Adams
Adams
Adams
Adams
Adams
Adams
Allen
Allen
Andrews
Arnett
Ayers
Bailey
Balding
Balding
Balding
Barnett
Bender
Billings
Bissantz
Bissantz
Bissantz
Bissantz
Bogges
Botting
Botting
Brown
Byerly
Callison
Campbell
Carl
Carruth
Caruthers
Catham
Chitwood
Chitwood
Clark
Clements
Clements
Clements
Clements
Clemons
Cliff
Cochran
Corliss
Cornelison
Cornue
Davis
Davis
Davis
Denton
Doles
Douglass
Dunlap
Dunlap
Dunn
Dunn
Ellis
Ellsworth
Farmer
Fishburn
Fishburn
Fishburn
Fishburn
Fishburn
Flynn
Follmer
Fuller
Fulton
Fulton
Furrow
Graves'
Green
Gross
Grunn
Hanks
Hardy
Hardy
Hargis
Hasting
Hawkins
Helton
Hinsey
Hoagland
Hoagland
Holley
Hookstra
Hookstra
Hookstra
Hunter
Hutcheson
Ingraham
Jones
Lacy
Lake
Landis
Lane
Lee
Lockert
Lockert
Lockert
Lockert
Lockert
Lockert
Logue
Ludwick
Marshall
Martin
Mason
McDaniel
McDaniel
McElwain
McEnany
McEnany
McKinney
McKinney
Mertes
Mertes
Miles
Miles
Miles
Miller
Miller
Moon
Moriarity
Morlan
Morland
Morris
Neff
Neff
Neff
Owens
Owens
Owens
Owens
Pardee
Pedrick
Pedrick
Peterson
Pickering
Pierce
Pierce
Plunkett
Poole
Prater
Prater
Pucket
Putman
Rawlins
Reynolds
Ricord
Risner
Risner
Roberts
Rouse
Salyer
Saunders
Sears
Seiflets
Shaw
Shepler
Shutts
Skeen
Slaughter
Strain
Tanner
Taul
Taylor
Thompson
Thompson
Updergraff
VanTrees
Walton
Wheat
Whitaker
Whitaker
Whitaker
Whitaker
Williams
York
York
Youart
Young
REEL #S745/KSHS Microfilm Collection

Union

The Union was a weekly newspaper, published in Sun City, Kansas, beginning November 1884, with Mr. Robert A. Neff as Editor. In November 1886, Mr. Neff was succeeded by W.A. Campbell, who in turn was replaced in February 1888 by J.V. Fishburn who remained in the position until September 1888. At that point, J.D. Youart and Rev. C.W. Owens took over as Editors. Rev. Owens resigned in December and Mr. Youart continued through the last issue published in March 1889. This reel begins Friday, November 1884 and continues through Friday, March 1, 1889, when publication was discontinued. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reel to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net)



Dec 12, 1884, pg 3, col 2
Died: Another pioneer has climbed the golden stair. Mr. Wm. Carl, perhaps more generally known as Buckskin Bill of the Rocky Mountains, died recently at his home in southwest Missouri. Mr. C. was one of the first settlers in Barber county. He located near Lake City in 1878, where he continued to live until last spring. He, in his normal state, was a man of keen perceptions, and of accurate business habits. He, during the past decade, wasted considerable money, and innumerable golden opportunities. R.I.P.

Dec 19, 1884, pg 3, col 2
Married: Mr. James Miles and Miss Emma Hookstra, of Sun City, Kansas, were joined in wedlock on Tuesday evening, Rev. Gillam officiating. Jimmie is the gentlemanly druggist of Sun [City] and his bride is a charming young lady well known in this community. [See below @ Sep 2, 1887 for death of Mrs. Emma Miles.]

Dec 26, 1884, pg 3, col 1
Born: A stranger came into the household of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fishburn this week. It was a girl of regulation weight. All the friends are glad to know that the "wee one" and mother are happy. Jack is as well as could be expected.

Jan 9, 1884, pg 3, col 2
Died: At the residence of Louis Lockert, near this place, on the 5th day of January, '85, James M. Rawlins. The death of Mr. Rawlins was entirely unexpected. It was instantaneous and painless - such a death as he had often wished for, when death should come. He arose from bed Monday morning feeling as well as usual, conversed a short time with some of the family, suddenly fell upon his knees in an attitude of prayer, and was in an instant dead. Heart disease was the cause. Mr. R. was born in Indiana nearly sixty-nine years ago, but when he had attained his manhood went to Chicago where he engaged in business extensively, but not as profitably as he had expected. Becoming tired of city life he turned his face westward - finally locating in this neighborhood ten years ago. He immediately invested his limited capital in cattle, and looking after that interest has been his principal avocation since, although he not infrequently speculated in real estate. Mr. R. was a positive but kindly old man. He adhered to his opinions with great tenacity, but was courteous in expressing them. Although unmarried he was a good friend to women and children, and has many times contributed money in aid of the distressed. He was simple in his tastes and habits, but his simplicity was not that of ignorance for he was a reader and possessed a mind well stored with useful information. He was a graduate of a good medical college, but practiced only a short time. Mr. R. had accumulated a handsome fortune, variously estimated at from $75,000 to $100,000, consisting of valuable real estate, a large interest in the Comanche Pool, and other desirable property. The relatives in Kansas are few - only Frank Farmer and two other nephews in Pratt county, we believe. One brother lives in Kansas City, and another elsewhere. The father of the deceased, aged ninety-one years, for whom the son had an affectionate reverence, lives in Indiana. They have all been telegraphed for. Old friend, "hail and farewell!" All of us who knew you in your Kansas home, lay our wreaths of affection upon your grave! "Lord, keep his memory green." The funeral services for Mr. Rawlins took place yesterday afternoon [Thursday, Jan 8, 1885]. Rev. J.M. Adams pronounced in his plain way, a touching tribute in memory of his departed friend.

