Cowley County Heritage Book

Pages

- 121 - 122 - 123 - 124 - 125 -


Cowley County Heritage Book Page 121


John Franklin Baker

John Franklin Baker, son of Emory F. and Martha Saxe Baker, was born June 7, 1944 in Winfield. He attended Webster Grade School and graduated in 1962 from Winfield High School, where he was on the football and track team, and played oboe in the orchestra and band.

He entered the U.S. Naval Reserve following graduation. He was named his Recruit Company Honorman at bootcamp. In 1964 the service sent him to the far east to serve on board the flagship of the 7th Fleet Command. He returned to Winfield in 1966 completing tours throughout the far east including Viet Nam.

John has furthered his education at Cowley County Community College, Southwestern College and Kansas State University.

AS a Winfield Police Officer and Sergeant from 1967 to 1977, he was named the Jaycees' Outstanding Young Officer in 1972. Upon leaving, he went into the real estate business, working for Lewis Boys Real Estate, Kindt-Dawson, Hauber Realtors and as owner of John Baker Realty. He now works for the State Of Kansas Department of Corrections at the Winfield Correctional Facility.

In 1967, he married Linda Margaret Vollweider of Oxford, Kansas. Their children are Christi Lee Baker, born in 1968, and Steven Russell Baker, born in 197 1. Both graduated from Winfield High School. Christi now attends Wichita State University and Steven works at the local Sears store.

He married Rae Lynne DeVilbiss-Hill in 1985. She is the daughter of Ray T. and Margaret DeVilbiss of Vermillion, South Dakota. Her father was the Director of Bands at the University of South Dakota. Rae Lynne attended the University of Kansas and graduated in 1976 with a BME in Music Therapy and is a Registered and Board Certified Music Therapist. She moved to Winfield with her three year old daughter Amanda (Mandy) Renee Hill, in 1978 to take a position as a Music Therapist at Winfield State Hospital and Training Center. After eight years as a music therapist she accepted a position as a Unit Director at the facility. Rae Lynne has served is a Girl Scout leader and as a board member of the Winfield Child Care Center and teaches private flute lessons. Her daughter, Mandy, attended the Winfield Child Care Center at the Webster School Building and now attends Winfield High School.

John has served as a Boy Scout Merit Badge Counselor, President of the Whittier PTA, Youth Soccer coach, Elder of the First Presbyterian Church, Director of the Winfield Board of Realtors, past Commander and Adjutant of the Winfield American Legion Post 10 and is a member of the Cowley County Amateur Radio Club.

Both John and Rae Lynne are members of the Winfield Municipal Band, the College-Community Orchestra and have played with the Community Theatre Orchestra.

The family resides in Winfield at 1604 Mound.

Submitted by John & Rae Lynne Baker
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Johnnie Mae Cox Bankston

Johnnie Mae Cox Bankston, a widow, with a six-weeks-old daughter, Jerry, came to Cowley County in 1925, She found employment on the Henry and Mary Jane Clark farm northeast of Dexter in the Plum Creek community. Jerry attended the Plum Creek country school, District #38 through sixth grade, then a move to Cambridge where Jerry attended the Cambridge Junior and Senior High school through the Junior year, then moved to Dexter where Jerry graduated with the Class of 1942. After graduation from high school, Johnnie Mae and Jerry came to Arkansas City to make their home.

Johnnie Mae was born 3-16-1889 Garland, Indian Territory, now Haskell County, Oklahoma, the daughter of John Cox and Prudence McBride Gipson. She died in Arkansas City 3-61970, buried in the Dexter Cemetery.

My children, Richard Arland Barker and D.M. Barker were born and raised in Arkansas City. Arland married Jeanette Childs, daughter of Delbert and Irene Stone Childs of Arkansas City. Arland and his family live in Cowley County, near the east edge of Arkansas City. He has worked for the A.T.&S.F. Railroad for twenty-four years.

I have 3 grandchildren born in Arkansas City: Troy Alan Barker, Julie Layne Barker and Shelly Kay Barker.

I married Vern M. Case 2-29-1968 and have lived in Arkansas City since coming here from Dexter.

Submitted by Jerry Case
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J.E. Banks Family

John Earl Banks "J.E." or "Jack" was born in a Wilson County Kansas farmhouse June 21, 1892. He liked high school, athletics, and the idea of business success. But he didn't like the farm.

After graduation in 191 1 he went, on his own, to Spalding Business College in Kansas City. There he met Sara Gardner, had a dance date on February 14, 1912 and married her August 31, 1912 at her folks home.

February, 1913 they both were working in Citizen's State Bank at Nowata, Oklahoma. J.E. became assistant cashier.

February, 1919 they moved to Ft Worth, Texas where J.E. ran an accounting business for IRS reports. They lived in several homes in Ft Worth. Their only child, Jack Junior, was born April 18, 1920 at 1 108 Lilac Street.

In 1921 J.E. and W.H. Pattee formed Young County Drilling Co. Sometime before 1924 Pcittee moved to Winfield to operate this company. Later in 1924, J.E. closed his accounting business and came to Winfield with family in an open Reo touring car. Arriving in Winfield they found housing hard to find with the oil boom. They recalled later that Winfield society was not very open hearted to oil people and lunch bucket carriers.

Housing was found in a rooming house run by Mrs Dubberstein in 608 College. Wonderful was her German coffee cake!

By 1926 Young Drilling Company was out of business without bankruptcy. But the "Poke" was gone. A new venture was needed.

In the fall of 1926 J. E., along with Martin F. Jarvis, George L. Jarvis, and George G. Gray formed The Winfield Investment Co., Inc. Thus was born the first consumer loan company in Winfield, second floor, Fuller building. the time of household appliances and autos for everyone had arrived! Later moves of the offices were to suites in First National Bank Building in 1930's and 901 Main Street in 1944.

In the years following 1926 J.E. Banks became known as a civic servant in several ways. In 1932 he was President of the Rotary Club. In 1935, 1936, and 1937 he served as President of Winfield Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge. Brought up a Methodist, he later became a trustee at the Presbyterian Church, After WW II he and George McNeish, Sr. were honored, along with Fred Clarke for their service on the draft board.

