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Miami County Obituaries
1890


 

Obituary of Morton Gray. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 17, 1890, page 3)

"Mr. M. Gray died last Tuesday at the Cottage House in Paola of kidney trouble. He was about seventy years of age and had lived in Paola many years, formerly having kept the Miami House. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Lucy Gray, one son, Frank, and two daughters, Mrs. W. R. Buck and Mrs. R. S. Smith. His remains were taken to Jacksonville, Ill. for burial in accordance with his request before death. D. M. Ferguson was delegated by the I. O. O. F. Lodge of which the deceased was a member to accompany the remains back for burial and started last Wednesday."

Note: His name was Morton Gray.


 

Obituary of child Roberts. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 31, 1890, page 3)

"Mr. and Mrs. George M. Roberts' little child died at Utica, Kansas, and the body was brought here for burial last week. Mrs. Roberts is the daughter of Mrs. Barnhill."


 

Obituary of John Doherty. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 31, 1890, page 3)

"John Doherty died in Wea township on the 23rd inst. of pneumonia preceded by grippe. He was 55 years old and highly respected. The burial took place on Saturday last."


 

Obituary of Olive Clover Beach. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, January 31, 1890, page 3)

"Mrs. Olive Beach, only daughter of Gen. Seth Clover, died at Waukesha, Wisconsin, on January 9th, after a lingering sickness of paralysis. She was born in Clarion, Penn. May 10th, 1846, and lived with her father and mother many years in Paola. She will be remembered as a bright, happy and handsome girl by many of the old settlers of this city. The burial services were held at the place of her death on the 11th instant. To Mr. Beach, Gen. Clover and other relatives we extend sincere sympathy."


 

Obituary of James S. Patten. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 14, 1890, page 3)

"James S. Patten, aged 22 years, the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel Patten, of this city, died at A. Zeigler's house three miles southwest of Paola, on Sunday morning the 9th inst. at 8 o'clock, from the effects of a stab in the stomach inflicted by Cass Roady on the night before about 11 o'clock.

The body was brought home Sunday afternoon and an inquest held by Coroner Reichard and the following jurors on last Monday: J. B. Hall, Jacob Smith, J. A. Payne, Charles Flanders, J. B. Hobson and J. B. Norton. The verdict is not in yet but it will probably be that Patten was stabbed to death by Cass Roady. Last Tuesday the body was taken to Fontana for burial. The Paola National Guards, of which the deceased was a member, turned out in uniform at the funeral. The services were held at the home of his parents before noon and there was a large gathering of friends.

After the murder Roady went west and is yet at large. He has been heard of in Stanton once or twice since the killing."


 

Obituary of Luler N. Endicott. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 21, 1890, page 3)

"Little Luler N. Endicott died February 13th, 1890, aged 11 years, 5 months and 10 days. It is with feeling of grief and sadness that we write of the illness and death of as bright and lovely a child as little Luler but it was Gods' will that she be called home and remembering that Jesus said "suffer little children to come unto me," we bow in tearful submission to this will. While we are writing Mr. and Mrs. Endicott requested us extend to friends and neighbors their thanks for the kindness and sympathy so generously shown them during the illness of their child and in their sad bereavement."


 

Obituary of James O. Grimes. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, February 21, 1890, page 3)

"We announce with sadness the death of James O. Grimes, Esq., one of the oldest and most honored members of the Cambridge bar, which occurred at his home, in Cambridge, Wednesday, February 12, 1890. He has been for some time in feeble health, and on Monday he was seized with something like vertigo and it was soon apparent that he had been touched by death. He was born in Fayette county, Pa., July 6, 1821, and had been engaged in the practice of law here since 1846. More extended notice will be made next week. -The Guernsey (Ohio) Times

The deceased was the father of Mr. P. H. Grimes, of this city, who left on the 13th inst. to attend the funeral. We extend sympathy to himself and wife in their affliction."


 

Obituary of Archie Marcham. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, March 28, 1890, page 3)

"Archie Marcham, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Marcham of Kansas City, Kansas, died last Tuesday and was buried in the Catholic cemetery near Paola, yesterday, Thursday, March 27th. The little fellow was sick only from Sunday night and seemingly had nothing but a bad cold. The physician in attendance said the baby would be up in a day or two but on Monday night he fell into a heavy sleep and half awoke away in the night choking up badly. Till 10 o'clock Tuesday he lingered on when death relieved him. Archie was 2 years old last January. To the parents and other relatives the sincere sympathy of the community is extended."


