Adams
Adams
Adams
Adams
Allen
Allen
Anderson
Arterburn
Athay
Atwell
Avery
Axline
Bahr
Ballard
Barkley
Barton
Benefiel
Bird
Blackmore
Blankenship
Blankenship
Blunk
Boden
Bragg
Brannan
Bullington
Bunton
Burgoyne
Burnett
Byerley
Cape
Catlin
Cavin
Cavin
Chandler
Christy
Circle
Clark
Clarke
Conine
Cook
Corrie
Coss
Cramer
Cross
Curtis
Cushenberry
Cushenbery
Daggett
Daum
Davis
Denton
DeWeese
Dobbs
Downtain
Dunham
Dunkin
Durfee
Dye
Earhart
Eastman
Edwards
Elliott
Fager
Farney
Fausett
Flint
Follett
Frederick
Frisby
Fuller
Garriott
Gibbs
Gibbs
Gibson
Gilmore
Goddard
Greever
Griffen
Groendycke
Handrub
Hanna
Harbaugh
Harris
Hayes
Hayes
Heise
Heise
Higgins
Hittle
Hoagland
Hooker
Hooper
Hoover
Howard
Hudson
Huffer
Huston
Ireland
Jesse
Jesse
Johnson
Johnson
Jones
Jones
Keller
Kelly
Kennedy
Kidd
Knight
Knowles
Landis
Larkin
Larkin
Lebrecht
Leibst
Leonhart
Lewis
Lewis
Lindley
Littrell
Lockwood
Long
Lorton
Louis
Lusk
Lytle
MacRoberts
Martin
Martin
Martin
Mathis
McAllister
McCorkle
McCormick
McCoy
McCracken
McCully
McDowell
McGinnis
McGuire
McGuire
McLaughlin
Merryman
Mills
Mitchel
Modlin
Moomau
Moomau
Moomau
Moore
Moore
Morris
Neal
Owen
Parker
Pearl
Poindexter
Protheroe
Richardson
Rogers
Romig
Romig
Rucker
Saunders
Saunders
Saunders
Scott
Selby
Sellers
Simpson
Smith
Snedegar
Stephens
Stewart
Stewart
Stith
Stout
Strickland
Strickland
Suhler
Swim
Swonger
Talbott
Taliaferro
Tarwater
Thomas
Thomas
Tillotson
Tincher
Tincher
Toombs
Twymann
Vangundy
Vannaman
Wadsworth
Waller
Warren
Warren

Watkins
Webster
Weidner
White
Williams
Wilson
Wright
Young

REEL #M872/KSHS Microfilm Collection

The Medicine Lodge Cresset (meaning "bright light") was a weekly newspaper, published in Medicine Lodge beginning early in 1879. At the time this reel begins, Friday, July 1, 1904, L.M. Axline and Otis Lorton were editor/publishers. Local news included coverage from the surrounding communities, as well as Medicine Lodge. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net).

Jul 7, 1905

pg 1, col 1

Died: The remains of Fred Suhler were brought here last Tuesday evening for burial. He accidently discharged a gun in getting out of a wagon last Sunday, and shot himself above the knee. The limb was amputated but he never recovered consciousness after the operation and died on Monday. Fred Suhler was born in Germany October 15, 1878 and died at Elmwood, Kansas, Jul 3, 1905, aged 26 years, 9 months and 18 days. He came to Kansas in 1886 and in 1901 he enlisted in the 28th U.S. Regulars, Company D. He spent three years in the Philippines and returned to Kansas in April, 1904. He had many friends and especially in this locality. Everyone who knew him liked him. His mother, who lives near Kingman, was telegraphed for and arrived on the noon train Wednesday. The Rev. Robinson from the Valley preached the funeral sermon at the U.B. church at 11 a.m. Wednesday and the remains were laid to rest in the Attica cemetery. We extend sympathy to this family. Attica Republican.

pg 1, col 4

Died: George Martin, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Martin of Nippewalla township, died Wednesday, July 5th, of asthma. He returned from Colorado a few weeks. And also on Jul 14, pg 1, col 4: George A. Martin, who died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Martin of Nippewalla township, on July 5th, 1905, was born in Ohio November 4th, 1859. He moved to Kansas with his parents a number of years ago and in 1884 came with them to Barber county. In 1896, he was taken ill with the asthma. The next year he moved to Colorado, hoping the climate would restore his health. It helped him for a time but the past few years he became worse again and three weeks before his death he returned to Barber county to spend his last days with his parents. Mr. Martin had in his lifetime his full share of trouble and suffering, mentally and physically, but he held up throughout all with great fortitude. To his parents and surviving relatives, the sympathy of everyone goes out. Interment was made in the Newkirk cemetery and R.V. Wright conducted a brief funeral service at the grave.

pg 1, col 4

Died: Mrs. Handrub, mother of John Handrub of Nippewalla township, died on Friday, June 30th, in her 85th year. She is mourned by all who knew her. Interment was made in the Newkirk cemetery.

