REEL F606/KSHS Microfilm Collection

Abrams
Anderson
Aushutz
Baird & Whitelaw
Barnhart
Bingham
Blake
Braden
Bryant
Byington
Campbell
Casteel
Clay
Clyburn
Cochran
Coleman
Connell
Cox
Cox
Cox
Coyan
Crone
Curtis
Dean
Deatly
Deming
Deveraux
Felker
Felter
Flynn
Flynn
Forry
Fuller
Gates
Girten
Graham
Green
Greene
Grimes
Grubb
Grubb
Hartman
Helson
Hennessy
Hinton
Hixon
Hodges
Hoffman
Howey
Hutton
Iliff
Iliff
Iliff
Iliff
Iliff
Iliff
Irvin
Jeffries
Johnson
Johnson
Jones
Keating
Kennedy
Keyes
Keyes
Keyes
Kirby
Knight
Krull
Latimer
Lewis
Macadan
Manning
McAuley
McKale
Miller
Millikan
Morgan
Morrell
Morrell
Moss
Myrick
Plumley
Pretz
Prickett
Reese
Roberts
Roberts
Roberts
Roberts
Romig
Ruble
Secret
Sellers
Shephard
Shipman
Shirley
Shrout
Sice
Smith
Stephenson
Stevens
Stewart
Strickland
Swain
Tippie
Trussel
Walk
Ward
Wasson
Waters
Watron
Watron
Watron
Welty
Williams
Winsett
Witt
Witt
Wright

Fulton Independent
October 1886 through May 1887

Bourbon County’s Fulton Independent was a weekly newspaper. The first issue, dated August 8, 1884, was published on a Friday; beginning August 30, 1884, issues were published on Saturdays. A. W. Felter was Editor/Publisher. These extracts have been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net)

Fulton Independent

Oct 30, 1886, pg 2, col 2

Died: Near Tulare city, Tulare county, California, Sept. 20th, 1886, John Connell, aged 22 years, five months and eighteen days. The deceased was well known in this community, was born and raised in this (Freedom) township. He had been an invalid for a number of years, and went to California in hopes to improve his health, but in this was disappointed, and [on] the date above mentioned, death closed his suffering. Johny [sic], as he was familiarly called, was a good boy, and his many friends and associates here will learn with sadness of his death. We are forcibly reminded in this that death is no respecter of persons, but comes alike to old and young, and is a warning to all to prepare for earth’s great and last change. His mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fuller have the sympathy of their many friends in this community.

Born: To the wife of E. T. Trussel, a boy.

pg 3, col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Abrams, on the 20th, a boy weighing 9 lbs.

Nov 6, 1886, pg 2, col 3

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Pres. Howey, on the 1st, a girl. Mother and babe doing well.

Nov 13, 1886, pg 2, col 1

Married: On Monday, [Nov] 8th, by Father Watron, of Fort Scott, Mr. Thomas Kennedy and Miss Kate Deveraux. The young couple start out on life’s journey with health, happiness and hosts of friends, and with every prospect of success. May they live long, happy and useful lives.

Died: At his residence, one mile north of Hammond, on Sunday, [Nov] 7th, at 10 o’clock, of paralysis, William H. Sice, aged 56 years. Deceased leaves two children, both grown - Harry, who lives 2 miles northeast of Hammond, and Alice, who resided with her father. Mr. Sice was a respectable citizen and will be missed by his many friends in the vicinity of his home.

Nov 20, 1886, pg 3, col 5

Married: Garland can boast of a wedding in high life: On Monday, Nov. 8, Mr. S. J. Bryant, to Miss Ellen Clyburn, all of Garland. Both the contracting parties were well down the shady slope of life, but may their cup of happiness be none the less full. Mr. Bryant is proprietor of Garland mills.

