1843. From the Buckeye state Mr. Condon went to Indiana, where at Logansport, on November 10th, 1866, he wed Miss Hattie Phelps, and two years later the husband, accompanied by the late J. M. George, came to Paola, Mrs. Condon following in the spring of 1869. Here a hardware firm was organized, composed of Mr. George, Mr. Condon and John F. Donahoe. …

After the death of his wife, in January, 1903, Mr. Condon continued making his home here with his children, until the winter of 1908, when he moved to Kansas City and married Mrs. Emma T. Cadwallader, who, with her daughter, Mrs. Rolla Rambo, of Kenosho, Wisconsin, survives. Mr. Condon leaves two daughters - Ida, the wife of V. G. Wright, of this city, and Mrs. Leila Taylor, wife of Harry S. Taylor, of Kansas City, Missouri. …"

[Note:This obituary continues on for another full column telling of his life, business and character. ]


 

Obituary of Sarah Conger. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 4, 1916, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. David Conger Dead. - The death of Mrs. Sarah Conger, wife of David Conger, and for forty-one years a resident of Marysville township, occurred at their home, three miles southwest of Hillsdale, Sunday afternoon, January 30th, 1916, about 4 o'clock. Mrs. Conger had been an invalid for the past six years, and her death was the result of a general decline. She underwent an operation in November, 1913, which was unsuccessful.

Sarah Price was born March 3rd, 1851, near Marshfield, Missouri, the daughter of Edward and Eliza Price, and remained there until she reached the age of twelve, when she went with her parents to Warsaw, Benton county, Missouri. She was reared and educated at Warsaw, and August 6th, 1871, became the wife of Mr. Conger, with whom she then went to Centerville, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Conger made their home on a farm near that city for one year, after which they returned to Benton county.

In 1875, they came to this county, and had since lived near Hillsdale. The deceased had been a faithful member of the Baptist church since early childhood. She was a good wife and an affectionate mother, and her absence will be keenly felt by those bereaved.

Besides the husband, three daughters survive: Mrs. Viola Kelly, wife of E. W. Kelly, and Stella, wife of G. W. Wilson, both of Hillsdale; and Mrs. Ethel Miller, wife of W. F. Miller, of Marysville township. The only son, William Edward, died in infancy. Five brothers, Dr. F. F. Price, of Saratoga, Wyoming; Milton Price, of Gatesville, Texas; George B. Price, of Greensburg, Kansas, and Alex and Isaac Price, both of whom live near Hillsdale; and one sister, Mrs. Almeda Phillips, wife of Curtis Phillips, of Grand Ledge, Michigan, also survive.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Monday afternoon, by Rev. M. M. Sooter, of Hillsdale, and interment was in the Marysville cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Emma Kolbohm. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 4, 1916, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Osawatomie Pioneer Woman Dead. - Mrs. Emma Kolbohm, wife of Theodore C. Kolbohm, of Osawatomie, died at her home in that city Thursday afternoon, January 27th, 1916, after an illness of two weeks of pneumonia. On the second of January, she was given a birthday party by her children, all of whom were present except a daughter, Mrs. W. P. Wright, of Hereford, Texas, and a short time later, she was taken ill.

Born in St. Louis, Mo., January 2nd, 1854, Emma Meahl was reared to womanhood at home with her parents, Carl and Dora Meahl, and in 1878, was married to Mr. Kolbohm, going from there to Pacific, Missouri, where he was employed by a railway company. In 1886, Mr. and Mrs. Kolbohm went to Osawatomie, and had made their home there continuously for the past thirty years.

The decedent was a kind hearted and lovable woman, and during her long residence in Osawatomie, won the respect and admiration of a large number of friends, who sincerely regret to learn of her death, and extend their heartfelt sympathies to the bereaved husband and children.

Beside the husband, she is survived by son, Henry P. Kolbohm, of Hutchinson, Kansas, and four daughters, Mrs. Emma Wright, wife of W. P. Wright, of Hereford; Mrs. Ella Bedell, wife of W. A. Bedell, of Jefferson City, Mo. ; Mrs. Anna Reyburn, wife of W. G. Reyburn, of Kansas City, Mo. ; and Pauline, who is now the wife of C. M. Gudger, of Osawatomie.

Funeral services were conducted by Reverend J. Sherman Hill, of Paola, from the home, last Saturday afternoon. Burial was in the cemetery, at Osawatomie. "


 

Obituary of Miriam Newton. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 11, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of a Pioneer. - Miriam Anderson was born in Noble county, Ohio, May 8th, 1823, and was married to Thomas N. Newton, November 24th, 1846. To this union were born nine children - Mrs. P. G. Walker, of Lamar, Colorado; Mrs. Robert Porter, of Melvern, Kansas; Oren Newton, of Kansas City, Mo. ; Joseph Newton, who died in 1880; Lambert Newton, John B. Newton and Mrs. L. N. Rhinehart, of Springhill, Kansas; Nathan Newton, of Tyro, Kans., and Margaret Newton who died in 1888.

Grandma Newton, as she was familiarly called, came to Kansas with her husband and children in April, 1867, and located on the farm, known as the John Nicholson place, northwest of Paola. There they remained on year, after which they removed to Springhill, where she has since resided.

Since the death of her husband, December 6th, 1895, she lived with her son, John B. Newton, in Johnson county, until February, 1903 when they removed to a farm just across the line in Miami county. There, after a long and useful life, she passed away, on January 31st, 1916, aged 92 years, 8 months and 23 days.

Besides the seven surviving children, Mrs. Newton leaves twenty-four grandchildren, twenty-one great grandchildren, and a large circle of other relatives and friends to mourn her death. She was brought up in the Baptist faith, but after coming to this state, became a member of the Methodist Protestant church. Funeral services, conducted by Rev. D. A. McCullough, of the M. E. church, were held from the home. Burial was in the Springhill cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Mary E. (Stilwell) Cole Fisher. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 11, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Burr Fisher. - Mrs. Mary E. Fisher, wife of Burr Fisher, died at her home, on East Piankishaw street, last Sunday morning, at 2 o'clock, after suffering from cancer of the stomach since last summer. Mrs. Fisher had been confined to her bed since the first day of this year, and had been constantly attended during her illness by her daughter, Mrs. Ed. Nevius.