pg 1, col 4

Died: John, little son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. McCorkle of Sharon, died at 5 o'clock Monday morning, July 3rd, aged one year, five months and nine days. The little fellow had been ill about a week with a disorder of the bowels. The body was brought to this city for burial and the funeral service was conducted at the Methodist church at 4:30 Monday afternoon by Rev. W.H. Moore.

pg 1, col 4

Died: From the Enid (Oklahoma) Daily Eagle we learn of the death of Lloyd Young which occurred at Enid on June 28th, in his 23rd year. The deceased lived in Medicine Lodge when a boy, leaving here in 1894, with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.W. Young. Besides his parents, he leaves two sisters, Mrs. E.M. Byerley and Mrs. W.S. Denton of Enid and three brothers, John Young of Lawton and Earl and Charley Young of Enid.

pg 1, col 4

Died: Little Audrice Myrtle Taliaferro, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Taliaferro of Amarillo, Texas, has gone to Him who said, "Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." She came to gladden the home September 12, 1903, and departed to be with the Lord June 26, 1905. Her life, though fleeting like a shadow, was long enough to make many hearts glad. There is an empty little bed and a vacant chair in the home, yet her life was not in vain. "It is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." We bow in submission to Him who doeth all things well, realizing that our Father causes no unnecessary pain. Not now but in the coming years, it may be in the better land, we'll read the meaning of our tears. Then, oh then! We'll understand.

pg 5, col 3

Born: Mr. and Mrs. James Bird rejoice in the advent of a nice little girl "bird" that has come to their home to stay. The little one was born on the 21st.

pg 8, col 5

Birthday: A number of county officials and neighbors conspired with Mrs. Wilson Monday evening to make County Clerk Wilson remember his 42nd birthday. Commissioner Lake called him down town while the stage setting was arranged and then took him home to a house full of company, with ice cream and cake on the one side. Through County Supt. Lake, he was presented with an elegant rocking chair.

Jul 21, 1905

pg 1, col 2

Died: In Lake City, Thursday, Jul 13, of the prevailing summer complaint, Dale V., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fager, aged one year, six months and eighteen days. Funeral services were held at the school house Friday afternoon. Interment was made in Lake City cemetery. Dale was an unusually sturdy boy, bright and precocious, and his loss to the family is a most severe affliction. They have the full and sincere sympathy of our people. [See Reel #871, at October 30, 1903 for birth of this baby on October 25th.]

pg 1, col 2

Died: "One of Medicine Lodge's Loveliest Girls a Victim of the Grim Reaper." There was a tear in many eyes and sorrow in every heart when the word came that Miss Helen Wright was dead in Wichita. The cause of death was necrosis of the foot. The primary cause of her ailment dates from her birth and she had suffered much pain all her life. A few weeks ago, just as she was ready to start on her vacation, she became ill from a pain in her foot. Dr. Donovan, who was called to attend her, discovered the cause. Ten days ago he took her to Wichita and assisted the surgeons in removing the diseased bone. Septic poisoning followed the operation and at 7 o'clock Saturday evening, July 15th, she died at Wichita hospital. The body was taken to Elk City, where her parents reside, for burial. Miss Wright was a sister-in-law to C.Q. Chandler, and she was employed as stenographer in the Citizens State Bank of this city. She was a lovely girl and as evidence of the esteem in which she was regarded in this city all the churches will unite in a memorial service at the Methodist church next Sunday morning. And on Jul 28, pg 1, col 5: "Impressive Union Services at the M.E. Church Sunday in Memory of Miss Helen Wright." The services held at the M.E. church last Sunday morning in memory of Helen Wright were well attended and in every way successful. All the churches of the town dismissed their services in order to attend. The church was decorated for the occasion. The chair in the choir loft which was formerly occupied by Miss White was draped in white. The text chosen for the occasion was taken from the last verse of the last chapter of Proverbs. "Let her own works praise her in the gates." These words were put over the pulpit where the entire congregation could read them. Promptly at 11 o'clock. a beautiful voluntary was played, after which the choir sang, "Asleep in Jesus." At the close of the hymn, Rev. Covert offered prayer. The scripture lesson was that portion of the 14th chapter of St. Mark's gospel which recounts the anointing of Christ's head by a woman and His commendation of her. Papers prepared by different individuals on the following subjects were read: On the work of the deceased in the Epworth League; On her work in the Sunday School; On her life in the home; On her life in the bank where she worked. And the nurse who cared for her during her sickness furnished a beautiful tribute of respect and praise. The pastor's remarks referred to the general aspects of her life. He suggested the following from the pen of Ben Johnson as being applicable to the deceased: "Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair and good and true as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee."