Nov 27, 1886, pg 3, col 1

Died: The Star is again called upon to announce another death. Mrs. L. M. Hodges died last Saturday morning and on Sunday afternoon her remains were interred in Barnesville cemetery. She was an old lady and had been ailing a long time, and when summoned up higher was prepared to go. Those who knew her say that she was an exemplary Christian and a good motherly woman. (Hume Star)

Dec 4, 1886, pg 3, col 2

Died: At about 8 o’clock on Sunday morning last [Nov 28] the wife of W. R. Bingham passed away from earth, after a lingering illness of many months. She was about 20 years of age and had been married upward of five years. Mr. Bingham has the sympathy of all his friends in his sad bereavement.

Dec 11, 1886, pg 2, col 1

Died: At the family residence, 8 miles southeast of Fulton, in Osage township, on Monday evening, Dec. 7th, after a brief illness, in the 72nd year of his age, Benjamin F. Grubb. Deceased was an old settler of Osage township, having located there about the year 1857. He had a wide circle of friends and acquaintances and was generally esteemed as an upright, honorable and kindhearted man. His aged wife survives him. The funeral took place from the family residence on Wednesday, [Dec] 8th, under the auspices of Samaritan Lodge, No. 35, I. O. O. F., of which deceased was an honorable member. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. Mr. Campbell, an old and intimate friend of the family, and was a touching tribute to the life-long virtues of the deceased. The remains were interred at the Fitzpatrick cemetery southeast of Hammond, in the presence of about 500 sorrowing relatives, friends and brother Odd Fellows. The bereaved widow and children of the deceased have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad affliction. [Samaritan Lodge Resolution of Respect follows obituary.]

pg 3

col 1

Born: Mr. and Mrs. Hanson Ward rejoice in the acquisition of a bouncing boy, who came to cheer their hearts last Wednesday.

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Knight, on Tuesday [Dec] 7th, a son. Mother and child are both doing well, and the happy father is all smiles.

col 2

Married: On Wednesday, December 1st, C. M. Cochran, of Hammond, and Miss Viola Shephard, of Fort Scott, by Rev. D. M. Smith.

Dec 25, 1886, pg 3, col 1

Married: At Mr. E. G. Morrell’s, Barnesville, Kas., Dec. 23, 1886, by Rev. J. M. Iliff, Mr. John F. S. Grubb, of Hammond, and Miss Alice E. Morrell, of Barnesville.

Jan 1, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Born: On [Dec] 28th, to Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Hixon, a daughter. Dr. Roberts was in attendance and reports mother and child both doing well.

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Lem. Morgan on the 20th, a daughter.

col 4

Married: At the M. E. Parsonage, in Fulton, on Christmas eve, by Rev. J. M. Iliff, Mr. A. H. Jeffries, of Parsons, Kas., and Miss Susan F. Casteel, of Fulton.

Jan 8, 1887, pg 3

col 2

Died: A man named Jones, living near Barnesville, died at 9 o’clock last Sunday morning [Jan 2]. At the request of the family, we learn, a post mortem examination was held by Drs. Sellers, of Prescott and Roberts, of Fulton, Baird & Whitelaw of Barnesville, Williams & Chastine and Daywalt & Herndon, of Hume, Mo. The examination revealed a highly irritated condition of the bowels, produced, it is supposed, by injudicious use of very hard and [not] matured apples. Deceased leaves a wife and two small children.

col 3

Married: Mr. W. C. Coleman and Miss Amanda Aushutz were married at the residence of the bride’s parents, in Scott township, on Sunday, Dec. 24, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman are well known in this community, where they have hosts of friends who join in wishing the young couple a happy and prosperous voyage through life. (Hammond notes)

Jan 15, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Died: Sunday morning, Jan. 9th, at 3 o’clock, of croup, infant daughter of James and Martha Johnson, aged 2 months.

col 2

Died: At 6 o’clock p.m., on Monday, January 10th, 1887: Wilber E., son of Milton E. and Mary L. Braden, aged 5 months and 18 days. Funeral took place from the home of the parents on Tuesday, [Jan] 11th, at 10 o’clock a.m., Rev. J. M. Iliff officiating. [Note: See Reel #F605 at Jul 24, 1886, pg 3, col 1 for Jul 22 birth of the Braden baby. See below for death of another child in this family.]