 

Obituary of Earnest Buck. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 18, 1890, page 3)

"Our community was shocked to hear of the death of Earnest Buck last Monday morning. He killed himself by drinking carbolic acid. The causes that led to the rash deed are unknown. He was subject to fits of melancholy sometimes aggravated by intemperance in drinking and it is said that disappointment in a love affair had something to do with it.

The deceased was in his 22nd year and was a young man of fine physical build, generous hearted and popular. He was the son of Myron Buck. His sad ending is deeply regretted and sincere sympathy is extended the family and friends. Burial took place in the Paola cemetery last Tuesday."


 

Obituary of Haen Koelster. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, April 25, 1890, page 3)

"Haen Koelster, an aged German, who suddenly disappeared about the middle of March last, was found in the Marais des Cygnes river last Sunday about a half mile above the "Green Ford", southeast of Fontana. J. H. Williamson and Miss Elva Green were boating and discovered the body floating by some drift wood. They notified H. D. McCoy who directed that the body be brought up to Fontana. Coroner Reichard was summoned and on Monday he empaneled the following named men at act as jurors: H. D. McCoy, W. L. Beck, J. E. Sims, S. A. King, Wm. Bigham and J. T. Ayers. Testimony showed that the old man had drowned himself. On his breast was a large flat stone weighing 29 pounds tied above and below by strips of cloth around his body and stuffed under his suspenders was his fur cap. In his pocket was a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Prothe telling them that he was discouraged over his poor health and intended to take his own life.

For weeks after he disappeared a search was kept up for him and he had been tracked to the river. However, his son, of Concordia, Mo., came and upon the advice of Mr. Prothe offered a reward of $25 to anyone who would find the old man, dead or alive. The jury returned a verdict that Haen Koelster premeditatedly drowned himself and the body was buried in the Fontana cemetery.

Mr. Koelster was a soldier in Co. C., 2nd Kansas Cavalry, and served from December, 1861, to September, 1864, being mustered out at Leavenworth. He leaves personal property to the amount of $1,150."


 

Obituary of Ermen Milton Smith. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, May 16, 1890, page 3)

"Died. At his residence in Valley township May 10th, 1890, E. M. Smith, aged 50 years, 4 months and 16 days - of consumption.

Ermen Milton Smith was born at Henderson Corners, Jefferson county, New York, December 24th, 1839. He moved to La Grange county, Indiana, two years later where he lived until the death of his parents. He then removed to Elgin, Illinois, where he was employed by his uncle in the capacity of a clerk until the breaking out of the rebellion. He enlisted in Company F., 12 Reg. Indiana Volunteers and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his enlistment, May 19th, 1862. During the later years of the war was employed in the government railway service in the South. He was married at Ft. Wayne, Indiana, September 17th, 1865, to Mary L. Stirk and with his family came to Paola, Miami county, Kansas, May 5th, 1870, where his family, consisting of two boys and three girls, still resides.

Mr. Smith was one of the best men in the county and his death will be deeply mourned. He was genial, honest and industrious. A large number of friends attended with the bereaved family the last sad rites at the Paola cemetery on Monday last where he was laid to rest."


 

Obituary of Samuel Howard. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, May 16, 1890, page 3)

"Killed at Hillsdale. Samuel Howard, an old man of nearly 80 years, was killed by the M. K. & T. passenger train at the crossing last Saturday night at Hillsdale. He had been to church and was returning with Mrs. Winsell when, in getting over the track, he was run down by the south bound passenger. A freight train was waiting on the side track and it is thought the light from the engine blinded the old man so he didn't see the running-in train. The cow catcher struck him above the ankle, and the speed being up, his head struck near the flag platform above, crushing the skull. Below Rutledge's, about 200 yards from the crossing, the engineer got the train stopped and backed to the depot with the body still on the cow-catcher.

Coroner Reichard was sent for and on Monday impaneled a jury. Testimony showed that death came in the way above stated. The jury was A. N. Protzman, Deck Fisher, R. Hampson, Jacob Frazier, J. B. Rowland and J. L. Officer. Mr. Howard had lived in Miami county for over fifteen years and was quite well known. He was buried in Hillsdale on the 10th inst."