pg 1, col 4

Married: One of the most beautiful weddings that has occurred in Barber county was that at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Rucker eight miles southeast of Medicine Lodge at seven o'clock Sunday evening, July 9th, when their charming and accomplished daughter, Miss Ina B. Rucker, was married to Mr. Albert L. Thomas, by Rev. F.S. Atwell of Sharon. The ceremony was witnessed by a large number of friends and neighbors. The wedding march was played by Miss Lulu Harris. After the ceremony, the guests were invited to partake of the bounteous wedding feast prepared by the bride's mother. Later on they were entertained with instrumental music by Mr. and Mrs. Horace Crawford. The bride came here about a year ago with her parents from Missouri. The groom came here about the same time and purchased a farm near Mr. Rucker. He is a son of Lafayette Thomas of Shelby county, Missouri. The bride was becomingly gowned in a dress of white organdy trimmed in over-lace. The groom wore a suit of conventional black. Until they can build a house on their own farm they will reside with Mrs. Thomas' parents. Among the wedding gifts were the following: [partial listing] Mr. and Mrs. Horace Crawford, large bowl and pitcher; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Holser, table cloth and napkins; Mrs. Mary Young and daughter, four piece tea set; Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Spangler, white lace bedspread; Elmer Harris, large cake stand; Lulu Harris, set of pie plates; Estella Harris, toothpick holder; Albert Rush, parlor lamp.

pg 1, col 4

Married: There was a quiet wedding at the Presbyterian parsonage in t his city Sunday afternoon in which two very popular young people of Barber county - Lloyd Davis of Sharon, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Davis, and Cora E. Stewart of this township, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Stewart - were united for weal or woe by Rev. W.M. Covert. Lloyd Davis is one of the finest young men in Barber county. He has lived here all his life and the writer, who has known him since his babyhood days, has yet to hear anyone speak ill of him. He is one of the successful teachers of the county. His bride is a lady of high attainments and popular among her associates. Their married life is certainly begun under skies of deepest blue. They will make their home in Sharon township.

pg 1, col 4

Engaged: The approaching marriage of Mr. Charles E. Daggett of Avard, Oklahoma, and Miss Ruby I. Lockwood of Kiowa was announced last week.

pg 8, col 4

Died: Mrs. Mattie Hooper of Kiowa died at the Rochelle hospital in Wichita Sunday night from cancer. The body was taken to Kiowa Monday for burial. Mrs. Hooper was born in Georgia fifty-two years ago and moved to Kiowa about fifteen years ago. She leaves a husband and three daughters.

pg 8, col 5

Married: Ezra S. Corrie of Valley township, son of T.N. Corrie, was married at Highland, Kansas, two weeks ago to Miss Mary Swim. Mr. Crane is a student in the Garrett Biblical Institute of Chicago.

pg 8, col 6

Birthday: A pleasant birthday party was given Sunday, July 16th, at Mr. Scott Moomau's, it being his fifty-fourth birthday anniversary. Ice cream and cake were served in the afternoon. The guests were Mr. and Mrs. V.C. Sleeper and two grandsons, Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Fairley, a son and three daughters, Mr. and Mrs. J.O. Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Luallen and two daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Warren and Leona, Mr. and Mrs. M.D. Shinliver and four boys, Mr. and Mrs. Park Moomau and four girls, Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Bentley and two daughters, Misses Laura and Sadie Fairley, Flora and Myrtle Warren, Messrs. Daniel McColl, Fred Moomau, Newton, Orrin and Jay Warren, Bird and Dick Lunsford, Ben and Riley McCullough, Harry Warren, Blaine Rucker, Fred Stipp and Homer Hooker. All left wishing Mr. Moomau many happy returns of the day. Signed: A GUEST.

Jul 28, 1905

pg 1, col 2

Married: On the 24th, George C. Barton of Susanville, California, secured a license to marry Lena Athay of Kiowa. They were married Wednesday.

pg 1, col 2

Married: Glenn Catlin of this township and Janie Cramer of Kingman county were issued a license to marry Wednesday. The ceremony will take place next week.

pg 1, col 2

Married: Edwin B. Allen and Mrs. Rachel A. Merryman to Elwood township were married here Wednesday afternoon by Probate Judge Gleason. And on Dec 8, 1905, pg 1, col 3: "Soon Tired of Married Life." On July 26, 1905, E.B. Allen and Rachel A. Merryman were married in t his city. On November 24th, W.H. McCague filed for Rachel A. Allen a suit for divorce alleging abandonment and praying that her maiden name be restored. She alleges that separation occurred about September 15th, less than two months after the marital vows were pledged, and that the defendant now resides in Salt Lake City.

pg 1, col 2

Died: The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Toombs died at the home of Mrs. Toombs' mother, Mrs. John Jesse, Wednesday, July 26. Funeral service was conducted by Elder J.H. Shamberger from II Samuel 12, after which interment was made in Highland cemetery. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of all. Lena was an exceptionally bright child, nine months old. She was taken ill with a spasm about three o'clock Tuesday afternoon and died the next morning. [Memorial poem follows.]

pg 1, col 4

Died: Samuel J. Adams, a well known citizen of this city, died Wednesday morning, July 26th, aged forty-eight years, twenty-three days. Funeral service was held at the family residence yesterday morning by Rev. Frank C. Ward, pastor of the Baptist church and a large number of sorrowing friends and relatives followed the remains to Highland cemetery. Mr. Adams had been ill about two years with Bright's disease. He leaves a wife and a number of children.

pg 5, col 1

Born: Wednesday morning before breakfast, a son, to Mr. and Mrs. Cad Jones. How'dy Grandpa Durfee.