January 18, 1960 Bankers Investment Co. of Hutchinson bought Winfield Investment Company, J.E. stayed on for about a year as manager of the branch. J.]. Banks, J.E.'s son, took Banks Insurance (was not sold then) to 915 Millington and continued it until retirement in 1965.

The Banks'built a home at 808 E. Tenth in 1950. Sara died there April 7, 1970. J.E. married Ruby Mider Gray on June I 1, 1971. He died about noon en April 27, 1984 at Winfield Rest haven. Both J.E. and Sara are buried in Highland Cemetery. Ruby lives at Cumbernauld Village.

Submitted by J.J. Banks
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J.J. Banks Family

Jack Junior (I.J. or "Jack") Banks was born 4-18-1920 in Ft Worth, Texas. His birth certificate read "infant male child of John Earl and Sara Banks". So the confusion of "Junior" started later.

He arrived in Winfield, Kansas in late 1924, with parents, J.E. and Sara, in a Reo touring car with isinglass windows.

They roomed at Dubberstein's, 806 College, then moved to 1512 E. 11th. J.1. started grade school at Webster, then to Stevenson. They moved to 1401 E. 1st in 193D. Seventh through twelfth grades were in what is now "Middle School".

J.J. played the clarinet and saxophone. For sports, golf was most important- R.A. Gentry was J.J.'s private clarinet teacher. Paul Painter was a fine music teacher and a guiding role model in J.J.'s life. J.J. joined Winfield Municipal Band in 1935, also played Dixieland in Wichita.

Three semesters at Southwestern College, five semesters and graduation from Kansas State with BS in Business followed.

In 1941, home from Manhattan, I.J. met Dorothy Ruth Brown with first date on 2-12-41. Dot was a student at Southwestern living with her aunt, Evelyn Johnston, at 1218 East I I th. A proposal soon followed. On 12-7-41 they were married in Dot's home in Waurika, Oklahoma. Japanese bombers were in the air while they were being married.

909 East 15th was home until 1947, 1821 Ames for a short time. They bought 615 East Tenth in 1948 and lived there until present.

After working at Cessna, J.J. joined the Navy. He was a Navy musician, then was commissioned an Ensign. In the Pacific Theater on USS Warren APA53 his duties were assistant communications and boat officer for landing craft.

11-19-45 found the Warren just off Samar. J.J. was "in the sack" when the night radioman awoke him to tell him he had a son. The bomb had been dropped. Many Japanese had lost their lives for people like J.J. Christmas day at Newton on a troop train, J.J. saw James Edson Banks. J.E., Sara, Dot, and Jim had driven through a blizzard from Winfield.

Sally Jean ("Sal") Banks came along on 8-19-1950. She like Jim, was born at Newton Memorial.

Training at Travelers in Hartford, J.1. became agency manager for Banks Insurance, of The Winfield Investment Co., 901 Main. In 1955 Banks Insurance became a separate partnership. J.J. became CPCU in 1958. When W.I.C. sold to Bankers Investment of Hutchinson, Banks Insurance moved to 915 Millington, the 209 East Ninth. Robert D. (Bob) Hartley of Hartley Insurance agency joined Banks Insurance 1-1-68 to become Hartley & Banks Insurance. J.J. served the following during life in Winfield: Chamber of Commerce, President 1969, Newton Memorial Hospital Board, President 1969, Country Club Board, H.L. Snyder Memorial Research Foundation Board, Presbyterian Elder 1959, Southwestern, since 1972 Trustee, Executive Committee, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary.

Submitted by J.J. Banks
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Cowley County Heritage Book Page 122


Barnes-Knuckey Family

Zacharihia and Alice (Garten) Barnes came to Cowley County, Kansas from St. Joseph, MO in 1883 in a covered wagon.

They made the Oklahoma run near Guthrie, OK but came back to Winfield and bought land at 17th and Cherry Sts. At that time there were three children. Four more children were born in Winfield. My mother, Lillian Mae, was born in 1894.

My Grandfather was a stone mason and cutter. He helped build the old Central School on East Ninth. He also had a truck garden and delivered produce to stores in town. At that time most of the land near their home was alfalfa fields.

Mr. Elmer George and Florence (Ashland) Knuckey came to Winfield from Oklahoma. In Lehigh town in Colgate County. They lived in home West of the RR yards North of the river. He was a painter and paperhanger. My father, L. George Knuckey, was born in Lehigh, OK in 1892. The family moved to Winfield in early 1900s. My father L. George and Lillian Mae Barnes were married in 1912. My brother lack E. born 1913. I, Lorence M., born in 1915. We first lived at 617 E. 17th. Then the first 1 1/2 years of my life we lived in a log cabin on the Walnut River, on West side, South of 14th St. bridge. There was a mineral springs and cave close to the cabin. My father sold spring water and raised mushrooms in the cave to sell to people and stores in Winfield. The cabin and springs belonged to Dr. Matthew (Matt) Hill, who practiced in Winfield.

My folks had four boys and four girls. I worked in many places in Winfield, attended Bryant School on the West side, mowed yards, worked in the Carson Bakery where Red Cross building is now. Also the old city market at 8th & Main and many other stores, meat markets, Shenneman's Market, Gibson Discount Store, Krogers, Safeway Store and Market at 10th & Main, now Stephenson Accounting office. The old Walnut Valley Produce and Winfield Wholesale Co. on North Main. I also worked for Wilson Fruit Stand on South Main. I have spent nearly all my life in Winfield, except during War. Worked for R.R. in Newton.

I married Waneta (Yates) in 1946 in Oklahoma. We have two beautiful children and three grandchildren.

I am retired now and enjoy life. My hobbies are cooking, stamp collecting and making belt buckles and bolo ties. All love to go to church.

Submitted by Lorence Knuckey
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Barnett-Bulion

James Lee Barnett, a single young man, rode into Cowley County, Kansas in 1886, arriving from Fristoe, Benton county, Mo. by horse back. James was born January 25, 1861, son of William Harrison and Leitha Jenkins Barnett. His father William H., was born in Lincoln County, Ky. to Schuyler and Elizabeth Harrison Barnett, who had come to Missouri in 1833 from Kentucky.

