REEL #R170/KSHS Microfilm Collection

Ange
Ange
Arendt
Atkisson
Atkisson
Berge
Beth
Blakeley
Bluebaugh
Brooks
Brooks
Brown
Brown
Bulla
Caldwell
Campbell
Campbell
Cardner
Catt
Clark
Cole
Collins
Cook
Covert
Cowan
Cummins
Cunningham
Davis
DeWein
Emerick
Endicott
Gardner
Gardner
Glover
Goodall
Gray
Green
Green
Hays
Hopkins
Hopper
Horn
Howerton
Huff
Johns
Jones
Jordan
Kaiser
Kipp
Lampton
Lampton
Lindsley
Luman
Mayhugh
McClimas
McDowell
McDowell
McGann
McKernan
McKinniss
Messenger
Miller
Miller
Miller
Morgan
Morris
Moulton
Noble
Pasley
Penniman
Perry
Pool
Porter
Porter
Purdom
Purkey
Putnam
Putnam
Reid
Russell
Russell
Shull
Shull
Smith
Snow
Speake
Stockmyer
Stotts
Streeter
Stringer
Stroud
Sutton
Swain
Tennyson
Test
Walker
Wallace
West
Weyant

Redfield Herald
November 1905

Bourbon County’s Redfield Herald was a weekly newspaper. The first issue, dated April 8, 1905, was published on Saturdays, with W.E. Stockmyer [referred to as Edd], as Editor. In October 1905, when Mr. and Mrs. Stockmyer left Kansas for New Mexico, publication changed from Saturdays to Fridays and J. Frank Pool replaced Mr. Stockmyer as Editor. At that point, the paper was considerably expanded; in addition to community news, coverage also included courthouse news and property transfers/deeds. Another editorial change occurred in October 1906 when Mr. Pool retired and Harry E. Luman became Editor. These extracts have been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reel to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net)

Nov 10, 1905

pg 2, col 4

Died: The community is moved to sincerest sorrow at the death, so early in life and promise, of our townsman, Arthur H. Streeter, which occurred at his resident home here, Nov. 3, 1905, at 11 p.m. He had been ailing for more than two years and last spring he and his family went to California to regain his health. He thought his condition bettered by his sojourn in that state, and returned a few months ago and bought out the livery business at Garland. His serious illness began on Thursday evening, and he sought his bed at that time. Twenty-four hours later he succumbed to his disease, acute asthma. All that was possible for medical skill to do was done. Arthur was born in Bourbon county, about five miles north of Garland, May 29, 1866, and at the time of his demise was 39 years, 5 months and 5 days of age. He had lived near this town all his life. Everybody was his friend, and save for ill health his future was one of success. He leaves a wife and one little girl, Ethel, beside a mother, two brothers and two sisters to mourn his untimely death. The funeral services were conducted by his friend and neighbor, Rev. Jas. Walker. Interment was made at the Large cemetery.

pg 4, col 3

Married: Mr. Milton Ange and Miss Bertha McDowell were united in marriage Wednesday. Mr. Ange is the son of Uncle Charlie Ange, south of town, one of our bright, industrious young men. Miss McDowell is a young lady that our community is proud of. The Dispatch joins with the many friends of the young couple in wishing them many years of happiness. [Mapleton news]

pg 6, col 3

Anniversary: Mr. and Mrs. R.T. Campbell, pioneer residents of Fort Scott, will celebrate their golden wedding anniversary on the seventeenth. It sounds like good old times to hear of golden weddings and the ringing of the bells in honor of the fiftieth anniversary is much sweeter music than the scratching of the pen entering a divorce decree.

pg 9, col 3 [Probate Court news]

Marriage Licenses:

Oct 2 - P.A. Cummins and Maude Lampton; W.W. Lampton and Flo Pasley. Both couples were married by Rev. W.C. Porter on the same date.

Oct 28 - Fred Bluebaugh and Estelle Miller, both of Fort Scott. They were married by Rev. B.J. McKernan.