Aug 4, 1905

pg 1, col 1

Birthday: A party of neighbors and friends gathered at the Goddard ranch July 30 to have a good time and help Mrs. Goddard enjoy her 59th birthday anniversary. They were entertained by graphaphone music and in the afternoon ice cream and cake were served. Among those present were Mrs. Aultman and daughter Gladys of Macksville, Kansas, Miss Lewis of Oklahoma, Anna and Hazel Ash, Mr. and Mrs. Slane and daughter Mary, Mrs. W.S. Ellison and daughter Oatta, Miss Grace, John and Amy Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Heelis, Miss Nellie, Bessie and Edwin Wright, Claude Warren, George D. Vatter, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Goddard.

pg 1, col 1

Died: Michael McGuire, who has been ill since last spring, died about nine o'clock Wednesday morning, August 2nd, at his home in the east part of the township. Funeral service was held at the Church of God at 10 o'clock yesterday morning and interment made in Sharon cemetery. Mr. McGuire was one of the pioneers of Barber county. He came to Kansas from Iowa in 1883, we believe, and bought a farm not far from where Sharon now is. He was eight-four years of age and he leaves a large family. And also on Aug 11, pg 1, col 3: Michael McGuire was born near Sweet Water, Tenn., September 4, 1824, and died August 2, 1905, at 8:45 a.m., at his home near Sharon, Kansas. He was married to Lucinda Edwards on the first day of January, 1846. They removed to Iowa in 1852, where she died September 8, 1868. To this union were born twelve children, eight of whom survive him, the other four having passed on to the unknown realities of the spirit world. His second marriage, to Miss Belle McCully, occurred at Washington, Iowa, November 2, 1876. >From this union three children were born, and one of them preceded him in death.. In the year 1882, he came to this county from Iowa and has been a resident of Barber county twenty-three years. He was converted and fellowshipped with the Church of God in 1862 at Harrisburg, Iowa. Since then he has been a strong member of that church. It was greatly due to his efforts that the Church of God was organized near Sharon. He was a supporter of the church both by word and by financial assistance. He leaves a wife, four brothers, ten children, forty grandchildren and nine great grandchildren, with a host of friends to mourn his departure. He often expressed his hope of a future and did not seem to dread the passing over the Jordan of death. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.E. Kelly at the Church of God Bethel near Sharon from the text, "Let me die the death of the righteous and let my last end be like His." Interment was made in the Sharon cemetery. A large procession followed the remains to its last resting place.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Henry Hoover and wife on Friday, July 28th, a son. Dr. Moore.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Rudolph Louis and wife, of Elwood township, on July 20th, a daughter.

pg 8, col 3

Married: Charles W. Barkley of Kiowa and Miss Ella A. McLaughlin of Rockford, Ohio, were married in Wichita Wednesday of last week.

pg 8, col 4

Died: Rathbone Follett, a former citizen of Hazelton, died recently in Newton where he has been making his home since leaving Hazelton. He was born in Lime Lake, New York, October 21st, 1830.

pg 8, col 4

Died: Mrs. Leonie Fausett died at her home in Hazelton Tuesday of last week. Death was the result of child birth. She was the wife of O.H. Fausett, to whom she was married about a year ago.

Aug 11, 1905

pg 1, col 1

Birthday: On Wednesday, August 2nd, neighbors and friends gathered at the home of F.W. Romig at Enon to celebrate the thirty-fourth birthday of Mrs. Sallie Romig, his wife. Everybody came with a well-filled basket of good things which either make the stomach uneasy or happy, according to the inclination of the person partaking of the goodies towards dyspepsia. All seemed to enjoy themselves except Philo Sherman, who complained that the waistband of his pantaloons was always too small on such occasions. I suggested that he might provide himself with larger ones against such times of need, but he protested that he had bought the largest he could find. When Philo does the best he can, angels can do no more. Signed: J.B. ROMIG.

pg 1, col 2

Died: Mary Caroline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Roy Arterburn, died at Anthony on Thursday, August 3, aged two years, one month and seventeen days. The funeral was held at the residence of A.M. Houchin of Medicine Lodge at 10 o'clock Saturday morning by Rev. W.H. Moore, pastor of the Methodist church, followed by interment in Highland cemetery. The little girl had been delicate most of her life and several times the past year death came very near claiming her. Mr. and Mrs. Arterburn have the heart-felt sympathy of everyone. A sister of Mrs. Arterburn from Eldorado and Mrs. Higgins of Kansas City, grandmother of Mrs. Arterburn, attended the funeral. [Note: G. Roy Arterburn and Dora Allen were married on Dec 24, 1901; their baby was born on Jun 17, 1903.]

