Greenwood County, KS
Newspaper Clippings
1877-1907

Transcribed by Betty Ralph    bralph@HiWAAY.net


12 Jul 1877 - Eureka Herald

John Kummerland had fifteen or sixteen acres of good wheat and another field of inferior quality. He stacked the wheat of each piece separately. On Tuesday night of last week, during the storm, lightning struck the stack of good wheat totally destroying it, but left the stack containing the inferior grain untouched.

Al Frazier reports that some one attempted a burglary at his house last Saturday night. They first tried the door, then a window. Failing to open either they got into the cellar or basement and tried to find admittance to the upper part of the house but were still unsuccessful. Al it seems heard all of this and lay wondering "what next."

Another theft was committed last Saturday night. Early Sunday morning H.S. Jones, two and one-half miles below Eureka, discovered that a set of harness, two saddles and three bridles had been taken from his stable. He thought he had a clue to the guilty parties and at once set out in pursuit following their trail east. Coming up with the wagon he supposed contained the thieves he made a careful examination, but became convinced he was in error. On Saturday afternoon two men had been seen riding mules bare back, and they were supposed to have camped near Mr. Jones's. An effort was made on Monday morning to get on their trail, but it proved ineffectual and the theft still remains a mystery. Mr. Jones was aided in his search by the active efforts of the Wheeler brothers and Sheriff Claycomb.

One day last week a little girl aged about eleven years, daughter of Robert Loy, was out on the prairie riding a pony, when seeing a wolf, she give chase. She unbuckled one side of the bridle rein, which fortunately had a rather heavy buckle, and guiding her horse with a single rein, she beat the wolf over the head with the buckle. Getting up with the beast she would dismount and tackle him until he turned to attack her when she would remount and renew the chase. In this way she ran the wolf down and finally killed him. During the conflict, the wolf bit the pony's legs slightly several times. The girl should have a special bounty on that wolf scalp, and deserves the first premium on equestrianism . This wolf has been busy for some time with several others in killing lambs belonging to Mr. Loy.


23 Jan 1878 - Eureka Censorial

Memorandum of Terms

In consideration of no further prosecutions by the authorities of the City of Eureka, Kan., Frank Davis, by his attorney, T.L. Davis, agrees to the following.

1st. That he will sell no more intoxicating liquor of any kind, including port, ale and beer, within the corporate limits of the City of Eureka, Kansas.

2d. That he will dispose of, at once, his entire stock of liquors of all kinds.

3d. That he will dismiss the appeals taken in the nine cases that have been tried in the police court and pay the cost and fines therein at once.

Roll of Honor

From West Creek school house, for the term ending January 11th, 1878

Names of pupils who were neither absent nor tardy, and whose scholarship and deportment average 90: Eva Worford, Merva Worford, Henry Worford, Riley Baywell

The following are those whose general average is 90 and above: Hattie Worford, Alice Cox, Elia Cox, Effie Glover, Ettie Klingsmith, John Cox, Henry Cox, G.L. Thompson, Florance Thompson, Josie Kreigle, Victoria Thompson, Cora Thompson, Lucy Klingsmith, Lawrence Worford, W.B. Worford, Chas. Thompson, Joal Klingsmith
J.J. Groseclose, Teacher

Otter Creek Items

Mr. Batton lives in the first white house immediately after you cross the creek on the Howard City road. He has a good farm and it is in a splendid state of cultivation; he has also a splendid wife, and the family, consisting of but these two, manage to live cheerful in their cozy little cottage. As a genius, Mr. B. is a success. He can repair a watch as well as any jeweler you ever saw. He can make a gun, and do all kind of carpenter work, but the most skilled piece of workmanship he ever did in the latter occupation was to make a chain out of a pine stick while he was held a prisoner in the army. He first commenced it by cutting a ring at the end, similar to the ring at the end of a common trace chain; he then cut two rows of twisting links for a distance where he makes a swivel; he then cuts one row of plain links till he arrives near the end of the stick where he makes another ring; he then finished it with the making of a Catholic cross. All this work he did with a pocket knife. The parts of the chain are so true and consistent as to perfectly astonish a person whenhe learns how it was made. Mr. B. has the chain nicely varnished and hung up in a show glass where it attracts the attention of every one who enters the house. It is said that he could have sold it for $50, and I think that a small price to pay for such a grand piece of workmanship.

Near to Mr. Batton lives Mr. John Hill. He, too, is a man that is duly respected by his neighbors, and is making a nice start in the farming business.

Mr. James Mills, who resides a short distance from Mr. Hill, is thinking of removing to Colorado in the spring.


22 May 1878 - Eureka Censorial

Mrs. Julia Cubbon of Cleveland, Ohio, is in the city visiting her parents Mr. And Mrs. B.J. Stilwell. She will remain here during the summer months.