Accompanying Jim Barnett to Kansas, in their covered wagon, was the Benjamin Randolph Bulion family. Mr. Bulion purchased land two miles south of New Salem, and lived there until he died in 1905. He and his second wife, Sarah Watt Bulion, are buried in Union Cemetery.

Barnett rented a farm and took as his bride Laura, the petite daughter of B.B. Bulion on January 29, 1891. Laura was born in Parke County, Indiana, October 28, 1869 to B.R. and Nancy Swim Bulion.

Jim and Laura Barnett purchased a farm one mile north of Frog Hollow School. Their four children were: Benjamin Riley, born January 24, 1892. Edna, born October 20, 1899 and twins Clara and Clarence Lee born January 11, 1905.

The story is told in this family that at the time the twins were born, Rfley having a reputation of being a tease, went to school and told of this big event of having two new babies at home. The teacher spanked him for telling a lie!

The Barnett children not only attended school at Frog Hollow, but attended Sunday School and Church there. Clarence remembers there were four sets of twins attending Frog Hollow at the same time that he and Clara attended, the other three sets were: Merle & Beryl Archer, Della and Stella Marshall, Otis and Orville Day.

Jim and Laura lived on their farm until Jim's death, June 18, 1950. He was 89. Laura died at age 96 on January 29, 1964. They are both buried at Union Cemetery.

Riley Barnett married Dulcie Thatch on April 18, 1917, they moved to Long Beach, California and were the parents of Wason, Betty lean and Ira Lee.

Edna taught school before her marriage to Paul Donley of Rock, Kansas, on December 27, 1925. Two boys were born to the Donleys, Lawrence and Donald.

Clara met Louis Hamm from Anthony, Kansas, while attending Southwestern College, they were married May 18, 1926. Children are: Dorothea, Phflip, Robert, Velma, Wanda and Maxine.

Clarence married Barbara Rose Landgraf of Garden City, Kansas, on May 4, 1925. She was attending St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing. They farmed and Clarence worked in the surrounding oil fields. To this couple were born Barbara Louise and Franklin John.

I married Norman Payne on April 18, 1943, we have two children, Steven Lee and Barbara June.

The love of life, the joy of taling the soil, sprinkled with a sense of humor perhaps gave the family their trait of longevity. Edna, 91, the twins Clara and Clarence, 85, are stiu living at this date, March 1990.

Written and Submitted by Barbara L. Barnett Payne
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Barnett-Dunbar

Lyman Leyton and Ada Barnett Dunbar are native born Cowley County citizens. Leyton's birthplace was Floral and Ada was born northeast of Winfield.

The Dunbar Family arrived in Cowley County in the early 1870's. Charles Dunbar, Leyton's father, was born in Winfield in 1874. As a young boy he herded sheep on the hills near Floral. In 1899 he married Olive Cole of Floral.

Leyton was born April 1, 1903 and had four younger brothers and sisters; Frank, Raymond, Lydia Shoemaker, and Beatrice Shirk. He attended schools in Cowley and Sumner Counties. He worked at Congdori Lumber, Winfield Nurseries, Albright Gardens, McGregors, and City of Winfield. During World War II he went into construction. He helped build Strother Field. We spent three years in Vancouver, Washington while he did shipwright work for Kaiser. We came back to Winfield in 1945. Leyton was secretary of United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners. Local 2382 and president of the Ark Valley District Councfl of Carpenters.

The Barnetts lived in Virginia. Schuyler Barnett married Elizabeth Harrison in 1811 in Lincoln County, Kentucky. As new frontiers opened up, the Barnetts moved to Benton County, Missouri about 1830. James Barnett came to Winfield around 1886. Richard Mathies Barnett, my granddad, settled near Noble, Oklahoma, about 1893. After a tornado left Richard's family homeless, James bought them to Winfield. Richard and Nancy Huffman Barnett, natives of Benton County, Missouri had five children: Myrtie Miller, Fannie Hathaway, Ella Jewell, Nadine Anglemeyer, and Hoyt Barnett.

Hoyt married Matilda Williams of Winfield, March 18, 1917. They had four daughters: Ada Elizabeth; Belva Louine married Floyd Garber; Ruth Helen married Willis Heskit; Floyd Nixon and Robert Camfield. Louise, a twin to Louine, died at birth.

The Williams tradition claims descendancy from Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island. Matilda's greatgrandfather, Luke, was the first preacher south of the Missouri River in Missouri. The family immigrated to Boonesville about 1815. Matilda was born 3 miles northeast of Guthrie, Oklahoma. My grandmother didn't like the wild frontier. When she received an inheritance, at her father's death, she moved across the border into Kansas, north of Wilmot.

I married Leyton June 17, 1939 in Winfield. We had one son, Charles Richard, who attended local schools. He married Mary Spencer of Osawatomie, Kansas. He works for Peabody, Gordon, Platt Energy Group. One grandson, Charles Leyton Dunbar, unmarried, works at the Winfield State Hospital and Training Center. Leyton died January 21, 1982. We located on Lowry Street in 1945 and I am still a resident after 45 years. I am a member of the Christian Church and the D.A.R.

Submitted by Ada Dunbar
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Dode Baxter and her Kansans

An early Arkansas City dance band was managed by Don (Forrest) Baxter. The members of that orchestra were Charles Hinkle, Eugene Waltrip, Lonnie Rose and Perry Moore.

Don married Doris "Dode-Dodie" Vaughn in 1926. 1 played piano and accordion by ear, so Don thought we had a great start on a larger group. This group included Sherrill Smith, drums; Howard "Dusty" Rhodes; Don Baxter, Manager Director, banjo and violin; Dc)de Baxter; Junior Kiesow, trumpet; Fredrick (Bus) Morgan, clarinet and saxophone; Walter (continued on page 123)

Submitted by Doris Vaughn Baxter Harp
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Cowley County Heritage Book Page 123


(continued from page 122) Probst, trumpet; Clark (PeeWee) Evans, trumpet; David AJlard (Substitute); Hall Collinson, saxophone. In 1926 the band played almost nightly in the Oklahoma oil fields and at many dances in Arkansas City.