Mary E. Stilwell was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, August 15th, 1849, and at the age of sixteen, was married to the late John Cole, coming west with him two years later and locating near Buckner, Missouri. She lived for several years in that vicinity, after which she moved to a farm near Rosedale, Kansas, later coming to Paola. In 1898, she purchased a farm near Osawatomie, and lived there with her son, John W. Cole, until 1902, when she married Mr. Fisher and came to Paola to make her home.

Mrs. Fisher was for a number of years an active member of the Christian church of this city and was ever a devoted disciple of the faith. She also belonged to the McCaslin Relief Corps, No. 4, of this city. Besides the husband, she is survived by three daughters - Mrs. Nevius, Mrs. William Classen, of Denver, Colorado, who was here during the mother's last illness, and Mrs. Ada Stanley, of Olathe, Colorado; four sons, John W. Cole, of Mound township; William Cole, of Osawatomie township; Thomas Cole, of St. Louis, Mo., and Ezra Cole, of Grain Valley, Jackson county, Missouri.

Funeral services were conducted at the Christian church last Monday afternoon br Reverend B. F. Ogden, and interment was in the Elmwood cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Bush Heflebower. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Died in Colorado. - Bush Heflebower died of paralysis in Ft. Collins, Colorado, Wednesday, February 23rd, 1916. The body will be brought to Kansas and buried in Springhill on Sunday next.

The deceased was a brother of the late David H. and Esrom Heflebower, of this county. He was a pioneer of high character, who was respected by all who knew him. "


 

Obituary of Maria (Tway) Wren. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Died After Week's Illness. - The death of Mrs. Maria Wren, widow of the late Daniel B. Wren, occurred at her home, No. 602 South Silver street, early Wednesday morning, February 23rd, 1916, at the age of 77 years. During her whole life time, Mrs. Wren had seldom been ill but she was seized with pneumonia just a week before her death, and gradually grew weaker to the end.

Maria Wren was born May 30th, 1838, in Champaign county, Ohio, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Tway, and was reared and educated in that county. She was married December 28th, 1858, at Mechanicsburg, Ohio to Mr. Wren, who was then a young physician, and with whom she went soon after to the town of Quincy, in Logan county, Ohio.

Mr. and Mrs. Wren lived at Quincy for about ten years, after which they removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, where they resided only a short time before coming to Paola. Arriving here the first day of April, 1870, Mr. Wren began practicing his profession, but was forced to give it up on account of failing health. His death occurred in this city, May 7th, 1879, after which the widow went to live with her only son, J. William Wren, with whom she made her home until death came.

Mrs. Wren was a quiet and capable woman, whose sweet disposition won for her the love and admiration of a large number of Paola's older residents, who will learn of her death with sincere regret. She had been a follower of the doctrines of the Baptist church since girlhood, and was said to have been affiliated with the Baptist church of Paola longer than any other living member.

Her son, William Wren, of this city, is the only near surviving relative. Funeral services were conducted from the home yesterday (Thursday) morning, at 8:45, by Reverend W. M. Hayler, and the body was taken to Fort Scott for burial beside the grave of the late husband, in Evergreen cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Laura B. (Hartell) McLaughlin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. O. F. McLaughlin Dead. - Mrs. Laura B. McLaughlin, wife of Orlando F. McLaughlin, and for forty-one years a resident of Paola, died at their home, No. 501 South Pearl street, Tuesday, February 22nd, at 1 o'clock p. m. Her death was due to complications brought on by a severe attack of the grippe, that she suffered last December, and from which she had never fully recovered.

Born in Independence, Mo., October 24th, 1860, Laura Hartell moved to Kansas City, Missouri, where she lived until the death of her mother, fifteen years later, when she came to this city, to make her home with her sister, the late Mrs. E. T. Ahrens.

In September, 1885, she and Mr. McLaughlin were married at his home, which was then in the northeast part of town, the ceremony being performed by Reverend Samuel T. Boyd, then pastor of the Presbyterian church.

Mrs. McLaughlin was for many years a member of the Congregational church, of this city, and took an active and efficient part in all the work done by the women of the church as long as her health permitted. Beside the husband, she is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Cora D. Leighton and Mrs. Amelia Thompson, both of Boulder, Montana, and Mrs. Pauline Bezanson, of Missoula, Montana, and one brother Edward Hartell, whose home is in Idaho.

The funeral services were held at the home yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, Reverend O. B. Thurston officiating, and the body was laid to rest in the Elmwood cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Mattie Gard. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. J. S. Gard Dead. - Mrs. Mattie Gard, wife of John S. Gard, a former resident of Paola, died at her home in Eldon, Missouri, Monday evening, February 21st, 1916, as a result of a general breakdown, which followed her recent recovery from an attack of pneumonia.

The deceased was born August 26, 1865, near Spencer, Indiana, the daughter of Absalom and Nancy Casida, and at an early age moved with her parents, to Austin, Mo., where her family made their home for several years before coming to Paola, and locating on a farm four miles northwest of town.

On the old Casida place, Mattie was reared to womanhood, and on the 24th of April, 1882, was married to Mr. Gard, who was then the proprietor of a livery stable in this city. Mrs. Gard resided here with her husband for three years, after which they went to Arkansas, later going to Eldon, where, about twelve years ago, they bought a farm, upon which they built a beautiful home. They remained on the country place only a few months, however, when they removed to Eldon, and retired from active business life.

Mrs. Gard is survived by the husband, and a daughter, Mrs. Frances Gard Schuchman, both of Eldon; her mother, Mrs. Casida, of Paola; seven sisters - Mrs. J. H. Holman, Mrs. Nellie Wilson and Mrs. Frank Elliott, of Paola; Mrs. Frank Flanders of Willcox, Ariz., Mrs. Jacob Reimal and Mrs. S. G. Jordan of Marysville township, and Mrs. Elijah Lyons, of Grenola, Kansas. Three brothers, William and Fred Casida, of Paola, and Frank, of Roosevelt, Okla., also survive.