Chas. Hoy, L.H. Pratt and J.D. Briggs, and their families all started for Colorado on Thursday of last week. They are all good citizens and we regret very much to see them make this change, however we expect to see them return within a few years.

While coming from Emporia on Friday of last week, Mssrs. O. Colburn, A.P. Ingalls and wife were overtaken by the severe wind and rain storm, and being unable to secure shelter, were compelled to make the best they could of the situation. Their clothing was thoroughly saturated. At man times during the evening they were compelled to stop their team and wait for a flash of lightning in order to ascertain if they were in the road. Mr. Colburn remarked that he had often heard of people traveling at "lightning speed" but it was his opinion this was a case where they "traveled by lightning."

Mr. T.A. Stanley of Lawrence, a cousin of Mrs. Simpson of this city, was in to see us last Saturday, and gave us the benefit of his observations as regards the crop prospects between here and Lawrence.

While he was painting his house, two weeks ago yesterday, Mr. T.L. Holloway who resides in the south part of the county, slipped and fell to the ground, a distance of about twelve feet, dislocating both his wrists. Dr. Grimes was at once sent for, who very soon replaced them, and on Friday of last week, Mr. H. was in the city, being able to use one of his hands to quite an extent.

While Edward Beedles and his 13 year old son, who resides on North Otter Creek twelve miles south of Eureka, were breaking prairie on Friday of last week, the boy was bitten on the heel by a small rattle snake, which caused the little fellow intense agony from the instant the reptile struck its fangs into his flesh, until he was brought to this city, where he received the skillful treatment of Dr. Wakefield. The leg was swollen as tight as the skin would admit and as spotted as a leopard. The antidote prescribed by the doctor had the desired effect , and on Monday the little fellow was able to be taken to his home and was considered by his physician to be out of danger.

District Court Proceedings
Moore vs. Moore, divorce granted plaintiff
Alles L. Boyer vs. Julia Boyer, divorce granted plaintiff

Roll of Honor

The names of pupils in room No. 3, who have neither been absent nor tardy, for the month ending May 17, 1878:

Jennie Stillwell, Lizzie Denison, Willie Bennett, Luella Fairbrother, Rosa Brock, Allie Tucker, Fannie Peters, Frank Baker

The names of pupils whose scholarship and deportment was 90 per cent, and above:

Hattie Grover, Rosa Jones, Samuel Wassam, Rosa Brock, Willie Barnett, Lizzie Denison, Maude Durkee, Frank Baker, Jennie Stillwell, Palmer Wakefield, A.W. Hant, Teacher

The names of pupils in room No. 1 who are perfect in attendance and 90 per cent and above in deportment for the month ending May 17: Maud Dethel, Ella Simpson, Bula Baker, Della Brookover, Mary Warder, Della Waybright, Jessie Yieldham, James Wilson, Alfred Waller, Charlie Hill, Eddie Ebenhack, Greely Brookover, Mattie Waybright

For the month ending April 12: Ada Wilson, Ella Simpson, Lola Baker, Bavanna Cochran, Flora Wilson


7 Feb 1884 - Eureka Herald

Mr. Clinton Huffman left Eureka last Tuesday to accept a position on a paper at Osage Mission.

Remaining uncalled for at the postoffice in Eureka, Kansas, February 4, 1884: Mrs. John Feller, Widow Hall, Edgar Haggard, Geo. F. Hise, B.F. Humphrey, Jim James, Mrs. Sarah Monger, Russell Lawrence, Mrs. Sanders, Mrs. Hannah Roland, Miss Alice G. Smith

Notice for Publication

Land Office at Independence, Kansas, January 28, 1884

Notice is hereby given that the following named settler had filed notice of her intention to make final proof in support of her claim and that said proof will be made before J.S. Stewart, clerk of the district court at Eureka, Kansas, on Monday, March 17, 1884, viz: Mary M. Curtis of Piedmont, Kansas for the south east 1/2 of the northeast 1/4 of section 19, township 27 south, range 10 east.

She names the following witnesses to prove her continuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land, viz: Brady Fowler, P.G. Moss, Burt Moss and Lem Ezell, of Piedmont, Kansas. No. 2399
M.J. Salter, Register

Notice for Publication

Land Office at Independence, Kansas, January 24, 1884
Notice is hereby given that the following named settler had filed notice of his intention to make final proof in support of his claim and that said proof will be made before J.S. Stewart, clerk of the district court at Eureka, Kansas, on Saturday, March 15, 1884, viz: Joseph T. Moore of Virgil, Kansas for lots 3 and 4 and the south 1/2 of the southeast of section 28, township 26 south, range 13 east.