Nov 1 - Ernest Brown and Viola Pearl Brooks, both of Uniontown [see below @ pg 15 for details of wedding].

Nov 2 - Rev. W.L. Gardner and Mrs. Amanda Mayhugh, of Prescott, Kansas.

Married:

Nov 6 - William H. Noble and Madge Myrtle Collins, both of Bronson.

Nov 3 - Clive Cunningham and Elsie Stotts, both of Englevale, were married by Probate Judge.

Nov 4 - H.L. Huff, of Hiattville, and Mrs. Pearl Perry, of Tunnel Hill, Indiana, were married by the Probate Judge.

pg 11, col 2

Died: The babe of Mr. and Mrs. Note Emerick died on Sunday evening with diphtheria, and was interred in the Tweedy cemetery. This is the second death in this family within ten days. Great sympathy is manifest in behalf of the sorrowing family. [Garland news]

pg 15, col 2

Married: At the Methodist parsonage at Fort Scott, on Wednesday, Nov. 1st, occurred the wedding of Mr. Ernest Brown, of Berlin, and Miss Viola Pearl Brooks. The contracting parties are well and favorably known throughout the community. Miss Pearl was one of Bourbon County’s efficient teachers and has many endearing qualities. Mr. Brown is an industrious farmer of the Berlin neighborhood. His friends are numbered by his acquaintances. The happy couple have gone to housekeeping on his father’s farm, where the best wishes of their many friends follow them. May their troubles be "little ones." [Oak Dale news]

pg 15, col 3

Born/Died: A little babe was born to Mr. and Mrs. T.G. Horn, Oct. 30th, but only lived a few hours. It was laid to rest in the Hepler cemetery. The family have the sympathy of their many friends. [Memorial poem follows]

Nov 17, 1905

pg 3, col 3

Married: Miss Ada Gardner was married on Wednesday to Mr. Silas A. Putnam, a prominent young business man of Leavenworth. The wedding took place at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. L.C. Cowan, about three miles west of Fort Scott. There were a large number of out of town guests, and many handsome gifts were received by the happy young couple. Misses Hazel Moulton, Leigh Penniman, Francis and Kittie Berge and Francis Cole assisted the hostess. Miss Edmonia Test skillfully rendered Lohengrin’s Wedding March, and Miss Hazel Kaiser sang "Beauty Eyes" just before the ceremony took place.

Married: Arthur R. Blakeley, one of the best young men in Fort Scott, and a member of the firm of Marble, Blakeley & Barr, was married on Wednesday evening to Miss Irene Shull, at the home of the bride’s parents at Knobnoster, Mo. Both Mr. and Mrs. Blakeley are most well and favorably known and no young couple has ever married in this town that had the well wishes of the larger part of the community than these young people are honored with.

pg 4, col 2

Died: Major A.S. Glover, a foremost citizen of this community, is no more. He was comparatively well until with a few hours of his death. Being accustomed to an active life and an industrious man he was in the habit of taking exercise in the way of moderate wood chopping and on Monday morning was at his task as usual. He made no complaint at dinner time excepting that he was very tired, and after eating sat down to rest. It was then he suffered a stroke of apoplexy from which he never recovered. Medical aid was immediately summoned, but it could avail nothing. Major Glover is survived by his widow and three children. Messrs. Edward and Clint Glover, the two sons, are prominent businessmen of Redfield, and the daughter, Mrs. Charles Runkle, resides near Hiattville. The entire family was present when the end came. The deceased moved to Kansas from Indiana in 1867 and resided in Fort Scott for a time, afterwards removing to his farm one half mile north of Redfield. Three years ago he retired and moved to town. Everyone was a friend to Major Glover and we all mourn his loss. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Green at the home at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon and interment made in Woods cemetery. The following is a short sketch of Major Glover’s life: He was born in Fountain county, Indiana, March the 19th, 1837, where he resided until the outbreak of the war of 1861. He served in the army for three years, and at the end of his term re-enlisted. He worked his way up through the various grades until he held a major’s commission and at the end of the war he was breveted a lieutenant colonel for meritorious service on the field of battle. He was a member of the 2nd New York cavalry. In 1863, he was married to Mary E. Hopkins of his home county in Indiana, and to this union five children were born. He was a member of W.H. Lytle Post, as well as The Old Settlers Association.