Born: To Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Roberts, on Friday, January 7th, a son. The mother and child are both doing well, while the Dr. is the happiest man in Fulton. They have been receiving a shower of compliments from all their neighbors ever since the advent of the young M.D., and by all it is hoped that the youngster may grow up to useful manhood without serious accident or misfortune.

Married: On Monday, January 12, by Probate Judge Waters, at his office, Charles D. Graham and Mrs. Bethany E. Strickland, both of Fulton, Kas. (Fort Scott Monitor)

Married: On Saturday evening, Jan. 1st, 1887, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. W. E. Hinton, and Miss Nora Blake. Rev. J. Blake officiating. (Caney Kansas Chronicle)

Jan 22, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Died: At nine o’clock on Monday evening, [Jan] 17th, of pneumonia, an infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Manning, near West Liberty.

col 2

Died: At 7 o’clock on Saturday evening, January 15th, Pearl, daughter of James and Martha Johnson, aged six years and about six months. The funeral took place from the family residence, 2 1/4 miles northeast of Hammond, Kas., at one o’clock p.m., Sunday last, Rev. S. Keyes officiating. This makes the second child Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have lost within the short space of one week. They have the sympathy of everyone in the entire community in their great bereavement.

Jan 29, 1887, pg 3, col 2

In Memoriam: Mary A. Ruble died January 9th, 1886, aged 54 years. A little over one year has passed since we were called to follow this dear sister to the grave. She died far from the home of her youth, far from the loved associates of her earlier years, and it was deemed necessary to gather from that eastern home some items of family history to aid in preparing even this brief sketch of the life of our departed friend. She was the daughter of Henry and Annie Felker, born in West Beaver, Snyder Co., Pa, in 1832; was one of a family of fifteen children; was married in 1850 to Alexander Romig. Only two short years of wedded life was her’s [sic] to enjoy, when death entered the home, husband and child were both taken, and the wife was left alone. In 1854 Mrs. R. was married to Henry S. Ruble - living in Pa, until 1858, when Mr. Ruble decided to seek a home for his family in the then far distant west. Selecting a location in Henry Co., Mo., he wrote for his wife to come. That was not the day of fast express trains and it certainly required a rare degree of courage for a woman with two small children to attempt such a journey alone; but all difficulties were bravely met and the family were again united in their new home. But here the heroic wife’s health became broken and she suffered the fever and ague for fourteen months. Again it was decided to move, and in March, 1860, the family located to Bourbon Co., Kan. Here for more than a quarter of a century the husband and wife bore the burden and privations of life in a frontier state, reaping also success and prosperity that crowned at last their years of patient toil. Yet these passing years brought occasions of sorrow as the parents followed to the grave the fourth of five little ones, whose short lives were yet long enough to brighten the home while they stayed, and leave an aching void in the circle from whence they were taken. Here also a more crushing agony came, when in March, 1885, the strong man fell at his post, and wife and children, with tear-blinded eyes and grief-stricken hearts, laid him to rest by the side of the little ones. But the cycles of time roll on, unheeding the somber cloud that darkens all our sky, and anon the smitten widow took up again life’s duties and cares, cheered and sustained by the ever-thoughtful kindness of her only son and loving daughters. Yet only a few months of a lonely life were her’s [sic] to endure, and then suddenly to us all the death angel came, and she crossed the dark river, and we laid her to rest in the silent city of the dead, where so many of her home-treasures were already sleeping. [Poem follows] The religious life of our sister Ruble is worthy of more especial notice. Converted at the age of seventeen, she united with the Lutheran church in 1849, always loyal to her early consecration of heart and life to the service of God; ever counting it her greatest joy to meet with His people and join in His worship; ever seeking to win those around her to choose that better part, which she found so precious to her own soul, her greatest anxiety was to see her children devoted followers of Christ. On New Year’s Day, of 1886, Sister Ruble joined in the labor of a festal occasion for the Sunday school, and, though very weary, in the evening her seat was filled in the house of God. Again on Saturday eve, she met with the worshipers in Zion and her voice joined with others in song and prayer. Thus was finished her active work on earth. A few short days of patient suffering were endured, and then she slept in Jesus. The memory of our beloved sister is sacredly cherished in many hearts. The rich legacy of her loving tenderness and her earnest Christian life, remain to comfort the surviving children. As they mourn their irreparable loss, let them look upward even through their tears, and wait for a glad family reunion in the kingdom of Heaven. (Signed "D. E. K.")