He names the following witnesses to prove his continuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land, viz: Henry Coburn, Geo. W. Burges, Thomas B. Cook and Moses Cunningham, all of Toronto, Woodson county, Kansas. No. 2381
M.J. Salter, Register

Notice for Publication

Land Office at Independence, Kansas, January 31, 1884

Notice is hereby given that the following named settler had filed notice of his intention to make final proof in support of his claim and that said proof will be made before J.S. Stewart, clerk of the district court at Eureka, Kansas, on Saturday, March 29, 1884, viz: John A. Walker of Beaumont, Kansas for the north 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 and the southeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4 of section 18, township 27 south, range 9 east.

He names the following witnesses to prove his continuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land, viz: Henry Briggs, William Myers, Joe Miller and Josiah Porter, all of Beaumont, Kansas. No. 2420
M.J. Salter, Register

Notice for Publication

Land Office at Independence, Kansas, January 24, 1884

Notice is hereby given that the following named settler had filed notice of his intention to make final proof in support of his claim and that said proof will be made before J.S. Stewart, clerk of the district court at Eureka, Kansas, on Saturday, March 15, 1884, viz: Timothy Boyer of Virgil, Kansas for lots 3 and 4 and the south 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 of section 1, township 24 south, range 12 east.

He names the following witnesses to prove his continuous residence upon, and cultivation of, said land, viz: W.E.J. Nixon, Horace Dean and R. Owen of Virgil, Kansas. No. 2375
M.J. Salter, Register


29 Oct 1886 - Eureka Herald

Mrs. G.D. Swift left Wednesday for Michigan. She will be absent until Spring.

Carl Birkett of Salem, went to Kansas City Wednesday for the purpose of buying cattle.

Mr. James Norval of Dodge City spent a portion of this week in the city visiting with his niece, Mrs. H.M. Shepard.

Mr. And Mrs. Frank Clark of Wichita were in the city this week visiting with Mrs. Clark's sister, Mrs. R.G. Ravenscroft.

Mesdames John Jones and Frank Lyon of Honey creek left Wednesday on a visit among relatives and friends at Princeton, Illinois. They will be absent about three weeks.

Miss Rea Blackburn, sister of Mrs. W.W. Powell of Clopia, has returned to her home near Cincinnati, O.

George Mitchell has purchased the restaurant business lately run by Jack Polley.

The Republicans of Eureka township met in convention last Saturday and placed in nomination a ticket as follows: For Trustee, H.T. Kenner; for Clerk, P.H. Landergin; for Treasurer, Edwin Tucker; for Justices, Granville Griffith and R.B. Menuch; for constables, D.R. Brock and T.C. Anderson.


10 Dec 1886 Eureka Herald

M.J. Verner has disposed of his interest in the two hundred head of Colorado steers, lately purchased, to Mr. O.G. Gregg.

F.H. Clark, Esq, who lives near this city on the northeast, has taken up as a stray. A red and white steer calf, no marks or brands.

The Lutheran ladies will meet in Aid Society session next Tuesday afternoon at the residence of Mrs. J.O. Porter, on School street.

On the 3d inst Judge Lamb licensed Mr. John H. Wilson and Margaret E. Hodgson to marry, and on the 7th did the same kindly act for Mr. W.J. Beedle and Miss Jennie Hill. Those are all Greenwood county people.

Mrs. Rev. Paul Hendrickson died at her home near Climax Friday night of last week. Her death was sudden and very unexpected, as she was sick but a very short time. Her bereaved husband has the sympathy of a large circle of friends.

Mr. Thomas Burkett, of Ivanpah, was picked up by the sheriff Wednesday as a talisman in the case of the state vs Rodenbaugh. But being a bachelor, with no one at home to look after his stock, the court took pity on him and excused him from sitting on the jury.

Miss Mamie Barger, who is attending the Female Seminary at Lutherville, Md., has received the "Golden Report." This report is only given to those who attain a high average in all their studies and sustain an exceptionable deportment. Of one hundred and twenty-six, but eight received it this term.

Mr. And Mrs. John Hanna returned Tuesday evening from a visit of two months with relatives in Illinois.

James Wilkinson, of Westmorland, England, cousin of Thomas Burkett and George Burkett of Ivanpah, came last Friday, and will probably make his home in this country.

Mrs. W.H. Drew, wife of our efficient county treasurer, and children, returned Wednesday evening from a three month visit among relatives and friends in Wisconsin and New York.

C.S. Hall of Bachelor Creek, was here on Monday. From him we learn that Mr. John Willis is able to be out, but that his brother Ezra Willis is still quite sick, though considered out of danger.

Mr. W.H. Wood of Delaware, Ohio, conductor on the C.C. & C. railroad, has been visiting the past week with his relative, Mr. W.H.H. Barger. He left yesterday for Wichita, with a view of finding a location.

