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Miami County Obituaries
1915


 

Obituary of Sarah S. Jacobs Ayres. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 30, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Ayres Dies Suddenly. - The unexpected death of Mrs. Sarah S. Ayres, widow of the late Robert S. Ayres, occurred at her home, No. 509 South Silver street, Thursday afternoon, April 22nd, shortly after one o'clock. Mrs. Ayres appeared to be in fairly good health on the morning of her death, and was up and around the house.

She went to her bedroom about 11 o'clock Thursday morning, and was found lying unconscious on the bed by her daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Graham, who went to call her to dinner. Dr. Koogler was summoned, but all efforts to revive her were futile, and the end came about and hour later, cerebro hemorrhage being the direct cause of her death. Robert, Mrs. Ayres's younger son, was called and was at his mother's side when she passed away.

Sarah Jacobs was born May 27, 1853, in Sangamon county, Illinois, and received her early education and training there. July 29th, 1873, she became the wife of Robert S. Ayres, with whom she came to Kansas, in the same year, locating in Paola. Four years later, Mr. and Mrs. Ayres went to Iola, Kansas, where he was station agent for the Santa Fe railway company. In 1882, they moved to Garnett, Kansas, where they made their home until 1904, when they returned to Paola. Mr. Ayres died here January 6th, 1913, wile serving his second term as mayor. Mrs. Ayres became a member of the Christian church, in Garnett, in 1866, and was a constant church worker until her health began to fail, several years ago. She was also a charter member of the Garnett Rebekah lodge.

The deceased was the mother of five children: J. LaVern Ayres, of Garnett; Mrs. Dorothy Graham, of Paola; Mrs. Bertha Mitchell, wife of J. L. Mitchell, of Iola; Robert S. Ayres, of Paola, and Clarence, the eldest son, who was killed while hunting, about twenty years ago.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Monday sfternoon by Reverend M. Moore, of Kearney, Missouri, assisted by Reverend D. Roy Mathews, pastor of the First Christian church and the Rebekah lodge, of Paola. Interment was in the Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Joel Barrett. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 12, 1915, page 1, Roll P58 "Joel Barrett Dead. - Mr. Joel Barrett died at his home near Beagle, Sunday, March 7, 1915. He had been an invalid for over two years, and death came as a welcome relief from intense pain, which he bore at all times with great patience and fortitude. For 43 years Mr. Barrett was a resident of the southern part of this county, and in all this time, his record was that of a good citizen, a kind and generous friend and neighbor, a loving and indulgent husband and father.

The deceased was born in Frederick county, Virginia, March 6th, 1848, the son of Joel and Sarah Barrett. With his brother, Charles, he came to Kansas in 1868, locating on the homestead near Beagle, in 1872, and here in March of the following year he brought his bride, who was Miss Eliza Sims, their marriage taking place at the residence of Samuel Boone, northeast of Paola. Five children were born to them, and with their mother, three survive. They are: Mrs. Rose Goudie, who lives on a farm near the home place; Harley Barrett, of Swift, Colorado, and Walter, the youngest, who is at home. Maude died in 1896, at the age of 19, and a son, Manfred J., died in infancy. He is also survived by five grandchildren, four brothers - Benjamin, of Smith county, Kansas; Charles of Miami county; Robert and Jonas, of Virginia - and three half-brothers, two living in Virginia and one in Colorado.

The funeral services from the home last Tuesday, were conducted by Rev. Charles Averill, and burial was in the Spring Grove cemetery."


 

Obituary of Sarah Hill Bates. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death Visited Sleeping Woman. - Samuel L. Bates, a Richland township farmer, living 11 3/4 miles northwest of Paola, received a sad surprise yesterday (Thursday) morning, when he went to awaken Mrs. Bates, who was sleeping in another part of the house. Mrs. Bates failed to respond to his call, and upon investigation, her husband was shocked to find that she was dead. She was apparently well and in good spirits when she retired Wednesday night, and the unexpected death was the last thing to be thought of by the bereaved family.

Coroner P. W. Robinson was called from Osawatomie to make an examination, and announced that the death had occurred several hours before it was discovered, and it was thought to have been due to hearth failure.

Mrs. Bates was born in Alleghaney county, Pennsylvania, June 15th, 1848, the daughter of Joseph and Margaret Hill , and in September, 1864, when she was sixteen years of age, she became the wife of Samuel Bates. With her husband, she came to Kansas in 1876, and located on a farm five miles south of Paola, where they lived for twenty years, before moving to the present home.

Mrs. Bates had been a member of the Baptist church since early childhood, and reared her four sons to be God fearing and useful men.

She is survived by the husband and the four sons, Joseph F., Charles, and Thomas, all of whom live in this county; and George L., who resides on a farm in Franklin county.

The funeral arrangements have not been made as we go to press."

[Note: Her first name, per Paola cemetery transcription, is Sarah.]


 

Obituary of Mary White Beets. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Mary Beets at Rest. - Death came to Mrs. Mary Beets at her home in Hillsdale, Friday morning, February, 19, 1915, following and illness of short duration, being sick only one week. Her condition was not considered serious until the 24 hours preceding her death.

The decedent, an old and highly respected resident of Miami county, has lived on a farm, a few miles north-west of Hillsdale for sixty years. She was a woman of strong character, cheerful disposition and home-loving inclinations. In the rearing and educating of her eleven children, she was a model mother, always administering to their needs through babyhood and childhood.

Mrs. Beets united with the Baptist church early in life, but since the death of Mr. Beets in 1892 she was compelled to forego her regular attendance of church services, and a few years ago she became a member of the Church of Christ.

Mary White was born in Oakhill, Jackson county, Ohio, July 24, 1835, and became the wife of John Beets in 1853. To this union were born eleven children, two of whom have passed to the spirit world. The eight girls and on son still surviving are: Mrs. Dora Moubley, of Paola; Mrs. Flora Hittle, of Drexel, Missouri; Mrs. Nettie Ford, of Kingsville Missouri; Mrs. Mattie Kirkland, Mrs. Bell Ford, Mrs. Bessie Miller, Mrs. Mollie Reese and Miss Nellie Beets, of Hillsdale; John Beets, of Sacramento, California, all of whom except Nettie Ford and John Beets, attended the funeral. She is also survived by twenty-six grandchildren and twenty-two great grandchildren, a sister, Mrs. Jane Drain, of Paola, and a brother, Steve White, of Hillsdale.

For about two years Mr. and Mrs. Beets lived in Missouri, and came to Kansas in 1855, locating on a farm a few miles northwest of Hillsdale, which has been the homestead for sixty years. Last November she rented her farm to James Gruver and with her daughter, Miss Nellie, moved to Hillsdale, so she would be near several of her daughters.

The funeral was held at the Presbyterian church in Hillsdale Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Trett, the pastor, and burial was in the cemetery beside her husband, who died 23 years ago. The bereaved family have the sympathy of many neighbors and friends in their great loss of a kind and loving mother."


 

Obituary of Henry A. Bell. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 17, 1915, page 1 "Prominent Louisburg Pioneer Dies. - Henry A. Bell, one of Miami county's best know and most highly respected citizens, died at his home in Louisburg, Kansas, Monday night, December 13th, 1915, age 69 years, 8 months and 29 days. The 18th of last month he returned from Gridley, Kansas, where he and Mrs. Bell visited for a month, in the best of health and spirits, but the following day was taken ill, death resulting three weeks later. His ailment was pronounced leakage of the heart.

Mr. Bell was born in Cass county, Michigan, March 14, 1846, and came to Kansas in 1865, locating at Seneca. He remained there only two years, however, going to Louisburg in 1867. Two years later he was married to Miss Louisa Lee. For sixteen years the family home was on a farm near Louisburg, though for the past thirty years they have lived in town. Four children were born to them, but only one son, Edward D. Bell, of Louisburg, survives. Besides the widow and one son, the deceased also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Cordelia Herbert, of Marcellus, Michigan, and Mrs. M. A. Fessenden, of Emporia, Kansas; one brother, Forrest D. Bell, of Gravette, Arkansas, and a half-brother, A. J. Bell, whose whereabouts is unknown.

The funeral services were conducted from the Christian church in Louisburg, Thursday morning, December 16, Reverend Philip Clark, of Harrisonville, Mo., officiating. Interment was in the Louisburg cemetery, the Odd Fellows giving a short ritualistic service at the grave.

Relatives from away attending the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. William S. Reed, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Reed and Mrs. Pallmeyer, of Gridley, Kansas; Mrs. Josie Weedman, of Webster City, Iowa; Mrs. Clara Russell, of Denver, Colorado, and her brother, Arthur Johnson, of Iola."


 

Obituary of Mary Black. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 31, 1915:

"Death of Mrs. Mary Black. - Mrs. Mary Black, and aged Negro Woman, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Brady, eight miles west of Paola, Monday morning, December 27, 1915, of a complication of diseases. Mrs. Black was about ninety-four years of age, and was born in Virginia, in slavery.

She came to Paola with the Bradys two years ago, from a farm near Spring Hill, to which she moved from her old home at Montserrat, Missouri.

Mrs. Black is survived by two grandchildren, Jess and Mary Shepard, who live with Mr. and Mrs. Brady. Her four sons were killed in an explosion in Carthage, Missouri, twenty-eight years ago.

The body was taken to Montserrat last Tuesday morning for burial."


 

Obituary of Bertha Huls Burnham. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 5, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"A Young Mother's Death. - Mrs. Bertha Burnham, wife of Clay B. Burnham, died Saturday night, January 30th, 1915, at her home in Hanna, Oklahoma, following a month's illness of malarial fever, which later developed into typhoid.