Jan 30, 1885
pg 3, col 3
Died: We are pained to learn of the death of Mrs. Poole, formerly Miss Minnie Updergraff. She died after a short illness, at Medicine Lodge, Tuesday morning. Mrs. P. - or Minnie as she was generally called - came to this county with her parents, when a child. All of the older residents knew her and remember her affectionately. She grew up to womanhood in our midst, and although young in years was counted "an old settler." From the dark days of '74, to the time of her death, she had a kind word for all who knew her and her memory will linger long with them.
pg 3, col 3
Died: At the residence of Wm. Green, near Sun City, January 29th, 1885, Ollie Davis, aged 18 years. Miss Davis had been ailing only a few days, and although seriously ill, her death was not at first anticipated. She however had a premonition of approaching dissolution, which was only too well realized. She had been engaged in teaching school in the district west of, and adjoining this. Her kind, quiet manner, her patient discharge of her duties as a teacher, caused her to be idolized by her pupils and beloved by their parents. The father and mother of the deceased live near Sharon, to which place the remains were taken for interment. Death, this winter, seems to have reaped a rich harvest from among the young. The "flowers that grown between" have been his favorites. And @ Feb 13, pg 3, col 1: The Medicine Lodge and Sharon papers of last week contain touching notices of the death of Miss Ollie Davis.

Mar 13, 1885, pg 3, col 1
Married: Sam Bender, now in the married ranks, has "settled down" with his family on Turkey Creek.

Mar 27, 1885, pg 3, col 2
Married: Miles Risner is presumably a married man. Last night - Thursday - he was united in matrimonial bonds, to Miss Ada Pucket, by Rev. J.M. Adams. Both bride and groom have resided in this vicinity since their childhood, and have many friends who wish them well. The "teacher" sends kindly greeting to his pupil.

Apr 3, 1885
pg 3, col 2
Married: At the residence of the bride's parents in Sun City, on Sunday March 29, 1885, by Rev. J.M. Adams, Thomas Dunlap to Rosa Callison. The happy couple are tendered the congratulations of the Union "force," who wish them their full share of prosperity and happiness in the future.
pg 3, col 2
Died: Mary Bailey died recently in Montana, where she has been living since her marriage. She was well known and highly esteemed in this community.
pg 3, col 3
Married: Capt. H.H. Hardy, our urbane probate judge, on last Sunday united in the bonds of matrimony Capt. Horace Pardee and Mrs. Emma Bogges, both of Little Mule Creek, this county. Both the contracting parties have arrived at the age of maturity when marriage means business and not a sentimental fancy, and we predict for them a life of happiness. May they prosper and the Captain's shadow never grow less.

May 29, 1885, pg 3, col 3
Died: Libbie Adams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Adams, at Sun City, on May 26, 1885. Age three years, eight months and eleven days. "Seest thou the work of Death." Darling little Libbie is dead. Oh! The agony those words bring to some hearts today. Aching hearts yearning for one who can never return. Despite the assurance of He who rules all things for the best, aching hearts cry out, in their grief and despair, for their darling. Those of us who have passed through the trying ordeal, know how to sympathize with the grief-stricken parents, and we can only wait the liberal hour when we can cross the dark mysterious river, and on the bright eternal shore, be re-united with our darling ones. Little Libbie has gone, but not for all time. She has entered the kingdom of He who says: "Suffer little children to come unto Me, and forbid them not, for of Such is the Kingdom of Heaven." Papa and Mama, she is there awaiting you. Free from all pain and care, she is mingling with the angel throng around the bright eternal throne. We mourn today, but on the morrow our sands are run, and we leave this preparatory world of grief and pain to enter upon a life eternal.

Jun 5, 1885, pg 3, col 3
Died: In Sun City, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. T.B. Reynolds, on Sunday morning, May 31st, 1885, at half past two o'clock, Mr. Gilbert L. Billings, in the 76th year of his age. The deceased was born in Summers, Con., and moved to Comanche county, Kas., in 1878, He has long been an invalid, suffering from the effects of paralysis for a number of years. The Rev. Mr. Adams officiated at the funeral, which took place from the residence, and the remains were followed to its last resting place by a large number of friends and acquaintances.

Aug 14, 1885
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Saunders, Sunday, August 9th, a son; weight, twelve pounds. Mother and child are doing well, and strong hopes are entertained that Frank will survive the trying ordeal.
pg 3, col 1
Born: Louis Lockert is the father of a bouncing baby boy, regulation weight. The event took place Wednesday morning. Louis is away from home, but when he returns it will be with a bucket of red paint, and the town will assume a scarlet complexion.
pg 3, col 2
Born: Still another. George Graves' home was brightened, Wednesday morning, by the appearance of a nine pound daughter. George is astonishingly happy and feels two feet higher. Cigars will pass around in due time.

Aug 21, 1885
pg 3, col 1
Born: Estie Whitaker is the proud father of a six-pound daughter, born August 19th. Estie says "She's little, but Oh, my!"
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Whitaker, August 14th, a daughter of regulation weight. Frank is correspondingly happy, and steps high.

Sep 4, 1885, pg 3, col 3
Died: August 30th, 1885, Newton, only son of Mr. and Mrs. W.O. Thompson. Our friends, Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, have been sadly bereaved by the death of their only son. Human consolation is of little effect, and only He that tempereth the winds to the shorn lamb can sooth the sorrow of the father and mother. The family have the sincere sympathy of many friends in this community.

Sep 25, 1885, pg 3, col 3
Died: "Death of A.A. Barnett - 'I was a stranger and ye took me in' " - Mr. A.A. Barnett died at the Commercial Hotel at about 9 o'clock Monday evening, of malarial fever. Last May he came from Chicago, in company with Dick Phillips, since which time he has been residing at the Phillips ranch, south of this place. Of his past we have been able to learn nothing, comparatively speaking. He was a fine, intelligent looking young man, about thirty-two years of age, and had no doubt filled a prominent position in life. Up to Sunday he had been sick ten days, but refused to have a doctor called, not recognizing the nature of his complaint, and thinking he would overcome the disease himself. Sunday he consented to the advice of parties at the ranch, and came to town. He secured a room at the Commercial and retired. Dr. Smith was called and found the patient to be in a delirious condition, in which condition he remained up to his death. Dr. Smith remarked to the writer Sunday night that he had no hopes of saving the patient, as the disease, having had a run of ten days with nothing to check it, had made such fearful progress that Barnett was virtually dying when he came to town. Dr. Smith held a consultation with Dr. Hutcheson, of Lake City, but their united efforts were fruitless, the patient gradually sinking until death relieved him. Although he came among us a stranger, he was treated as a brother. A stranger in a strange land, yet a brother among brothers. All that mortal hands could do to ease his last moments was done. Here was displayed that magnanimity, that open-handed, free-heartedness of the western people. A stranger came into our midst, sick - dying. Did we ask who he was? Did we ask for his social standing, or pasty history? No. We knew he was a man - a stranger, and we cared for him with all the tenderness of a brother. He was buried in a beautiful spot in the new cemetery, and as "dust returned to dust," each heart offered a silent prayer for the sorrow stricken mother, who was anxiously awaiting the return of her boy.