When the Marceline Ballroom (Madison & Summit) opened, we were regular week-end musicians, In the summer, Don mounted an airplane propeller for a fan to circulate the air. We played circuit dances over Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. We broadcast from WBBZ, Ponca City; Wichita, and KGGB in Albuquerque, NM.

Dodge City was in its heyday and many bands stopped over for a Battle of the Bands with us. Some were; Lawrence Welk, Blue Steele and their orchestras and Harry James, a flashy trumpeter, also played there.

After our stay in Dodge City, we booked Albuquerque at Selvas and The Heights, also the Kinsley Opera House in 1929. When the depression hit, we were forced to disband and return to Arkansas City. Don and I immediately signed with Dr. John R. Brinkley at Milford, and hitch-hiked to Del Rio, Texas to join the Brinkley organization on XER, Villa Acuna, Coahuila, Mexico.

Don produced and copyrighted a piano course and authored several other books. His "Major Kord" book, "Learn to Play Piano in 10 Easy Lessons" was a very successful venture on XER. He also announced for the Brinkley station. We also worked many other border stations until we bought our own station XEG, a 50,000 watt station, in Monterrey, Mexico.

From this we moved to San Antonio and started our recording studios, recording talent for both the United States and Mexico. Groups well-known, even today, that we recorded were the original Carter Family, A.P., Sarah, Maybelle, and Maybelle's three daughters, Anita, Helen, June (Mrs. Johnnie Cash) Carter; The Morgan Family (including J. P. Morgan) from Los Angeles; Governor of Texas, Pappy (Lee) O'Daniel, a trio of Slim, Hal and Red. Those were happy days!

Submitted by Doris Vaughn Baxter Harp
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Curtis E. and Leda Bechtel

Curtis E. Bechtel and Leda Vernon Bechtel moved to the Atlanta community in May 1982. They live in Harvey Township on what is known locally as the Ward Ranch. Curt was employed a manager of the Atlanta Co-op and retained that position when the business merged with the Farmers Union Co- op in Winfield.

Leda has been employed at the Winfield State Hospital and Training Center and Southwestern College.

Curt and Leda are both graduates of Kansas State University and Leda will receive her Masters Degree in Education from Southwestern College in May 1990. They are the parents of two children, Bryan and Beth. Bryan is a graduate of the University of Nebraska, is married to the former Connie Thietzen, and lives at Henderson, Nebraska where he is in sales for the WalCo Company.

Beth attended Bethel College for two years and graduated from Kansas State University. In 1986 she and Becky Ritter owned and operated the Wildcat Inn cafe in Atlanta. Beth is currently enrolled on graduate school at Wichita State University and is employed as a floral designer.

The family attends the Timber Creek Friends Church. They have been involved with the Atlanta Labor Day activities, the Atlanta Community Theater and the Lions Club

Submitted by Leda Bechtel
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Albert Earl Becker

Albert Earl Becker, born 2-15-1883 at Winfield and married Alba Barkley Stewart on 12-3-1906 in Winfield. Alba was born 4-30-1882 in Neosho Co., Kansas. She is the daughter of Samuel Stewart and Jessie Campbell. Earl worked as an Express Messenger for Santa Fe Raflroad in Newton, Kansas from 1907 until returning to Winfield in 1917 where he took a job as a rural mail carrier delivering Route 2, west and northwest of Winfield, for twenty-eight years. After retiring from the Post Office, Earl worked with his son, Stan, who operated a Texaco Station at Fourteenth and Main in Winfield. Earl enjoyed a good game of checkers and once won the Class B Championship at a tournament sponsored by the Kansas Checkers Association. He was also active in the Masons. Earl died 8-11-1951 in Winfield, and Alba died 7-14-1954 in Wichita. Both are buried in Highland Cemetery at Winfield.

Earl and Alba had five children: Alberta Allene Becker, born 1-9-1908 at Newton, Kansas, died 7-4-1989 in Seattle, Washington, and her ashes were scattered in the mountains near Seattle. She was married 8-25-1928 at Winfield to Carl Campbell Sharp who was born 7-16-1907 at El Dorado, Kansas. He is the son of Walter Sharp and Gertrude Campbell. Allene and Carl had five children: Richard Carl Sharp, born 9-11-1929 in Winfield; Marvin Hugh Sharp, born 11-25-1931 in Winfield; Virginia Ann Sharp, born 8-28-1941 in Wichita.

Lillian Ruth Becker, born 2-15-1912 at Newton and died 10-11-1980 at Wichita. She was married 6-21-1936 at Iola, Kansas to George Merle Williams Sr., who was born 9-10-1912 at Marion, Kansas and died 2-28-1982 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He is the son of Fred Reed Williams and Frances Elizabeth Skidmore. Ruth and George are buried in Resthaven Cemetery, Wichita, Kansas. Their two children are: Kay Jean Williams, born 9-28-1941 in Winfield; George Merle Williams Jr., born 2-13-1950 in Wichita.

Kenneth Beard "Kenny" Becker, born 10-10-1914 at Newton, died 4-30-1984 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and is buried in Highland Cemetery, Winfield. He was married 11-15-1939 at Wichita to Theda Ione Grant, who was born 5-16-1919 at Emporia, Kansas. She is the daughter of William McKinley Grant and Flossie Susan Statton. Kenny worked for the U.S. Postal Service from 1937 until his retirement 3-30-1973. He served as Winfield's Postmaster from 10-12-1968 until his retirement.

Albert KeithBecker, born 10-11-1923 in Winfield. He was married 10-14-1949 at Wichita to Dorothea Mary Unmack, who was born 9-20-1920 in Long Beach, California. She is the daughter of Louis Leopold Unmack and Grace Matilda Patterson. Keith and Dorothea have one daughter, Connie Lea Becker, born 10-13-1954 in Wichita.

Kermit Stanley "Stan" Becker, born 12-22-1925 in Winfield. He was married 5-20-1950 in Winfield to Barbara Jean Cranston, who was born 5-16-1928 in Winfield. She is the daughter of Martin Elmer Cranston and Alta Elizabeth Smith. Stan and Barbara have two children: Paula Jean Becker, born 5-20-1955 in Winfield; and Martin Lee Becker, born 8-21-1957 in Winfield.