The body was brought to Paola last Wednesday evening for burial, and funeral services were conducted by Reverend B. E. Ogden and Reverend W. M. Hayler from the home of Mrs. Frank Elliott yesterday (Thursday) afternoon. Interment was in the Elmwood cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Isaac M. Brandon. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"I. M. Brandon Dies at Topeka. - I. M. Brandon died at his home, 1230 Fillmore street, Topeka, Kansas, on Wednesday, February 23rd, 1916. For twenty-five years Mr. Brandon was a resident of Paola. He moved to Topeka in 1903, and was in his 76th year, having been born August 10th, 1840. He is survived by his wife and four children: W. W. Brandon, who lives in Nebraska; Mrs. Charles I. Carrico, of Osawatomie, and Mrs. W. R. Gillmore and Mrs. F. V. Borst, of Topeka.

Mr. Brandon was a man of high character. His soldier record was of the highest and his reputation was that of a man who attended to his own business, respected other people's opinions, was truthful and charitable. "

[Note: His name is Isaac, his wife's name is Jane and his children are William, Ida and Frances. ]


 

Obituary of James B. Norton. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 3, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of James B. Norton. - James B. Norton, for thirty-five years a well known resident of Paola, died at his home, 504 North Pearl street, about 6:30 o'clock Monday evening, February 28th, 1916, after a serious illness of several weeks. Mr. Norton had been an invalid for a number of years, but had not been confined to his home until recently.

He was born June 13th, 1836, in Decatur, Bryan county, Ohio, the son of Dr. Greenlief and Sallie Beasley Norton and received his early education in that vicinity. When the call for volunteers for the Hundred Days' Service, toward the end of the Civil War was issued, he shouldered a musket with the One Hundred Sixty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served to the end, after which he went to Washington Court-house, Ohio, where for many years he was employed as a salesman for a dry goods company.

Mr. Norton came to Paola in 1879, and soon after arriving here found employment as a book-keeper in the Miami County National Bank, remaining with that business for four years, when he resigned and accepted a county assessorship.

June 9th, 1881, he was married to Miss Alice Gano, the ceremony being performed by Reverend McClung, then pastor of the Presbyterian church of this city, and a short time later, retired from active business life. The decedent was one of the most influential members of the local lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and held the position of recorder for the organization for the past twenty-nine years.

Beside the wife, he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. J. D. Bryan, of Ottawa; a son, Horace Norton, who is an instructor in the Thiel College, at Greensburg, Pa., and a brother, Judge J. Q. A. Norton, of Lawrence, Kansas, all of whom were here for the funeral.

The funeral services were conducted by Reverend J. C. Everett from the home last Wednesday afternoon, and the body was laid to rest in the Elmwood cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Daniel Milton Martin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 17, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of an Old Soldier. - Daniel Milton Martin, a resident of Miami county since 1866, died at his home near Osawatomie, on Thursday, March 9th, 1916, after an illness of over a month, during which time he suffered intensely.

Born August 30, 1834, in Hartford county, New York, Mr. Martin went to Osawatomie April 21, 1867. He lived there and worked at his trade as a carpenter until 1861, when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted February 11, 1862, and was assigned to the Eighteenth U. S. colored infantry, as second lieutenant, and was promoted to first lieutenant January 21, 1866, serving until the close of the war. He was mustered out at Huntsville, Ala., February 21st, 1866, and returned to Osawatomie, where he was married to Miss Katurah Ann Snyder, in the following August. To them three children were born - Mrs. Florence Bates, of Los Angeles; George M. Martin, of Fontana; Mrs. G. W. Bromell, of Kansas City, Kansas - who with the widow survive.

Mr. Martin remained in Osawatomie and worked at his trade until 1884, when he moved with his family to the farm where he lived up to his death. He also leaves four brothers and one sister - Mrs. Fannie Marvin, of Meadville, Penn. ; John Martin, of Michigan; George H. Martin, Osawatomie, and Frank and Hannibal Martin, both of Gunnison, Colorado. The decedent was honest and upright; loved and respected throughout the southern part of the county.

The funeral services, held at the residence Saturday morning, March 11th, were conducted by Reverend G. W. Skinner, of Fontana, and interment was in Oakwood cemetery, Osawatomie. Mr. Martin was a Mason andthis order had charge of the ritualistic rites over the grave. "


 

Obituary of Margaret Lazetta (Ziebach) Bowers. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 24, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Grandma Bowers Dead. - Mrs. Margaret Lazetta Bowers died Wednesday evening, March 22, 1916, following a five days' illness at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. H. A. Yeater, in this city. The deceased was in her 88th year. Since being crippled in a fall last autumn, she had made her home with her son, J. W. Bowers, near Springhill, coming to the Wiley home, in Paola, about a month ago. Friday she went to her granddaughter's for a visit and while there suffered a nervous breakdown that caused her death.

Mrs. Bowers was the daughter of Jacob and Ann Ziebach and was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1828. She remained with her parents until she was 20 years old, when, with two of her sisters, she came West, locating in Orangeville, Illinois. Two years later she was married to Martin Bowers and for eighteen years they continued to make their home in Orangeville. Then the family went to Green county, Wis., but after living there a number of years, returned to Illinois, this time settling at Sterling. Eight years later they moved to Mapleton, Iowa, and here Mr. Bowers died in 1888. The widow came to Kansas about fifteen years ago and has since resided in Hillsdale, this county. She was a staunch member of the Methodist Episcopal church from her girlhood and reared her sons and daughters to be useful and conscientious citizens. She is survived by the following children: Jacob Sylvester Bowers, of Emporia, Kans. ; John William Bowers, who lives on a farm near Springhill; Mrs. Rose Ann Currier, of Sterling, Illinois, and Mrs. Berdie M. Wiley, the wife of A. F. Wiley, of this city. All of the children, except Mrs. Wiley, who is in Pasadena, California, for her health, attended the funeral. The deceased also leaves thirteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Short funeral services will be held from the F. D. Yeater home 401 West Kaskaskia street, this (Friday) afternoon, at 1 o'clock, when the body will be taken to Hillsdale, where services will be held from the Methodist church at 2:00 o'clock, conducted by Rev. B. F. Coburn. Interment will be in the Hillsdale cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Mathias Klassen. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 14, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"A Patriot at Rest - Mathias Klassen died at his home, 608 East Peoria street, Paola, on Saturday, April 8th, 1916, at 2 p. m., aged 87 years and 7 days. He had been down sick only a day, though rapid decline set in a month ago. Surviving him are his wife, Mary, and six daughters. The eldest, Katie Koehler, widow of the late Jacob Koehler is temporarily living in New York City, with a son, Augustin, Jr., and the youngest, Myrtle, wife of T. V. Campbell, lives with her husband in Topeka, May, the wife of Rock Conflans, lives with her husband at Fort Scott; Libbie, the wife of W. H. Marchum; Nettie, the wife of William Todd, and Josephine, the wife of Frank H. Gray, all reside with husbands and children in Paola. Mary, Pauline and Margaret died in infancy and Lou, the only son, died in Wyandotte county, Kansas, in 1904. The grand children living number fourteen and the great grandchildren, six.