pg 12, col 2

Married: Miss Maude Speake, daughter of Robert Speake, of Uniontown, and Mr. Ed. Hopper, of Bronson, drove to Fort Scott, Monday to be married. They will make their home at Kernville, Crawford county, where Mr. Hopper is employed in the mines.

pg 13, col 3

Married: A very pretty home wedding occurred at the home of the bride’s grandmother, Mrs. Catherine Tennyson, at the noon hour Tuesday, November the 14th, when the marriage of Miss Gertie Tennyson and J.P. Sutton, of Texas was solemnized. The bride was attired in an artistically arranged dress of white mohair, with chrysanthemums in her hair. The groom wore the conventional black. The house was beautifully decorated in autumn leaves and lilies. The bride and groom descended the stairs and stood under an archway of autumn leaves, lilies and chrysanthemums, where the ceremony was performed by Rev. T.B. Gray. None but the immediate relatives and a few of the bride’s most intimate friends were present. Many very nice and useful presents were received. Silver knives and forks and a pickle fork, which were the bride’s grandfather’s were presented to her by her grandmother, Mrs. Catherine Tennyson; silver tablespoons and teaspoons by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Tennyson; silver pickle castor, Mr. and Mrs. E.O. Morris; butter knife, Frazier Tennyson; sugar shell, Frank Weyant; salt and pepper shakers, Cora Tennyson; linen towels, Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Atkisson, and a crystal berry set, Miss Flo McKinniss. The dinner was such as could only be prepared on a prosperous up-to-date farm, managed by a cook whose culinary record is second to none. The generosity of Grandmother Tennyson’s idea in providing for the inner man was fully displayed when she failed to recognize the customary habit of providing each guest with a little square box of cake. It is said she gave to each one a ten pound sack (?) instead. The bride was born and raised in this community, and has made her home with her grandmother for the last fifteen years. She is well and favorably known by every one as a good, unassuming and conscientious Christian girl, and in every way fitted to grace the home of a noble and true husband. She has the congratulations and best wishes of her many friends that her married life may be happy and useful and that the efforts of herself and husband to obtain an enviable record of fidelity and happiness may be attended with success. The groom is a young and prosperous stock man of Texas, and they will make their future home in that state.

pg 13, col 4

Born: Mr. and Mrs. O.D. Jones, of Huntington, Va., are the proud parents of an eleven pound boy. Mother and boy are doing fine. Mrs. Jones will be remembered by her old chums and schoolmates as Miss Imo Stroud.

pg 14, col 2 [Probate Court news]

Marriage Licenses:

Nov 7 - Luther E. Catt to Lulu Wallace, both of Fort Scott; Milton L. Ange to Bertha J. McDowell, both of Mapleton; John P. Miller to Mary J. Swain, both of Fort Scott.

Nov 8 - Frank Messenger to Helen Covert, both of Fort Scott; William D. Tucker to Mary West, both of Fulton.

Nov 10 - J.W. Purdom to Bessie McClimas, both of Bronson

pg 16, col 1

Born: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Cook are the proud parents of a nine pound boy who arrived at their home Thursday, November the 9th. [Rocky Point news]

Nov 24, 1905

pg 2, col 2

Born: Mr. and Mrs. W.I. Kipp, of 404 Crawford Street, are receiving the congratulations of their friends because of the addition to their family of a little daughter, who arrived a few days since. This makes the vote in that part of town on the girl question unanimous. There are eight unmarried young ladies and a large number of young ladies who are wedded living in that half block between Fourth and Fifth streets on the west side of Crawford, and not a boy in sight, excepting those who are the heads of families. We know of several couples having large families of boys who are applicants for houses in that vicinity.

pg 2, col 3 [Probate Court news]

Marriage Licenses:

Nov 14 - Silas O. Putnam, of Leavenworth, Kas., and Ada Theodosia Cardner of Fort Scott.