Oct 16, 1885, pg 3, col 3
Died: Mr. Ambrose Denton, one of the proprietors of Elm Mills, died at his residence at Elm Mills, last Monday. Mr. Denton had resided in this county eight years, and was well and favorably known. Mr. Denton has served the people twice in the capacity of county surveyor, once by appointment, and once by election.

Oct 23, 1885
pg 3, col 2
Born: Last Saturday a daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Fishburn. Bill evidently believes in keeping with the fashion.
pg 3, col 3
Died: Mr. W.H. Moriarity died at his ranch, in this county, last Sunday, and was buried Monday in the Old Kiowa cemetery, under the directions of the I.O.O.F. order. Brother Moriarity came to Barber county in 1878, was a good citizen, a good neighbor, well liked and respected by all.
pg 3, col 3
Married: A wedding took place on Bear Creek Sunday, the contracting parties being Geo. R. Brown and a Miss Clemons. Uncle Tom Whitaker officiated and tied the matrimonial knot. The Union wishes the happy couple a life full of joy and success. May life's path run through milk and honey, instead of ups and downs; secure plenty of honest money, and a lot of little Browns.

Oct 30, 1885, pg 3, col 2
Birthday: October the 27th was the thirty-first anniversary of E.P. Caruthers, editor of the Medicine Lodge Index. Ed., permit us to congratulate you, and wish you may live long enough to reach the exalted pot bellied weather prophet position of centenarian, when we will be pleased to congratulate you again.

Nov 20, 1885, pg 3, col 2
Died: John Shepler, formerly express agent at Medicine Lodge, died on the 15th. Mr. Shepler had been in poor health for some time, having been afflicted with consumption for a number of years.

Dec 4, 1885, pg 3, col 4
Married: Dec. 3rd, by Rev. J.M. Adams, Mr. Fielding Salyer and Miss Katie Whitaker, at the residence of Rev. Adams. The Union joins their numerous friends in congratulations, and wishes the young couple a prosperous journey through the voyage of life. May they ever dwell in harmony as they walk hand-in-hand through the era of matrimonial bliss and ultimately receive its greatest blessing. Two souls with but a single tho't; two hearts that beat as one.

Dec 18, 1885, pg 3, col 4
Born: Miles Risner is happy over the fact of his being the father of a baby girl. The event took place on the 7th.

Dec 25, 1885, pg 3, col 2
Born: December 22nd, 1885, to the wife of T.J. Dunlap, a girl of regulation weight, Dr. J.H. Higbee officiating. Both mother and daughter are doing well.

Feb 19, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Married: Dennis Flynn, one of the brightest and most enterprising business men of New Kiowa, was on the 10th [of Feb] united with Mrs. Ada Catham in the holy bonds of matrimony. Friend Flynn, permit the Union to extend its congratulations and state that you have formed a happy union where your name is not Dennis in the parlance of the period. Joy be with you.

Feb 26, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Born: On February 21st, to the wife of Mr. F.A. Gross, a boy of regulation weight. Both Mother and son are doing well. Dr. Higbee officiated.

Mar 19, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Born: On March 14th, to the wife of Nelson Morlan, a son of regulation weight, christened Jesse Hendrickson Morlan. Dr. Higbee officiated, and informs us that mother and son are doing well.

Apr 9, 1886, pg 3, col 4
Died: "The Work of Death" - It is with feelings of the deepest regret we learn of the death of Mrs. Mason, wife of Henry M. Mason, north of Lake City. Mrs. Mason died at four o'clock Tuesday evening, after a very protracted case of child labor. She was born in Woodford county, Ky., and came from one of the best families of that state. Last spring she came with her husband to Barber county, where she had already won a host of friends, who mourn her loss, and deeply sympathize with the sorrow-stricken husband. Words of sympathy cannot lessen the husband's grief, or call back the one who has forever gone. It is but the fulfillment of the inevitable - the wish of the Master, and though the cross may seem heavy to bear, and the heart cry out neath its load, yet we must bear it, and bow in submission to that unknown power, for such is the decree of the Eternal Court.

Apr 16, 1886, pg 3, col 4
Died: "Eternal Rest" - At Sun City, Kansas, April 10th, 1886, Robert Fishburn in the 71st year of his age. Mr. Fishburn was a native of Yorkshire, England and had resided in this country since 1863. For more than 13 years he had lived in this county, coming with the advance guard early in '73. He knew all about the dangers and hardships of pioneer life, and performed in a manly way his duties in the first settlement of the country. His quaint old country humor and kindly ways made friends of those who knew him, and there were none of the older settlers with whom he was unacquainted. He was a man of sterling integrity and untiring industry, and was stricken by the fatal illness while at work. The large concourse of people, who witnessed the last sad rites, attested the kind opinion of his neighbors who had known him so long and so well.

Apr 23, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Born: Green Adams is happy. A bald-headed young lady, without any teeth, engaged board at his house on the 15th of this month. She doesn't talk much, owing probably to the fact that she isn't conversant with the American language, but Green thinks she will outgrown the difficulty.