Bertha Huls, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Huls, was born on a farm in this county, four miles west of Louisburg, April 20th, 1890. At the age of fourteen years she joined the M. E. church at Somerset, and in 1906 moved to Hanna, Oklahoma, with her parents. There she became the wife of Clay Burnham on November 17th, 1907, and this union was blessed with four children, the youngest of who, Frances Lorene, is but four weeks old. The others are Dorothy Bell, aged six; Paul William, aged four, and Keith Clay, who is in his second year.

The funeral services were held at the Burnham home last Monday, Reverend Groves, pastor of the Methodist church in that city, officiating. Mrs. Burnham was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and this body conducted its ritualistic ceremony at the burial. The decedent also belonged to the Yeoman lodge and the Pythian Sisters, which organizations, as well as other friends, sent beautiful floral tributes.

Besides the bereft husband and children left to mourn the loss of this good wife and mother's devoted affection, are the heart-broken parents, Gilbert and Eva Huls, so well-known in this county, and Bertha's two sisters and four brothers - Berenice, Marie, Lloyd, Leslie, Glen, and Phil. Mrs. Burnham's grandparents in Miami county are Mr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Wise, of Middle Creek township. Mrs. Wise, Mrs. Frank Wise, Jr., and Miss Jessie Jones, of Louisburg, went to Hanna Sunday night to attend the funeral."


 

Obituary of John Capper. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 30, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"A Brave Man Dead. - Mr. John Capper died at his home in north Louisburg Saturday night, July 24th, after suffering two years from rheumatism. Eighteen months of this time, Mr. Capper had been bedfast, enduring the pain quietly and without complaints of any kind. Funeral services were conducted from the home Sunday, July 25, conducted by Reverend Hudson, of the Baptist church, of Louisburg, and the body laid to rest in the Louisburg cemetery.

Mr. Capper was born September 14, 1843, in Liberty, Union county, Ind., where he grew to manhood and where he was married twenty years later to Mary Elizabeth Elliott. To them were born six children, but two of them, with the mother, died several years ago. The four still living are: Mrs. Ida Wolf, of Louisburg, Ira and Mort Capper, of Somerset, Kansas, and Clinton, of Louisburg.

Mr. Capper came to Kansas in 1877 and has lived in and around Louisburg ever since. He went back to Indiana in January, of the following year, and was married to Emily Jane Merriman, returning to this county with his bride. Of the three sons born to them, two survive: Lawrence, who lives in Harrisonville, Mo., and Perry, of Louisburg. Mr. Capper also leaves eighteen grandchildren, seven great grandchildren and one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Ellis, who lives in Indiana."


 

Obituary of Joseph Andrew Collins. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 15, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Joseph Collins. - Joseph Andrew Collins, a well known retired farmer, of Fontana, died at his home in that town Wednesday, October 13th, at 12:00 o'clock m., after an illness of only three days, of indigestion, at the age of eighty years.

Born in Ross county, Ohio, December 4th, 1835, he remained in that vicinity until he reached the age of twenty, when he went to Douglas county, Ill. In 1858, Mr. Collins married Elizabeth Shinkle, in DeWitt county, Illinois, and they made their home on a farm there until 1875, when they came to Kansas and settled on a farm in Linn county.

Fifteen years ago, the decedent gave up farming on account of failing health and moved to the present home, in Fontana. Mr. Collins was for many years a member of the Methodist church, but was never affiliated with any lodge or other organization.

He is survived by the wife - one daughter, Mrs. Rosetta Moore, wife of J. L. Moore, who resides on a farm near Fontana; and two sons, - William E. Collins, of Fontana, and John Collins, who lives on a farm near Twin Springs, in Linn county.

Funeral services were conducted by Reverend George Skinner, of Fontana from the Methodist church at Twin Springs, and interment was in the Cadmus cemetery, yesterday afternoon, October 14th."


 

Obituary of Dolly Gordon Cravens. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 23, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Joseph Cravens. - Mrs. Dolly Cravens, wife of Joseph Cravens, died at the General hospital, in Kansas City, Mo., last Wednesday morning, from the effects of an operation, which took place about two weeks before. Mrs. Cravens was born in this city, March 24th, 1888, the daughter of William Gordon, sexton of the Paola cemetery, and made her home here until about two years ago, when she went to Kansas City, and was married to Joseph Cravens. She returned with her husband to Paola soon after the marriage, but moved to Kansas City last November.

The deceased is survived by her father and three brothers: William, of Kansas City; Clinton, of Arkansas City, Kansas; and Garfield, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The body was brought to Paola last Thursday noon for burial in the Oak Grove cemetery. Funeral services were conducted from the colored Baptist church, at one o'clock, by Reverend Carlton."


 

Obituary of Dorothy Davis. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of an Infant. - Dorothy, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Davis, (colored), died at their home in the southwest part of town early last Tuesday morning, February 23rd, after an illness of five days, of pneumonia. The child was born in Paola, February 11th, 1915, and was strong and healthy until the pneumonia developed from a recent cold.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Wednesday afternoon, by Rev. K. P. Bond, and the burial was in Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Peter Dellinger. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 15, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Peter Dellinger Dies Suddenly. - The death of Peter Dellinger at the home of his son, S. E. Dellinger, near Bucyrus, Friday morning, October 8th, came as a distinct shock to his wife and children. Enjoying his usual good health the day before, he made a trip to Paola with his son, T. A. Dellinger, and not until that evening was he stricken with the illness that terminated in his death a few hours later.

The deceased was born in Shenandoah Valley, West Virginia, October 12th, 1837, and at the time of his death was 77 years, 11 months and 26 days old. When the Civil war broke out, he enlisted in Company C, West Virginia cavalry of the Confederate army, serving throughout under "Stonewall" Jackson. He was wounded in the battle on South Branch mountain, but served until the close of the war. After being mustered out, he was married January 19th, 1865, to Miss Matilda Emmart. They came West, living a short time in Illinois and several years in Missouri, before locating on the farm in Ten Mile township that has been the family home for the past forty-five years. Ten years after his arrival in this state he united with the Baptist church, living a consistent Christian life since that time, and raising his children in the fear of God and with a wholesome love and respect for their fellow men.

Four children, two sons and two daughters, were born to them, all of who, with the widow, survive. Mrs. Jennie Stayton, the wife of Louis Stayton, is a resident of Olive, Oklahoma. The other daughter, Mrs. Elva Braden, the wife of W. M. Braden, lives on a farm in Ten Mile township. T. A. Dellinger resides on a farm adjoining the home place, and S. E. Dellinger on one just across the south road. All the children attended the burial, which was from the home at 2:00 o'clock Sunday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. C. F. Mosher, pastor of the Baptist church of Chiles. Interment was in the Bucyrus cemetery."


 

Obituary of George Feldmann. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, May 28, 1915, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"George Feldmann Dead. - The death of George Feldmann, for many years a well known farmer of Miami township, occurred at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harry Karr, 2 1/2 miles west of New Lancaster, Friday evening, May 21st, 1915, about seven o'clock. Mr. Feldmann suffered a stroke of paralysis in May, 1913, and had failed rapidly in health from then until the end, having been confined to his bed for seven weeks.

He was born in Hanover, Germany, in May, 1844, and, when he was two years of age, came to America with his parents, who located in Benton county, Missouri. At the age of twenty, Mr. Feldmann enlisted in Co. E., 3rd Missouri Infantry, and served in the western campaigns of the Union armies until the close of the Rebellion, when he returned to the home of his parents. In 1879, he came to this county, settling on a farm in Miami township, and the following year, was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Neu, whose death occurred on the home farm eighteen years ago. The deceased moved with his family to Ford county, Kansas, in 1885, and made his home there for four years, after which he returned to Miami county, again locating on a farm in Miami township.

Mr. Feldmann is survived by four daughters: Mrs. Emma Homrighausen, wife of Fred Homrighausen, 8 miles east of Paola; Mrs. Louisa Karr, wife of Harry Karr, at whose home the death occurred; Mrs. Clara Evert, wife of Paul Evert, near Fontana, and Mrs. Ida Folks, wife of George Folks, of Osawatomie. Two sons, August and Otto Feldmann, both of whom live on a farm, southeast of Fontana, also survive.

The funeral services were conducted from the home last Sunday morning, by Reverend Broadfoot, of New Lancaster, and interment was in the Highland cemetery, near Block. Reverend Jennrich, of Highland, conducted the services at the grave."


 

Obituary of Thomas Fenoughty. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 8, 1915, page 5, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"M. Fenoughty's Brother Dead. - Thomas Fenoughty, a prominent farmer of Douglas county, Kans., died at his home, four miles from Baldwin, last Thursday evening, September 30, 1915, at the age of eighty-five years. Mr. Fenoughty had lived in Douglas county for many years, and was one of the county's most well-to-do farmers. He was a brother of Michael Fenoughty, of Stanton township, in this county, and of Mrs. John Dyer, of Marysville township. Mr. and Mrs. M. Fenoughty, Mrs. Wm. Sheehy, of Paola; Mr. and Mrs. Dyer, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Butel and family, of Marysville township, attended the funeral and burial at Baldwin last Saturday morning."


 

Obituary of Anna Doran Finn. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 31, 1915, page 1, microfilm Roll P58, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Miles Finn Dead. - Anna Finn, widow of the late Miles Finn died at her home, Paola, Kansas, on Monday morning, December 27th, 1915, aged 66 years, 2 months and 3 days. She had been an invalid for over a year.