Submitted by Connie Becker Lawrence
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Solomon, Susan, Amos, and William Becker

Four of John Becker and Elizabeth Zimmerman's ten children were among Cowley County's earliest citizens:

Solomon Peter Becker, born 2-4-1838 in Dciuphin Co., Pennsylvania and served as a private in Captain Charles Rile's Company in the Civil War. He was in the Ohio Artillery Volunteers from 1862-1865. His discharge papers say he was twenty-seven years old, 5'8" tall with dark complexion, black eyes and hair. In the late 1860's, Solomon built a one-story log cabin about ten miles north of Winfield. A carpenter by trade,he constructed several claim cabins in the Walnut Valley. In June of 1869, Solomon helped Col. E. C. Manning lay the foundation for the "first dwelling house upon the original town site (Winfield) proper". Solomon died 3-24-1905 in Cowley County, and is buried in Union Cemetery, Winfield.

Susan Ellen "Susie" Becker, born 12-14-1839 in Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania died 6-26-1921 in Cowley County, and her body was placed in the Mausoleum at Highland Cemetery, Winfield. She married John Beard on 3-29-1876 and they established their home at Kellogg in western Cowley County. John was born in August 1845 in Ohio, died 10-20-1915 in Cowley County, and his body was placed beside Susan's in the Mausoleum. Amos Albert Becker, born 12-22-1844 in Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania died 4-2-1912 in Cowley County, and is buried in Highland Cemetery, which is located on Amos Becker Road in Winfield. The road is so named as Amos once had the responsibility for its maintenance. He Married Lillian May Seely on 3-26-1882 at his sister's home in Kellogg. Lillian was born 7-4-1859 in Vinton, Iowa, died 12-31-1910 in Winfield, and is buried in Highland Cemetery, Winfield. She is the daughter of Jacob Seely, Jr. and Mary Ann Boyden. Amos and Lillian had eight children, all born in Winfield: Albert Earl Becker, born 2-15-1883, died 8-11-1952 in Winfield, married Alba Barkley Stewart on 12-3-1906; Leon Orris Becker, born 1-7-1885, died 3-30-1941 in Winfield, married Mary Agnes Stewart on 6-19-1912; Lewis Clyde Becker, born 3-31-1887, died 3-3-1929 in Parsons, Kansas; Clarence Irwin Becker, born 2-2-1889, died 12-12-1940 in Placerville, California, married Mabel Elizabeth Unmack on 9-19-1916; Roy Becker, born 6-25-1892, married Zellah Northrop; Jessie Mildred Becker, born 2-8-1897, died 11-16-1976 in Winfield, married Robert Henry Cunningham on 8-16-1921; and unnamed twin sons, born 1901.

William Edward Becker, born 3-10-1849 in Clark Co., Ohio, died 3-16-1925 in Arkansas City, and is buried in Hope Cemetery, Arkansas City. He married Clara Ellen Gamble on 2-27-1890 in Cowley County. Clara was born 5-12-1870 in Springfield, Illinois, died 5-26-1962 in Arkansas City, and is buried in Hope Cemetery, Arkansas City. She is the daughter of Samuel Gamble and Josephine M. Jones. William and Clara had three children, all born in Cowley County: Margaret Elizabeth Becker, born 11-27-1893, died 5-7-1972 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, married Walter Leslie Hopkins on 9-4-1912; Robert Beard Becker, Born 4-12-1897, died 5-28-1952 in Arkansas City, married Olah Mae Drennan on 10-8-1919; and Susie Grace Becker, born 4-22-1906 and married Oliver Frank Davis on 6-21-1924.

Submitted by Connie Becker Lawrence
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Glen & Lavinia Beery

The Beery family ancestors have been traced to the German-speaking canton of Berne, Switzerland, as part of the Mennonite colony. When William Penn offered the Beerys refuge in Pennsylvania, they rode the ship "Friendship" for four months to Philadelphia, arriving October 16, 1727. They immigrated to Virginia, then to a farm three miles south of Brooklyn, Iowa. Glen William Beery was born on this farm on February 15, 1887. He met Lavinia Elizabeth Wylie from a neighboring farm, and they married December 22, 1909. Lavinia was born August 15, 1888.

In the 1920's the family moved to a larger farm south of Winfield. This farm was a dairy farm. They sold their farm in the mid 1940's and moved into Winfield to retire. Then Glen passed the civil service exam and went to work at the air base south of Winfield, called Strother Field. The base closed down and Glen transferred to Pueblo, Colorado. Glen worked there for three weeks and died of a heart attack on November 22, 1945.

Glen and Lavinia had five children. While living in Iowa they had four children: Letitia, born on May 17, i 912; Ronald, born February 28, 1915; and a pair of twins, Ruth Darlene and Thealene, born December 3, 1916 (Thealene died at birth). When they moved to Winfield area Leretha was born November 19, 1928.

After Glen died Lavinia and Leretha returned to Winfield and lived with Lavinia's parents, the Alexander Wylies on 12th Street, Lavinia worked at a laundry for ten years, then as a cook at the State Training School northeast of Winfield. (continued on page 124)

Submitted by Joan Rundle McBride
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Cowley County Heritage Book Page 124


(continued from page 123) After the death of her parents, Lavinia lived with her sister, Edith, for a while on Ann Street in Winfield. Upon the death of Edith she moved to the farm of her oldest daughter, Letitia, near Piedmont, Kansas.

Glen and Lavinia's first born, Letitia, married Chois Rader on January 3, 1932. They had two daughters: Charlene and Elizabeth.

Their second born, Ronald, married Letty Kimberlin on May 29, 1938. They had one daughter: Sharon.

The third born and one of the twins: Ruth Darlene married Earl Rundle on May 28, 1936. They had three children: Joan, Darrell, and Gary.

Submitted by Joan Rundle McBride
Scanned out of the Cowley County Heritage book, Page 124.