Apr 30, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Married: "Double Harness" - Our winsome county superintendent of public instruction, Miss Gerlie Skeen, was on the 21st [of Apr] united in marriage with Mr. M.J. Lane. Both of the contracting parties are well known throughout Barber county. M.J. Lane is well and popular known throughout the county as "Uncle Mat," although a young man in years. We give a yank to our poetical churn, For it's a long Lane that has no turn, And as every thing seems serene, We spin a yarn out of a Skeen. Gerlie, Gerlie, who'd ever tho't that You'd descend to adore Mat!
May 28, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Married: Mr. Frank Lockert and Miss Dora Douglass, on the 24th [of May] at Medicine Lodge. These young people are well and favorably known in this vicinity and their many friends unit with the Union in wishing them a long and happy life.

Jul 2, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Married: "Wedding Bells" - Wednesday evening a number of guests assembled at the Whitaker House and witnessed the marriage of Lunday Hawkins to Miss Ida Hoagland. The ceremony was performed by Judge T.P. Whitaker, in a solemn and impressive manner. Due congratulations followed, after which the doors leading to the dining room were thrown open and the guests invited to enter and partake of the wedding feast. And such a feast it was. The tables fairly groaned beneath their loads of eatables. It was a banquet fit for a king, and one that will long be remembered by the merry guests there assembled. After supper the party adjourned to the Commercial House where an orchestra had been provided for the occasion. And in time to the soft strains of music that filled the air with delicious strains of harmony, whiled away the hours in merry dancing, till the golden streaks of dawn bade an adue [sic] to the lingering night. The Union extends its congratulations to the happy couple, as they enter upon their voyage of matrimonial bliss. May they walk hand-in-hand along the path of life, basking in the sunshine of peace and contentment, and when the hand of time has turned their locks to silver, may they look back upon an unregretted past.

Jul 9, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Died: At the residence of James York, near this city on Wednesday, July 7th, Mrs. Sally Dunn aged seventy three years. Mrs. Dunn has had good health up to the time of her death and was known in this vicinity as "Aunt Sally."

Aug 20, 1886, pg 3, col 4
Born: Harry Plunkett is the happiest man on earth. He wears a smile that causes his mouth to resemble an old gum shoe stretched around a telegraph pole. His joy knows no bounds, and his hysterical glee borders upon hilarity. It is all on account of a son that made his debut at Harry's home Tuesday night. A bouncing baby boy of regulation weight and facial expressions. The mother and son are doing well, while it is hoped that with proper care, and due caution, Harry will survive the trying ordeal.

Sep 24, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Anniversary: The surprise party given last Monday evening to Louis Lockert and wife, by a number of their friends, in honor of the twenty-first anniversary of their wedded life was an enjoyable affair. Louie says he will "stay wid us" during the balance of his voyage through life.

Oct 1, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Born: The home of Milt Clements was brightened by the advent of a young daughter last Saturday evening. The young lady has evidently come to stay, a fact which causes Milt to smile a smile of smiling smilingness.

Oct 22, 1886
pg 3, col 2
Married: The Medicine Lodge Index, of [Oct] 20th, contained the following: "Unless there is some un-looked-for change in the programme, Alex. R. McKinney, of this city, will be married at Richmond, Ky., to Miss Emma Cornelison, a sister of Mrs. T.S. Proctor, of this county. The young lady is well and favorably known in this county, where she made many friends during her visits. Mr. McKinney is to be commended for his excellent taste and sound judgment in the selection of a wife."
pg 3, col 3
Married: Dr. R.C. Hutcheson and Miss Susan Andrews were married at the residence of the bride's parents, near Lake City, on the 14th. Rev. W.R. Hutcheson officiated. We congratulate the happy couple and wish them a life filled with the richest and noblest blessings. We came so near telling the truth in a recent article about the Sunday-school convention, wherein the Doctor and a domestic article were conspicuously mentioned, that our hair stands upon end, and, like the frightful ghost, will not down. Forgive us this time, kind Doctor, and we will never do so again. What, never? Hip, never!!

Nov 19, 1886
pg 3, col 3
Died: We are called upon this week to note the death of Mrs. M.E. Allen and that of her son, Willie. Willie's death occurred on the 13th [of Nov] and that of his mother on the 14th. Mrs. Allen had been sick for several weeks and had been in a more dangerous condition than was realized by her friends. Her death occurred at about nine o'clock Sunday evening. Willie's illness was of a short duration, only lasting about ten days but his already impaired system could not withstand the unrelenting attach made upon it by the disease - Typhoid fever - and was called away at an early hour on the morning of the 13th. Mrs. Allen settled here in 1882 upon a farm on Turkey creek, moving to this place from Cherokee county. It was her sad misfortune to have located where she did as in the following year the terrible cyclone swept across their farm killing her husband, mother and brother, leaving her alone with her three children, whose interests and welfare she has ever guarded with all a mother's love and tenderness. She leaves two little daughters, a sister and her many friends here to mourn her death. Mother and son have gone from this world of sin and sorrow, to a brighter and better world beyond - gone to their rest in heaven. [Memorial poem follows.]
pg 3, col 3
Born: To O.J. Corliss and wife, a son of regulation weight. The youngster made his appearance into this world early Monday morning. Mother and son doing well and with careful nursing, O.J. will weather the storm.

Nov 26, 1886, pg 3, col 4
Birthday: At the dinner party given on the 18th [of Nov] by Miss Nevada Pierce in honor of her nineteenth birthday, the following parties were present: Miss Irene Lake, Miss Burton, Mrs. Frank Gordon and Charlie Carl of Lake City; M.M. Croutis, wife and daughter of Arkansas City; Miss Lou. Grunn, Miss Ida Reynolds, Miss Stella Jeffers, Miss Ada Baldings, J.R. Lamport, George Lockert, O.E. Lamport, Jas. York and wife, of Sun City, We were unable to get a list of presents but are informed that they were numerous and very nice. Every one speaks in the highest terms of the way they were entertained by Miss Nevada and of the excellent dinner served, it being of a character that would have tempted the palate of an epicure. Uncle Dan was in the height of his glory and did himself proud. [Subsequent correction from Mrs. Frank Gordon to Mr. Frank Gordon.][See below @ Jan 7, 1887 for wedding of Miss Pierce.]
Dec 3, 1886
pg 3, col 4
Anniversary: Mr. and Mrs. Ira Hargis celebrated in a quiet and pleasant manner the nineteenth anniversary of their wedded life last Sunday. A few of their many friends were invited to their home and passed the time very pleasantly.
pg 3, col 4
Died: At the residence of his mother in Sun City, November 27, 1886, William Hookstra, aged 26 years. Mr. Hookstra had been a hopeless invalid for several years. No one knew better than he that his lease of life was uncertain, but he pursued the even tenor of his ways with a philosophic equanimity closely approaching stoicism. He did not defy the grim Messenger but calmly awaited his approach, and when the end came he passed away as one "who lies down to pleasant dreams." Notwithstanding his physical infirmities, he was an industrious worker, honest in his dealings and a good citizen generally - What more need be said! The surviving members of the family, but a little time since sorely afflicted by the tragic death of a brother of the deceased, have the sincere sympathy of all our people. And: Card of Thanks signed by Mrs. Hookstra and Mrs. Emma Miles, as mother and sister. [See below for death of Mrs. Emma Miles.]