Forty-six years ago last June, Mrs. Finn came to Paola. She was 20 and Miles 30 years of age, then. The week before they had been married in Chicago, by Rev. Father Butler, so, here was the end of their wedding trip. They stopped two days in Kansas City, where Mr. Finn got the job of section foreman, on what was then known as the Missouri River, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad, now the Frisco. It was the only job he ever had, for the railway management held him until failing health took him out of the service, 21 years afterward. Mr. Finn died in March, 1894.

Mrs. Finn was a woman of clear vision, and the highest morals. Born in the county Wexford, Ireland, she came to America in her teens. Her family name was Doran and she inherited a vigorous brain and willing hands. When her husband died, the care of the home with five sons and four daughters, fell upon her. None of them at that time was self supporting. Their schooling and their ways of life became the mother's task. How well she did is evident, for the Finn boys have grown to be useful men and the daughters noble women, all respected for their moral worth and honored for their good citizenship. Delia is the wife of Chris McGrath, and with husband and children, she is the queen of a country home in Coffey county; Miles is handling the homestead and Anna is the wife of Charles Reed, living in St. Louis, Missouri; Edward J. lives in Paola with wife and baby, and John M. is teacher at Stilwell, Kans.; Lawrence J. in charge of the shipping department of the Paola branch of the U. S. Radiator Corporation; Jerry holds a responsible position in Wichita, and Katherine is chief assistant in a loan and abstract company of Paola. Susie, the baby of the family when her father died, is a teacher in the Edgerton, Kansas, schools, having been elected and re-elected by the board of education of that town. A brother of the deceased, Lawrence Doran, lives in St. Louis, and, also, two sisters, Mrs. Dora McFarland and Mrs. Susan Maher, resided there. In the county Wexford, Ireland, there are three sisters and a brother - Mrs. Bridget Donnelly, Mrs. Kate Kehoe, Mrs. Margaret Murphy and Mr. Edward Doran.

Burial was in the Catholic cemetery on Wednesday, the 29th inst., after Requiem High Mass was chanted in Holy Trinity church. Reverend Father Kinsella, assisted by Reverend Fathers Burk and Albin, conducted the services. Notwithstanding the prevalence of grippe and the cold weather, there was a large gathering of people, both at the church and the cemetery. The sermon by Father Kinsella was most appropriate and will long be remembered by the large number of listeners. His tribute to the faith and works of Mrs. Finn was eloquent in its simplicity and beauty. At the grave, Rev. Father Burk conducted the final rites beside the mounds where rest the husband and child who had gone before."


 

Obituary of Minnie Elizabeth Fisher. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 3, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Baby Fisher Dead. - Death relieved the suffering of Minnie Elizabeth, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Fisher, at their home on West Kaskaskia street, about 7:30 o'clock Monday evening, August 30th, 1915. The baby was born in Paola, June 9th, 1915, and since that time had been afficted with a very rare disease of the spine, which was incurable. The heartfelt sympathies of their many friends are extended Mr. and Mrs. Fisher in the sad bereavement of their first born and only child.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Tuesday afternoon by Mrs. J. Sherman Hill, and the procession journeyed to Hillsdale, where the little body was laid to rest in the Hillsdale cemetery."


 

Obituary of Mary Nash Folks. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 16, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"An Early Kansan Called. - The death of Mrs. Mary Folks, wife of Geo. F. Folks, and for fifty-six years a resident of Miami county, occurred at her home, two miles east of Osawatomie, Monday morning, April 12, 1915. Mary Nash was born in Hanover, Jackson county, Michigan, July 2nd, 1842, and at the age of sixteen, was married to George F. Folks.

Mr. and Mrs. Folks came to Kansas in the year 1859, and located in Osawatomie, making the trip from Kansas City by wagon, there being no railroad to that city in those days. There they made their home for five years. Mr. Folks then took up farming and after living on various farms near Osawatomie, settled on the place that is now the Folks homestead, and which has been their home for forty-seven years.

The five children who survive her - Albert, of Cambray, New Mexico; Newton, of Pittsburgh, Pa.; Mrs. Mabel Shilling, of Columbus, Kansas; Mrs. Annie Cartwright, of Noble, Oklahoma, and George Folks, who resides on the home farm - are a credit to her diligence and faithfulness as a mother. One brother, James Nash, of Moscow, Michigan thirteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren also survive...

The funeral services were conducted from the home yesterday (Thursday) morning at ten o'clock by Rev. Joel Barker, of Osawatomie, pastor of the Methodist church, and burial was in the Whiteford cemetery."


 

Obituary of Laura Belle Beets Ford. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 12, 1915, page 1, Roll P58 "Death Claims Mrs. Joseph Ford. - Mrs. Joseph Ford, who for the past six years has been a patient sufferer, was called to her final reward Sunday evening, about 10:00 o'clock. For several days is was known that the end was near, and relatives had been summoned to her bedside. Mrs. Ford's mother, Mrs. Mary Beets, died two weeks ago.

Laura Belle Beets was born on a farm a few mile northwest of Hillsdale, December 28th, 1869, and died at her home in Hillsdale, March 7, 1915, aged 45 years, 2 months and 9 days. She was married to Joseph Ford, October 26, 1903. To this union were born two children, Trell and Delma, who, with their father, her seven sisters, Mrs. Dora Moubley, of Paola; Mrs. Flora Hittle, of Drexel Mo.; Mrs. Nettie Ford, of Holden, Mo.; Mrs. Mollie Reese, Mrs. Mattie Kirkland, Mrs. Bessie Miller and Miss Nellie Beets, of Hillsdale; one brother, John Beets, of Sacramento, California, are left to mourn her loss.

The funeral services were held Monday afternoon from the Presbyterian church, conducted by Reverend Trett, pastor of the Presbyterian church, assisted by Reverend Paine, of Kansas City, pastor of the Methodist church, and the body was laid to rest in the cemetery, by the side of her parents. The bereaved husband, children and other relatives have the sympathy of their many friends in this sad loss of a kind a living wife and mother and a loyal sister."

Note: Laura's parents are buried in the Old Hillsdale Cemetery, however there is no headstone there for Laura.


 

Obituary of J. D. Geuy. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 30, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"J. D. Geuy Died Last Sunday. - The death of J. D. Geuy, for nearly fifty years a resident of Osage township, marks the passing of another of Miami county's pioneer German settlers. Mr. Geuy had been in very poor health for several years, and about three weeks ago, suffered an attack of pleurisy, which culminated in his death at his home, four miles north of Fontana, Sunday evening, April 25, 1915.

Joachim David Geuy was born near the city of Schwerin, in the Province of Mecklenburg, Germany, August 8th, 1837, and left the Fatherland at the age of twenty-four, coming to the United States, and locating on a farm a short distance from Westville, Indiana.

The deceased was married at Westville, in 1895, to Dorothea Steinman, whom he had know in Mecklenburg, and the following year, came West, settling on a farm several miles north of Fontana, near that upon which he died.

Mr. Geuy is survived by the wife and seven children: John G. Geuy and Mrs. Dora Smith, both of whom live near Pendleton; Mrs. John Detmering, and Edwin L. Geuy, both of Osage township; J. J. and Herman G., both of Osawatomie; and Mrs. Clara Hahn, the wife of George Hahn, who resides on a farm three miles south of Osawatomie. A half brother, Henry Geuym and a sister, Mrs. Mary McHail, both live near Westville, Indiana.

The funeral services were conducted from the home last Tuesday afternoon, by Reverend J. Sherman Hill, of Paola, and interment was in the Debrick cemetery, a half mile east of the Geuy home."


 

Obituary of John James Goodrick. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 29, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"An Honored Pioneer Dead. - John James Goodrick died at his home, 5 miles west of Osawatomie, Friday October 22nd, 1915, at 10:00 p. m., aged 88 years and one month. He had been in failing health for the past two years, but his last sickness was of only two weeks' duration.

Mr. Goodrick was born in Ohio, September 21st, 1827. When a small boy he moved with his parents to Hamilton county, Indiana. Here he was married June 4th, 1848, to Miss Margaret Vanderslice. Seven years later they came to Kansas, locating in Miami county, but remained here only one year before returning to their old home in Indiana. In 1858 they again came to Miami county, settling on the homestead where they have since lived, and where Mrs. Goodrick died in November, 1905.

Of the seven children born to them, four are still living. They are: Benjamin F., who is a resident of Osawatomie; Jacob M., who lives on the home place, and Mrs. Mollie Mills and Mrs. Emma Fields, who live close by. He is also survived by five sisters: Mrs. Mary Stanbro, of Stanton township, and Mrs. Emily Eisele, Mrs. Minerva McGill, Mrs. Barbara Thorp and Mrs. Prudence Campbell, of Paola.

John Goodrick lived a quiet, useful Christian life, and was respected and esteemed by all who knew him. Sincere sympathy is extended the bereaved relatives.

The funeral services were conducted at the Indianapolis school house by Reverend Iler, of Osawatomie, Sunday afternoon, at 2:00 o'clock, and a host of relatives and friends were there to pay their last tribute of love and respect. Burial was in Indianapolis cemetery."


 

Obituary of Minnie Brown Kettler. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 16, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Minnie Kettler Dead. - Mrs. Minnie Kettler, widow of the late William Kettler, died at her home twelve miles southeast of Paola, Monday morning, July 12th, 1915, after a lingering illness, lasting over four months.

