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Miami County Obituaries
1892


 

Obituary of Lorana Day. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Lorana Day, wife of John Day, died at her home in Stanton, January 2d, 1892. She had been in poor health most all winter, but was able to be aroused until about two weeks previous to her death. She was taken with the la grippe and continued to grow worse until death relieved her.

Mrs. Day was born at Vernon, Jennings county, Indiana, February 3d, 1833, and was married to John Day at that place in 1850. They moved to Stanton, Kansas, in 1865, locating on the farm they now occupy. She leaves a husband and five sons to mourn her death.

The three eldest, who live in Idaho, were telegraphed the first of the week of their mother's dangerous illness, and the oldest, Cassius M. Day, took the first train for home, arriving Sunday morning, but too late to again behold his mother living. The two other boys were unable to be present. Mr. Day and the two youngest were with her till the last.

She was a true wife, a loving mother and a good neighbor, and was beloved by all who knew her. Her death will not only be felt by her near relatives but by her many friends throughout Miami county. The funeral services conducted by Reverend Williams, of the U. B. church, were held at her late residence Sunday evening at 2 p.m. The attendance was very large. The remains were laid to rest in the cemetery west of Stanton."


 

Obituary of Catharine Lane. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 8, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Catharine Lane, mother of the Lane Brothers, Anson, Byron and Franklin, and Mrs. Caleb Servos and Mrs. Fred Snyder, all living in Osage township, died at her late home, near Fontana, on Friday, January 1st, 1892, aged 90 years and 8 months. Besides the above named sons and daughters there are two others living and five dead.

The deceased was a lady of rare strength of both mind and body. Leaving her native home, Canada, where she was born April 30th, 1801, she came with her husband, Rev. Gilbert Lane, to Kansas in 1863, and settled in Osage township. Early in life she became a member of the church and remained steadfast in faith through all the turbulent trials and hardships of rearing a large family and living on the frontier. She was remarkably good and useful woman whose death, though it came not till she had more than seen the fullest measure of years, was deeply mourned. Many relatives survive her near Fontana and Lawyer Lane, of this city, is a grandson. Rev. Manuel conducted the funeral services last Sunday and the body was buried in the Fontana cemetery."


 

Obituary of Pryor B. Mayo. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 15, 1892, page 3)

"The death of Pryor B. Mayo which occurred last week in St. Louis removes another of the popular and useful young men of Miami county. Since leaving here, he was engaged in business in Springfield, Mo., where he was postmaster during President Cleveland's administration. In the prime of life, under 40 years of age, Mr. Mayo had a bright future ahead of him. He was a gentleman of ability and integrity who nobly earned his high reputation."


 

Obituary of Arthur Charles Hart. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 15, 1892, page 3)

"The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hart will regret to learn of the death of their eldest child, Arthur Charles, which occurred on Wednesday the 6th inst., after an illness of just three weeks. All human skill was exercised in vain for the little fellow's relief. His age was two years, nine months and fifteen days. To the bereft we extend our sincere condolences."


 

Obituary of Sidney S. Walrath. Information provided by Tom Walrath, 15 April 2000. (Reference: Miami Republican, 21 Jan 1892)

A SUICIDE.

Sid Waldreth [sic] committed suicide in Paloa Thursday night last by taking morphine. About 8 o'clock in the evening he went to Wm.Forner's billiard hall and got a glass of hop tea in which he put some powders. He went out the back door, through the alley and to Dell Gill's barber shop, where he remained about ten minutes,going from there to Lou Moffett's restaurant,where he sat down on a chair. He had not been there a great while when he fell from the chair. Drs. Hoover & Porter were called in and worked with him until 12:45 o'clock,when he expired.The deceased was 39 years of age and came to this county about 3 years ago from Sandusky,Ohio, where he was seperated from his wife. He leaves one son, about 7 years of age. Geo Hobert, northwest of Palola, whom he wroked for when he first came to this county, knew him in Ohio. Last fall he worked on the farm for Col. Lynde, who afterward got him a good position in Kansas City, which he soon lost on account of his drinking habits. In his pocked was found an envelope that had apprently been carried a long time, and which contained three photographs, one of his little son. On the envelope was written, "I do this deed because I am penniless and forlorn, and can not get any work. Do with my remains as you please; it matters little to me. Bury my boy's picture with me."

Coroner Boyle of Louisburg came down to Paola and held an inquest Friday. The jury, composed of E. W. Robinson, J. a. Payne, James Chiles, J. W. Beaty, J. T. Haughey and W. B Guptil, returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death by an over dose of morphine."

That's all the information I have, other than the post card that George Hobert mailed to my Grandfather, Earl Walrath, telling him of his fathers' passing away.