 

Obituary of John W. Gossett. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, June 27, 1890, page 3)

"Dr. John W. Gossett died at his home in Paola last Friday morning about 2 o'clock. He has been sick for three years and most fo the time was confined to the house. For a year he had been unable to turn over in bed without help and nearly all of the while had to be fed. John and Frank, his two eldest sons, nursed him with care - one or the other always being near him.

Dr. Gossett was widely known here having practiced in Miami county from 1861 till stricken down in 1887. He was born in Grant county, Kentucky September 30th, 1828, and on arriving at mature age fitted himself for the profession that he ever followed with success. He was know far and near as one of the best physicians in the county. Nor was his usefulness confined altogether to his chosen calling. He served as a member of the Legislature in 1868 having been elected the fall before over Col. E. H. Topping, one of the ablest and most popular men in the county. His record in the House was without a blot or blemish. Later he was a member of the Board of Education and acted in other capacities as an industrious and public spirited citizen. His last political race was in 1878 for the State Senate when the three cornered contest was waged by L. Bradbury, H. L. Phillips and himself, resulting in the election of Mr. Bradbury. All three have now left the landing where party strifes cease and gone to the other haven across the dark river whose sullen waters murmur back no message from the dead that the living may know their fate and fortune on the other shore. Of the family there are six children living, John, Frank, and Hallie are at home and the three daughters, Mattie, Lou, and Maggie being married reside in different localities with their husbands. Mrs. Herman Chesbro lives in the county, Mrs. W. P. Stanley in Kansas City and Mrs. R. B. Stanley in Independence. All were present at the funeral but Mrs. Stanley, of Independence, who is very sick. The burial on Sunday at 2 p.m. was largely attended and short services were held by Rev. E. W. Thorton at the residence. The pall bearers were Drs. Haldeman, Hoover, Porter, Reichard, Potter, Johnson, Walthall and Walters. At the grave the ceremony was brief.

Many and cheering are the recollections of Dr. Gossett in Miami county. In his blunt and unstudied manner he was always a generous, warm-hearted man. Professionally he stood high and hundreds of persons here and there living to-day attribute to his skill their getting well. He was true to friends and free from deception. In the affairs of every day live no one had to guess and wonder just what Dr. Gossett would do after he had promised. His backbone was of the vigorous kind. His family and friends may well mourn a useful, upright man's death over his remains."


 

Obituary of William G. Hackett. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 11, 1890, page 3)

"William G. Hackett died at his home in Paola last Wednesday and was buried on Thursday. He had been in feeble health for many years, in fact he was discharged from the army for permanent disability in 1863. He was born in Maine, January 14th, 1817, and came to Kansas in 1871. Always frail in body he gradually became weaker in late years until death found him weighing not over 75 pounds.

Mr. Hackett was a man of firmness of character and full of energy. On the 4th he accompanied Mrs. Hackett to Osawatomie's celebration and only last Monday he was on the streets. Life's fire suddenly stopped because the fuel was all gone. His prolonged life was largely due to the intelligent and patient care of Mrs. Hackett, who in all the days that multiplied into weeks that lengthened into months and years, was at his side the faithful monitor and harbinger of his welfare. The funeral was largely attended and among the mourners were his soldier comrades."


 

Obituary of James S. Williams. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 11, 1890, page 3)

"James S. Williams, who died at his home near Salina, Kansas, on the 4th inst. was buried in the Paola cemetery last Sunday. The deceased was for nearly 20 years a resident of this county where his good name and memory is still honored. He was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, in October, 1825, and came West in 1869. He served in an Ohio regiment in the war and his record as a soldier was the very best. Few knew of his army career because he was one of those brave men who helped fight the battles of his country when the war was on and quit when peace was declared.

Mrs. Rachael B. Williams survives her husband and will stay in Saline county where her three sons, Jerry, James and Len reside with their families. Mrs. Dave Rainey, the only daughter, lives in Paola. While a large circle of friends mourn Mr. Williams' death it was a satisfaction to all that the ashes of the good old man were brought here to repose in the old burial ground that he had so often trod."