The boy, Klassen, left his native place, in Southern Prussia, now a part of the German Empire. When he was 16 years old, and came to America. April 1st, 1829, was his birthday. As an apprentice at tailoring he had learned much of what was his trade in after life, and he took up this line of work for the first five years in the United States. In 1850, when the gold excitement drew so many thousands westward, he went to California, but didn't like it out there, so he came back and settled down to his trade as a tailor in Chicago. This was in 1853, and the next year, on the 17th of October, he and Mary Schuster were married. He was then 25 and she was 15 years of age. There the couple stayed for a few years, and in 1857, with their daughter, Katie, they came to Kansas City, making the journey mainly by steamboat. Of course it was not Kansas City then, but Westport and Westport Landing. About four years later, Mr. Klassen came with his family to Paola and here they have been ever since. The first year they lived in a house that stood across the street from the Baptist church, and, in 1862, they moved into a house built by Mr. Klassen, that is known, far and near, as the Klassen home. Here the Klassen girls and the one son were reared, and here it was that the grand old patriot closed his earthly career last Saturday.

The home completed, Mr. Klassen enlisted in Company C, 12th Kansas, and served through the war. He was a soldier in word and deed, courageous, patient, intelligent and vigorous…

From 1867 to 1887 Mr. Klassen was the leading tailor between Kansas City and Fort Scott…

On last Tuesday, the 11th inst., the body of the aged patriot was given back to earth, under the salute of the Grand Army of the Republic, the gray haired boys, who knew him in times that tried the souls of men and women, too, standing about the open grave, paying the soldiers' tribute of respect to a comrade who has gone to ‘Fame's eternal camping ground'. "


 

Obituary of Mary (McDonald) Mills. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 21, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Died in Her Eightieth Year. - Mrs. Mary McDonald Mills died on Monday morning, April 10, 1916, at the home of her son, Walter Mills, in Sugar Creek township, this county. She had been in failing health for the last three years, and April 1st, suffered a stroke of paralysis, which caused her death. Tuesday afternoon funeral services were conducted at New Lancaster by Revs. C. C. Jones and J. N. Edwards, and the body was laid to rest by the side of the husband in the New Lancaster cemetery.

Mary McDonald was born in Warren county, Ohio, November 21st, 1837, where she grew to womanhood. She joined the Methodist church in 1874, eighteen years after her marriage to Hiram Mills. To them were born four children: Laura and Jennie, who died in childhood, and Mrs. Anne Hewitt, wife of S. W. Hewitt, and Walter Mills. A sister and brother, Rebecca Weir, and James McDonald, eleven grandchildren, and six great grandchildren, all living in Miami county, are left to mourn her death. "


 

Obituary of Vines Jennings. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, May 5, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Vines Jennings, Pioneer, Dead. - Vines Jennings died at his home in Marysville township, May 2nd, 1916, aged 73 years, five months and 21 days. He had been in failing health for nearly a year. Besides his wife, he leaves nine children.

Mr. Jennings was born in Green county, Illinois, November 13, 1832, and came to Kansas in 1866. All of this time has been spent in Marysville township, this county. Mrs. Jennings, his first wife, died in 1874, and two years later he was married to Mrs. Henrietta Powell. The children of the first marriage surviving are: Mrs. Elizabeth Job, wife of Clay Job, who lives at Bucyrus; Mrs. Anna Brown, the wife of Charles Brown, residing on the William Hampson farm, east of Hillsdale; John Jennings, in Olive, New Mexico; William and James Jennings, who live near Edgerton, and George Jennings, west of Hillsdale. These by the second marriage are: Lettie, wife of John Kay, residing on a farm near Springhill; Rosa, the wife of James Thomas, who also lives on a farm near Springhill, and Jule Jennings, at home.

Among farmers of this county who worked and builded, Vines Jennings took front rank. He had no other ambitions than to till the ground well, rear a family and treat his neighbor as he would be treated himself. Honesty was the corner stone of his character and all who carry the Jennings name or the Jennings blood, have that trait in them. When he first came here, Miami county was considerable of a wild. With his own hands he "hewed the shaft and laid the architrave" of dwellings, school house and church. In his religious faith he was a Baptist and his conduct was such as to reflect credit upon the church.

The burial took place in Hillsdale on Thursday, the 4th inst. Of course, there was a large throng of relatives, neighbors and friends from a distance. Reverend W. M. Hayler, of Paola, conducted the services. "


 

Obituary of Samuel H. Sanders. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 9, 1916, page 7, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Relatives in Hillsdale received word Tuesday afternoon that Samuel H. Sanders, a veteran of the Civil War, had died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles Schafer, at Fredonia, Kansas, aged 79 years. About twenty -five years ago, Mr. and Mrs. Sanders left Hillsdale, where Mr. Sanders had been engaged in the drug business, and went to southeastern Kansas, where they lived until August, 1910, when Mrs. Sanders died, since which time the deceased made his home with Mrs. Schafer. Mrs. Sanders was Miss Margaret Officer before her marriage. There are four children living, all grown - James, Fred and Mrs. Schafer, living in Fredonia, and Mrs. Flora Jacoby, of Reading, Kansas. Two sisters, Mrs. T. W. Officer and Mrs. Mary Stovall, of Hillsdale, are the only other surviving relatives. The funeral arrangements had not been made Wednesday, but the burial was to be in the Hillsdale cemetery beside the body of his wife. "


 

Obituary of Leanah D. (Akers) Johnson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 23, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Well-Loved Pioneer Woman Dead - Mrs. Leanah D. Johnson died Friday, June 16th, 1916, at the home of her son, Edgar E. Johnson, on East Kaskaskia street, this city. Her death was due to old age, she being in her 83rd year, and a general breakdown that kept her in bed for the past seven months.