Mr. Geo. Guess of Louisville, Ky, is in this city visiting with his sister, Mrs. E.N. Bailey, and is accompanied with his children. Mr. G is a conductor on the Louisville and Indianapolis railroad and his home is between these cities.

J.P. Bradbury had a sale on the 7th. He is going to Illinois.


28 Jan 1887 - Eureka Herald

Mr. John S. Jones, of Honey Creek, sold his farm, with the intention of returning to Oregon. His children and friends persuaded him to give up the intention, and now he is again the owner of a farm in this county, having purchased the John G. Diehl farm on Honey Creek. The Herald, in common with all, is glad he will remain.

J.C. Netherton passed through the city Wednesday, driving thirteen head of yearling heifers, half-blood Galloways, that he had purchased of Mr. E. Mahan of Janesville township. He was taking them to his home on Spring creek. Mr. N. is making arrangements to enter quite extensively into the breeding of this fast-becoming favorite cattle. He paid for the yearling heifers mentioned the above sum of $25 per head. They are fine ones, sure.

One of the pleasantest events of the season was the surprise party made Mr. And Mrs. F.J. Cochrane, by their friends Monday evening. The occasion being the fifteenth anniversary of their marriage, their beautiful home on Oak street was filled with light, mirth and good cheer.

Married

Morgan-McMurty - At the residence of the bride, on Walnut street, on Thursday evening, January 20th, 1887, the Rev. George Johns officiating, Mr. Monroe Morgan to Mrs. Emeline McMurty. No cards. No cake.

McGrew-Blackman - At the residence of the bride's parents, in this city, on Wednesday, January 26th, 1887, at 7:30 o'clock p.m., the Rev. C.R. Rice, pastor of the M.E. church officiating, Miss Ida McGrew, eldest daughter of Walter W. McGrew to Mr. T.V. Blackman, an attaché of the Republican office.

Born

Mullinax - At the residence of the family, in this city, on Thursday, January 20th, 2887, to Mr. and Mrs. H.H. Mullinax, a handsome boy baby. Dr. F.J. Stewart the attending physician.

Died

Bennett - At the residence of her son, Benson S. Bennett, Esq., in this city on Monday, January 24th, 1887, at 11:10 o'clock p.m., of paralysis, Mrs. Jane Bennett, aged 78 years, 8 months and 18 days.

The funeral services, conducted by the Rev. C.R. Rice, were held at the M.E. church at 2 o'clock p.m. on Wednesday and were largely attended by the friends of the deceased and family.

The Herald was favored Saturday by a pleasant call from Mr. B.H. Foster of Wilson creek. Mr. F. is an old soldier, was a member of Co. K, 66th ILL. W.S. and his memory is stored with man reminiscences of that interesting period of our country's history. The Herald is always pleased by visits from old soldiers.

Piedmont News

Mr. Alie, from Missouri, is visiting his cousins, Tom Wade and Charley Wade. He is a pleasant gentleman.

Mr. Harry Hart is back again, but will soon leave for Kiowa county. Charley Grimes and wife are visiting in Kiowa county. Mr. Grimes thinks of removing there.

Married Sunday, 23d, at the residence of G.B. Orail, Mr. Thomas Miller to Miss Maggie Taylor. Mr. Miller is an industrious young man. We wish them success.

Murry Rader has rented a farm near Howard, Elk county, where he will soon move to commence work.


4 Oct 1889 Eureka Herald

MARRIED

At the probate office, this city, Friday, September 27. 1889, Judge Emmerson officiating, D.W. Strimple and Lucy J. Curtis, both of this county.

At the probate office, this city, Tuesday, October 1, 1889, Judge Emmerson officiating, Oscar Hillman and Carrie Wiggins, both of this county.

At the probate office, this city, Wednesday, October 2, 1889, Elder Scruggs officiating, A.J. Hall and Elvira Curtis, both of this county.

At the home of the bride's parents, in Fall River township, Wednesday, October 2, 1889, Judge Emmerson officiating, Clark Jones and Anna Broddle, both of this county.

At the home of the bride's parents in Fall River City, Elder J. W. Hunter officiating, L.M. Piggott and Annie Wilson, both of this county.

Index

Home to Greenwood County


[an error occurred while processing this directive] newspaper readers since 5 July 1997

Copyright ©1997  Debbie Wafford / SLC, Utah   drwaff@mail.aros.net

HTMLization by Kermit Kittleson   kittkerm@ucs.isu.edu

The KSGenWeb logo is copyrighted for the exclusive use of the KSGenWeb Project for display on official KSGenWeb Pages only. Unauthorized use of the contents of this page for profit/commercial ventures is expressly prohibited.


Home Page for the
Kansas State Library
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project