pg 1, col 2

Married: Sunday, August 6th, at the residence of Dr. F.S. Atwell of Sharon,, Mr. Wood C. Dunkin and Miss Amanda Romig, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Romig of Enon. A good supper was spread and all went off as merrily as the proverbial marriage bell. True, the elements became rather damp for awhile, but not the ardor of the company. The rain delayed matters somewhat, so Grandpa and Grandma Romig had to drive home after night, arriving at 12:30. Signed: J.B. ROMIG. The Cresset desires to join in the congratulations that are being extended to these young people. They have both grown up in Barber county. Mrs. Dunkin formerly resided in this city. Mr. Dunkin is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Dunkin of Sharon valley.

pg 5, col 1

Married: Miss Christine Frederick and James Griffen were married at Alva on July 29th. The bride is a daughter of R.H. Frederick, formerly of this county. She is well known here and is liked by everybody. Mr. and Mrs. Griffen will make their home on his claim near Farry, and not far from her father's place. Aetna people extend congratulations and good wishes. [Aetna news]

pg 5, col 2

Birthday: George Sellers was 43 years old last Tuesday [prob Aug 8] and about fifty of his friends and neighbors made him a visit on that date loaded down with ice cream and cakes. George was somewhat surprised we are told but not more so than were some of the guests at George's capacity for cream. One of those present intimated that the host got away with forty-three dishes. [Isabel news]

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Lee Strickland, Jr., and wife, on Wednesday, August 9th, a daughter. Dr. Moore.

Aug 18, 1905

pg 1, col 4

Married: H.E. White of this city and Miss Clyda Earhart of Caldwell were married Wednesday, August 9th, at the home of a sister of the bride at Attica. They are now at home in a suite of rooms in the opera block. Mr. White is head hardware man in the Chase Hardware Co's store. The Cresset extends congratulations.

pg 1, col 4

Married: Charlie Cushenberry, son of Mr. and Mrs. Cushenberry of Sharon township, and Miss Auna Cavin of Harper county, were married Wednesday, August 9th by Rev. F.S. Atwell of Sharon. These are two very popular young people in the community in which they have lived and grown up.

pg 1, col 4

Died: Vera, little 5 year old daughter of I. M. Mathis, formerly of Isabel, but now living in Wichita, died Thursday morning at 12:45. A telegram was received by Lester White, but too late for him to leave today for the funeral. [Isabel news]

pg 5, col 2

Birthday: Sunday, August 13th, being A. Avery's 75th birthday, his daughter, Mrs. J.M. Williams, gave a surprise dinner in his honor. A most bountiful table was spread and everyone did justice to what was placed before them. They all wished him many happy returns of the day. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. A. Avery, Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Bud Hall, Mr. and Mrs. F.F. Root and family, Mr. and Mrs. Otice Williams, Miss Emma Sargent, Miss Lola and Master Hal Williams. [Eagle news]

pg 8, col 3

Born: To W.J. Littrell and wife on August 12th, a son. Dr. Moore.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Troy Watkins and wife on Saturday, August 12th, a son. Dr. Coleman.

pg 8, col 4

Born: Dr. Atwell and Nurse Johnson report the birth of twin girls on August 10th to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Daum of Sharon. The babies weighted 7 and a half and 10 and a half pounds.

Aug 25, 1905

pg 1, col 4

Married: Green Adams of Sun City, one of the earliest and best known settlers of Barber county, and Mrs. Emma Johnson of this city were married at Cassville, Mo., Sunday, August 20th. They arrived here Wednesday night and are now receiving the congratulations of a large circle of friends.

pg 1, col 4

Born: Pratt Republican - To Mr. and Mrs. C.P. Swonger, just across the line in Barber county, a boy, Tuesday morning. A.J. Tillotson, the grandfather, is so proud that he took a day off and came to Pratt to celebrate.

pg 8, col 3

Born: Dr. Moore received word this week that he is a great grandfather. A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Roy Moore at Alva Friday of last week.