Leanah D. Akers was born May 27, 1834, in Putnam county, Indiana, where she received her education. At the age of 21, she was married to Dr. D. H. Johnson, at Carpentersville, Putnam county, Indiana. Here they resided until 1859 when they came to Kansas, settling near Greeley, in Anderson county, coming to Paola at the close of the war in 1865. To them four children were born, two of whom died in infancy, and two still survive - Mrs. Minnie B. Mathews, of Kansas City, Mo., and Edgar E. Johnson, of this city. She also leaves a brother, Dr. G. W. Akers, of Stafford, Kansas, and ten grandchildren, and four greatgrandchildren. Mrs. Johnson was a devout member of the Methodist church since girlhood and was given a life membership to the Missionary Society.

The funeral services were held from the Methodist church Sunday afternoon, June 18th, at 3:00 o'clock, interment being in Oak Grove cemetery beside her husband.

The following out-of-town people attended the funeral: Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Mathews and seven children, of Kansas City, Missouri; Doctor G. W. Akers, of Stafford, Kansas; Mr. and Mrs. Dee H. Johnson, of Parker, Kansas; Mrs. Mattie Hungerford, of Kansas City, Mo. ; Dr. Frank Heath, of Lane, Kansas; Thomas Heath, of Wellsville, Kansas, and Mrs. Snyder, Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Harden and Mrs. Laird, of Osawatomie. "


 

Obituary of Charlie Grimes. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, 14 July, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Charlie Grimes Dead. - Charles Marion Grimes died at his home in Ten Mile township, near Somerset, this county, on Sunday, July 9, 1916, age 71 years and two months. He had been sick nearly a year and, at the time of his death, was under the efficient care of Miss Higgins, of Kansas City.

Born in Guernsey county, Ohio, May 5th, 1845, the son of John A. and Rhoda Grimes, he came west, and settles in this county in 1868. The next year he returned to Illinois, and then came back to make Kansas his permanent home. On the 23rd day of October, 1877, he was married to Ida Pettingill, then a leading teacher of this county. To them were born two daughters and one son. Maud, lives with her husband, James Fickel, near Somerset, and Olah is the wife of Harry Everhart. They also live in this county. John, the only son, is at home with his mother. Burial was in the Wagstaff cemetery, Tuesday, July 11th, 1916. Services were conducted by Rev. Molesworth, of Louisburg. Besides his wife, he leaves a brother, Joseph Grimes, of this county, and other relatives, back in Ohio.

To his widow, two daughters and his son, the thousands who knew the father and head of the family, extend deep and sincere sympathy. His going took from our midst and honorable man, whose name will long be remembered for the good that was done by him, through the activities of a useful life. "


 

Obituary of B. F. Simpson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 18, 1916, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

Note: This obituary is two and a half columns, or 15 paragraphs in the newspaper - with a photograph that takes two columns. Much has been omitted in this transcript. Summarized:

- He enlisted in Co. C, of the Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry, was promoted to Major.

- He was elected to the House of Representatives in Topeka, served as Speaker, and later chosen to the state senate.

- In 1878 he was appointed to the position of United States Marshal for the district of Kansas.

- He was appointed to the Kansas Supreme court commission in 1886, and later became a member of the supreme bench.

"Honorable B. F. Simpson Dead. - A Kansas character without an equal, in many ways, has gone to take its place in the state's history. Ben Simpson died at his home in Paola August 10, 1916, age 80 years, 4 months and 17 days. He was born in Belmont county, Ohio, March 24, 1836.

Mr. Simpson landed in Kansas a few months after his 21st birthday, and at once began to take part in the affairs of the border. From Ohio he made the trip with Wilson Shannon, who was appointed governor of Kansas Territory by James Buchanan in 1857. Shannon was a Democrat and Simpson's father was a Democrat, but when Ben arrived on the scene he at once espoused the Republican cause. After a few weeks at Lecompton and Lawrence, young Simpson came to Paola. On the way here he overtook William R. Wagstaff, another Ohio boy who came to cast his fortunes with the West. The two reached Paola about the same time, Simpson 21 and an ardent Republican: Wagstaff 24 and an ardent Democrat. The friendship formed in these early days continued to the end. They were law partners many years and afterward became brothers-in-law, marrying sisters.

While the county Lykins, as Miami was then called, needed a prosecuting attorney to look after the border outlaws, there was scarcely enough work to keep up the office. Simpson was chosen and served. A year later he was elected to the legislature and later still he was a delegate to the Wyandotte constitutional convention that framed the constitution under which the territory ended its existence and became a state in January, 1861.

On the 15th day of March, 1863, Mrs. Augusta Burford and Benjamin F. Simpson were married in Paola. Mrs. Simpson was the widow of Lewis Burford, and had one son, William, who, by the way, died about two years ago. To Mr. and Mrs. Simpson were born five sons and five daughters. Sue, the eldest daughter, died in infancy; Mattie, in 1885, and Emma in 1888. With their mother, the others are living. Frank Simpson's home is in San Francisco and Benjamin F., Jr., lives there, too. Richard Simpson resides in Kansas City, Missouri; James is in Butte Montana, and Don lives in Winnipeg, Canada. Miss Carrie Simpson is a member of the film censor board with headquarters in Topeka, and Augusta lives with her husband W. E. Brelsford, in Topeka. There are also two grandchildren, Francis J. Simpson, of San Francisco, and LaRiene Brelsford, of Topeka. Mrs. Simpson will continue to live in Paola for some time. Her sister, Mary J. Wagstaff, died in New York some ten years ago, and her two nieces - Miss Lillie Torrey Wagstaff and Mrs. Lillian Kemp - are residents of New York City, their home being Holland House. …

The funeral service at the Methodist church in this city was brief. There was a hymn, a prayer by Dr. O. B. Thurston, a short sermon by Rev. G. W. Braden, followed by the journey to the cemetery. This was at four o'clock on Saturday afternoon. August 12th, 1916. No trappings of pomp or glory were in evidence. A silk flag half enshrouded the casket, from which the sword and flowers were removed. Don Brown stepped to the head of the grave with his bugle, and "taps" reverberated above the low rumble of an approaching train down the valley, floating over the trees to John Brown's Lookout in the distance. Dust to dust was softly said, and the Genius of Kansas was given back to earth. "

[Note: Page 143 of Marriage Record Book 1, Miami Co., Kansas, is March 15, 1862, not 1863. ]


 

Obituary of William LeRoy Everett Barnes. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 25, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Baby Dies from Burns. - Little Roy Barnes died Monday, August 21st, 1916, from burns received on August 11th, when he accidentally pulled a kettle of hot water onto himself. The child suffered intensely, and death came as a blessed relief from pain.