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W.O. & Winnie Bender Family

Jasper William Otterbein Bender (W.O. or Will) was born May 6, 1876 in Earlville, Illinois to Conrad and Clarisa Rit@hie Bender. Will's grandfather came to America from Rotterdam in 1750. On March 17, 1897 Will married Winnie Ethel Franks near Mendota, Illinois. Will and Winnie had three children, Harold, born May 31, 1899 at Meridan, Illinois, Leslie, born Sept. 29, 1900 in Mendota, Illinois and Hazel, born March 6, 1902 at Blairsville, Iowa.

The Benders came to Cowley County in 1902 and settled on Grand-View Ranch about 8 miles north of Winfield located on Timber Creek. Another daughter, Winnie Ellen, was born June 8, 1907. Will and Winnie lived the rest of their lives on the ranch. Will died January 13, 1944 and Winnie died August 15, 1972. Both are buried at Highland Cemetery.

Will and Winnie were active in community affairs and were charter members of the Grand-View Methodist Church. Will had a rich deep bass voice and sang with a men's quartet in the community. Both were members of Farm Bureau. Winnie was active in the HDU and the Women's Missionary Society of the Methodist Church. They encouraged young people and supported Southwestern College.

Grand-View Ranch was a favorite gathering place for all of the family from 1902 until it was sold in 1973 following Winnie's death, Each summer members of the family gathered at the Ranch for vacations. At one time there was a camp-ground on Timber Creek which was a vacation spot for various families in Winfield who owned cabins there.

Harold, Leslie, Hazel and Winnie attended Winfield High School and Southwestern College. Harold married Lucille Fuller on March 10, 192 1, Leslie married Elise Harris, June IO, 1925, Hazel married Milton Kroth Sept. 7, 1926 and Winnie married Lawrence Anderson Nov. 30., 1929. Leslie, Elise, Hazel, Milton, Winnie and Lawrence were educators and were active in teaching and the administrative field.

Harold and Lucille established their home in the GrandView Community and had two daughters, Celia Elienor born Jan. 10, 1922, and Joy Elaine born Dec. 21, 1923. Harold farmed until 1923, then worked for the Farmers Union Elevator at Winfield, Rock and St. Paul, Kansas. Later the sender family moved to Burns, Kansas, where Harold became manager of a Farmers Union General Store, expanding the business to include a poultry yard. Another daughter, Nancy Ellen was born July 30, 1938 at ElDorado, Kansas. In 1958 Harold, Lucille and Nancy returned to Winfield. Nancy graduated from Winfield High School and Southwestern. She is married to R. David Goodell. Ellenor married Harry Doss and Joy married Frank Bennington, was divorced and married Milton Eash.

Harold worked as bookkeeper at the Hackney Elevator and became assistant manager before he retired in 1972. Lucille was treasurer at First Federal Savings and Loan, Winfield, retiring in 1965. Harold was a member of the Winfield Quarterback Club and the American Legion. Like his father, Harold had a rich deep bass voice and sang in the church choir and in a mixed quartet in the Burns area. Lucille was a member of Kansas Authors, Priscilla Club, Women's Society of the Methodist Church and American Legion Auxiliary. Both were supporters of Southwestern College.

Harold died Dec. 26, 1977 and Lucille died Dec. 28, 1989, Both are buried in Highland Cemetery.

Submitted by Nancy Bender Goodell
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Randy Lee Benton

Randy Lee Benton was born 22 August 1961 in Arkansas City, Kansas to Paul Allen and Eloise Leora (Martin) Benton. Randy has lived all his life in Arkansas City and attended Francis Willard Elementary and Arkansas City High School. He wrestled from age twelve to fourteen, and played baseball in little league.

Randy loves to fish and does every chance he gets. Many times, as a child, he skipped school to go fishing. He hid his fishing reel in his boot. When his mother caught him he said to her, "Mom, I caught this fish for supper, so you won't be mad at me, will you." Of course, she Couldn't get mad, Randy is quite an avid "white water" cancer. He also loves horses and rode every chance he could when he was younger.

Randy married Kelly McManus in March 1983. They have three children: Steven, Shawn, and Kayla. They divorced in 1987.

Randy married Leila (Mathews) Hearlson in 1989. Leila has two children: Tricia and Loren Hearlson.

Randy has worked for John Bruton Conoco, A & A Butcher shop, Shanks Grocery. On his eighteenth birthday he started working for Rodeo Meat Company where he worked until they closed. He then went to General Electric at Strother Field where he is presently. Leila, also, works at General Electric.

Submitted by Eloise Leora Johnson
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Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence L. Bergevin

Among the early businesses in Winfield was the Bergevin Drug Store. Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence L. Bergevin moved to Winfield in January, 1925 Their first location was in the 700 block of Main. In 1923 they moved to a building owned by Frank Jarvis at 905 Main. They had a soda fountain and made their own umpteen flavors of ice cream, and their frozen malts were very popular. They were in business at that location until a fire on January 4, 1940 which started in Johnson's 10 Gent store at 903 Main (next door to the drug store), forced them to move temporarily to a building at 924 Main. They rented Dr. Martin's building at 903 Main (formerly Johnson's 10 Cent Store) and put in a Walgreen Agency drug store. Besides having a soda fountain, they served meals. After a severe bout of undulant fever, Mr. Bergevin sold the drug store. This was probably in 1949 or 1950. Later, Dr. Cecil Snyder called on Mr. Bergevin to establish The Clinic Pharmacy. It first was located on the third floor of The First National Bank Building. The Snyder-Jones Clinic was located on the third and fourth floors of that building. In 1964 The Clinic Pharmacy and The Snyder Clinic moved to a new building at 1317 Wheat Road. Mr. & Mrs. Bergevin's son-in-law, Charles W. Wright, purchased The Clinic Pharmacy, and Mr. Bergevin continued to work as long as his health permitted.

Cora Ward Bergevin was born in Oxford, Texas and L.L. Bergevin was born in Chateaugay, New York. They met in Fairfax, Oklahoma and were married in Ft. Worth, Texas in 1916. They lived in various locations before coming to Winfield in 1925. In 1930 they purchased a pioneer home at 319 E. I Oth which had been built about 1878 by John Bliss, an uncle of E.H. Bliss. They lived there until their deaths. Cora died in 1970 and L.L. died in 1973. They had two daughters, Helen W. Bergevin born in Yale, Oklahoma and Ruth Ann Bergevin born in Winfield, and four grandchildren.