 

Obituary of Ezron Heflebower. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"Ezron Heflebower died at his home in Ten Mile township, Sunday the 17th inst., of grippe. He was the brother of David H. Heflebower and one of the leading men of the county and owned at the time of his death several farms in his neighborhood, comprising about 1,800 acres of the best land in the county. He located in his present home thirty-four years ago, coming from Jefferson county, Virginia, where he was born in 1829. A family and many hundred friends sadly realize that death has taken a noble father, husband and brother to the other shore.

Mr. Heflebower was a true type of the sturdy, useful men who had spent the best years of life in making a living for their own and advancing Miami county in every way to the front of the improved sections of the West.

The burial ceremonies were witnessed by a large concourse of relatives and friends who earnestly attested their sympathy and regard for the noble dead."


 

Obituary of Dudley M. Sheldon. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"An Old Settler Dies. Dudley M. Sheldon died at his home in Osage township, near Fontana, January 15th, 1892, aged 64 years. A few weeks ago he took down with grippe and it developed into acute pneumonia.

Mr. Sheldon was born in Ontario county, New York, January 4th, 1828, his father being of French descent and his mother a Scotch woman. In 1849 he was married to Ruth B. Hall who for 43 years was his faithful companion. Leaving New York he located in Bureau county, Illinois, in 1857 and three years later he moved with his family to Miami county, then Lykins county, Kansas Territory. From August 26th, 1862, to April 7th, 1865, he was in the army having enlisted as a private in Co. C. 12th Kansas Volunteers. He was discharged by reason of a gun shot wound received in the battle of Jenkins Ferry, Arkansas. Four sons, Winfield H., David, Emor J., and Henry, survive the father and all reside in this county, two of them, W. H. and E. J. , being prominent and well known lawyers of Paola.

Mr. Sheldon was an industrious, honest and obliging citizen who was respected by all who knew him. His death is a sad bereavement to his family and a serious loss to the community. The burial at Fontana was largely attended."


 

Obituary of Lewis Long. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"Lewis Long, brother of Amos W. Long, died at his home nine miles southeast of Paola on Tuesday, January 19th, and was buried in the Spangler cemetery near La Cygne, on Thursday. Grippe complicated with pneumonia was the cause of death.

The deceased was born near Tarlton, Pickaway county, Ohio, October 10th, 1832, and came to Kansas in 1857, locating in Linn county. Since that time he has been a resident of either Linn or Miami and was generally engaged in operating a saw mill. He leaves a wife and nine children, seven of the children grown, to mourn his loss.

Mr. Long was a generous, hard-working man, who amid the hardships of rearing a large family, always did the best he could. He was liked by neighbors and his death is deeply regretted by a host of friends."


 

Obituary of Fannie M. Catchpole. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"A Sad Death. The sudden death of Miss Fannie M. Catchpole at the residence of G. E. Barnes in this city last Wednesday morning was indeed a sad affair. She had a sore throat and was told to take chloride of potash and gargle it, but misunderstanding the directions, swallowed it. A physician was summoned and everything possible was done but with no avail and death followed in about thirty-six hours after swallowing the potash.

She was a young lady of rare promise and friends say she was soon to be married to an estimable young man of Paola. The funeral will be held to-day."


 

Obituary of Lucien S. Dagenett. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"Lucien S. Dagenett died at his home on the Ottawa Reservation, Indian Territory, 13 miles south of Baxter Springs, Saturday, January 10th.

The deceased was well known in Miami county. He was born in Park county, Indiana, September 24th, 1841, and came here in 1852 locating on the ground where Paola now stands. He was a generous, upright man and his death will be mourned by many friends here."


 

Obituary of Sidney S. Waldreth. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 22, 1892, page 3)

"Tired of Life. A man by the name of S. D. Waldreth died at the Moffat restaurant last Friday morning from a dose of morphine taken internally to end his life. He was a stranger here having come a few months ago and worked a little here and there. On the day previous he had been drinking some and in the evening came to Smith Taylor at the restaurant and asked for lodging saying that he had no money. Mr. Taylor told him that he could have a bed and he soon came back and sat down in the office. About 8 o'clock he fell from his chair and it was first supposed he fainted or was stricken with paralysis but when Drs. Hoover and Porter came they pronounced his prostration to be from morphine. All was done that could be but he died about 1 a.m. the 15th inst. Having no friends and nothing to identify him, the body was buried in the Paola cemetery.

Coroner Boyle was notified and called a jury, E. W. Robinson, Jas. W. Chiles, J. A. Payne, W. B. Guptil, J. W. Beaty, and T. H. Henry. The verdict was that S. D. Waldreth committed suicide by taking morphine. The following note duly signed was found in his pocket:

'I do this deed because I and penniless and forlorn and can not get any work. Do with my remains as you please; it matters little to me. Please bury my boy's picture with me' ".