Nov 16 - Chester A. Campbell, of Fort Scott, and Pearl M. Morgan, of Fulton.

Nov 18 - Albert F. Lindsley and Elsie Arendt, both of St. Louis County, Mo.

Nov 21 - Grover C. Purkey, of Hepler, and Mamie L. Stringer, of Hiattville; George W. Goodall and Florence A. Hays, both of Fort Scott.

Married:

Nov 16 - Lee H. Snow and Gertrude McGann, both of Fort Scott, were married by the probate judge.

Nov 18 - Samuel W. Endicott and Minnie Johns, both of Garland, were married by the probate judge.

Nov 20 - Richard M. Clark and Julie A. Howerton, both of Garland, were married by the probate judge.

pg 3, col 1

Married: Kenneth G. Reid and Estella DeWein are married and have settled down at 420 south Eddy street. This fine young couple are both Fort Scott products, and the town is proud of them. The report of their wedding came to this office last week about seven minutes after our papers had gone to press and we were defeated in our plan for giving them the send-off we had anticipated, but we now join with the entire community in extending hearty well wishes for their future welfare and happiness.

pg 4, col 1

Died: Gladys, the youngest daughter of L.M. Bulla, living about six miles south west, died Sunday night of membranous croup. She was a very bright child, and a great favorite with everyone. Also on Nov 24 @ pg 11, col 2: Little Gladys, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Bulla. She was taken seriously ill last Friday. Dr. Miller was quickly summoned...[illegible]...The little sufferer battled fiercely with the dread disease until Sunday night. Scarcely ten minutes before she died she took the glass she had just drank from, walked across the room and placed it on the dresser, returned to her little bed and passed quickly away. Little Gladys was give years, three months and six days old. She was a bright and beautiful child, loved by all who knew her. Oh! How sadly she will be missed at home, at school and at Sabbath school, where she loved most to go. The home was filled to overflowing with sympathizing friends. The little white casket was completely hidden beneath floral offerings. The funeral services were conducted at the Dunkard church by Rev. Caldwell, of Redfield, assisted by Brother Green. The pall bearers were Lee Shull, Sam Russell, Will Russell and Burriel Davis, who bore the little white casket from the church to that strange land where friends meet without greeting (the burying ground). It is with profound sorrow that we learned of the death of little Gladys, and we extend to the bereaved family our heartfelt sympathy. [Memorial poem follows]

pg 5, col 1

Birthday: An enjoyable social occurred at the pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Atkisson on Saturday evening, November 18th in honor of the 22nd anniversary of the birth of their son, Marcellus. About eighty guests assembled at an early hour. The evening was spent in social games and party playing. After refreshments were served, all departed at midnight, saying they had spent a pleasant evening. Signed: One that was there. [Uniontown news]

pg 6, col 2

Died: Jesse B. Smith Dead - The clean citizen and prominent Fort Scott business man Jesse B. Smith is no more. In the prime of life and when he had but just succeeded after a good fight in establishing his business on a firm financial footing, and secured a comfortable home, he was called away by his Maker. His life is an object lesson to many of us, for he was ready, having joined the Presbyterian church at the age of fifteen, and lived a consistent Christian life since that time. Apparently a well man a week ago last Sunday, he was suddenly stricken with the fatal illness, and died last Sabbath afternoon, the victim of pneumonia. He is survived by an immediate family consisting of a faithful wife and two sons, Willett and Robert, who have in this hour of their deep affliction the honest sympathy of every man, woman and child in Bourbon county. The funeral services were conducted by the venerable follower of Christ, Rev. Dr. Porter who had been life long pastor to the deceased, and the body was interred in Evergreen cemetery Tuesday afternoon.

pg 14, col 1

Born: Mr. and Mrs. Jordan are the parents of a new baby boy. [Devon news]

pg 14, col 2

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Edd Beth, Nov. 13, a fine boy. Mother and child are doing well. [Harding news]

December 1905



Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

tcward@columbus-ks.com


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