Cora was very active in clubs and organizations and served as president of several of them. She also was head of the Cradle Roll at the First Christian Church for twenty-five years. She was active in church work and clubs as long as her health permitted. She worked side by side with L.L. in their drug store business from beginning to end. L. L.'s lifetime hobby was golf. He loved the game. He also belonged to and supported several civic organizations. They were respected business people and made a positive contribution to Winfield.

Submitted by Ruth Ann Wright
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Bernard Family

William Henry Bernard was born in Kirksville, Mo. 12-16-1849. He was called Henry.

Under the Homestead Act of 1862, Henry and his mother, Mary Ann, took one-hundred sixty acres of raw, unbroken prairie land three and one-half miles northeast of Oxford, Kansas on the Udall road.

When they arrived at Winfield, Kansas, November 1, 1871, there were only ten houses. They traveled on a covered wagon filled with a few cherished possessions, including a bed, cookstove, and a big iron dinner bell that had been saved during Quantrill's Raid.

On the southeast corner of the farm, Henry first built a oneroom log cabin with a "lean-to" on the west side. He "broke" twenty acres that fall and the next Spring "cross-harrowed" the land and planted it to beans and pumpkins. The first winter they lived mainly on buffalo, deer, prairie chickens, wild turnips, (continued on page 125)

Submitted by Dorothy Drake Bernard
Scanned out of the Cowley County Heritage book, Page 124.

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Cowley County Heritage Book Page 125


(continued from page 124) sand plums, and wild grapes. Indians used his farm for a campground, and Henry became acquainted with several chiefs and interpreters.

On 1-29-1873 Henry Bernard married Sarah "Jenny" Pen nington, the daughter of Samuel and Julia Pennington, home steaders living two miles west of the Bernard farm.

Henry and Jenny lived in the cabin eleven years, then built a frame house to the north. They lived in it the rest of their lives. Henry was talented. In addition to farming, he wrote poetry, practiced taxidermy, was a hunter and trapper. An accomplished fiddler, he was always in demand for dances and meetings. He was instrumental in organizing the Oxford (Sumner County) Mutual Telephone Company, remaining a director for forty years. He also helped develop the Mt. Vernon Cemetery west of Winfield near the farm and was active in other county projects.

Their children were: Leland Albert, Stella G., Freddie M., Mary E., Ethel A., William C., Bertha M., and Ruth E. "Jenny" died 12-24-29. Henry died in the Spring of 1942. His poems include "The Battle of Kirksville" and "The First Buffalo Hunt".

Leland Albert, first child of William Henry and Sarah Jane (Jenny) Pennington Bernard, was born November 14, 1874. This was the "Year of the Grasshopper" and the year the Oxford Mill was finished. He was fourteen years old when a cow kicked and broke his ankle. Osteomylelitis (could have been gangrene) set in. He nearly died. His mother cured the disease by using maggots to eat away the infected flesh. Leland attended Jackson School that his grandfather started. They used split logs to sit on. He attended college at Burns, Oklahoma. Leland owned considerable land around Oxford. He raised and rode race horses. After winning the first horse race held in Kansas, he was waylaid by men who had hidden beneath a bridge and threatened to kill him if he did not quit racing. Leland owned the first truck in Cowley County, a Reo with hard rubber tires.

Leland married Emma Lovina Duncan, 3-15-06. She was born 1-25-1879, to Isaac and Elizabeth Duncan of Olive Hill, Kentucky. She came to Cowley County in 1891.

Leland and Emma raised six children. Together they sur vived the 1923 flood, the Great Depression, dust storms, torna does, and drought. The children were: Vager Duncan, Delore J., Ruth Elizabeth, Russell Valentine, Ethel Jean, and William Henry, (Grandfather's namesake) For a few years the family lived in Colorado but later moved back to a farm near Geuda Springs, Kansas. The children attended Lone Star School. Lat er the family moved back to the Bernard homestead south of Udail. Leland died 6-19-50. Emma died 6-10-62.

William Henry Bernard, youngest child of Emma and Leland, born 6-18-18, Geuda Springs, is still a resident of Cowley County, Winfield, Kansas. After attending elementary school at Lone Star and Jackson School, he attended high school in Winfield, Arkansas City and graduated from Arkan sas City Junior College. He then served four years in WWII, Pacific Theater. Upon his return he attended Kansas State University in engineering and became employed by the Kan sas State Highway Department. This William Henry married Dorothy Jean Drake, 6-6-48, who was teaching at Jackson School (that his great grandfather, Samuel W. Pennington, had started). Three daughters were born to them: Cheryl Maureen, 11-29-49; Karen Ruth, 9-28-51; and Muriel Denise, 11-27-54. Dorothy and Henry (Bill) have continued to live in Winfield and are active members of Grace United Methodist Church, and in community and civic organizations. After retirement, Henry, (Bill), has worked part time for the City of Winfield Engineering Department.

Submitted by Dorothy Drake Bernard
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Glen and Lavinia Beery

The Beery family ancestors have been traced to the Ger man-speaking canton of Berne, Switzerland, as port of a Mennonite colony. When William Penn offered the Beerys refuge in Pennsylvania, they rode the ship "Friendship" for four months to Philadelphia, arriving October 16, 1727. They immigrated to Virginia, then to a farm three miles south of Brooklyn, Iowa. Glen William Beery was born on this farm on February 15, 1887. He met Lavinia Elizabeth Wylie from a neighboring farm, and they married December 22, 1909. Lavinia was born August 15, 1888.

In the 1920's the family moved to a larger farm south of Winfield. This farm was a dairy farm. They sold this farm in the mid 1940's and moved into Winfield to retire. Then Glen passed the civil service exam and went to work at the air base south of Winfield, called Strother Field. The base closed down and Glen transferred to Pueblo, Colorado. Glen worked there for three weeks and died of a heart attack on November 22, 1945.