Note: His name was Sidney S. Walrath and he is buried in the Potter's Field section of the Paola Cemetery.


 

Obituary of Harry Flesher. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 19, 1892, page 3)

"Harry Flesher, 62 years of age, was run over by and engine in the yard at Grant's Pass Last Tuesday. As a result of the accident his arm was amputated and he died Thursday morning. During the war he was Captain in the 9th Kansas Volunteers and was at one time well off, financially. Whisky ruined him, and he died a drunken pauper. - North Vernon, (Ore.) Leader.

Captain Flesher was one of the pioneers of Allen county. He located the quarter section on part of which A. Jeffers now lives, a short distance east of Iola. In 1857 or '8 and lived there until the breaking out of the war when he enlisted in the Ninth Kansas and was elected Captain of Co. E. All the old Ninth Kansas boys - Judge Arnold, John Walters, John McDonald and others - knew him well and are sorry to learn of his death. - Iola Register.


 

Obituary of George Sleppy. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 19, 1892, page 3)

"George Sleppy died at his home in Richland township on February 8th, 1892, after a few days' illness, with grippe that terminated in pneumonia.

Mr. Sleppy was an upright and useful man. He was born in Ohio in 1830 and came to Miami county, Kansas, twelve years ago where he lived till his death. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss, his son, J. M. being the eldest. The burial in Scott Valley cemetery on the 10th was largely attended.

Thus another of the good and true men of this county has gone to return no more and a large circle of relatives and friends mourn his departure."


 

Obituary of Lucy J. Farnham. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 19, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Lucy J. Farnham died at the residence of her son, Wm. Farnham, in Rich Hill, Mo., last Sunday, the 14th inst., aged 66 years and 11 months.

Mrs. Farnham was born near Shelbyville, Tennessee, in March, 1825, and moved with her parents to Green Castle, Indiana, when 16 years of age. Then she was married to Prof. A. C. Farnham in 1842. The following year Prof. Farnham accepted a position as instructor in the Shawnee Mission, south of Kansas City and after continuing in that line of work for a while he removed with his wife to Arcadia, Mo., where he taught in the female seminary till 1861 when he went to Lawrence. After the Quantrill raid he went into the army, Mrs. Farnham remaining with the children at home.

In 1866 Prof. Farnham and family moved to Paola and bought a small farm adjoining the city on the north. From that time till 1875, when he died, Mr. Farnham was identified with the educational interests of this county, serving as Superintendent of the Paola schools and also County Superintendent. Disposing of the farm Mrs. Farnham bought property in Paola in 1881 and made her home in town.

For some time past she had been in poor health and much of the time made her home with her children. The grippe went hard with her this winter and though she had recovered enough to visit her son, William, a few weeks ago she relapsed on the 10th inst., and bade farewell to a long, active, useful and noble life. She was the mother of nine children - three dead and six living.

The eldest son, William, resides at Rich Hill. Richard and Hamlet, at Joplin and George at Ft. Smith. The two daughters live in this county - Mrs. Emma V. Crowell in Paola and Mrs. Anna Boyle at Louisburg. They all were here this week to attend the last sad rites of their mother's departure. From far and near friends gathered at the Paola cemetery on Wednesday, the 17th inst., to attend the burial.

Mrs. Farnham was a true type of the good mother who is the main-stay of the country. Industrious, pure-minded, self-denying and ever-hopeful, she labored for those she loved directing their footsteps always onward and upward. The sons and daughters of such a mother can well rise up to call her blessed."

Note: Asbury Farnham and Lucy Finley were married in Putnam County, Indiana on September 15, 1842.


 

Obituary of Margaret Coughlin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 4, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Margaret Coughlin, wife of Michael Coughlin, died at her home in Richland township, Miami county, Kansas, Friday morning, February 26th, 1892, and was buried in the Catholic cemetery at Edgerton, Sunday, February 28th.

The deceased had been sick for several years and human kindness and medical skill were of no avail. She leaves a husband and eight children to mourn her loss, all of which were present except one daughter who resides in Oklahoma and one son who lives in California. Mrs. Margaret Whalen Coughlin was born in County Clare, Ireland, January 21st, 1832, and emigrated to Crawfordsville, Indiana, when nine years old and in 1853 was married to Michael Coughlin and came to Kansas in 1858 and resided here ever since. She leaves a large circle of friends to mourn her loss."


 

Obituary of Enos L. Cheasbro. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 4, 1892, page 3)

"Mr. E. L. Chesbro died at the home of his son, H. F. Chesbro, west of town last Wednesday, aged 68 years. He was an old settler, highly respected and all will regret his death.

The deceased has lived here for over 25 years. He was born in New York and at the age of 23 years was married in Illinois to Miss Colton who died about two years ago. Of eight children born, five are living - H. F., Mont, Ed, Mrs. B. F. Cook and Mrs. Della Robinson. The funeral yesterday was largely attended."