 

Obituary of James W. Steele. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, July 18, 1890, page 3)

"James W. Steele, who died at his home in this city on the 10th inst., was born in Woodford county, Kentucky, in 1815. In 1829 he located at Lexington. Six years following he went to Richmond, Kentucky, and in 1840 was married to Miss Sarah A. Hart. In 1844 he moved to Platt county, Mo., where he resided 40 years. Four sons and one daughter were born to him and their mother still survives. With his family he moved to Paola a few years ago and most of the time since was engaged in the mercantile business.

The deceased was an exemplary member of the Christian church and during 40 years residence in Platte county, Mo., he missed attending service only three Sundays and then he was away from home. He was one of the charter members of the Board of Trustees of the Orphan's School at Camden Point and always took a lively interest in education. His remains were buried in his old Missouri home county followed to the grave by a large concourse of friends. Rev. E. Wm. Thornton, of this city, conducted the funeral services."


 

Obituary of Thomas F. Johnson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 15, 1890, page 3)

"Thomas F. Johnson died at his home, about seven miles northwest of Paola, on Wednesday, August 13th, 1890, at 4 o'clock p.m. of typhoid fever. He had been sick since last May but at times rallied and apparently was recovering. But the last week he began to decline rapidly and death came to his relief at last.

He was born in county Wicklow, Ireland, June 15th, 1814, and came to America when about 25 years of age. Before leaving he married Diana Brady, who survives him. In 1844 he settled in Shellsburg, Wisconsin, where he resided till December, 1879, when, with his family, he located in Miami county. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, four of whom are living.

Funeral services will be held to-day at 10 o'clock a.m., by Rev. J. J. O'Connor, at the Holy Trinity church in this city and the burial will be in the Catholic cemetery, east of town, about noon.

Mr. Johnson was a rugged old patriot who sought America to rear a family in the land of liberty. Peace be to his ashes."


 

Obituary of Hugh S. Campbell. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 15, 1890, page 3)

"Col. Hugh S. Campbell, died at his residence in this city on last Thursday night, 12 o'clock. A few days previous he was taken with one of those customary spells of severe pain so dreaded by his physician and friends. Nothing could be done and his great heart ceased to beat at midnight, August 7th, 1890. Around the death bed were Mrs. Campbell, Chas. W. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. V. C. Jarhoe, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kensinger, Dr. Walthall, and a few personal friends.

Col. Campbell was born in Scotland in 1829, and 20 years later located in Buffalo, New York. Here on the 12th of July, 1850, he married Miss Margaret Boyd, who has ever since been his helpmeet and comforter even to the sad scenes of his last moment on earth. From Buffalo he moved to Erie, Pennsylvania. Here in August, 1861, he enlisted as a private in the 83rd Penn. Infantry. In a short time he was commissioned Captain. In the battle of Gaines Mill, Va., July 29th, 1862, by bravery and good judgment he so ably managed his company that as soon as his superior officers fell he found himself in command of the grand old 83rd Regiment. This promotion was regarded as doubly earned by all the soldiers who knew of the gallant services rendered where shot and shell left over half of his regiment among the slain. Only a few days later at the battle of Malvern Hill, Col. Campbell was severely wounded but kept his place in the command. His courage was of the kind that takes men into the thickest of the fight and by the time of the second battle of Bull Run his gallant regiment numbered less than 100 men. Here he was again dangerously wounded, August 30th, 1862, and with his iron will he declined to quit his command and staid with the Army of the Potomac till May, 1863, when his wounds so disabled him that he reluctantly accepted the honorable discharge that reads to-day, "on account of wounds received in battle." He was appointed Provost Marshal of the northern district of Pennsylvania and served till the close of the war. He was a soldier by nature and took to the camp and the field with an ambition that knew no criterion but success. His war record was valorous deeds when battles were on - not the mouthings of unscarred warriors in the piping times of peace.

In 1867 Col. Campbell moved to Paola and engaged in the real estate business. He became an extensive operator and added largely to his worldly fortune. Twenty years ago rheumatism attacked him and grew worse as months multiplied into years. Since 1874 he has not been able to walk and kept his invalid chair only when lifted into his buggy for a ride. All this time he directed and controlled a very large business, conducted litigation, took an active part in politics and made his power felt in various ways.

The funeral was one of the largest ever witnessed in Paola, and Rev. Chas. N. Cate's memorial was pronounced by hundreds the best of his always successful and touching orations. As the last rays of Sunday's sun brightened the oaks and evergreens, the marble shafts and gravel walks of the Paola cemetery and kissed the dark casket and the gray hairs of veterans who ranged on either side, the dust of a brave and generous soldier, husband, father and friend was lowered into the tomb."