Dec 10, 1886
pg 3, col 3
Married: On last Thursday evening, Walter Fulton and Miss Eliza Adams, both of Sun City, were married at O.F. [Odd Fellows] Hall, Rev. Owens officiating. The contracting parties are well and favorably known in this vicinity and the Union wishes them a long, happy and prosperous life. In honor of the event, the bride and groom gave a dance on the evening of the wedding to which all their friends were invited and all in attendance report it one of the most enjoyable occasions of the season.
pg 3, col 3
Birthday: Miss Edna Cornue gave a dinner party to quite a number of her friends last Saturday, the occasion being the celebration of her tenth birthday. Edna is one of the brightest little girls in our town and a great favorite among her acquaintances. The little folks were all highly pleased and unite in pronouncing the dinner party a complete success.

Dec 17, 1886
pg 3, col 2
Engaged: Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss Julia Balding to Mr. Louis Bissantz, both of this city, to take place January 1st, at 8 p.m. in the Odd Fellows Hall. [See below]
pg 3, col 2
Died: Uncle Milt Clements informs us that he received a letter last Saturday announcing the death of his mother who resided in Christian county, Ill. She was 92 years and 10 days old at the time of her death.

Dec 24, 1886
pg 3, col 2
Engaged: Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss Mollie Adams to Isaac N. Prater to take place this evening at the residence of the bride's parents. [See below]
pg 3, col 2
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lockert on the 21st, a girl of the usual weight. Frank wears a regular broncho smile now.

Dec 31, 1886, pg 3, col 3
Married: On the evening of the 24th, I.S. Prater and Miss Mollie Adams were married at the residence of the bride's parents in this city, by Rev. Owens. Mr. Prater is well known in this vicinity having come to this place about two years ago from McGoffin county, Ky. And has made many friends here. The bride is the oldest daughter of our townsman, Wm. Adams, and is so well known to our people that no words of praise or introduction from the Union are deemed necessary. A fine supper prepared by the bride's parents was served after which those disposed were given the opportunity to trip the light fantastic to music engaged expressly for the occasion. The Union was remembered in the way of a liberal share of the wedding cake. We give below a partial list of the presents: George Lockert, glass butter dish; Reuben Marshal, glass water pitcher; Mrs. B.F. Saunders, syrup pitcher; Louis Bissantz and Jacob Mertes, set of knives and forks; Miss Nevada Pierce, fine tidy; Miss Stella Jeffers, fruit dish and cream mug; Joe Dalzelle, glass syrup pitcher; Mrs. H.E. VanTrees, 1 pair linen towels; Mr. and Mrs. Miles, slipper case and tea pot; Mrs. F.A. Whitaker, lamp; Mrs. Leny Adams, glass fruit stand; O.J. Corliss, fine clothes brush.

Jan 7, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Married: Samuel Helton and Miss Jane Cliff on Friday evening last.
pg 3, col 3
Married: On last Sunday afternoon, Mr. Riley Lake and Miss Nevada Pierce were married at the residence of the bride's parents. The wedding was a very quiet affair, the guests being confined to members of the families and their immediate friends. Both the parties are well known and have many friends. The Union wishes them a long, prosperous and happy life. And: May 15, 1885 - It a-Pierce to us that Riley Lake has a fondness for the picturesque Turkey Creek. Anyhow, about eight days out of the week, he is seen heading that way.
pg 3, col 4
Married: "Wedding Bells" - On last Saturday evening occurred the wedding of Mr. Louis Bissantz and Miss Julia Balding, at the I.O.O.F. hall in this place. The Rev. J.H. Shilder officiating. The affair proved to be the social event of the season. The bride and groom have a large circle of friends in the town and vicinity, and all had looked forward to the event with the deepest interest. Fully one hundred invited guests were present. The bride was dressed in rich dark blue satin trimmed in brocade velvet, with a bonnet of the same material. The groom wore the conventional black. After the ceremony and the congratulations had been tendered, the party repaired to the Commercial House where a supper had been prepared that would have been a credit to a caterer of the famous Delmonico. The greater number of the guests passed the remainder of the evening at the hall, dancing and in many ways amusing themselves. The bride and groom have commenced keeping house in the Hookstra residence on Main Street and are fixtures in the community. "Blest be the tie that binds their hearts and souls together and many their lives flow on together as pure as the riplet fresh from its mountain home." Below we give the list of presents. The cards from some presents were lost and we are unable to give the names of the donors. [The list is very long. Please consult the original reel or contact me: thebissons@worldnet.att.net]

Jan 14, 1887, pg 3, col 2
Born: There is great rejoicing in the house of J.V. Fishburn for unto the household another child is born, a boy of the usual dimensions.

Jan 28, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Married: On last Sunday afternoon at the residence of Louis Lockert, Mr. Tom Botting and Miss Louisa Grunn. Rev. Shilder officiating. Mr. Botting is a young man held in high esteem by all who know him and is one of our most successful farmers and stock growers. The bride is a niece of our townsman, Mr. Louis Lockert, and has a very large circle of friends in this community. The Union wishes them all the happiness they can get out of a long and prosperous life.