Note: His name was Enos L. Cheasbro, and he married Abagail A. Colton May 6, 1847 in DeKalb Co., Illinois.


 

Obituary of David B. Wilson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 25, 1892, page 3)

"Judge D. B. Wilson died at his home in this city on Wednesday night, the 23rd inst., aged 75 years, three months and seven days. He was born in Belmont county, Ohio, December 11th, 1816, and located in this county in May, 1856. At the outbreak of the was he went into the army. In January, 1863, he became Probate Judge, and after being twice re-elected, declined to serve longer.

Till a few years ago he resided on his farm between Paola and Osawatomie when he moved to town. Mr. Wilson was a useful and honorable citizen who raised a large family of three sons and six daughters. No man in the county was more universally respected and his death is mourned by all who knew him. The funeral will take place this afternoon in the Paola cemetery."

Note: His name was David B. Wilson.


 

Obituary of Jonathan E. Thayer. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 25, 1892, page 3)

"Jonathan E. Thayer, who has been steadily failing for months, peacefully passed from earth at his home here on the 23rd inst., at 11 p.m. Thus another of the forceful characters who have long been identified with the business interest of Paola has gone to join old associates on 'that other shore.'

Mr. Thayer was born in Massachusetts November 9th, 1823. In March, 1849, he married Miss Sarah Flint, who after more than two score years constant and affectionate companionship mourns his departure. Of three sons born only George E. is living, Charles and Clarence having died years ago.

Since January, 1869, Mr. Thayer has been connected with the business interests of Paola. For nearly 20 years he has been a stockholder and officer in the banking houses of the town and at the time of his death was director in the Miami County National Bank. He was an exemplary member of the Presbyterian church and in every walk of life commanded the esteem and respect of his fellow men.

The funeral takes place to-day at 1:30 p.m. Interment in the Paola cemetery."


 

Obituary of Joseph Rowe. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 1, 1892, page 3)

"Last Sunday night about half past seven o'clock Joseph Rowe, who lived near Beagle, was run over in the yards of the Memphis Route and was crushed and mangled into a frightful mass. He was standing on the track just east of the depot when yard engineer, B. J. Allen, was running his engine to the round house and was struck and killed instantly. Engineer Allen knew nothing of it till he had housed his engine. Blame attaches to no one but Rowe, himself.

The remains were taken to Blasdell & Culbertson's undertaking establishment and on Monday afternoon a Coroner's inquest was held before a jury composed of the following named gentlemen: S. W. Davis, D. W. Oyster, Jr., Peter Graff, M. A. Straight, C. T. Shoemaker and T. H. Henry. After hearing the evidence the following verdict was arrived at:

'We find that the deceased, Joseph Rowe, came to his death by his own carelessness, and we hereby exhonerate any person from blame in this connection.'

The deceased was forty-five years of age and for the past thirty years has lived in Mound township. He came from Tennessee to Kansas. He leaves a wife and seven children."


 

Obituary of Urban Butler Prescott. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 8, 1892, page 3)

"U. B. Prescott, died at his home in Paola last Sunday the 3rd inst., and was buried in the city cemetery the following Monday.

The deceased was born in Middleburry, New York, March 10th, 1822. In 1842 he was married to Miss Phebe Cass and three years later he moved to Sycamore, Illinois, where he engaged in the wagon and carriage making business. When the war broke out, being physically unable to serve in the ranks he took the position of Suiter's Clerk and later on removed to Chicago, engaging in the real estate business. While in DeKalb county he was elected County Clerk in which position he served four years. Retiring from this he was chosen Clerk of the Court and afterward Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, serving in the two positions eight years, when he was appointed and served one year as Deputy Sheriff.

In 1871 Mr. Prescott with his family moved to Kansas and located at Marion where he lived till 1876. Then he moved to Paola and lived here ever since. Had he lived one day longer he would have reached the full 50th year of his marriage. He leaves a wife and three daughters and two sons to mourn his death. Mrs. T. H. Ball, of Aurora, and Mrs. R. D. Ingersoll, of Kansas City, are here, but Mrs. H. P. Bissett, of Chicago, the youngest daughter, could not be present. The two sons Jos. R. and William J. are here. Mrs. Prescott, their mother, is very low with pneumonia. The many friends of the family deeply sympathize with them in their distress."

Note: His name was Urban Butler Prescott.


 

Obituary of Emma Alice Brown. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 8, 1892, page 3)

"Miss Emma Alice Brown, daughter of Judge N. H. Brown, died at home here last Tuesday at 6 o'clock a.m. of heart disease. She had not been in the best of health but was usually well on the Wednesday before and was up town.