William LeRoy Everett Barnes was born in Omaha, Nebraska, November 15th, 1914. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William F. Barnes and a baby sister, Esther Corrine, six months old. He was the grandson of Dr. and Mrs. J. S. Barnes, at whose home he had been since the accident. Roy was a member of the Cradle Roll of the Christian church. Four of Damon Barnes's little friends were acting pallbearers. Morton Stevenson, Wade Dunaway, Ray Todd and Pearl Copple, and six small girls acted as the flower bearers.

The funeral services were held from the Christian church by Rev. B. E. Ogden, Tuesday afternoon at 3:00 o'clock. Interment being in Oak Grove cemetery. "


 

Obituary of Eliza (Ayres) Clark. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 8, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mrs. Eliza Clark Dead. - Richland township lost one of its pioneer women Monday in the death of Mrs. Eliza Clark, who had spent her life of fifty-seven years in that part of Miami county. The deceased had been ailing two years of leakage of the heart, but her last sickness was of only two weeks duration.

Eliza Ayres, the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Ayres, was born April 13th, 1859, on the same farm in Richland township where her death occurred, Monday. She was married February 27th, 1880, to Adam Clark, but the husband died when her three children were small. Undaunted, Mrs. Clark managed the farm as well as looked after her household, and educated her children to be useful men and women. The only daughter, Mrs. Mary Fenton, lives with her husband, L. B. Fenton, in Ottawa, while the two sons make their home in Argentine. E. B. Clarke is engineer and John Clark fireman on the railroad. Mrs. Clark is also survived by three brothers - John Ayres, of Richland; Will Ayres, who lives near New Lancaster, and George Ayres, in Kansas City - and four sisters, Mrs. Lee Bucklew, Mrs. John Cherry and Mrs. C. C. Christ, all living in Richland, and Mrs. Hattie Totten, who is a resident of Ventura, Calif.

The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from Eden Chapel, Richland township, and interment was in the Scott Valley cemetery, the services being conducted by Rev. G. M. Thorne. "


 

Obituary of Edward Welsh. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 15, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in His 77th Year. - Mr. Edward Welsh died Tuesday morning, September 12th, at his home in West Valley township. He began to fail last Friday and had not the strength to battle with his ailments because of his advanced age.

Mr. Welsh was born in the county Cavanagh, Ireland, May 4th, 1840, so he was 76 years, four months and eight days old at the time of his death. He came to America when 16 years of age and located at New Trenton, Ind. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Co. H., 52nd Indiana Infantry, and served through the war. On being honorably discharged he returned to New Trenton and was married there August 4th, 1867, to Miss Mary J. Stewart. The couple remained in Indiana three years, when they came to westward to Kansas City, Mo. The country was new then and Mr. Welsh first found employment as driver on a mule car in Kansas City. With the advent of the cable car, he went to work in the stock yards. Altogether he lived twenty-four years in Kansas City. In 1894 the family moved to Harrisonville, Mo., where the deceased engaged in farming and fruit growing, continuing in that line of work since coming to Miami county, nine years ago.

Mr. Welsh worked hard. He was fair in his business dealings, kind to his neighbors, considerate of his family and faithful to his church and his God. Besides the widow he is survived by two daughters and four sons. One daughter, Miss Mary Welsh, and a son, Ezra Welsh, are at home. The other daughter, Mrs. Rose Fergus, wife of Earle Fergus, lives in Paola city. Two of the sons, T. F. and J. E. Welsh, live in Kansas City, Mo., and the other, J. J. Welsh, in Kansas City, Kansas.

The funeral Mass was sung from Holy Trinity church Thursday morning, Reverend Father Kinsella officiating, and the body was taken to Kansas City for burial. "


 

Obituary of Edward Augustus Floyd. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 6, 1916, page 1, with photograph, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in Colorado. - Dr. Edward Augustus Floyd, father of H. A. Floyd, was buried in Paola last Sunday, the 1st inst. The body was brought from Aurora, Colorado. Doctor Floyd died there on the 28th of September, 1916, aged 83 years and 23 days. Mrs. Floyd, his wife, died in Denver, in 1902. The sons and daughters surviving are: H. A. Floyd, Paola; Dr. W. B. Floyd, Denver; Miss Lillian Floyd, Aurora; Mrs. Elizabeth Froelich, Denver, and Mrs. J. C. Eldred, better known here as Susie Floyd, of Belpre, Kansas.

For thirty years Doctor Floyd was a leading man of this county. Although he was a physician and surgeon, he continued at dentistry. He liked it, and took high rank in dental surgery. He patented a tooth plate that brought him a royalty for forty years. Born at Medford, Massachusetts, September 5, 1833, he came Westward with his parents in 1840 and lived with them at Greenwood, Illinois. Near there he was married to Miss Cornelia Ann Hamilton, in 1851, and , in 1870, came to Miami county. Here he bought a farm a mile east of town and put out one of the first large orchards planted in this section. He had a turn for agriculture, and took deep interest in the work, although he maintained an office in Paola and attended to his dental practice. He was identified with every worthy improvement , and quietly gave much to charity. At the time of his death he was still a stockholder in the Miami County National bank, and owned other property here as well as in Colorado.