 

Obituary of Jacob Keiser. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, August 22, 1890, page 3)

"Jacob Keiser died suddenly at his home in Hillsdale last Monday, the 18th inst. He had been in poor health since returning from Arkansas, about a year ago but the day he died was able to walk about. In the forenoon he was on the streets and after dinner sat down in the parlor. Mrs. Keiser, who was fatigued from constant care of her husband, lay down to rest. When she awoke Mr. Keiser was dead in his chair.

The deceased was born in August county, Virginia, on the 11th of January, 1818, and located in Kansas in 1869 on a farm in what is now Ten Mile township where he lived till 1880 when he moved to Hillsdale and engaged in grain dealing. Later he went with his sons, William and Jack, to Lonoke, Arkansas, and staid some time, returning in 1889. He was a man of good ability and in 1876 was the Reform nominee for the Legislature against C. F. Tracy, of Miami township, and was beaten only three votes. He wrote much for the newspapers and wielded considerable influence among his neighbors. Upright in all his dealings and obliging with everybody he was deservedly popular. The funeral took place last Tuesday, his remains being interred in the Hillsdale cemetery."


 

Obituary of James N. Baker. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 5, 1890, page 3)

"James N. Baker died at his old home east of Paola, on Saturday, August 30th, after a lingering illness. Since the 1st of July last he had not felt well but it was not till in August he took to his bed and he steadily grew worse in spite of all that could be done by both physician and family.

Mr. Baker was born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., March 10th, 1821. He was brought up on a farm and emigrated to Tazewell county, Ills., in 1843, landing in Pekin on the 20th of May, He was married in Tazwell county, Ills., September 24th, 1843, to Miss Elizabeth Bowers, who was formerly of the same county and State. He spent one year in Tazewell county, two years in Logan county, and in June, 1846, he moved to LaSalle county, Ill. He was engaged in farming and stock growing in that county fifteen years. In the spring of 1862 he moved into Lee county, still in the pursuit of farming, fifteen years. In 1876 he purchased his present fine farm of 360 acres, situated near Paola, to which he moved his family in January, 1877, and resided till death.

The funeral on Sunday was generally attended and a longer procession to the Paola cemetery has seldom been seen. The rites were performed by Rev. Wm. Jones, of the Presbyterian church."


 

Obituary of Cyrus M. DeBall. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, September 5, 1890, page 3)

"Died - August 29th, of typhoid fever, at the residence of his father, Dr. J. M. DeBall, in Osage township, Cyrus M. DeBall, aged 24 years.

The subject of this notice was born near Quincy, Ills., and removed to Miami county at the age of 4 years. He was educated at the common schools of this county and attended several sessions of the county institutes, preparing himself for teaching. Possessed of more than ordinary ability, he soon rose to an enviable position in educational circles. Of an unblemished character, honest and earnest in all things, bright, genial and gentlemanly, with enlightened views of men and affairs, he seemed assured of a long life of pleasure and usefulness.

He was buried from the Baptist church in Paola cemetery, Sunday, August 31st, Rev. Wilson officiating. The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Paola, and the floral offerings from many friends were numerous and beautiful. Verily 'The good die young, While we, whose hearts are dry as summer dust, live to the end.' "


 

Obituary of Frances P. Shaw. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 10, 1890, page 3)

"Mrs. Frances P. Shaw, wife of Knowles Shaw, died at her home in this city on Tuesday night, October 7th. She had been in failing health for some time - asthma being the chief trouble. Mrs. Shaw was born in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, June 4th, 1840, was married to Mr. Shaw at Osawatomie in 1866. Her maiden name was LaCroix. Ida, the next eldest child, is the wife of Mr. Steele and resides at La Cygne. The rest of the children, three in number, are at home. The funeral last Wednesday was largely attended."


 

Obituary of Clara Murlin. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 10, 1890, page 3)

"Mrs. Clara Murlin died last Tuesday at her home in the north part of the city of a complicated ailment, pulmonary troubles principally, after an illness of about five weeks. She had been an invalid for several years but last spring her ailment began to assume a more serious nature and she gradually grew worse till at last she was made prostrate to await her only relief, that given by the grim monster, death. Friends without number gathered at her bedside during her illness, eager to render aid and succor her wants, and her last days were made as easy and happy as one in her condition could hope for, but death came at last, not unexpectedly, however. Thus another kind woman has put on immortality.