Glen and Lavinia had five children. While living in Iowa they had four children: Letitia, born on May 17, 1912; Ronald, born February 28, 1915; and a pair of twins, Ruth Darlene and Thealene, born December 3, 1916 (Thealene died at birth). When they moved to Winfield area Leretha was born Novem ber 18, 1928.

After Glen died Lavinia and Leretha returned to Winfield and lived with Lavinia's parents, the Alexander Wylies, on 12th Street. Lavinia worked at a laundry for ten years, then as a cook at the State Training School northeast of Winfield. After the death of her parents, Lavinia lived with her sister, Edith, for a while on Ann Street in Winfield. Upon the death of Edith she moved to the farm of her oldest daughter, Letitia, near Piedmont, Kansas.

Glen and Lavinia's first born, Letitia, married Chois Rader on January 3, 1932. They had two daughters: Charlene and Elizabeth.

Their second born, Ronald, married Letty Kimberlin on May 29, 1938. They had one daughter: Sharon.

The third born and one of the twins: Ruth Darlene, married Earl Rundle on May 28, 1936, They had three children: Joan, Darrell, and Gary.

Submitted by Joan Rundle McBride
Scanned out of the Cowley County Heritage book, Page 125.

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Amos Biddle and Family

Amos Biddle was born December 12, 1838 in Carroll County Ohio, and married Cindrilla Ann Kerr, born November 15, 1843 in Owens County Indiana, in Owen County Indiana on December 20, 1860. While living in Indiana five children were born to this couple: George Alvin, Charles Weldon, Dela, Elza Armstrong, and Albert Lewis. The family lived on a farm in Owen County for eleven years before Amos, with a desire for new land, decided to move his family to Cowley County, Kansas.

Amos Biddle with his wife and four children left Indiana by covered wagon in the summer of 1872 traveling with his wife's mother, Anne (Armstrong) Kerr and several of her brothers and sisters. They arrived in Winfield in October of 1872 where they were met by Amos's brother-in-law Robert Kerr who had came to Cowley County earlier and selected land for the families to settle. The family dog went to Kansas but became homesick and showed back up in Owen County, Indiana.

The Amos Biddle family settled on a farm near the Albrights Gardens which was located one mile west of Kellogg on the Arkansas River. The farm known as Albrights Garden was well known for its beautiful botanical gardens and a place for many social and political gatherings.

In 1878 Amos bought eighty acres of land one mile south and one-half mile west of Mt. Zion School where five more children were born: Meldo A., Jesse Amos, Edgar Thomas, Carrie May, and Olla Angeline. The children attended the Mt. Zion School for only a few months out of each school year because their help was needed on the farm.

The Kerr families that came with them to Kansas also purchased land nearby on the Arkansas River. This river would overflow its banks quite frequently and there are many family stories of its flooding the whole area for miles around. Many times the river would rise so fast that the families had only time to save themselves and let the livestock go. The Biddle house was on high ground and was a favorite place to go for safety.

Amos's children were: George who married Rose Anna Orr, lived in Braman, Oklahoma, had one child; Charles married Daisey Dean Beswick, lived in Newkirk, Oklahoma, had eight children; Dela died in infancy, Elza married Mary Louise Ehmke, had four children; Albert married Viola Bell Bonewell, had three children; Melda died at age fifteen, Jesse married Elsie Ethel Ramsey, had eight children; Edgar married Susie Arminta Ramsey, had two children; Carrie May died at age two; Olla married Benjamin Harrison Bonewell, lived in Bra- man, Oklahoma, had seven children.

The parents of Amos Biddle were John W. and Elizabeth (Gamber) Biddle of Washington County, Pennsylvania. Parents of Cindrilla Biddle were John and Anne (Armstrong) Kerr and they were residents of Holmes County, Ohio and the two families met in Owen County, Indiana.

Amos Biddle died July 24, 1897 and Cindrilla Biddle died July 30, 1911 and are buried in the family plot in the Mt. Zion Cemetery six miles west of Winfield.

It has been a pleasure to write this history of my grandparents who I never had the pleasure of meeting and only know them through the stories told by their children and grandchildren.

Submitted by Ralph D. Biddle
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Ed & Susie Biddle

The Biddle and Ramsey families grew up west of Winfield. They all took part in community activities of Kellogg and the rural schools. Ed and Susie were acquainted during this time and became sweethearts.

Edgar Thomas Biddle and Susie Arminta Ramsey were married 23 December 1908 in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas.

Children of this union were: Della May, born 25 April 1912 and died 24 August 1938; June A. born June 8, 1910. June married Dub Murray of the same community 7 March 1937 and now lives in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Ed and Susie farmed in Vernon Township. They lived on the eighty acre farm west of her brother and family, Wayne and Gladys Ramsey, several years. During that time this author was around three-years-old. I developed a habit of "running off" to go to Aunt Susie's house for cookies, the most delicious sugar cookies ever and usually freshly made. More than once, I stepped in the door and climbed up to the cookie jar and helped myself to the best cookies. They were especially good after the brisk walk in rain, snow or sun. Some rules were soon set down and I had to change my habits. I have been reminded of this story many times since. Aunt Susie got a kick out of seeing me coming as much as I enjoyed those good sugar cookies.

After many years of farming, Ed and Susie moved into Winfield. Susie worked at a bakery on Main Street and went to work at four am. every morning to start the dough to make donuts and breads and other treats.

Ed died in 1946. Susie moved to Denver, Cola, in 1947 with her daughter and son-in-law, June and Dub Murray. In Denver she worked in Cattleman's Motel and had many stories to tell. She continued to live with June and help raise grandson Danny after Dub died. June was Cafeteria Manager at Lowry Air Force Base and Fitzsimmons Army Base for the Army Air Force Exchange Service, nineteen and one-half years. She moved to Lincoln, Nebraska in June, 1976. Susie moved with June to Lincoln and died there in 1980. Susie is buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery besides her parents and husband and daughter, Della.

When a child, Susie was picking up potatoes with her family in the garden which was west of the house at that time. She (continued on page 126)

As told by June Murray to Janis Ramsey Reinhardt
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EMAIL Cowley County Coordinator
Karen Rodenbaugh ....Arkansas City, KS
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State Coordinators
Tom & Carolyn Ward, Columbus, KS
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