Soon after going to Colorado, fifteen years ago, Doctor Floyd settled in Aurora, a suburban city of Denver, and soon became prominent. He served several terms as healthwarden, and a factor in educational matters. A man of his grasp and conceptions was bound to be in the front wherever he lived because he was useful. Thousands in this county will remember through life, his excellence of character and many good deeds. Rev J. C. Everett and Rev. O. B. Thurston conducted the burial services last Sunday afternoon and interment was in the city cemetery. "


 

Obituary of John A. Keenan. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 6, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"A Young Man's Death. - John A. Keenan died at his home in Wea township, six miles northeast of Louisburg, Tuesday evening, October 3rd. He was only 32 years old, of fine physique, rugged and hearty, and his death came as a great shock to Paola friends. A carbuncle formed on his shoulder about a week ago, and after an operation was performed Monday to relieve the intense pain, blood poison set in, and he succumbed the following evening.

John was the only son of Mr. Joseph F. Keenan, of Paola. He was born April 17, 1884, on the farm, where he grew to manhood, where his brief married life was spent and where his death occurred Tuesday. On the 7th of June, 1916 he was married to Miss Eva Seck, daughter of J. H. Seck, of Wea township, and the young widow survives. He also leaves his father and two sisters, Mrs. Frank Decock, of Chiles, and Sister Loyola, who is a nun in the St. Agnes Academy, Kansas City, Mo.

Mr. Keenan was very popular in the northern part of the county, where he is best known. He was a hard worker of unquestioned integrity, who was always first in any project for the betterment of his community or his church.

The funeral services were from the Wea Catholic church, yesterday morning, Father Michael, of Kansas City; Father McNamara, of Louisburg, and Father Freisburg, of Wea officiating. Burial was in the Wea cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Keenan, Miss Hazel Mobley and Mrs. George Clark went up from here for the funeral. "


 

Obituary of John Buegel. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 13, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of John Buegel. - On the 5th of October, 1916, at 12:30 p. m., John T. Buegel died at his home near Block, this county, aged 84 years, 3 months and 22 days. He had been in failing health for several months, but was able to be about, and was in Paola on Saturday, September 30th. However, death was caused by old age. His once strong body was worn out.

Born in Province of Westphalia, Germany, June 13th, 1832, he came to this country when young. Since 1875, Mr. Buegel has been a resident of this county and during all of these forty-one years he has been an upright, industrious man. He leaves a wife and three sons and one daughter. The widow is in the home and with her is Carl Buegel. Theodore is teaching a school in Minnesota and Rev. Harmon Buegel is located at Grand Forks, N. D. Lena, Mrs. William Koepke, lives with her husband at Norfolk, Neb. All were here to attend the burial.

The funeral was held last Sunday at the Evangelical Lutheran church, just south of the Block store, Reverend Droegemueller officiating. There was a large gathering of neighbors and he will long be remembered by the people of this county. His three boys bear an honored name and have succeeded in the world. The daughter, Mrs. Koepke, is married well, and her hundreds of friends here were glad to see her back even for a short time. "


 

Obituary of Amanda Lynn Youmans. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 20, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 20, 1916, page 1, with photograph:

"T. L. Youman's Mother Dead. - Mrs. Amanda Youmans, a pioneer resident of Miami county, died at her home in Osawatomie, October 9th, following a lingering illness of paralysis, and was buried there the following afternoon. Funeral services were conducted from the home by Rev. J. A. Barker, pastor of the Methodist church, and the ceremony at the grave was under the auspices of the Eastern Star lodge, of which order she had been the chaplain for many years.

Born in Freemansburg, Pa., November 21, 1847, Amanda Lynn was married to Mr. Youmans, of Washington, Warren county, New Jersey, when only 18 years old. About ten years later they came to Kansas, locating on a farm that has since become a part of the town of Osawatomie. Six children were born to them, the following five of them survive: Date L. and Charles C. Youmans, of Muskogee, Oklahoma; T. L. Youmans and Mrs. Jack Kelley, of Osawatomie, and Mrs. Frank Dunlap, of Brawley, California, and all were at the bedside of their mother when death came.

Mrs. Youmans was a kindly, sweet-faced mother, whose life was spent in devotion to her children. Then came ill health to shadow her declining years, but it served to chasten and refine an already noble spirit, not to embitter. Mourned alike by young and old, generous-hearted Mother Youmans has gone to receive her reward. "


 

Obituary of William Henry Patterson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 27, 1916, page 7, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"William Henry Patterson, who met a tragic death here, October 18, 1916, was born in Christian county, Illinois, September 14th, 1863. He came west with his parents, when he was 21 years of age and located in Bates county, Missouri. They later moved to Kansas and in the spring of 1897 located on the farm, where he continued to reside until his death. He leaves two brothers and four sisters: John, whose home is in Kansas City, Mo. ; Louis, who lives on a farm, about four miles from the home place, and Mary, Jennie, Hattie and Abbie, who made their home with their brother, Will, at the old home place. William Patterson was a good citizen, honest, truthful and progressive. His word was as good as his bond. He showed a large-heartedness in taking to himself the care of his sisters when the father died. The funeral on Sunday at the old homestead was attended by practically the whole community. Rev. L. O. Hudson conducted the service, after which the body was laid beside his father in the Louisburg cemetery. "

Note: In the previous issue of The Western Spirit, page 1, William P. Patterson was murdered as he sat in the parlor of his house. He was shot through a window by someone outside the house. Two of his sisters were in the kitchen at the time of the shooting.


 

Obituary of Charles F. Surber. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 3, 1916, page 3, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Charles Surber Dead. - Charles F. Surber, of Osawatomie, died at the home of his sister, Mrs. Maude Merrill, in Kansas City, Thursday, October 26, 1916. An employee at the Missouri Pacific round house at Osawatomie, he had been unable to work the past six weeks because of indigestion, and his illness became so serious three weeks ago that he was taken to Kansas City for treatments, his death occurring on Thursday.

The deceased was born near Beagle, February 3rd, 1867, the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Surber, and spent all but one of his 49 years in that vicinity. About a year ago he married the daughter of W. D. Wilson, of Osawatomie, and since lived in that town. He is survived by the widow and a step-daughter. He also leaves three brothers, Samuel D., who lives near Beagle; Geo. W., at Ottawa, and James M., at Fredonia, and three sisters, Mary E., wife of William Atherton, Burlington; Suzanna J., wife of J. W. Hecht, King City, Mo., and Maude, wife of Andrew Merrill, Kansas City, Missouri.