Feb 5, 1887, pg 3, col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hennessy, Wednesday evening [Feb] 2nd, a daughter. Mother and child are both doing well.

Died: At the home of the parents near Fulton, on Monday January 24th, at 3 o’clock p.m., Addie, daughter of Eugene McAuley, aged 4 weeks.

Feb 12, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John Shirley, on the 5th, a daughter. Dr. Roberts reports mother and child both doing well.

col 2

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John Cox, Friday [Feb] 4th, a daughter. Mother and child are both reported to be doing well. Madam Gossip will please call and see the baby.

Married: At the residence of Mrs. Moss, Hammond, Kas., by Rev. J. M. Iliff, on Thursday, Feb. 3d, Mr. Elmer Witt, of Hammond, and Miss Nancy Barnhart, of West Liberty. A large number of guests witnessed the ceremony and many presents were made to the happy couple.

Feb 19, 1887

pg 2, col 3

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents, seven miles southwest of Fulton, on Wednesday, February 16th, by Rev. J. M. Iliff, of Fulton, Mr. E. T. Stewart and Miss Cora Witt, both of Bourbon County. The ceremony was solemnized in the presence of some seventy invited guests. The bride was the recipient of many handsome and valuable presents. A bountiful repast was spread and many were the expressions of good will and wishes of the guests for the happy future of the young couple. The Independent family was not forgotten by the genial host and hostess, and hereby tenders its acknowledgments for a goodly portion of choice viands prepared for the occasion. Our best wishes are tendered to the happy couple.

Pg 3

col 1

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents, Feb. 14th, Charles S. Plumley, of Neodasha, Kas., and Arthelia T. Dean, of Fulton, the officiating clergyman being Rev. F. M. Shrout, of Fulton. [See obituary for Mrs. Plumley below, Oct 8, 1887, pg 3, col 4.]

col 2

Died: Feb. 6, Grandma Myrick, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Mapleton.

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Deatly, Feb. 7, a son. Mother and child are doing well, but it is doubtful whether William will pull through or not. (Pleasant View news)

Feb 26, 1887, pg 3, col 2

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents in Fulton, Sunday, [Feb] 20th, by Rev. Father Watron, of Ft. Scott, Mr. Frank Forry, of Fulton, and Miss Nan. Teresa Green, youngest daughter of Hon. W. H. and Mary Green, of Fulton. The ceremony was a quiet one, only members of the family being invited. Mr. Forry has long been engaged as salesman in the mercantile firm of M. A. Stapleton & Co., and has a host of friends. The bride is too well and favorably known to the people of this neighborhood to need special mention by us. The Independent was not forgotten when the dainty bits of cake and other delicacies were passed around, and joins the countless friends in wishing the newly-wedded couple a happy and prosperous future.

Mar 19, 1887, pg 3, col 2

Died: At 7:30 o’clock on Wednesday morning, [Mar] 16th, William Byington, aged 73 years. The funeral took place from the family residence on Friday at 2 o’clock p.m. Deceased came to Kansas thirty years ago, from Pennsylvania. He leaves a daughter - Mrs. Prickett, a widow lady well known to many of our readers, also a son aged about 23 years, unmarried. His death is mourned by a large list of friends and acquaintance, and the bereaved children have the sympathy of the community in this sad hour of affliction. [A Memorial Resolution dated Mar 18, 1887, for Mr. Byington from Eldora Lodge #28 A.F. & A.M., Mapleton appears on Mar 26, pg 3, col 2.]