The deceased was fifty years of age and had been a resident of Paola for twenty five years. Her husband, B. Murlin, died in February, 1880, leaving her and six children. The children survive her and all reside here except Ed, who lives in Missouri. For years she has been a devout member of the Presbyterian church. She was ever a kind neighbor and an indulgent mother. Her death is lamented by a large number of relatives and innumerable friends. The Eastern Star, of which she was a member, conducted the funeral ceremonies. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Chas. N. Cate. Yesterday afternoon her remains were laid to rest beside her husband and now Paola cemetery claims all that is earthly of a true, noble and kindhearted woman. May she rest in peace.

To the bereft we extend the only consolation that can be given in a trying hour like this, a true and genuine heartfelt sympathy."


 

Obituary of George W. Robinson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, October 31, 1890, page 3)

"The death of Dr. G. W. Robinson at his home in Fontana on the 9th inst. takes from Miami county one of its best citizens. He had suffered for years with lung trouble and last month went to Colorado in the hope that he would be benefitted but no relief came and a brief period elapsed after his return when death relieved him.

Dr. Robinson was born in Chester county, Penn., February 26, 1828, and married Miss H. M. Riggs in 1853. Later on he graduated in the Medical College in Keokuk, Iowa, and from there he moved with his family to Fontana where he practiced medicine. Four children were born to them, Lemuel H., who died many years ago, Vernon W., Sarah and Ella with their mother survive the good man now gone to the world of promise. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and an exemplary pillar in the Baptist church. A few years ago he was appointed Health Officer of Miami county, a position he held at the time of his death. The whole community mourns with the family over the departure of a useful and respected citizen."

Note: His name was George, and his wife's name was Hannah.


 

Obituary of Eliza M. Ayres. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 7, 1890, page 3)

"In Memoriam. - Eliza M. Ayres was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1813. She was married to Thomas Ayres June 11th, 1829. In 1859 they moved to Kansas and settled near Hillsdale, Miami county. She died November 2nd, 1890, at 1:30 o'clock a.m. She was the mother of 14 children, 7 of whom survive.

Sister Ayres was converted and joined the M. E. church in 1835. On coming to Kansas she united with the M. E. church South, in which communion she passed to her reward. She led a consistent Christian life, always hopeful, always trustful. She was sorely afflicted several consecutive years before her death. She bore her affliction with Christian fortitude, never murmuring. The writer visited her a number of times during her sickness and always found her ready and waiting. Her last hours were of resignation and her end peace.

The funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Hillsdale in the presence of a large congregation of relatives and friends, after which her remains were laid in their resting place - in the cemetery, one mile west of Hillsdale. God bless the bereaved."


 

Obituary of Mary Townsend Dickinson. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 14, 1890, page 3)

"Died. - At the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Emeline Eastin, in Louisburg, Kansas Nov. 1, 1890, Mary Dickinson, aged 87 years and 7 months.

Mary Townsend was born May 1st, 1803, in Hancock county, Tenn. She became the wife of James Dickinson in the year 1821. They were among the early settlers of Indiana, and resided there until the death of her husband which occurred October 14th, 1872. Fourteen children were born to them, six having preceded the mother to the grave. Seventy-three grandchildren, forty-six surviving ones, forty-one great-grandchildren, three great-great-grandchildren and eight children live to remember mother and grandmother in love and kindness. She was a firm and intelligent believer in the word of the living God, recognizing the great fact that future life is only possible through a union with the life giver, Jesus Christ.

At an early age she became a member of the Christian church and lived a faithful Christian life. The funeral services were conducted by the Baptist minister, Rev. Shaw, at the residence, Monday, November 3rd, 1890."


 

Obituary of George W. Haines. Information provided by Marc Doty, mdcdoty@indy.rr.com, 16 Apr 2008. (Reference: The Western Spirit, Paola, Miami Co., Kansas, Friday, November 14, 1890, page 3)

"George W. Haines, aged 23 years, died at his home in Sugar Creek township last Friday, Nov. 7th, of consumption. He was a prosperous young farmer and leaves a wife and a host of friends. Mrs. Haines has the sympathy of a generous public."


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