Mar 25, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Died: The wife of J.D. Ricord, residing near Deerhead, died at her home last Tuesday. Mrs. R. was a good wife, a good mother and a good friend. Her bereaved husband and children have the sympathy of the entire community.

Apr 22, 1887, pg 3, col 2
Visiting: Louis Bissantz informs us that his father will start for this country about the last of May. He is 82 years of age and the trip is quite an undertaking for him. And Jul 8, 1887: Louis Bissantz' father is visiting in the city a few days. Mr. Bissantz is in his 78th year and has just made the trip across the ocean from Germany. Quite an undertaking we think for a person of his age. [Note: Ages are printed as published.]

Apr 29, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Married: At the residence of Geo. W. McDaniel, on the evening of the 24th, by the Rev. J.C. Halliday, Mr. W.E. McEnany, of Sun City, to Miss Sadie E. Seiflets, of Caldwell. May no briars or brambles of discontent ever intervene to cut them out of pure matrimonial bliss.

Jul 29, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Born: Alexander Proctor McKinney - On Saturday night last there was born to Alex McKinney a boy of regulation weight. According to T.S. Proctor's report, the young fellow made his advent with three cheers for [Grover] Cleveland. It is needless to say that Alex. came into town Monday stepping on all the high places and apparently as proud as a king. Long live Alexander Proctor McKinney.

Aug 5, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Married: Sidney G. Neff and Miss Ethel Morris were united in marriage at the Central Christian Church on Wednesday morning by Rev. Geo. B. Peak. The newly married couple started for California on their wedding tour and are now probably rusticating on the Pacific coast of the briny deep. [Originally published by the New Republic]

Aug 26, 1887, pg 3, col 4
Died: "Death Notice" - Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock the impressive funeral services was pronounced over the remains of Mrs. George McDaniel at the Congregational Church, Rev. S. Price officiating, and afterward she was buried at Spring Grove Cemetery with her infant nestling in her arms. The baby, after a short existence of about two weeks, died Wednesday night at 10 o'clock and the mother, who has been bedridden for nearly a year, died a victim of consumption not many hours afterward at 3 o'clock Tuesday. [Note: transcribed as published.] Mrs. McDaniel was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Hinsey, living just east of the city, and as Ida Hinsey is known everywhere as one of the very few young ladies among the original settlers of the Anthony town site. Miss Hinsey was decidedly a belle and was admired for the many qualities of heart and disposition which she possessed. She was afterward married to a most worthy young mechanic, George McDaniel, at Caldwell, who afterward brought his bride to Anthony. It is always touching to see a mother and babe buried together and in every way this is a most distressing case. The people of this community extend deep sympathy to the stricken husband and afflicted parents and universal regret is occasioned by the death of one of Anthony's earliest citizens and most exemplary young married woman. [Original published by Anthony Republican] Deceased was a niece of Mr. and Mrs. E. McEnany.

Sep 2, 1887
pg 3, col 2
Died: Mrs. Hookstra deserves the sympathy of our community. Her son John was killed on a railroad, in Mexico, the 8th of June '86; Will died Nov. 27, of the same year and now the death of Mrs. Miles on the 29th of this month makes the third death in the past thirteen months within her family. And pg 3, col 3, Died: "At Rest" - On Monday evening at midnight, Mrs. Emma Miles, aged 22 years, wife of James J. Miles, quietly passed away. The deceased had been sick for some time having been confined to her bed for the past nine weeks. She was the daughter of Mrs. Hookstra, an old settler of Barber County, and whose son died here last year from the same dread disease, consumption. During her long dreary sickness she was so patient and though often suffering great pain, never complaining. The deceased was the mother of one child, a babe fourteen weeks old. She leaves a husband, a brother in Chicago and a sister whose home is at Greensburg, to mourn her loss. Her sister arrived at her bedside a few hours before her death. The stricken family have the sympathy of the entire community in their great bereavement. Funeral service was held at the school house Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. O.C. Shaw officiating. She was taken to Saratoga and entered beside five of her brothers and sisters. [Memorial poem included.][See above for marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Miles and for death of William Hookstra.] And on Sep 9, pg 3, col 3, an I.O.O.F. Memorial Resolution. [See also Sep 23 for death of the Miles' infant.]
pg 3, col 3
Died: Deerhead, Aug. 29, 1887 - Miss Ella Walton who has been sick for some time, died on Sunday morning at her home near Deerhead, and was buried on Monday in the Lake City Cemetery. The deceased was going to make proof of her claim this week had she not been called before the Judge on High.
pg 3, col 3
Died: Robert, the five-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Ingraham, died at their home in this city, last Saturday night, at 10 o'clock, after an illness of six days, from typho-malaria. The funeral services were held at the M.E. church on Monday morning at 10 o'clock, being conducted by Rev. Sanderson. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this community in the loss of their bright and interesting child. [Orig published by Medicine Lodge Index] Hank has been cashier of the Bank of Sun City, and has made many friends here who join with us in expressing our deep sorrow at his loss.
pg 3, col 3
Died: It is with deep regret that we announce the death of little Claudie, son of our minister, the Rev. Mr. Shaw. He died Sunday evening at the home of his parents in Lake City. We extend to the bereaved father and mother our heartfelt sympathy.

Sep 10, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Born: Walter Fulton is the father of a ten pound boy, born Saturday September 10th. Walt is exceedingly happy and hits all the high places along the road.

Sep 23, 1887, pg 3, col 2
Died: The infant child of J.J. Miles died last Wednesday evening at 9:20 o'clock. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Shaw. The body was taken to Saratoga for burial.

Oct 21, 1887, pg 3, col 4
Died: Duncan Doles, aged 50 years, one of the old settlers of Barber county, died at his home west of here 5 miles, last Wednesday, Oct. 12, after an illness of two years duration. [Orig published by Medicine Lodge Index]

Nov 4, 1887, pg 3, col 2
Born: Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bissantz are the happy parents of a boy baby born last Friday. The Union extends congratulations, and hopes that the fond anticipations of Louis and wife regarding the future of the baby may be more than realized.