Miss Brown was a promising girl of 18 years of age, respected by all who knew her. Her sudden and premature death is universally mourned and to the stricken parents and sisters the community extend heartfelt sympathy. The burial took place yesterday when friends assembled at the Brown residence and followed the loved one to her resting place in the silent city of the dead."


 

Obituary of John D. Day. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 8, 1892, page 3)

"John D. Day died at his home in Stanton township on Thursday, March 31st, and was buried on the following Friday. Mr. Day was an old resident having lived in this county since 1865. He was born in Jennings county, Indiana, in 1829. He reared a large family of six sons and three daughters. Two sons only lived her the others that are living being located out west. Mrs. Day died about three months ago and now the family is broken."


 

Obituary of Ephraim Gilmore. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 15, 1892, page 3)

"Judge E. Gilmore died at his home here last Wednesday at 6:42 p.m., aged 82 years, 2 months and 7 days. The deceased was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, February 27th, 1810, and moved to Aledo, Illinois, in 1831, where he lived till 1883 when he located in Miami county as one of the founders of the National Bank of Paola.

Judge Gilmore was a gentleman of rare ability and great usefulness. He was one of the old school and his lifetime was spent to improve the West. He was a father of nine children - seven sons and three daughters. Three are dead. Of the living, Lyman C. and Ephriam reside here and John A. and Robert N. in Anderson county.

Mrs. Gilmore survives him. The funeral takes place to-morrow, services at the Presbyterian church and interment in the Paola cemetery."

Note: His name was Ephraim Gilmore.


 

Obituary of Catherine Koehler. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 15, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Catherine Koehler, mother of Jacob, Frank and Joseph Koehler, died in Kansas City on Wednesday the 13th inst. in her sixty-fifth year. She had been in poor health for some time and the burden of years wore heavily upon her. She was a lady of remarkable vitality and strength of mind and many people here will remember the good woman from their acquaintance when for a time she made her home in Paola.

The funeral occurred yesterday, the 14th inst., the Koehler families and Mrs. Klassen of this city attending. The numerous friends of the deceased extend sincere sympathy to the sons and other relatives of the noble dead."


 

Obituary of Fred Hamlin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 10, 1892, page 3)

"Fred Hamlin, the eighteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harve Hamlin, in Miami township, encountered a fearful death on Thursday, June 2d, by falling into an iron boiler of hot water that had just been set off the stone. Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hamlin, of this city, grandparents of the unfortunate child, attended the funeral last Friday, the 3d inst."


 

Obituary of David Burns Stephenson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 24, 1892, page 3)

"David Burns Stephenson, one of the oldest settlers of Miami county, died last Friday night at his home, two miles north of town, of Bright's disease. He had been in poor health for some months but was bedfast only three weeks.

He was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, in March, 1822, and was therefore 70 years of age. At the age of thirty he was married to Miss Mildred Akers in Putnam county, Indiana, who survives him. In 1864 they moved to Miami county and settled on the old homestead, north of town, where, during that 28 years, they have lived continuously and reared a respectable family of three sons and one daughter, viz: Mrs. W. M. Rice, who resides at Fort Scott, L. H. Stephenson, Dwight and John, all of whom live here. Mr. Stephenson was of that type of manhood we find in the sturdy pioneer and they are all good citizens. His attributes of character were pronounced and his personality a distinct one. He was a man who had the courage of his convictions, and that is always admirable in anyone. His example in many respects is a good one to follow. He had many friends and few, if any, enemies. Time lays all ranks low and few of his generation remain. Over fifty years of his life were in the Presbyterian faith and his was a devoted christian life. Persons who have known him longer than we will say to his credit what we have left unsaid.

The funeral took place Sunday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. W. H. Robinson. Perhaps the largest concourse of citizens, neighbors and friends ever known to attend a funeral in the county paid him the last tribute of respect in following him to the grave. To the bereaved wife and members of the family we extend the most genuine sympathy. May he rest in peace."


 

Obituary of Henry Graupner. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 24, 1892, page 3)

"Henry Graupner died very suddenly Wednesday morning of heart failure. It was his custom to get up very early and do the morning chores and then go in the house and lie down and rest while waiting for breakfast, and Wednesday morning he did the same. He got up apparently as well as usual, and after doing his work lay down in waiting. When the morning meal was ready he was called several times without responding and going into his room his daughter found him dead. Examination proved the above cause of death.

The deceased has been a familiar character in this vicinity since 1857 and of course his sudden death is a surprise to his friends. For many years he has lived on his farm adjoining Paola on the southwest. About thirteen years ago his wife died and now five daughters and one son are left of the family. He was born in Germany in 1828 and came to America when quite a young man. During his long residence here he has been known as a quiet, peaceable citizen. He has attended to his own affairs and commanded the respect of his neighbors, and when that is true a man can truly be said to be a good citizen. He had many good qualities and they commended him to the respect of a good citizen.