Mar 26, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Married: At Fulton, Kansas, March 13th, by Rev. S. Keyes, Geo. T. Helson and Miss Sophronia Anderson, both of Ft. Scott.

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents, near Uniontown, by ‘Squire Reese, on Thursday, March 10th, Albert Tippie, of Timber Hill township to Miss Alice Hartman, of Marion township. (Telephone)

col 2

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents, in this city, on Thursday evening, [Mar] 24th, at 8 o’clock, by Rev. J. M. Iliff, pastor of the M. E. church, Mr. Jas. B. Lewis and Miss Ora Greene, both of Fulton. A small number of invited guests were present and witnessed the ceremony. Mr. Lewis is so well known in the community that it is unnecessary for us to enlarge upon his many sterling qualities of head and heart, while his handsome young bride has during her brief sojourn in our city won a warm place in the affections of all. The Independent joins the large circle of friends and acquaintances in wishing the wedded couple a future replete with happiness and success.

pg 4, col 2

Married: Miss Carrie Clay, daughter of H. P. Clay, of Stanton township, was married on Wednesday to E. J. Curtis, of the same place, Rev. Thos. Stephenson performing the ceremony. The lady is highly accomplished and universally respected, and the groom a well to do young farmer; and they start out in life with bridge prospects. (Pleasanton Observer)

Died: On Friday, March 11th, Mrs. Maggie Millikan, wife of Al. Millikan, aged about 19 years. Deceased was ill but about two weeks, of pneumonia, and although all was done for her that medical skill could devise or loving friend suggest, she gradually sank under the influence of the terrible malady until death relieved her of her suffering. The funeral took place from her home near Dayton.

Apr 2, 1887

Died: The wife of Columbus Williams, living east of Prescott, was buried at the Fulton cemetery last Friday afternoon. A large procession accompanied the body to its last resting place.

Apr 9, 1887

Died: At 10:50 o’clock a.m. on Monday, April 4th, after a brief illness of paralysis, Michael Walk, aged 80 years, 4 months and 10 days. The interment took place on Wednesday, [Apr] 6th, at the Wright cemetery. The deceased was born in Davidson county, N.C., November 24, 1806; was married to Miss Rebecca Swain in that county, in 1833; removed to Adams county, Ill., in 1837. He remained there until the winter of 1851-2, when he removed his family to Greene county, Mo. After a residence there of about 3 years, he again joined the westward tide of emigrants and in May, 1855, landed in Bourbon county, Kansas. Owing to the unsettled state of affairs prevailing here at that time, he remained only one year and then removed to Henry county, Mo., where he remained until 1859, when he again came west and settled in this county. Here he remained until 1864, when he removed to Douglas county, Kas., where he remained until the spring of 1867, when he again returned to Bourbon county, where he continued to live up to the day of his death. His estimable wife died in January, 1875, at their farm home east of this city. He resided on the farm until he sold it, in the spring 1883, since which time his home has been with his son, William, in this city. Six children were born to this couple, three of whom are still living, viz., William L. and Samuel, both residents of this county, and Mrs. Christian Krull, of Whatcom county, Washington Ty. Deceased was for more than 40 years a member of the M. E. church, although not connected with any charge at the time of his decease. He was well known and universally esteemed for his honest and upright conduct, and his sudden death has cast a feeling of sadness over the whole community. His children have the sympathy of our people in their bereavement.

Apr 9, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Secret, of Hammond, on Saturday morning, April 2d, a daughter.

col 2

Married: At the residence of the Justice, on Saturday evening, March 26th, by Wesley Shipman, J. P., Charles Grimes and Miss Esther Kirby, both of Prescott, Kas.

Died: On Tuesday morning, the 29th of March, Mrs. Hugh Coyan. Interment took place at the Mapleton cemetery. Deceased leaves a large family to mourn her loss. (Pleasant View news)

Apr 16, 1887, pg 3 col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Irvin, on Sunday evening, [Apr] 10th, a son. Mother and child are both doing well.