Sep 1, 1905

pg 1, col 4

Birthday/Reunion: Uncle Eli Harbaugh of Nippewalla township was eighty years old last Friday, August 25th, and all the sons and daughters and near relatives, with a sprinkling of friends, met at the home of U.S. Landis in Kiowa on Sunday to celebrate the event. Despite his years, Uncle Eli appeared as young as anyone in the party and he got as much enjoyment out of it. Among the relatives present were Henry Harbaugh, wife and son, of Sumner county; George Harbaugh and son of Alva; Joseph Harbaugh, wife and two children; Ben Harbaugh, wife and five children of Nippewalla township; and Mrs. Mary Landis and four children of Kiowa. The children and grandchildren present numbered twenty-six.

pg 1, col 5

Born: Saturday night, a girl weighing eight pounds, to Mr. and Mrs. C. Roy Moore, four miles east of Alva. Mother and baby are all right, but the happy papa, grandpas and grandmas, uncles and aunts all have St. Vitus dance of the mouth when addressed by their new names.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Case Stout and wife at Kinsley, on August 20th, a daughter.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Dwight Mills and wife, Friday night, August 25th, a daughter. Dr. Coleman.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Verne Gibbs and wife on Thursday night, August 24th, a son. Dr. Coleman.

pg 8, col 5

Married: At Anthony on Wednesday, August 30th, Miss Inez Moomau and Mr. Homer Hooker. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Moomau, north of town and the groom a son of Mr. and Mrs. H.K. Hooker of Mingona township. Both of the young people are well known and their many friends will join the Cresset in wishing them a happy wedded life in which their known industrious natures foreshadow future worldly success.

Sep 8, 1905

pg 1, col 1

Reunion: A surprise birthday party for Mrs. Homer Talbott and a family reunion were held at the home of Mrs. B.F Talbott, Sunday, August 27th. It was a very pleasant occasion as it was the first time during the past five years that the entire family was united. Those present were R.L. Groendycke, wife and three children; H.A. Talbott, wife and five children; Clarence Martin, wife and five children; H.B. Downtain, wife and three children; Mrs. B.F. Talbott, grandma to this bunch of husky youngsters, Clifford A. Talbott, her youngest son, who has just returned from an extended stay in California and other western states.

pg 1, col 2

Married: John H. Dunham and Ollie M. Twymann, two popular young people of Isabel country, were married Wednesday, August 30th, by Rev. C.A. Thornton. The Cresset extends congratulations and best wishes.

pg 8, col 1

Born: To John Burgoyne and wife, on Saturday, September 2nd, a daughter. Dr. Coleman.

Sep 15, 1905

pg 1, col 2

Marriage License: Probate Judge Gleason issued a marriage license Tuesday to Elmer I. Long and Dilia M. Leonhart of Kiowa.

pg 1, col 3

Married: Last Friday morning at 9:20, Miss Anna Brannan and Mr. Abe Vangundy, both of this city, were quietly married in Alva by Probate Judge Wilson, completely surprising their many friends.

pg 1, col 4

Family Reunion: "The Hanna Family." T.L. Lindley and son, Glenn, returned Monday from a trip east, which included a reunion of the Hanna family of which Mr. Lindley is a descendant on his mother's side, at Prosperity, Pennsylvania. Mr. Lindley was elected vice president of the Hanna Family Association. He enjoyed the reunion very much. The attendance of the members was very large and during the session there were sermons by prominent divines and speeches by others, all members of the family. A brief history of the Hanna family is given by the Washington (Pennsylvania) Observer as follows: "In the thirteenth century, Patrick Hannay, a resident of the southwest coast of Scotland, built and occupied a castle since known as "Castle Sorby." The family came into prominence about the time of the Wars of the Roses, and some of the occupants of Castle Sorby wielded a commanding influence in the affairs of England, at the time when quaint old Phillipe de Commines wrote that ‘England was the country where the public weal is best ordered and where least violence reigns over the people.' The Hannays occupied many useful public positions. They were members of parliament during several generations and in 1630 Sir Robert Hannay was made a baron. When the great revival of letters that produced Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlow, Burton and numerous other great writers swept over England it was only natural that the Hannay family should have a representative among the men who thought the pen was as honorable a weapon as the sword. Accordingly, Patrick Hannay, M.A., assiduously courted the muse. When Benjamin Franklin was in England in 1763 trying to make the English ministry understand that the people of the American colonies would not submit to a stamp tax, he gave the country a great many important facts about the soil and climate, the iron and coal, and varied resources of the western world. Many of the wide awake, enterprising people of Great Britain heard these reports with great interest and resolved to try their fortunes in the new field thus opened to them. In the same year that Franklin returned to the colonies, 1764, Thomas Hanna sailed for the new world and arrived in Philadelphia in the fall. Following the example of many Scotch-Irish Presbyterians who had preceded him, he at once pushed out into the wilds and settled in southern Pennsylvania, where he found quite a number of his countrymen engaged in the heroic task of felling the primeval wilderness. About a year after his arrival in this land of promise, he died, leaving two sons, Robert and Thomas Hanna. Hugh Hanna, first son of Thomas Hanna, cast his lot among the vigorous farmers of Washington county, Pennsylvania, choosing as his companion for life Rebecca Vance. From Thomas and Rebecca Hanna are descended the Washington county members of the Hanna association. The descendants of Robert Hanna are scattered throughout the United States. The late Senator Marcus A. Hanna [1837-1904, Republican senator from Ohio who also successfully managed the 1896 presidential campaign of William McKinley] was descended from Thomas Hanna and was, perhaps, the most eminent of those who have borne the name."