He will be buried to-day by McCaslin Post of which he is a member. We extend sympathy to the bereft."


 

Obituary of Alexander P. Brown. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 29, 1892, page 3)

"Alexander P. Brown died at his home, near Fontana, on Sunday night, the 24th inst. He had been sick a long time. Mr. Brown was one of the earliest settlers in this county having come from Indiana with his wife and located on a claim in Osage township in 1858. He reared a large family and stood high as an obliging neighbor and useful citizen. The burial in the Fontana cemetery last Tuesday was largely attended."


 

Obituary of George F. Payne. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 29, 1892, page 3)

"George F. Payne died at the old home, the residence of his parents Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Payne, west of town on Monday night, the 25th inst., aged 36 years. He had been sick for over a month with some disorder that resulted in the bile going all through his system.

The deceased was born in Monroe county, Wisconsin, in 1856 and came with his parents here in 1867. About seven years ago he was married to Miss Jennie Lawrence in Massachusetts and she, with a son six years old, mourns his death. In boyhood George learned the printer's trade and worked at different times on the Paola papers. Several years ago he went south west and established the Beaver City Advocate on the strip called No-Mans-Land that afterward came into Oklahoma. He conducted this paper successfully and last spring sold it for two thousand dollars and came back home with his wife and boy. He was an industrious, honest, useful man and his early death is deeply mourned. The burial and funeral rites last Wednesday afternoon at Paola cemetery were witnesses by a large assemblage of friends of the family."


 

Obituary of Elizabeth Masters. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 5, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Elizabeth Masters, mother of the several Masters families of this county, died at her home near Hillsdale last Sunday, July 31, and was buried on Monday beside her husband, John Masters, in Hillsdale cemetery.

The deceased was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, November 4th, 1818, and in 1837 married John Masters. In 1853 they moved to Illinois and in 1867 the family located in this county. Eleven children were born to this worthy couple of whom seven are living, Mrs. W. H. Lyon being the only daughter living. The boys living are Joseph, Harry, James, Dock, (G. J.) Woodson and Hendrick.

Mrs. Masters was for fifty years an exemplary member of the Christian church. Her departure was like dropping off to sleep. She knew everybody and talked over the end approaching and left for the other shore blessing children, relatives and friends."


 

Obituary of Rhoda Houser. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 26, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Rhoda Houser, wife of the late Samuel H. Houser, died at the homestead a few miles northwest of Paola last Tuesday night, the 23rd inst., in her 76th year. She had been sick some time and, worn with the cares and toils of years, lay down at the end of life's journey to peaceful slumber. Two sons, Asa and Moses, and one daughter, Mrs. George Jennings, all respected residents of this county, are the survivors of this honored pioneer family.

By the side of cemetery mound in Paola burial ground where reposes the dust of her husband she was laid to rest last Wednesday with the benedictions of those who knew her from early days. Of her life here we can but repeat the sentiment expressed by The Spirit of her husband ten years ago: 'During his long residence here he ever bore the reputation of an honest, industrious man who commanded the confidence and esteem of neighbors. Although years of life were checkered with the hardships of frontier life, always maintaining a cheerful disposition and never hesitating to lend helping hands to the needy, he has gone to sleep in the soil he loved and mingle with the dust so ofter trod where no city and but few families companioned in the county he helped to make.' "


 

Obituary of Leonard S. Hymer. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 2, 1892, page 3)

"Leonard S. Hymer, of Paola, died in Kansas City, Mo., on Tuesday morning August 30th. Mr. Hymer in attempting to board a moving train near the Union Depot at Kansas City on Thursday evening, August 25th, fell and the car wheel cut off the toes of his right foot. He was bruised about the body in several places and his head badly hurt. Assistance arrived shortly after the accident and was taken to the City Hospital. There his bruises were dressed and part of the foot amputated. As soon as word reached Paola Dr. Wesley Hymer, went to Kansas City and found him doing reasonably well. He returned and Mrs. Hymer, Len's wife, went up and returned last Monday. The surgeon decided it best not to remove him for some time. That evening he was taken with congestion of the brain and died within a few hours. This doubtless was caused by the injury received on the head. The funeral was held in this city yesterday and a large concourse of relatives and neighbors attended the burial in the Paola cemetery.

Mr. Leonard S. Hymer was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, in March, 1852, and came with his father to Kansas about 30 years ago. He was the next eldest son. He has been for many years associated with his father, Dr. Wesley Hymer, in the practice of Veterinary Surgery and was very successful. He leaves a wife and two sons, Perry and Millard, aged 10 and 5 years, to mourn his death. Len was a useful citizen and upright neighbor. Friends of the family on every hand extend deep sympathy to the bereaved wife, children, parents and other near ones."