Born in Germany, September 28th, 1845, Minnie Brown left the Fatherland at the age of nineteen, and came to America alone, to make her home with relatives at St. Charles, Missouri. After a residence of three years in that city, she became the wife of William Kettler, and came with him to Miami county, Kansas, the following year, locating on a farm near Block.

Mr. and Mrs. Kettler lived for one year on that place, and then moved to the farm, four miles east of the settlement, which has been the Kettler homestead continuously since, and where, on the 25th of November, 1907, Mr. Kettler's death occurred.

The deceased was a woman of quiet disposition, seldom taking an active part in any of the festivities of the German settlement - content to remain within her home, surrounded by the members of her family.

She is survived by nine children: Mrs. Lizzie Atkinson, wife of John B. Atkinson, of Pleasanton , Kansas; Mrs. Matilda Dageforde, wife of J. W. Dageforde, Alberta, Canada; Mrs. Katherine Dageforde, wife of John Dageforde, of Block; Mrs. Lena Ohlmeier, wife of John Ohlmeier, near Block; John H. and Henry D. Kettler, of Middle Creek township; William J., of Miami township, and Harmon M. and Fred H., the younger sons, who live on the home place. Funeral services were conducted from the home last Tuesday afternoon, by Reverend W. J. Poole, pastor of the Presbyterian church of Miami township, and the body was laid to rest beside that of the late husband, in the Highland cemetery."


 

Obituary of Elizabeth Zimmerli Kohler. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 1, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Died on Christmas Day. - The death of Mrs. Elizabeth Kohler, aged 91 years and 11 months, ocurred early Friday morning, December 25th, 1914, at the home of her son, Victor Kohler, 5 1/2 miles northwest of Paola, in Stanton township, following an illness of only two days. Mrs. Kohler was a robust woman, who had always enjoyed good bodily health, but an attack of pneumonia, that came on suddenly, was more than her advanced age could baffle, and she passed peacefully away at three o'clock Christmas morning.

Miss Elizabeth Zimmerli was born in Canton Argau, Switzerland, January 25th, 1823. Andrew Kohler, whom she married in 1856, died in Switzerland six years later, and, with her only son, Victor, and brother, Theophilus Zimmerli, the mother came to America in 1865. After a short stay at Cincinnati, the three moved on to Fort Wayne, Indiana, which was their home for seventeen years. In 1882 they journeyed to this state, locating in Wyandotte county, and six years later, leaving his mother and her brother, the son Victor, came to Miami county and bought a farm in Stanton township, where, with his family, he has since resided, the mother joining them ten years ago.

Mrs. Kohler was a woman of deep religious convictions, and was originally a member of the German Reform church, but sisce coming to this country had accepted the Methodist faith and worshiped at Eden Chappel. One of Mrs. Kohler's treasured possessions was a Bible over two centuries old - printed in 1713. In the neighborhood where she had lived for the past ten years this good, old mother was held in high esteem by all who knew her. She was always active and took a keen interest in the farm, nearly every day finding her about the place looking to the crops and live stock.

The funeral sermon was preached last Sunday morning at 11 o'clock at the late residence in Stanton township, by Reverend F. Day, of Edgerton, who is also the regular pastor at Eden Chappel. After services at the home, the body was brought to Paola, interment being in Elmwood cemetery. Mrs. Kohler is survived by her son, Victor, and three grandchildren, Fred, George and Grace Kohler. Her brother, Theo, died six years ago."


 

Obituary of Matt Luby. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Wm. A. Luby's Father Dead. - Mr. Matt Luby, 72 years old, a farmer, living at Luby Station, of the Stang line, in Johnson county, died last Sunday at St. Margaret's hospital in Kansas City, Kansas. Since 1868 he had been a resident of Olathe vicinity. Funeral services were held there last Tuesday morning. The deceased was the father of William Luby, teacher of mathematics in the Northeast high school, in Kansas City, Mo. Professor Luby's wife, Agnes is the daughter of Mrs. Jacob Koehler, of this city."


 

Obituary of William Maloney. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 5, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Died in His 56th Year. - William Maloney died at his home, three miles northwest of town, Monday morning, February 1, 1915. He had been bedfast several weeks with an illness that terminated into pleuro-pneumonia. A few hours before the end came Mr. Maloney was feeling much improved, which indicated a change for the better, but early Monday morning his condition became considerably worse, the fatal hour coming at three o'clock.

William Timothy Maloney was born in Fayetteville, Brown county, Ohio, March 8th, 1859. With his parents he came to Kansas when a small boy, locating in Miami county, which has been his home ever since, except a residence of two years, in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, about 17 years ago. On April 16, 1885, Mr. Maloney and Miss Mary J. Conner were married in this city, and to them were born six children. They are: Charles, of Jackson, California; Walter, of Portland, Oregon; Augustine, Marle, Helen and Bernard, who are at home. Three brothers survive: James, of Fresno, California; John, of Eldora, Colorado, and Patrick, of this county; also three sisters - Mrs. Charles Millard, of Salt Lake City, Utah; Mrs. Agnes Barkyoumb, of Kansas City, Mo., and Mrs. M. M. Powers of Paola....

Reverend Father Kinsella officiated at the ten o'clock Mass Wednesday forenoon, at Holy Trinity church, and interment was in the Catholic cemetery, east of town. Mr. Maloney was a Knight of Columbus and a large number of members marched in a body from the K. of C. hall to the church in the funeral procession."


 

Obituary of Esther Friedmann Mayer. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Esther Mayer. - Mrs. Esther Mayer, wife of the late Henry Mayer, died at her home, 210 South Silver street, last Friday evening, January 1st, 1915, after a long illness, at the age of eighty-one years. Mrs. Mayer had been failing in health for some years, although, until recently, she was able to come to the store of her son, Harry, occasionally, and meet old friends.

Her maiden name was Esther Friedmann, and she was born August 29th, 1833, in Koenigshofen, Bavaria, Germany. At the age of nineteen, she came to America, with her brother, Samuel Friedmann, with whom she made her home, in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1855 she married Henry Mayer, in Cincinnati, and came with him to Paola in 1878. Since Mr. Mayer's death, September 12th, 1905, the widow has made her home with her daughter, Miss Lillian Mayer, on South Silver street.

Mrs. Mayer is survived by one son, Harry Mayer, of this city, and two daughters, Miss Lillian Mayer, of Paola, and Mrs. Anna Kauffman, of Fort Scott. A brother, Benhardt Friedmann, who lives in the town of her birth, also survives.

The funeral services were conducted from Mrs. Kauffman's home in Fort Scott last Sunday afternoon by Rabbi Faber, of St. Joseph, Mo., and the body was laid to rest beside the grave of her departed husband."


 

Obituary of Frank McCabe. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 12, 1915, page 1, Roll P58 "Death of Frank McCabe - Frank McCabe, a well known farmer of Paola township, die at his home one-half mile west of town, Thursday afternoon, March 4th, 1915, following an illness of only four days' duration. Mr. McCabe contracted a severe cold while attending his daughter, Sarah, who is quite ill, and pneumonia developed which he was unable to check.

The decedent was born near Kirkcudbright county, Scotland, in 1849, coming to the United States with his parents when eighteen years old. The family located in Illinois, and in the late '70's Frank came to Kansas, and for a number of years worked in the northern part of the state and in southern Nebraska.

Mr. McCabe was married in 1884 at Beatrice, Nebraska, and later settled on a farm in Pottawatomie county, Kansas, near the town of Blaine. Mrs. McCabe died in 1897, and eight years later, the husband, with his family, moved to a farm in this county, three miles north of Paola, where they resided until a few years ago, when he located on the farm west of town, engaging in the dairy business, which he conducted up to the time of his fatal illness.

At the time of his death, Mr. McCabe's son, John, who recently returned from Montana, was confined to the house with an attack of grippe as were his sisters, Sarah and Mary. All three are under a nurse's care and are now convalescing.

Besides the three children, Mr. McCabe is survived by two brothers, Hugh and James, of Joliet, Illinois. A Requiem Mass was said for the deceased at Holy Trinity church last Monday morning at which time the body was sent to Blaine, Kansas, where the interment took place."


 

Obituary of Frank Means. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 24, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Frank Means. - Frank Means, for many years a well known Negro resident of this city, died at his home in the southwest part of town Tuesday morning, September 21st, 1915. Mr. Means had been suffering since the later part of August from lubar pneumonia, and had declined steadily from the beginning. He was born into slavery in 1836, his father's name being Solomon Kofer. His years as a slave were spent in Missouri, but when he became free, he moved to Kansas. He is survived by a daughter, Leona Means, who made her home with him. Funeral services were conducted last Wednesday morning at the Second Baptist church by Reverend Carlson, and burial was in the Paola cemetery."


 

Obituary of Samuel Moredock. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, May 28, 1915, page 1, with photograph, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Samuel Moredock Dead. - The death of Samuel Moredock, for many years a well known resident of this city, occurred at his home, No. 210 North Silver street, early Sunday morning, May 16th, 1915, as the result of a stroke of paralysis, which he suffered last Friday morning. Mr. Moredock was past eighty years of age, but had not been ill in many years, and was able to do a day's hard work at the time he was stricken.

He was born January 3rd, 1835, in Jefferson, Greene county, Pennsylvania, the son of George and Priscilla Moredock, and the early years of his life were spent in the hills of his native state. January 31st, 1861, he was married to Nancy J. Riggle, in Jefferson, and continued to make his home there until the spring of 1883, when he came West with his family, and located on a farm, near Fontana, in this county.

After five years residence on the farm, Mr. Moredock came to Paola, and had made his home here continuously since.