Nov 25, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Died: "In Memoriam" - Elizabeth Hanks, wife of Byron Hanks, aged 21 years, died last week in Pratt county, of typhoid fever. She came to Barber county in 1872, and was a daughter of W.O. Cochran, of Deerhead. A quiet thoughtful child, in her maturer years she became a dignified gentle woman, who discharged her manifold duties as became a Christian, in full belief that she would receive her reward. Her husband and three young children are mourning her loss, while her father, mother, brothers and sisters grieve over her, knowing however that their loss is her eternal gain.

Dec 16, 1887, pg 3, col 3
Married: The marriage of J. Ed. Allen to Miss Emma Taylor is announced. Both of the contracting parties are well known to many of our readers who will wish that the new couple may live long and happily together.

Feb 10, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Married: At the residence of the bride's parents, Wm. Shutts to Miss Addie Balding, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating. Both parties are well and favorably known in this community. May peace, prosperity and happiness go with them through life, and when they render final account for their stewardship, may it be well with them is the wish of the Union.

Feb 17, 1888, pg 3, col 2
Born: There was a house on south Elk Creek made jubilant (Sunday morning) by the advent of a bouncing boy. Mrs. M.L. Chitwood is the happy mother.

Mar 2, 1888
pg 3, col 2
Born: Ed Roberts of Glick has a broad grin on his "phiz." It's a girl.
pg 3, col 2
Married: Mr. Ludwick and Miss Miller, of Ludwick, Pratt Co., were married last week.
pg 3, col 3
Died: Capt. Byron P. Ayers died at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning after a long sickness. The G.A.R. have been very kind to him and his friends, during his illness, and have given him a formal G.A.R. burial, at which there were a great number of people from all parts of the county present. He was highly respected by all who knew him.

Mar 16, 1888
pg 3, col 2
Married: At the home of the bride's parents on Oak Creek, Mr. Lee to Miss Strain.
pg 3, col 3
Died: Saturday, March 10th, the infant son of B.L. and Rachel Taul, age 1 year, two months and ten days. Our heart beats with sympathy for the bereaved parents whose only consolation is given in these words: "Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." Or ask, "Where is they spirit flown? I gaze above - thy look is imaged there; I listen - and they gentle tone is on the air."
pg 3, col 3
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John M. Furrow, on the fourth [of Mar], a fine boy of regulation weight. John says that his new boy will soon be turning furrows to plant corn, cotton and other truck.
pg 3, col 3
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Botting on Sunday morning the 11th [of Mar], a fine boy, weighing 9 pounds, of which Tom feels justly proud. The mother and child prospering finely, but the father looks very pale, but the doctor says he is certain to recover.
pg 3, col 4
Married: At Medicine Lodge Mar. 8, E.M. Byerly to Miss Minnie Young, Rev. A. Axline officiating. Mr. Byerly has our best wishes. May peace and prosperity ever be found sojourning with this happy couple.

Mar 23, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Died: Medicine Lodge lost two of the best physicians by death lately that they ever had. Dr. J.R. Davis died March 10th and Dr. C.L. Dunn who died March 17th.

Apr 6, 1888
pg 3, col 3
Married: At the Grand Hotel at Medicine Lodge, April the 2nd 1888, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating, B.R. Tanner of Sun City to Miss Jennie B. Logue, of Pratt, Kansas.
pg 3, col 3
Born: In Medicine Lodge, April 3rd, 1888, to Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Rouse, a daughter. [Orig published by Barber County Index]
pg 3, col 3
Born: Twins are so popular in this county: Last week, near Lake City there was born to W.O. Thompson and wife a pair of boys. On the 31st [of Mar], at their home south of Medicine Lodge 13 miles, a boy and a girl were born to Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Landis. Mr. Landis is county superintendent of schools. [Orig published by Barber County Index]

Apr 20, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Died: A sad and fatal accident happened at Hazelton last Sunday morning. While the separator at the creamery was in motion, it bursted [sic], scattering fragments in all directions, which fatally wounded Geo. Clark, N.P. Moon and Harry Moon. Harry Moon died Monday morning and Mr. Clark and Mr. [N.P.] Moon died Monday night.

Apr 27, 1888
pg 3, col 3
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fuller on April 20th, an 11 pound boy. Frank says he knows this country will produce as he commenced harvesting.
pg 3, col 3
Born: D.N. Morland wears a 12x14 smile on his "Phiz" caused by the arrival of twin girls at his home April 21st. Mother and children are getting along nicely.
pg 3, col 4
Died: Mrs. Tilla Slaughter, née Lacy, died Sunday evening, after a short illness. She leaves a year old boy and a kind husband to mourn her loss. "And they may feel, who loved her most, a pride so holy and so pure, Fate hath no power o'er those who boast a treasure thus secure." [Lake City news]

May 18, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Married: In this city, by Rev. W. Ireland, of this city, on the 1st of May 1888, at the residence of Prof. J.H. Carruth, 1312 Ohio st., David L. Jones of Pleasant Grove, Douglas co., Kansas, and Julie E. Pedrick of Sun City, Barber County, Kans. [orig published by Lawrence Tribune]

Jun 8, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Born: An express package arrived for Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Williams Thursday - it was a fine large girl. [Lake City news]

Jun 22, 1888, pg 3
Born: After we had gone to press last week, we learned that G. Adams and Mr. Davis had both been obeying the command to multiply and be fruitful, for they each had an addition to their families.

Jul 20, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Died: Last Wednesday morning, Pleasent Chitwood called to his son Richard, a boy of 12 years, as he slept in the upper story of his house, to get up, but not receiving an answer he went up to see what was the matter, he found his son, the pride of his house, dead. He had been struck by the lightning in the early part of the evening. The sympathies of every Christian father and mother in this whole country goes forth to the family in their bereavement, and may they remember the words, "Rejoice ye in the dead for they know no more sorrow." And: Jul 27, pg 3, col 3: Our informant in regard to the sad death of Richard Chitwood was mistaken, Mr. Chitwood heard something fall (he presumes it was plastering) and asked his wife what it was, and she answered she thought the house had been struck. He then jumped up and ran up stairs in time to see his son draw his last breath.