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Died: The six month old baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Farney died last Friday night at their home one and a half miles east of Kiowa. The funeral services were held on Monday afternoon at the German church 11 miles southeast and the burial took place at the cemetery nearby. [Kiowa news]

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Married: On Sunday, September10th, at 12 o'clock, at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. Frank Frisby to Miss Nellie Mitchel, Squire Smith officiating. Their friends in Eagle and vicinity extend a hearty congratulation and hope that joy and happiness may always dwell in their home. That they will be successful and prosper in all their undertakings. May no grief or sorrow ever cross their pathway. Mr. and Mrs. Frisby leave this week to spend their honeymoon in Illinois and upon their return they will begin housekeeping in the hope that Mr. Frisby has prepared for his bride. Mr. Frisby is an honest and energetic young man and we all feel proud of the flower he has plucked. May happiness and prosperity dwell forever with you as you journey down the river of life is the wish of - A FRIEND.

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Married: On Thursday evening, September 7th, Dr. A.W. Clarke of Alva and Miss Birdie Blunk, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Blunk of Elwood township, were married in Anthony. Both of these young people are well known in this county. Dr. Clarke studied dentistry in this city.

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Married: The announcement of the marriage of Miss Dollie Bahr, daughter of Mr. A.H. Bahr, formerly of Sharon, and Mr. Charley Leroy McDowell on September 6th at Cherokee, Oklahoma, has been received here. The bride was born in Barber county and her family is well known here and in the Sharon valley. The young people will make their home at Driftwood.

Sep 22, 1905

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Died: At eight o'clock Wednesday evening, September 20th, John McCracken, after as brave a fight against death as was ever seen, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.T. McCracken, of Elwood township. The young man was about nineteen years of age. The cause of death was uremic poisoning, resulting from a stone passing from the kidneys into the bladder. He had been very ill for the past three weeks and Drs. Coleman and Donovan of this city spent night about with him. He will be buried today in the family cemetery near his home. The funeral will be conducted by Rev. M.B. Engle of Harper.

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Died: At the Waldron Chase farm in Elwood township, at 4 o'clock Friday morning, September 15th, J.W. Selby, aged seventy-one years. Interment was made in the Eldred cemetery. Deceased was a native of Ohio and came from that state to Barber county in 1900. He had been ill for several months at his home near Medicine Lodge, but getting better he moved a short time ago to Elwood township where death's illness overtook him. He leaves three sons, residents of this county.

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Died: Margaret P. Jones, aged 75 years, 2 months and 22 days, died at the home of her niece, Mrs. John Protheroe, north of this city, Sunday night, September 17th. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in this city by the pastor, Rev. W.H. Moore, Tuesday morning and the remains taken to her former home, Arvonia, Osage county, for burial by Mr. and Mrs. Protheroe. Mrs. Jones was born in London and was a fine old English lady. When she was taken ill a few weeks ago, Mrs. Protheroe, who looked upon h er more as a daughter than a niece, brought her to her home here and tenderly cared for her until death claimed her.

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Died: From the Harper Advocate - At his home in Crystal Springs, Kansas, on Friday morning, September 8th, 1905, Wm. Rogers, aged 78 years, 4 months and 8 days, after a lingering illness of two months. Funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. Scott on Friday afternoon and on Saturday the remains were taken to Barber county and laid to rest in the Mumford cemetery. Mr. Rogers was born in Ripley county, Indiana. He went to Iowa in 1845, to Missouri in 1852, and then to Kansas in 1884. He first located at Mumford, Barber county, but removed to Crystal 8 years ago. He left a wife and five grown children, vis: Mrs. Rogers and her daughter, Miss Nellie, of Crystal; U.G. Rogers of Medicine Lodge; Mrs. Jennie Ballard of Kansas City, Missouri; Dr. E.D. Rogers of Caney; and Birdie Leibst of Mumford. Mr. Rogers was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a man loved and respected by all his acquaintances. The many friends of the family sincerely sympathize with the bereaved.

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Birthday: Mr. and Mrs. T.A. Hittle of Mingona township presented their daughter, Vera, a beautiful organ on her 10th birthday.