The deceased was a man of ardently industrious type, coming of sturdy, old Scotch stock, and went about the daily duties of his life with quiet tenacity of purpose typical of that race, in a manner which commanded the respect and admiration of all with whom he dealt. He became a member of the Baptist church when a young man, living a clean, Christian life until the end.

Mr. Moredock is survived by the wife and six children: William Moredock, of Carthage, Mo.; Reed Moredock, of Independence, Missouri; Miss Nannie Moredock, of Trinidad, Colorado; Mrs. Mary Gillogly, of Kansas City, Mo.; Miss Ollie Moredock and Mrs. J. L. Fuller, both of Paola. Two grandchildren, Kenneth Moredock, of Independence, Missouri, and Mrs. Isa Kimler, of Oklahoma City, Okla., and two great grandchildren - Dorothy and Leon Kimler, also survive.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Tuesday afternoon by Reverend W. M. Hayler, pastor of the First Baptist church, and the body was laid to rest in the Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of J. M. Morgan. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 17, 1915, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"J. M. Morgan Died Here. - J. M. Morgan, a pioneer resident of Louisburg, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William Abney, in Paola, Sunday afternoon, September 12, 1915, following an attack of heart failure which he suffered Saturday evening. Mr. Morgan was apparently in good health and spirits Saturday evening, and was able to eat a hearty supper, but was stricken shortly after the meal. He was revived Saturday night and on the following morning seemed to have recuperated considerably, but was unable to withstand another attack, which occurred that afternoon.

Born in Shelby county, Illinois, February 25th, 1833, James Marion Morgan grew to manhood at the home of his parents, William and Nancy Morgan, and learned the trade of wheelwright and blacksmith in his father's shop. At the age of eighteen, he was married to Margaret Bridges, near Windsor, Illinois, and to this union were born ten children, seven of whom are still living. Mrs. Morgan's death occurred in Louisburg in 1882, and she was buried in that town.

In 186, Mr. Morgan's health began to fail, and in company with his oldest son, John J. Morgan; his brother, the late Perry Morgan, and a cousin, William H. Morgan, who lives in this county, he started West in a wagon, going through the Ozark mountains to southern Missouri, and finally coming north to locate at Louisburg, which was then known as New St. Louis. Mr. Morgan settled on a farm four miles west of that town, and returned to Illinois after his family. Within a year, he had completely recovered his health, and he gave up farming to move to Louisburg, where he started a blacksmith shop, which he conducted for forty-three years, doing the heavy shop work until he reached his eightieth year, when he retired. For the past two years he had made his home with his daughters, Mrs. James Smith, of Louisburg, and Mrs. Abney, in Paola. Mr. Morgan was a charter member of the I. O. O. F. lodge of Louisburg, and organization in which he had always taken an active interest. He is survived by three sons - John J. Morgan, of Somerset; William Morgan, of Pueblo, Colorado, and Joseph Morgan, of Long Beach, California; also four daughters - Mrs. Abney, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Hattie Ring, of Paola, and Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson, of Kansas City.

The body was taken to Louisburg for burial last Tuesday noon, and services were conducted at the grave by Reverend L. O. Hudson, Pastor of the Baptist church of Louisburg."


 

Obituary of Harry Morrell. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Killed in a Train Wreck. - Harry Morrell, the young brakeman, who was killed in the wreck fo the Frisco freight train at Olathe, last Sunday night, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Morrell, of Fontana. The young man was born at Fontana in 1893 and had lived there throughout most of his life. He had been in the employ of the railroad company for nearly a year, and was one of the most popular in the service, always efficient and prompt in the discharge of his duties. Harry Morrell was well know in Osage township, and the many friends of the family sympathize with them in their unlooked for bereavement.

Besides his parents, the deceased is survived by one sister, Miss Hilda Morrell, and a brother, Frank, both of whom live in Fontana."


 

Obituary of Sarah Light Neiswender. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 3, 1915, page 3; "Death of Mrs. Neiswender. - Mrs. Sarah Neiswender, wife of Charles W. Neiswender, died at her home on West Chippewa street, this city, Friday, November 26th, 1915, following an illness, from stomach trouble, which lasted for a period of several months.

She was born at Burns, Steuben county, New York, June 7th, 1852, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Light, and came to this county with her parents at the age of six years, locating on a farm, one mile west of Paola. There she was reared to womanhood, and, in 1889, became the wife of Mr. Neiswender, who then lived on a farm west of town.

In 1900, they moved to Stilwater, Oklahoma, but remained there only a short time, when they went to Kansas City, where they made their home until they returned to Paola, three years ago.

She is survived by her husband - on son, George J. Neiswender, of Paola; three brothers, George M. and Victor Light, of Paola, and Alonzo, of Muskogee, Oklahoma; and two sisters, - Mrs. Celia Cott, wife of C. M. Cott, of Denver, and Mrs. Rose Wren, wife of Pearl Wren, who resides on a farm near Paola.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Sunday afternoon by Reverend Jay C. Everett, pastor of the Presbyterian church, and interment was in the Paola cemetery."


 

Obituary of Minnie Koelsch Brocker Overbeck. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 12, 1915, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Charles M. Overbeck Dead. - The death of Mrs. Minnie Overbeck, wife of Charles M. Overbeck, occurred at their home two miles north of Block, Saturday, November 6th, 1915, following a severe illness of four weeks. Mrs. Overbeck had been in poor health since the first of this year and was unable to overcome the breakdown which she suffered recently.

She was born on a farm adjoining her home, June 14th, 1875, the daughter of Andrew and Frederica Koelsch, and all of her life had been spent on the two places. She was reared and educated in that neighborhood, and on the 8th day of November, 1894, became the wife of the late Fritz Brocker, to which union were born three children, Elizabeth, John and Frank, all of whom survive.

The deceased was married to Mr. Overbeck, August 10th, 1910, at Block, and continued to make her home on the farm where her death occurred. Mrs. Overbeck was reared in the faith of the Evangelical church, and was ever faithful to the doctrines of her creed.

Beside the husband and the children mentioned above, she is survived by her parents, and another daughter, Eileen, four years of age. Three brothers - William, Otto and Fred Koelsch, and one sister, Mrs. Emma Mueller, all of Valley township, also survive.

Funeral services were conducted from the home last Monday afternoon by Reverend Beitch, pastor of an Evangelical church, in Kansas City, and the body was laid to rest in the Highland cemetery."


 

Obituary of David W. Oyster. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 17, 1915, page 1, [The original obituary is ten paragraphs long, or about a column and a half, and includes a photograph. It has been shortened here.], transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of David W. Oyster. - News of the death of David W. Oyster at his home in this city Saturday night, December 11th, 1915, came as a severe shock to Paola and Miami county citizens. Only a few days before he was up town, apparently in the best of health.

Monday, the 6th inst., Mr. Oyster began suffering from a bruise on his knee, inflected two months ago by accidentally striking it against a trunk when he and Mrs. Oyster were preparing to start on an Eastern trip. The mishap gave him no trouble at the time and throughout their eight weeks' stay in Washington, D. C., both enjoyed splendid health. They returned home Thanksgiving Day and soon thereafter what appeared to be a carbuncle started on Mr. Oyster's knee. The infection spread rapidly, but Dr. Brooking, the attending physician, didn't anticipate any immediate trouble until last Friday, when his patient's condition changed for the worse. That night a specialist from the University hospital, at Kansas City, arrived and found that gangrene poisoning had developed which a diabetic affliction of the sick man had hastened. Death came at ten minutes past nine Saturday night.

David William Oyster, a son of David W. and Eliza A. Oyster, was born on Christmas Day, 1852, in Georgetown, District of Columbia, which is now West Washington, and was christened there in the Methodist Episcopal church when 2 1/2 years old. With his parents he came to Kansas in ''9 and at the age of 17 engaged in the live stock business. The family then lived on a farm, west of town. There were twelve children and David attended school in the Walnut Creek district, later taking a course in a business college at Kansas City, Mo. He retired from active business eleven years ago to devote his time to other interests.

October 20th, 1887, Mr. Oyster and Miss Lillie Roberts were married in Paola, Rev. Charles N. Cate, a Presbyterian minister, performing the ceremony. To them was born a son, Holly, who died when eight years old. Besides his devoted wife, the decedent leaves a lovable daughter, Lillian, aged 11 years; also three sisters and two brothers. Mrs. Mary E. Taber lives in Kansas City, Mo.; Alice V., the wife of Alonzo Altman, resides on a farm in Stanton township, and Mrs. Katherine Nicholson lives with her husband, Rezin I. Nicholson, on the farm, 3 1/2 miles northwest of Paola. The surviving brothers are: George M., of this city, and Dr. John H. Oyster, of Kansas City, Mo. All were present at the burial except Dr. Oyster, who was unable to attend on account of sickness.

Funeral services were held from the Oyster home, No. 1, West Shawnee street, last Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Reverend George W. Braden, pastor of the M. E. church, officiated, and interment was in the Paola cemetery. W. D. Oyster, R. I. Nicholson, D. W. Bowen, Harry Oyster, Edwin Oyster, C. N. Emery, Charles Oyster and Tom E. Oyster served as pall bearers. ..."