 

Obituary of Martha J. Riley. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 2, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Martha J. Riley died at her home in this city at 5 o'clock a.m. September 1st of stomach trouble caused by an abcess on her liver. This ailment had threatened her life several times and brought her near to death but this time it proved fatal. She was down town on Friday last and was taken sick on Sunday.

Mrs. Riley's maiden name was Price and she was born August 8th, 1829, in Hancock county, Ohio. In about the year 1845 she was married to Mr. Hugh W. Riley who died September 12th 1887. With him she came to Miami county in 1867 and has lived here ever since. Thirteen children were born to them, 9 sons and 4 daughters. Five sons are living, Dr. E. W. Riley, at Louisburg; Dr. Jos. B. Riley, at St. Joe, Mo.; W. D. Riley in Chautauqua county, Kansas; Bayard T. Riley in business in Paola and Bret Riley studying medicine. The only daughter living, Mrs. Dan Amick, lives in Valley township near town. A sister of the deceased, Mrs. J. D. Barnes, the only survivor of her side of the house, resides at Knotts, Indiana. Mrs. Riley was a woman of remarkable strength of character. Industrious, charitable and religious in her nature she endeared herself to home and neighbors. Her wholesome precepts and exemplary conduct were not in vain for her children grew up to usefulness and to do her honor. She was a respected member of the Christian church and her noble deeds will long live in the memory of all who knew her. The burial will be to-day at 10 o'clock a.m."


 

Obituary of John Morris. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 16, 1892, page 3)

"John Morris, father of Tom J. Morris, died suddenly of heart disease at his home in Hillsdale last Friday. He was at the table eating dinner and fell over without a signal or groan. The family rushed to his side but he was dead.

The deceased was well known as a useful and upright man, and his death is deeply mourned. The funeral in Hillsdale on Saturday, the 10th inst., was largely attended."


 

Obituary of John Beets. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 30, 1892, page 3)

"John Beets died very suddenly last Thursday night at his home, four miles northwest of Hillsdale, of heart failure. He was enjoying apparent good health up to the time of his death. Mr. Beets was born in Hawkins county, Tenn., in August, 1826, and was, therefore, 66 years old last month. In early boyhood days he moved to Cass county, Mo., where he made his home for several years. In 1852 he was married to Miss May Clark, who, with eight daughters and one son survive him. Two sons are dead. In 1855 he moved to Miami county and has here resided since that time. Fifty years of his life were spent in the Baptist faith and at the time of his death he was an honored member of the church at Hillsdale.

Mr. Beets was that type of the sturdy pioneer that we are pleased to honor as our best citizens. He endured the hardships and privations of turbulent times and reared a family that does him honor. The old homestead upon which he first located has ever since been the scene of his active career. He has always been a useful citizen, honored, admired and respected by all. His admirable traits of character, generosity and sterling honesty commended him to no less. In the late autumn of life he closed his eyes in the calm serenity of death leaving a large and worthy family, considerable property, gained by dint of industry and frugality, and above all an honored name. From dust he came and to dust he returned again. His remains were interred in Hillsdale cemetery last Friday. We extend our unqualified sympathy to the bereaved wife, daughters and son."


 

Obituary of Thomas M. Carroll, Jr. Photocopy of the originial printed obituary provided by Terris "Terry" C. Howard, email, 8 August 2008. (Reference: undocumented, probably from the Miami Republican ca Sep or Dec 1892)

"Death of Tommy Carroll. Thomas M. Carroll, Jr., son of Capt. and Mrs. Thomas M. Carroll, died Wednesday afternoon, the 21st inst., at the home of his parents in Paola, at the age of nearly fourteen years. Five weeks ago Tommy and his little sister Sally were taken ill with typhoid fever. All that loving care and medical skill could do were restored to to releive the little patients of their sufferings, which have thus far been successful in the case of the little girl, but in the case of Tommy the disease had become so firmly seated that it was impossible to throw it off, and while the fond parents hoped against hope for his recovery, the unwelcome messanger put the seal of death upon the pride of their household, and he gently dropped into the sleep that knows no awkening in this life.

His death at so tender an age, with the life just forming in beauteous lines, giving promise of a sturdy manhood of more than usual usefulness, is inexpressably sad, and in tendering the deeply stricken parents their heartfelt sympathy, their friends realize that it is but a poor consolation where death has struck such a cruel blow, but they can find a lasting solace in the knowledge that in the fullness of time they will again behold their boy in all the purity and innocences of his youth.

Tommy was a bright, manly boy, of many excellent traits of character, open-hearted, thoughtful and regardful of the feelings of his parents and friends. He was born and reared in Paola, and will be sadly missed not only in his home, but by his school mates and associates, among whom he was a favorite. The funeral was held yesterday afteroon, a very large assemblage gathering to pay their last respects."