Apr 23, 1887, pg 3

col 1

Died: It is reported that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wasson lost a son aged about 8 years, by death last week.

Died: Note: A cyclone hit the town of Prescott about 7 o’clock on Thursday evening, Apr 21. Several articles deal with the details of the storm including property damage to homes and businesses. Ten people died, among them: Jacob Stevens, Mrs. Jeff Crone, Miles Miller, the child of W. B. McKale, Miss Mary Macadan, P. Flynn’s 12 year old son, Mrs. S. E. Wright, S. P. Deming’s child aged 6 months. Please consult this issue and others immediately following the disaster.

May 7, 1887, pg 3, col 2

Died: At her home in Pittsburg, Pa., Sunday, April 24, after an illness of more than three months, Mrs. Annie M. Hoffman, aged 38 years. Deceased was the sister of the gentlemanly and efficient ticket and station agent at this place, Mr. J. A. Pretz, who has the sympathy of all his friends in this great bereavement.

May 14, 1887, pg 3

col 2

Died: At the residence of Lee Cox, near Barnesville, Kas., Tuesday, May 10th, Hobson Cox, aged 79 years. The funeral took place from the residence on Wednesday at 4 o’clock in the afternoon, Rev. Keyes officiating, and the remains were interred at the Jolly cemetery, near West Liberty. Deceased was born in Richmond, Va., abut the year 1808. He came to Kansas about six years ago. He was a cousin of the father of Gus, Nero, Lee, John and Lafayette Cox, with whom many of our readers are personally acquainted.

col 3

At the residence of the bride’s parents, in New Albany, Ind., Tuesday, May 10th, 1887, Mr. Harry G. Gates, of this city, and Miss Viletta Hutton, of New Albany. The happy couple reached Fulton on the 2 o’clock train Thursday [May] 12th, where they were met by a number of friends. Mr. Gates certainly needs no introduction to most of our readers in Bourbon and adjoining counties, as owing to his connection for a number of years past with the Prescott nursery as junior partner and salesman also, he has had business transactions with a very great number of people, and all unite in according to him and the firm of which he is a part a reputation for genuine business talent, upright and honorable conduct and gentlemanly courtesy. The bride is not a stranger to all the good people of this community, from the fat that she spent a number of months within the past year visiting friends here, and became quite well acquainted here during that period. She has been universally spoken of as a modest young lady of graceful and winning manners and a warm and affectionate disposition. The people of Fulton will gladly welcome the young couple to their city, where they will have a large array of friends who will find pleasure in meeting them often.

May 21, 1887, pg 3, col 1

Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents in Butler, on Thursday, May 5, 1886 [sic], at 9 p.m., by Rev. J. B. Welty of Pleasanton, E.D. Latimer of Pleasanton to Miss Minnie Winsett. (Pleasanton Observer)

May 28, 1887

pg 3, col 2

Married: At the Catholic church in this city on Monday, [May] 23d, at 10 o’clock a.m., by Rev. Father Watron, of Ft. Scott, Mr. William E. Flynn, of Fort Scott, and Miss Alice Keating, of Fulton. The ceremony was performed in the presence of some 300 spectators and the ceremony was said to be beautiful and affecting. Mr. Flynn is well known to many of our readers as a rising young lawyer, and was raised here in Freedom township. The bride, a handsome and accomplished young lady, is the daughter of John Keating, one of Bourbon county’s prosperous farmers and an upright, honorable citizen who has resided here a great many years, and whose friends and acquaintances are numbered by the score. The Independent tenders its best wishes to the happy couple. [There is a related article, quite lengthy, on Jun 4, 1887, pg 3, col 3 which lists the wedding presents received by the couple.]

pg 4, col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. George Girten, this week, a girl. Mother and child are doing well and George is happy.

June 1887 through December 1887



Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

tcward@columbus-ks.com


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