 

Obituary of George M. Oyster, Sr. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 24, 1915, page 1, microfilm Roll P58, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"He Was Dave Oyster's Uncle. - George M. Oyster, Sr., died in Washington, D. C., on December 13th, age 89 years. He was an uncle of the Oyster boys here, and visited in Paola in 1885, when his brother, D. W. Oyster, Sr., was living. The Washington Star refers thus to the deceased: 'Mr. Oyster was one of the most capable and popular of the old time Washingtonian. He had lived at 210 East Capital street for 60 years. He led in furnishing the purest and best dairy supplies, and amassed a fortune. Funeral services at the Oyster home were conducted by Rev. Father J. M. O'Brien of St. Peters Catholic church at 2 o'clock p. m., on the 15th inst.' "


 

Obituary of Julia Fuller Parker. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Dies in Her Eightieth Year. - The many friends of Mrs. Orin Parker, mother of Ed. F. Parker, of this place, will be grieved to learn of her death Sunday night, November 21st, 1915, at her home in Tacoma, Washington, where she was buried Tuesday afternoon.

Mrs. Parker's maiden name was Julia Fuller, and she was born in Vermont, January 25th, 1836. Fifty-five years ago she was married to Mr. Parker and they lived in various Eastern cities until 1878, when they located in Kansas City, which was the family home until sixteen years ago when they moved to Tacoma, Wash., where they have since resided.

Mrs. Parker is survived by the husband, three sons and one daughter. They are: G. A. Parker, of Portland, Oregon; W. O. Parker, of Seattle, Wash.; Ed. F. Parker, of Paola, Kansas, and Mrs. F. A. Leach, of Tacoma, Washington."


 

Obituary of William F. Parker. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 8, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of William F. Parker. - The sudden death of William F. Parker occurred at his home, 502 East Piankishaw street, about 11 o'clock, Wednesday, October 6th, 1915, following an attack of heart failure, which was aggravated by acute indigestion. Mr. Parker had been in poor health for the past five years, but seemed to be feeling fairly well last Wednesday, and spent the evening with his brother, George M. Parker, at the latter's home. William Fountain Parker was born July 10th, 1847, in Garrard county, Kentucky, the son of John and Ann Parker, and moved with his parents to Macon county, Illinois, when quite young. He was reared to manhood on a farm near Decatur, and in 1873, was married to Mrs. Mary Russell, in Macon county, coming to Paola two years later.

The deceased followed the trade of plasterer until his health began to fail, about five years ago, when he retired.

Mr. Parker was a quiet spoken man, of moderate habits, and the many friends he made during his long residence here will sincerely regret to learn of his unexpected death. He was a member of the Christian church.

Besides the wife, he is survived by two sons - Charles L. Parker, of King City, Missouri, and Roy, of Kansas City, and four daughters - Tottie, the wife of Loren Cornett, of Broken Bow, Nebraska; Ruth, the wife of Maurice Johnson, of this city, and Grace and Jessie, both of whom live at home. Three brothers - John, and George M., of Paola, and Woodson Parker, of Sharpsburg, Illinois, and one sister, Mrs. Martha Young, of Kansas City, also survive.

Funeral arrangements had not been made, pending the arrival of relatives, as we go to press."

Note: The Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900, has William F. Parker and Mary C. Russell married on Sept. 14, 1882 in Macon County, Illinois.


 

Obituary of Mary Jane Lickiss Pickles. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 17, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Gone to Her Reward. - Death came as a relief to Mrs. Mary Jane Pickles at her home in Paola on Monday night, September 13th, 1915. She had been an invalid for many years, and next November would have been seventy-five years old.

Born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, November 2nd, 1840, she left there when fourteen, with her parents, Captain and Mrs. John Lickiss, to make a home in the United States. The family settled at Georgetown, Illinois, now known as Steeleville, and there, on April 30th, 1859, she and Mr. Elias Pickles were married. Over thirty-six years ago, Mr. and Mrs. Pickles, with their children, came to Paola, Kansas. Of the ten sons and daughters born to them, nine survive. Louisa, the wife of William Fritz, lives in Osawatomie township with her husband; Annie, wife of Mr. John Fenoughty, lives near Osawatomie, where her husband farms and runs a dairy; Agnes is the wife of John Lyons and they reside on a farm northwest of Paola, in Richland township; Rebecca lives with her husband, Bert Stiles, at Spring Hill, Kansas; Genevieve and her husband, Jasper Poteet, live in Paola, where Thomas J. and Alice Pickles reside. John Pickles and his sister, Margaret, live on a farm in Marysville township, this county. A brother of the deceased, John Lickiss, is a resident of Steeleville, Illinois, and a sister, Mrs. Louis Malone, lives there, as does another sister, Mrs. Clementina Burgfeld, and a third sister, Mrs. Rebecca Flack, resides in Boise Idaho.

Mr. Elias Pickles, the husband and father, died in this city, July 22nd, 1901. He was a miller of splendid ability and high standing. About three years ago Mrs. Pickles lost her eyesight, and this kept he indoors nearly all the time. She was a woman of rare gifts of mind and body, intelligent, religious and queenly in her conduct and carriage. To her neighbors and her church she was know as one most exemplary and devout, and to her family she was the ruling spirit, beloved to a degree that became devotion.

From the home at 701 East Kaskaskia street, this city, the casket was borne, on the morning of September 15th, by sons and sons-in-law, followed by relatives and members of the Catholic ladies alter society, to Holy Trinity church, where the Rev. Father Kinsella sang the requiem mass and delivered a most appropriate sermon. The services over, burial was in Holy Cross cemetery, east of town.

The tribute of Father Kinsella to the character of Mrs. Pickles was so timely and so fitting that every listener was deeply impressed. Long, long will the memory of this gentle woman survive. Besides sons and daughters, useful and honorable, she left to the world examples of good that will live forever."


 

Obituary of Daniel J. Ramey. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 30, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Daniel Ramey. - The rather sudden death of D. J. Ramey at his home in Spring Hill early Friday morning, April 23rd, 1915, came as a shock to his many friends in Miami and Johnson counties. Mr. Ramey had been sick just a week, but was convalescing rapidly, when he suffered a relapse.

Daniel Jarvis Ramey was a native of North Carolina, being born in that state, Surry county, May 8th, 1836. At the age of twenty-two, he and Miss Margaret M. Thompson were married and to them were born seven children. They are: Mrs. Dora Rudy, Newton, Charles, David W., George and Schuyler, all of Spring Hill, and Mrs. Mattie Rowe, of Cyril, Oklahoma. ..."


 

Obituary of Sarah D. Hodges Ramey. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 18, 1915, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Sarah D. Ramey Dead. - Mrs. Sarah D. Ramey, widow of the late Samuel P. Ramey, and for the past forty-five years residing on a farm in Richland township, died at her home, fifteen miles northwest of Paola, Thursday, June 10th, 1915. Mrs. Ramey had been an invalid all winter, and a short time before her death, she suffered a general break-down. The deceased was born in Surry county, North Carolina, in 1838, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Hodges. There she was reared and educated, and, growing to womanhood, became the wife of Samuel Ramey, with whom she came West about the time of the out-break of the Civil war. Mrs. Ramey went to Lawrence, Kansas, with her husband a short time later, and was in that city at the time of the Quantrill raid. In 1870, the Rameys came to this county, settling on the farm in Richland township, which had been their home continuously since. The death of the husband occurred there in 1904. Mrs. Ramey became a member of the Primitive Baptist church when a girl, and had ever been a true follower of the doctrines of that denomination. She is survived by two sons: L. G. Ramey, of this city, and Richard P. Ramey of Richland township; and four daughters: Mrs. Mattie Nelson, wife of Gus Nelson; Mrs. May Denoon, wife of C. E. Denoon, and Miss Violet Ramey, all of Richland township; and Mrs. Alice Tiernan, wife of John Tiernan, of Colorado Springs, Colorado.

The funeral services were conducted from the home at 11 o'clock last Sunday morning, by Elder L. W. Hall, of Blue Springs, Mo., and burial was in the Antioch cemetery."


 

Obituary of Stella Day Rowe. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Stella Rowe. - Mrs. Stella Day Rowe died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Susan A. Day, two miles southeast of Beagle, on Wednesday morning, February 17th, 1915, after a long illness of cancer.

Mrs. Rowe was born near Beagle, October, 13th, 1880, and was reared and educated in this county. In September, 1902, she became the wife of Elmer Rowe, then a young farmer, living near Beagle, and whose death occurred in Muskogee, Oklahoma, March 10th, 1912.

The deceased was well known in and around Beagle and her many friends deeply regret to learn of her sad death, extending their heartfelt sympathies to the bereaved family.

Mrs. Rowe is survived by her mother, one sister, Mrs. Etta Rose, who lives near Beagle, and one brother, Harland Day who makes his home with the mother.

The funeral services were conducted from the home last Thursday afternoon, by Reverend Skinner, of Fontana, and interment was in the Beagle cemetery."


 

Obituary of Lucy A. Creek Rynerson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 24, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Resident of Valley Township Dead. - Mrs. Lucy A. Rynerson, widow of the late John D. Rynerson, of Osawatomie, died at her home in West Valley township, Tuesday night, December 21st, 1915, at the age of 21 years, 11 months and 5 days. Mrs. Rynerson had been ill only about three days and her death was due to paralysis of the throat.

She was born in Clay county, Mo., January 15th, 1834, the daughter of Jacob and Virginia Younger Creek, and was reared to womanhood in that vicinity. When a young woman, she became the wife of Mr. Rynerson, and moved with him to Osawatomie in June 1883. The husband died in that city, June 20th, 1887, and was buried in the old Oakdale cemetery.

Shortly after his death, the widow moved with her children to the farm in Valley township, which had been her home continuously since. Mrs. Rynerson had always been a true Christian woman, and had been a member of the Baptist church for nearly seventy, years.