 

Obituary of James Johnson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 21, 1892, page 3)

"James Johnson, of West Valley township, died rather suddenly last Friday, the 14th inst., after an illness of three days. He was taken on Tuesday, the 11th inst., with somthing like cholera morbus and rapidly got worse till death resulted.

Mr. Johnson leaves a family. He came to Kansas when it was a Territory, in 1857, and lived in Osawatomie some time. Then he bought a farm near there and remained in Kansas till 1864 when he went to Ohio. In 1879 he returned to Kansas and bought the present home place, a splendid farm, east of the State Insane Asylum. He was buried in the Paola cemetery on Saturday, the 15th inst. The deceased was 69 years old and highly respected."


 

Obituary of Hannah E. Brayman. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 28, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Hannah E. Brayman died at her home in this city on Thursday morning, the 27th inst., after a long illness.

Mrs. Brayman was the daughter of David Coonradt and was born in Brunswick, New York, February 16th, 1840. With her husband, W. B. Brayman, she located here over 20 years ago. Three daughters, Mrs. Kate Deyo, of McCune, Kansas, Mrs. Bird Atkinson, of Alliance, Neb. and Miss Nettie, of this city; two sons, Charles and Eddie - all mourn her loss. The funeral will take place to-morrow at 2 o'clock p.m. Services at the Congregational church."


 

Obituary of Lucinda S. Barnard. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 25, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Lucinda S. Barnard, one of the most highly respected ladies of Osawatomie township, died at her home near Osawatomie on the 19th inst. Her health was caused from a tumor of many years growth.

The deceased was born in North Carolina in 1820 and was nearly 73 years old at the time of her death. In early childhood she with her parents emigrated to Indiana and it was there that she was married to Calvin Barnard. In 1856 they came to Kansas Territory, making the trip overland. Since June 4th, 1856 she has lived on the old homestead and with her honorable husband has helped to build up this county. Mrs. Barnard was a good neighbor, a kind wife and a dutiful mother and her death is mourned by hosts of friends. She was an honored member of the Society of friends. Interment was made in the Quaker cemetery near Osawatomie."


 

Obituary of Nell McKinney. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 2, 1892, page 3)

"We regret to announce the death of Little Nell, the 19-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. McKinney which occurred last Saturday morning. The ailment was congestion of the brain. The little thing was put to bed Friday night apparently as well as ever but the break of day Saturday morning found the light of her life gone out forever. To the bereft parents we extend our sincerest condolences. The funeral was held Sunday and the remains laid to rest in Hillsdale cemetery."


 

Obituary of Louveina A. Smith. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 2, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Louveina A. Smith died Monday morning of this week at her home, on East Wea street, of consumption. For several months the dread ailment had been preying upon her life but it was only within the past month that death was shown to be near.

The deceased was born in Nicholas county, Ky., in 1865. In 1878 her parents moved to Freeman, Mo., and there lived for several years. On Dec. 6th, 1882, she was married to S. P. Smith, who, with four young children, two boys and two girls, survive her. They lived a few months in Osawatomie and early in the summer moved to Paola. Mrs. Smith was for many years a devout member of the Christian church. She was of a kind, amiable disposition, a model wife and loving mother. It is sorrowful, indeed, that the dispensations of Providence should leave a husband bereft of a wife's tender affections when, so much needed, and above all that four small children should be deprived of a mother's love and nurture, but death must come and we have no right to question its choice. Divine law has taught us that there is beauty in death and has afforded much in consolation. Genuine sorrow marks the test of affection and when grief has run the limit the beauties of life and death are plainer made.

The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Christian church and after an impressive ceremony the remains were laid to rest in Paola cemetery. We extend the warm hand of sympathy to the bereft husband and children."

Note: S. P. Smith's mother's obituary was in the Dec. 9, 1892 edition of the Western Spirit.


 

Obituary of Martha W. Smith. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 30 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, December 9, 1892, page 3)

"Mrs. Martha W. Smith died at Osawatomie last Friday night after a prostrate illness of three and a half months. Her death was the result of a complication of throat and lung troubles of about five years duration.

She was born in Macoupin county, Ills., in 1829, where she lived until 1880, at which time she removed with her husband and family to Cass county, Mo. Two years after this removal to Missouri Mr. Smith died. Five years later she moved to Kansas and for the past three years has lived with a son in Osawatomie. She leaves five children, three sons and two daughters, one son living in Harrisonville, Mo., two daughters and one son in Osawatomie, and one son, S. P. Smith, in Paola. She was an amiable woman, a kind mother and was loved and respected by hosts of friends. Her life was indeed a useful one.

The remains were taken to Freeman, Mo., for interment and last Sunday were laid to peaceful rest in the Freeman cemetery in the presence of a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends. We extend our sincerest condolences to the bereft relatives."

Note: S. P. Smith's wife died the week before.


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