Jul 27, pg 3, col 3
Married: At the residence of the bride's parents, July the 24th, 1888, Mr. M.F. Hasting of Sun City and Miss Lottie Martin of Lake City, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating. May peace, prosperity and happiness ever shine in at their door is the wish of The Union.

Aug 17, 1888, pg 3
Married: August 14th, at the Halloway House in this city, Miss Bashee Marshall to Mr. Elmer E. Putman, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating. May their term of connubial bliss be as long as that old Patriarch Methuselah's life. And may sweet content ever abide in their household.

Oct 5, 1888, pg 3, col 2
Married: At the residence of the bride's parents 3 miles northeast of town, Mr. Wm. Arnett of Wabash, Ind., to Miss Myrta Pickering, of Sun City, Kansas. Rev. Rollingston, of Lake City, officiating. The Union extends the hand of congratulation and well wishes.

Oct 23, 1888, pg 3, col 2
Married: Peter J. Mertes and Miss Sophia Follmer, both of this city, were publicly married at the City Hall on last Thursday evening, Justice Taylor officiating. The hall was filled with the friends of the contracting parties and had it not been for the storm which came down upon us that evening, there would not have been room to have held the people. After the ceremony, the hall was turned into a dancing floor and everybody present took part in the most pleasing of all amusements, the dance. At 10 P.M., the attention of the people present was called to an elegant supper, of which all partook freely and such exclamations as "Oh! Look at those nice cakes," etc., were heard on all sides. After supper the dancing recommenced and the assembly did not disband until the "wee small hours o' the morn" had grown to a very respectable size. The Union joins with all the bride and groom's friends in wishing them a long and happy married life from which may many blessings "like oval plants around their table spring."

Nov 2, 1888
pg 3, col 2
Married: Mr. Frank Holley and Miss Julia Owens were married last Sunday, near Deerhead, this county.
pg 3, col 3
Died: At his residence in Medicine Lodge, Tuesday Oct. 30, 1888, Geo W. Ellis, after a short illness. Mr. Ellis is one of the old settlers of Barber Co., and was highly respected by all who knew him. He was buried under the auspices of the I.O.O.F., whose funeral service is among the most impressive and grand of any of the secret societies. We offer our best wishes to his bereaved friends and "Point them beyond the skies, to him who dries the orphan's tears, and wipes the widow's weeping eyes." And also: @ col 2: F.A. Whitaker, Jacob Mertes, M.H. Clements and C.W. Owens went to the Lodge Thursday to attend the funeral of Geo. W. Ellis.

Nov 16, 1888, pg 3, col 3
Married: On Nov. 1st, 1888, at Wichita, Kansas, Miss Lela, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Neff, and Mr. A.A. Miller, of Wichita. The bride was one of Sun City's beautiful belles and while we extend our heart felt congratulations, yet we do so with a tinge of sadness for our loss. Mr. and Mrs. Miller at once commenced housekeeping at Wichita.

Nov 30, 1888, pg 3, col 2
Married: On Thursday, Nov. 29, 1888, at the residence of J.Q. Wheat in Eagle township, Barber Co., Kansas, Mr. A.E. McElwain to Miss Mary Peterson, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating. The Union wishes the newly married couple happiness and prosperity in life.

Dec 14, 1888
pg 3, col 2
Born: Uncle Milt [Clements] came to town on Wednesday with a smile of happiness all over his person from crown of his head to the end of his toes (although they are cork), all because he has just received another boarder in his house. It's a boy.
pg 3, col 3
Married: They say that Frank Hoagland and Miss Hattie Owens were married by the Rev. J.M. Adams, Thursday evening, but we have not seen the bridegroom to get the facts. May bob-o-links and robins near them always sing. And children, like young oval plants, around their table spring.

Dec 21, 1888
pg 3, col 3
Married: At the residence of the bride's mother in Comanche Co., Mr. Geo. H. Sears to Miss Anna Pedrick, Rev. C.W. Owens officiating. The relatives of the contracting parties being present, after the ceremony, a nice supper was served of which all partook freely. The Union with the host of friends joins in wishing the young couple a long, happy and useful life.
pg 3, col 3
Married: A double wedding is to occur in this city, next Sunday afternoon, December 23rd, at the home of Judge Hardy, the contracting parties being Mr. J.L. Ellsworth and Miss Babe Hardy and Mr. Fred Hardy and Miss Minnie Hunter. Mr. Ellsworth is a prosperous young farmer living west of this [town]. Miss Hardy and Fred Hardy are daughter and son of Probate Judge Hardy, of this city. Miss Hunter is a young lady from Illinois who has been out here quite awhile visiting the Hardy family. Both young couples are well mated and their many friends will wish them happiness and prosperity. [Orig published by Barber County Index]

Jan 4, 1889, pg 3, col 3
Birthday: On last Friday, the 28th [of Dec], a number of our citizens banded together and from some dark corner collected a large amount of good eatables and pounced down upon Harry VanTrees, the occasion being the "Jedge's" fifty-fourth birthday. To say that Harry was surprised would be drawing it rather mild, for he was completely taken by surprise, and it was a long time before he tumbled to the racket. By this time, the boys had cleaned out his furniture store and after considerable chaffing, the younger people adjourned over to the store and dancing commenced. After a short while, the guests and Harry were invited out to supper and there the surprise was complete: oysters, pies, cakes without number were upon that table and the way that crowd enjoyed themselves at that table was a sign to behold. The dancing was kept up until nearly daylight and everybody went home satisfied that they had had the best time of the season. The Union wishes Harry many more anniversaries of the same kind.

Jan 18, 1889, pg 3, col 2
Died: Saturday, Jan. 5th, 1889, Mrs. Jas. York, after six days of extreme suffering, caused by erysipelis [sic]. Mrs. York was one of those women that every person could go to, with assurance in times of trouble. She was always a kind and affectionate mother and a loving daughter and wife: Ever ready to do her share to make society what it ought to be, she was truly a lady. The heavy blow that has thus fallen upon her mother, husband and children cannot be realized by the world. The Union along with many others extend to the grief-stricken family their heartfelt sympathy at their great loss.

Barber County Newspapers



Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

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