She is survived by two sons - R. D. Rynerson, who resides on the home place, and Philip, of Osawatomie; and one daughter, Mrs. Allie Holman, of Wellsville, Kansas.

Funeral services were conducted from the Christian church in Osawatomie yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, by Reverend Oscar Joneson, and the body was laid to rest in the Oakdale cemetery, beside the grave of the late husband."


 

Obituary of Mamie Sanders. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 12, 1915, page 1, Roll P58 "Miss Mamie Sanders Dies Suddenly - Miss Mamie Sanders, the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Sanders, of this city, died suddenly at the home of her sister, Mrs. Hardy Singletary, in Kansas City, Missouri, last Wednesday morning, March 10th, 1915. Miss Sanders had been visiting here sister for several weeks, and seemed to be in fairly good health, but was stricken with an attack of heart failure on the morning of her death, and died before a physician could reach the home.

She was born on a farm near Windsor, Missouri, August 1st, 1893, and came to Paola with her parents seven years ago, receiving her education in the schools of this city.

Miss Sanders was a girl of excellent character, whose quiet and tender disposition will endear her memory to her many friends in this city, who extend their heartfelt sympathies to the bereaved family. Besides her parents, she is survived by three sisters: Miss Ida Sanders, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Mrs. Earnest Russell and Mrs. W. H. Barrett, of this city; two brothers, Delmore and William, both of Paola.

The body was brought to Paola, and the funeral services, at the grave yesterday afternoon (Thursday), were conducted by Reverend W. M. Hayler, pastor of the Baptist church. Burial was in the Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Shadrach M. Sellers. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Shadrach M. Sellers Dead. - Death Came to the Aged Citizen at His Home in Paola Last Tuesday. - Shadrach Mitchell Sellers answered the final summons Tuesday morning, January 5, 1915, at 10:20 o'clock, at his home on East Chippewa street, following a general breakdown that had kept him confined to the bed for two weeks or more.

Mr. Sellers's place in this community where he lived for nearly 48 years, was an influential but not a conspicuous one. He was strong in mind and character, but retiring in disposition and was affectionately regarded by his fellow citizens. Born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, January 23rd, 1822, he was in his 23rd year when his marriage to Miss Anna Knicesley occurred at Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. This was on August 31st, 1844.

Eighteen years later, in the summer of '62, Mr. Sellers enlisted as a member of Co. G., 18th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry and served throughout the entire Civil war under General Phil Sheridan. But for a severe injury received at Hanover, Pa., by a horse falling upon him the day preceding the battle of Gettysburg, he would have participated in that memorable conflict.

After being mustered out at the close of the Rebellion, Mr. Sellers returned to his family and in the spring of 1876 he and his wife came West, locating in Paola, which has been their home ever since. The good woman, whom the faithful husband wed over 70 years ago, survives, along with the following children: Thomas M., of Houston, Texas; George W., of Connellsville, Penn.; Asa K. and David O., of Paola; Mrs. Margaret Atkinson, of LaCygne, Kansas; Mrs. Jennie Merker, of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Fred, of Brooksville, Florida; Frank E., of Coffeyville, and Harry C., of Osawatomie, Kansas. Mr. Sellers also leaves twenty grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.

Yesterday afternoon, the 7th inst., funeral services were conducted at the Sellers home, No. 7 East Chippewa street, at two o'clock, and there was a large attendance of friends from far and near. Reverend O. B. Thurston, pastor of the Plymouth Congregational church, and Rev. E. W. Spencer, of the M. E. church, officiated at the house and McCaslin Post No. 117, G. A. R., of which Mr. Sellers was a worthy member, had charge of the ritualistic ceremony at the grave in the Paola cemetery."


 

Obituary of William H. Shivley. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 2, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"William H. Shivley's Sudden Death. - William H. Shivley, well known farmer, of Osawatomie township, died suddenly of heart failure, in the yard of his home, two miles south of Osawatomie, Tuesday morning, March 30. Mr. Shivley assisted by Andy Chandler, had been loading hogs, and had just started to the house, carrying a bucket of corn, when he fell, unconscious. Mr. Chandler hurried to his aid, but the stricken man lived only a few minutes, after the collapse.

William H., the second son of the late John W. Shively, was born in Carroll county, Missouri, May 11th, 1847, and was reared to young manhood in that vicinity, coming to Kansas with his parents, in 1869, and locating on a farm near Osawatomie. The following year, he went to Franklin county, where he took up farming for himself, but remained there only a short time, when he returned to this county and settled on a farm in Stanton township. In 1873, Mr. Shively married Barbara Adams, whose death occurred in 1897, at their home in Stanton township.

Mr. Shively went to Fremont, Ind., two years later, and was married in that city to Elizabeth McCune. In 1902, he retired from the farm and went to Fremont to live, but returned to Kansas after a residence of two years in Indiana, and made his home for a time in Paola. Then, in 1905, he bought the farm south of Osawatomie, where his untimely death occurred.

Beside the wife, Mr. Shively is survived by five children: Mrs. Frank Rider, of Almont, Michigan; Milton Shively, of Osawatomie; Mrs. Arthur O'Brien and Walter and Harry Shively, all of whom reside in Wilson county, Kansas. Four brothers, Samuel J., of this city; J. W., of Nelson, Nebraska; Louis, of Chattanoogo, Okla.; C. A., of Hays, Kansas, and Ed W., of Los Angeles, California, also survive.

The funeral services were conducted from the home yesterday (Thursday) morning, and burial took place in the Stanton cemetery."


 

Obituary of Basil M. Simpson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 20, 1915, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Basil M. Simpson Buried Here. - The body of Basil M. Simpson, a former well known resident of Paola, whose death occurred Sunday, August 15th, 1915, at the home of his son Dr. Hal C. Simpson, in Denison, Iowa, arrived in Paola last Tuesday for burial. He had been suffering for about eight weeks with cancer of the liver and was confined to his bed nearly one month previous to his death.

Mr. Simpson was born January 25th, 1843, in St. Clairsville, Ohio, the son of William P. and Rachel Simpson, and was reared and educated there, learning the printing trade when a young man. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted for three months' service in the militia and at the end of that time became a private in Company D., 43rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served during the conflict, being mustered out with the rank of Sergeant Major in July, 1865. In August, that year, Mr. Simpson came to Kansas, locating in Paola, and in 1866, with the late John McReynolds, founded the Miami Republican with which newspaper he was connected for many years.

On Christmas, in 1871, he was married to Lottie H. Buck, whose death occurred nineteen years ago on a farm three miles north of Paola. Mr. Simpson moved with his family to Kansas City, in 1883, later going to Sweet Springs, Missouri where he remained only a short time before returning here and locating on the farm north of town. In 1898 Mr. Simpson again went to Kansas City to live, but after residing there for seven years, he went to Denison, where he had made his home with his son, Hal, continuously since.

Besides the son, he is survived by one brother, Benj. F. Simpson, of this city. Funeral services were conducted from the home of W. R. Buck, on North Castle street, last Tuesday afternoon, by Reverend O. B. Thurston, and the body was laid to rest in the Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Hiram Gould Skinner. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 16, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"A Soldier Pioneer at Rest. - The death of Hiram Gould Skinner occurred at his home, 504 West Peoria street, Monday afternoon, April 12th, 1915, after an illness of only two days. Mr. Skinner's health had been poor for a number of years, but he was not seriously sick until last Saturday evening, when he became violently ill, from an attack of gastritis.

Born in Vernon, Jennings county, Indiana, February 10th, 1844, Mr. Skinner was reared and educated there, and at the age of eighteen he enlisted in the Fifty-second Indiana Infantry, serving for three years in the Civil war with Company I, of that regiment. He was mustered out at the close of the great conflict, being honorably discharged with a clean war record.

Mr. Skinner came to Kansas in 1865 with a brother and a sister, both of whom are now dead, and located on a farm in Stanton township, this county. He married Pocahontas Mitchell, at Stanton, in 1869, and continued to make his home in that vicinity until 1882, when he disposed of the farm, and went to Anderson county, Kansas, where he again took up farming.

Twenty-two years ago, the decedent retired from active farm life, and came to Paola to live. He capably served as city marshal of Paola for a number of years, and was night watchman until 1911, when his health began to fail. Mr. Skinner was a member of the McCaslin Post, No. 117, Grand Army of the Republic, and took an active and important part in all the business of that organization.

He is survived by the widow and two daughters, Hallie C. Wilson, wife of Guy Wilson, and Willie Beatrice Cooper, wife of J. H. Cooper. Both reside in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper, Mrs. Wilson and E. H. Day, a nephew, of Pueblo, Colorado, were here to attend the funeral, which was conducted by Reverend G. W. Braden and Reverend O. B. Thurston, from the Methodist church yesterday (Thursday) afternoon. Burial was in the Elmwood cemetery, their services at the grave being under the auspices of McCaslin Post, G. A. R."


 

Obituary of George W. Smith. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 26, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"G. W. Smith Dead. - The death of George W. Smith occurred at his home in Fontana Thursday morning, February 18, 1915, following a short illness.

Mr. Smith was born in Bond county, Illinois, August 7th, 1843, making his age 71 years, 6 months and 11 days at the time of his death. In the early sixties he came to Kansas with his parents, and spent practically his entire life in this state, with the exception of a few years in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

At the age of 20, Mr. Smith responded to the call to arms, gallantly serving his country from 1863 until the close of the war as a member of Company C, 15th Kansas Cavalry. He participated in the battles of Big Blue, Little Blue and other skirmishes along the border, opposing Captain Price in his memorable campaign against the Northern cause.