Mr. Surber had been a member in good standing of I. O. O. F. lodge for over twenty-three years, and this order conducted the rites at the grave Friday afternoon, interment being in the Beagle cemetery, following services at the Methodist church. "


 

Obituary of Josiah Bennett Hobson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 24, 1916, page 1, with photograph, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Death of a Pioneer. - Death came to J. B. Hobson at his home, 501West Miami street, Paola, Kansas, last Sunday, November 19th, 1916. He was in his 86th year and died of paralysis. He was stricken nearly three weeks ago, and up until that time he was in usual health, going back and forth between his home and the Paola Free library. Death was peaceful and painless.

Fifty-nine years ago Josiah Bennett Hobson came to this county. It was before Kansas became a state, and when the county was called Lykins. He was 26 years old, straight as an arrow, hair that matched his black eyes, well educated and ambitious. With others in the far East he had conceived the idea of taking a part in the activities of state making. From his native place, Utica, Indiana, where he was born, January 2nd, 1831, he later moved to Ohio, and, with Hiram V. Beeson, Ezra W. Robinson and Gustavus A. Colton, he formulated the plan for a town company and the name of Stanton was agreed upon. The party reached Paola, in March, 1857, and camped about where the Baptist church now stands. Next day tents were pitched on the hill, not far from the western line of this county, and the young city of Stanton was placed upon the map. Times were stormy and the John Brown troubles filled the air. For a while it looked as though Stanton would win, but soon it became evident that its future was sealed. Mr. Hobson came to Paola and at once entered into the work of town building. Federal court was held here then, and President Buchanan appointed Young Hobson as the resident clerk. He held that position for several years, being re-appointed later by Judge Thatcher.

In the summer of 1868, Miss Catherine Saunders, a college girl of Ann Arbor, Michigan, came to Kansas and met Mr. Hobson. It was a love match, and on the 22nd of September, that year, they were married in Paola. To them were born two daughters and a son. With their mother they survive Mr. Hobson. Phebe, wife of Ray Gill, lives with her husband at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, and the other daughter, Miss Katherine Hobson, the well known librarian, lives here. So does the son, Josiah Bennett Hobson, Jr. There are two living brothers of the deceased, Dr. J. F. Hobson, of Cleveland, Ohio, and Thomas Milburn Hobson, of Paola. "

The next two paragraphs list many of Mr. Hobson's accomplishments. Summarized, they include:

- Member of the Paola Town Company

- He laid out Park Square, and he placed a provision at the dedication that no building to be erected on it

- One of the organizers of the Paola Savings Bank, later called the First National Bank, of Paola

- Mayor, two terms

- Served in the school board

- He was a Mason of high standing

- He was a leading real estate dealer for more than twenty years

"So, death came to this pioneer in his 86th year, at his own fireside, surrounded by those he loved best. The funeral services, last Tuesday, the 21st inst., were conducted at the home by Rev. J. C. Everett, and Rev. O. B. Thurston. Interment was in the Paola cemetery, and many of the old settlers were in attendance. This burial ground Mr. Hobson had helped to lay out and helped to Beautify. Thus lived and died a man whose name is linked with Kansas history. "


 

Obituary of George Ayres. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 15, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Died in Richland Township. - George Ayres, aged 54 years, died at the home of Charles Crist, Richland township, this county, on Wednesday, the 13 inst., and will be buried today, the 15th, in Scott's Valley cemetery, 8 1/2 miles northwest of Paola.

Mr. Ayres was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Ayres, the pioneers widely known and universally respected. He never married. All who knew George were his best friends. "


 

Obituary of Michael Mitchell Powers. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 21 April 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 15, 1916, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P59)

"Mr. Powers Dead. - Michael Mitchell Powers died at his home in Paola, No. 502 East Shawnee street, at 4:20 o'clock a. m., on Tuesday December 12th, 1916, aged 70 years, 6 months and 27 days. He had been subject to serious heart trouble for many years, and twice before he was near death. Monday, last, he seemed quite well, except for a cold, and went to bed early. Once in the night he got up to take some cough medicine. About 4:00 o'clock he sort of choked and Mrs. Powers and Anna got to him at once. He was nearly gone, however, and died without a struggle.

Born in the County Waterford, Ireland, May 15th, 1846, the boy, Michael, was brought by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Powers, to America in 1849, and from the Atlantic coast the family came west to settle in Wisconsin, in 1860. Here the boy grew up as country boys do generally, and when 17 years old enlisted in Company H, 39th Wisconsin Infantry. He went with his regiment right to the front, where he remained until the war was over. He became a bridge carpenter and followed the business until 1905, when he had to retire on account of heart affection. His trade brought him to Miami county in 1876, and here he became acquainted with Miss Annie Maloney. They were married at Holy Trinity church, Paola, Kansas, by Father Daniel J. Hurley, on July 7th, 1879.

For over thirty-seven years the Powers family has lived here. The living sons and daughters are: Mary Ellen, the wife of Wallace Hainline, of this city; Thomas Edward, the elder son, married and residing in Beatrice, Neb. ; Grace Agnes, wife of Charles H. Dunaway, living in Osawatomie; Pierce Mitchell, better known as Perry Powers, who is at Kankakee, Illinois, and Anna Elizabeth Powers, who is at home. Mr. Hainline is the well known horse-shoer and Mr. Dunaway is train dispatcher of the Osawatomie division of the Missouri Pacific Road. Mr. Ed Powers is a druggist, now representing a big wholesale house on the road and Perry Powers is a bill poster, well to the front in a responsible position. Miss Anna Powers is business manager of The Western Spirit.

There was a large funeral yesterday, the 14th inst. Requiem Mass was chanted by Rev. Father Kinsella, at Holy Trinity church, at 9:00 o'clock in the forenoon and burial was in the Catholic cemetery, east of town.

The Knights of Columbus, Council No. 1149, attended the funeral in a body, marching from the Powers home to the church, under the direction of Grand Knight Johnson. "


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