After the war, the deceased took up farming in Miami and Osage townships, and was one of the influential farmers of this county. For the last few years he has lived in Fontana. Mr. Smith's first wife, Adaline Gebo, died November 25, 1878. By this union two daughters were born - Mrs. Desdemonia Lawhead, of Miami township, and Miss Ellen Smith, who made her home in Fontana with her father. By his second marriage, three son and two daughters were born. They are: George O., of Oakland, California; Victor Otto, of Fontana; Virgil D., of Kansas City, Kansas; Mrs. Maggie Alexander and Mrs. Minnie Williams, of Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Smith, who, before her marriage, was Mary Jane Long, died 26 years ago to-day. Mr. Smith's brothers, John, Marion and Lafayette, are well known farmers living in Miami township. Of the four sisters surviving, Mrs. Amanda Pryor and Mrs. Alma Smith live in this county, and Mrs. Elvira Arbogast and Mrs. Olive Huff are residents of California. All were present at the burial, except George O., of Oakland; Mrs. Arbogast and Mrs. Huff.

The funeral was held last Saturday morning from the home in Fontana, conducted by Reverend Skinner, Pastor of the Methodist church, and the services were largely attended by friends and relatives from far and near. The Masonic order, of which Mr. Smith was a faithful member, had charge of the ceremony at the grave, interment being in the New Lancaster cemetery."


 

Obituary of Amelia Stoddard. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 15, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Miss Amelia Stoddard Dead. - Miss Amelia Stoddard, a former resident of Greenbush, Wisconsin, who, for the past year and a half had been making her home with her sister, Mrs. Henrietta Stoddard-Turner, in this city, died yesterday afternoon, October 14th, 1915, as a result of a paralytic stroke which she sustained four weeks ago. Miss Stoddard was seventy-four years of age, and was born in Copenhagen, New York, June 22nd, 1841. She had been and invalid for several years. The body will be taken to Greenbush for burial."


 

Obituary of Sarah Lois Lee Upton. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"The Death of Mrs. John Upton. - Mrs. Sarah Lois Upton, the wife of John Upton, formerly of Marysville township, this county, died in Kansas City on January 4th, 1915, after a short illness of pneumonia. Her family and intimate friends didn't think that there was danger, and her death was a shock to all of them.

Mrs. Upton was beloved by all who knew her. Her maiden name was Lee, and she attended the schools in Marysville township, prior to her marriage to Mr. Upton. She was born in Ohio on September 27th, 1857. The Lee family came to Marysville township over forty years ago, and Lois was then a little girl. She was of studious turn and always showed a sincere regard for religion. On November 21,1875, she was married to Mr. John Upton, and, until ten years ago, the family resided near Hillsdale. The four children born to this marriage died in infancy. Mrs. Nettie Garrett, an adopted daughter, lives in Rosedale, Kansas.

The body was brought to Hillsdale for burial on Tuesday, January 5th, and the funeral services were conducted by Reverend Trett. Interment was in the village cemetery.

The Upton home is now at 2018 West 36th street, Rosedale, Kansas, and to the bereaved husband, heartfelt sympathy goes out from every quarter. To him the world is dark indeed for there is nothing on earth to make up for the heavy loss, the burden of sorrow that he now carries."


 

Obituary of Nellie Zama Weaver. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 1, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Their Granddaughter Dies. - Nellie Zama Weaver, the three months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weaver, of Abby, Colorado, died at the home of Mrs. Weaver's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dunaway, on West Osage street, in this city, yesterday (Wednesday), shortly before noon. Mrs. Weaver and the infant had been visiting her parents in Paola for some time, but the child was strong and healthy until a few days before her death. The funeral arrangements had not been made as we go to press."


 

Obituary of Almiranda Garvin Todd Wilgus. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 15, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Mrs. Almiranda Wilgus Dead. - The death of Mrs. Almiranda Wilgus, who for fifty-four years had been a resident of this city, occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Frank H. Sheer, 306 East Piankishaw street, shortly before 8 o'clock Monday morning, October 11th, 1915. For a number of years she had been declining rapidly in health, and for the past year and a half, had been bedfast.

Almiranda Garvin was born August 22nd, 1834, at Kingston, Madison county, Kentucky, the daughter of William and Nancy Shannon Garvin, and at an early age moved to Bloomington, Ind., with her parents, later going to Mount Sterling, Illinois. In 1855, she became the wife of Henry Todd, and went to Cooperstown, Illinois, from which city she and her husband came to Kansas Territory, locating at Sugar Creek, in the southeast part of this county, where Mr. Todd died, in 1859. The deceased lived in that vicinity during the early border troubles, and was more than once forced to entertain marauding bands of invaders from the Missouri side.

In 1861, Mrs. Todd was married to Alfred Wilgus, at Sugar Creek, the ceremony being performed by R. J. Bannister, then probate judge of Lykins county, as this county was known. Mr. Wilgus was at that time proprietor of a store in West Point, Missouri, but came to Paola and started a mercantile business, which he conducted for many years. After his death, October 21st, 1885, the widow made her home with her children.

Mrs. Wilgus had been a life-long church member and was a very devout Christian, always interested in the work of the churches. She never cared for social prominence, but was content to stay within her own quiet domain, rearing with tenderness and care a large family of children. Surviving are two sons, Davis E. Wilgus and William Todd, both of this city; and two daughters, Mrs. Ivah Scheer, wife of Frank H. Scheer, of this city, and Mrs. Emma de Cordova, wife of William F. de Cordova, of Tishomingo, Oklahoma. A sister, Mrs. Mary J. Wells, of Collinsville, Texas, and a step-daughter, Mrs. Lydia Jane Jackson, of Munsey [sic] Indiana, also survive.

The funeral services were conducted from the Scheer home yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, by Reverend O. B. Thurston, who officiated in the absence of Dr. Jay C. Everett, and the body was laid to rest beside the grave of the late husband, in Elmwood cemetery. The burial was largely attended, and the floral offerings beautiful...

Those out-of-town who attended the funeral services of Mrs. Wilgus were: Mr. and Mrs. Bruce T. Wilgus and children, Anna Marian and La Una, of Madison, Arkansas; Mrs. William F. de Cordova, of Tishomingo, Oklahoma, and her daughter, Mrs. William Skinner, of Dallas, Texas; Frank and Rena Wilgus, and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Wilgus and children, of La Cygne, Kansas."


 

Obituary of Mary E. V. Oldham Bevis Wilton. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 22, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Mary Wilton. - Mrs. Mary E. V. Wilton, widow of the late Joseph Wilton, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel H. Oldham, five and one-half miles south of Paola, Tuesday morning, October 19th, 1915, at the age of sixty-nine years, eleven months and two days. She had been ill since last January, when she gave up housekeeping at the home of her late parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold Reamer, in Valley township, and went to live with her daughter, and for the past six weeks had been confined to bed.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 21st, 1845, Mary Wilton was reared and educated there, and in 1863 became the wife of Andrew Bevis, to which union was born one son, William A. Bevis, now a resident of Osawatomie. Mr. Bevis enlisted in the Union army during the civil war, and died as a result of wounds received in battle.

The deceased continued to make her home in Cincinnati, and in 1874, was married to Joseph Wilton, in that city, coming to Kansas with him six years later, and locating on a farm in Valley township, Miami county, where Mr. Wilton died in 1909. After his death, the widow made her home with her parents, who lived on a farm in that neighborhood.

For a numbe rof years Mrs. Wilton taught music throughout the southern half of the county, and during that time made a large number of admiring friends who will learn of her death with sincere regret. She is survived by two daughters - Mrs. Oldham, of Valley township, and Mrs. R. G. Seitz, of Atchison, Kansas, and a son, Mr. Bevis of Osawatomie. Her only sister, Mrs. Samuel Chambers is believed to be living at West Point, Nebraska.

Funeral services were conducted from the Oldham home last Wednesday afternoon by Dr. J. C. Everett, pastor of the Presbyterian church, of Paola, and burial was in the Elmwood cemetery."


 

Obituary of Sarah J. Young. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 14 March 2007. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 15, 1915, page 1, transcribed from the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, KS, microfilm roll P58)

"Death of Mrs. Sarah. J. Young. - Mrs. Sarah J. Young, widow of the late Jacob Young, died at her home on West Piankishaw street last Tuesday night, January 12th, 1915, after a serious illness lasting nearly a month. Mrs. Young had been failing in health for a number of years, but had never been seriously ill until the present winter.

She was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, December 14th, 1842, and at the age of eighteen, became the wife of Jacob Young, moving with him to Iowa several years later. In the late sixties, Mr. and Mrs. Young came to Miami county, and located in Middle Creek township, which was their home until his death, in 1907, when Mrs. Young, with her daughter, Miss. Edna Young, moved to Paola to live. During her long residence in Middle Creek township, the deceased established a wide acquaintance, and her many old friends will sincerely regret to learn of her death.

She is survived by ten children: Mrs. Andy Reichard, of Lincoln, Neb.; Mrs. E. C. Cramer, of Davidson, Sask, Canada; Mrs. James Menefee, of Trenton, Mo.; Mrs. C. D. Routt and Miss Edna Young, both of Paola; Milton R., of Hutchinson, Kansas; Sidney, of Pander, Neb.; Jasper, of Trenton, Mo.; Edward, of Lyons, Kansas, and Earl, of Louisburg, Kansas.

The funeral services were conducted from the Methodist church yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, by Reverend E. W. Spencer, and the interment was in Elmwood cemetery."


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