Sep 29, 1905

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Married: A very pretty church wedding occurred at the Methodist church at six o'clock Wednesday evening, September 27th, the principals being Mr. Charles Johnson, son of Mrs. Emma Johnson Adams, and Miss Cornelia Gibson, daughter of Mrs. J.P. Gibson, all of this city. The Methodist ritual service was used and the words that made these popular young people man and wife were uttered by the pastor, Rev. W.H. Moore, in the presence of a large company of well-wishing friends. The church was simply decorated with ferns. Mrs. T.J. Best played the wedding march and the ushers were Misses Gladys Gibson, Alma Shell, and Lilian Lorton. After the ceremony, the young couple, standing on the portals of the church, received the congratulations of those present. Later a reception was held at the home of the bride's mother on Walnut street for the relatives and a few of the intimate friends, during which refreshments were served by the young ladies who acted as ushers. These young people are too well known here, and too highly esteemed to need more than a passing notice from us. The groom has lived in the county most of his life and the bride was born here. We trust that their hopes and ambitions will be fully realized. The bride was becomingly dressed in a gown of blue taffeta silk with heavy lace trimmings. She carried a bouquet of carnations. The happy young people began housekeeping at one in the Vaughn residence on First avenue east. Those present from out of town were Misses Ethel and Ora Patton and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Newkirk of Kiowa and Miss Grace Corrie of Isabel. And also Jan 12, 1905, pg 1, col 5: Cornelia M. Gibson Johnson, wife of Chas. M. Johnson, died at her home in this city at 12:15 Tuesday morning, January 9, 1906, aged twenty-four years and nineteen days. The cause of death was blood poisoning resulting from premature childbirth. The funeral service was held at the Methodist church at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning by her pastor, Rev. W.H. Moore. A large number of mourning friends and relatives were present and the floral offerings were many and beautiful. Cornelia M. Johnson was born and raised in Barber county. On September 29th, 1905, she was married to Charles M. Johnson. A little more than a week ago the illness which caused her death came upon her. It was only a few weeks ago that we attended the wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson. Little did we think then, as we saw them surrounded with well-wishing friends, with every indication of a happy future, that we would so soon be called upon to chronicle the death of one member of the union. Mrs. Johnson has always taken a prominent part in church work and young people's societies and was a member of the Methodist choir. She was blithe of heart and those who came within the circle of her ever-cheerful presence could not help holding her in high esteem. Her death does not fill the hearts of her husband and relatives alone with mourning. Their grief is shared by all who knew her. The flowers that covered her casket will soon wither and fade, but so long as the grass upon the mound over her bed in the silent home of the dead shall green and ripen will her many virtues be remembered. The bereaved relatives of the late Mrs. Cornelia Gibson Johnson desire to thank the neighbors and friends who were so kind and attentive during the hours of sickness.

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Married: There was a quiet wedding Tuesday evening at the home of Probate Judge Gleason, the Judge performing the ceremony in his inimitable style. The parties were Mr. Will Fuller and Miss Mary Lytle of this city, who surprised most of their friends not a little. Of course, we suspected that something was pending but we were surprised, as well as pleased. The bride is known to most everyone and the groom is one of the extensive stock dealers of the county. The Cresset extends its best congratulation for their happiness and success.

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Born: Good boy Jack! We have a report over the ‘wireless' from Deerhead that Mr. and Mrs. Jack Larkin are to be congratulated on the arrival of a pert little girl at their home Saturday night. Luck to the Larkins, may their tribe increase. [Lake City news]

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Born: To S.S. Modlin, of Eagle township, on Friday, Sept. 22nd, a boy. Dr. Moore.

Oct 6, 1905

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Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Blankenship in Sun City, Tuesday, October 2nd, a ten and a half pound boy. Mother and child doing well. Dr. Rogers.

Oct 13, 1905

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Died: Mrs. W.J. Gibbs of Sharon, and one of the well known women of Barber county, died at her home on Friday, October 6. Mrs. Gibbs, whose maiden name was Sarah Francis Clark, was a native of Ohio county, Indiana and was married to W.J. Gibbs in 1876. They moved to Barber county in 1883 where they have lived since that time. Mrs. Gibbs had been in poor health most of the summer and was supposed to be improving until a few hours before her death. The improvement in her health was so marked that Mr. Gibbs had left home to attend to some business affairs and did not know of the change until after death had relieved her suffering. Three sons and two daughters survive her and all are living in Barber county. The Cresset joins their many friends in extending sympathy to the family. W.J. Gibbs and family wish to express their gratitude to the friends who so willingly assisted them during their late bereavement. And on pg 5 from Sharon news: Mrs. Gibbs' death was a sad surprise to all, but such is life. The obituary is published in another column. The funeral sermon was preached by Elder Engle of Harper in the Christian church to a large audience

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Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Huffer on Tuesday, October 3rd, a son. Dr. Atwell.

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Died: Agnes Frances McCormick was born in Scotland, April 2, 1880. After a lingering illness since last February, she died at her home three miles southwest of Kiowa, on September 26, 1905, aged 25 years, 5 months and 24 days. She was united in marriage with Clark Lewis June 11, 1899. To this union was born two children, one boy and one girl, aged 4 and 6 years, [and] with these her husband sorrows. [Kiowa news]

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Born: To Wm. Curtis and wife on Saturday, October 7th, a daughter. Dr. Moore.

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Born: To Geo. W. Poindexter and wife on Friday, October 6th, a daughter. Dr. Moore.

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Married: Otto Cavin of Harper county and Edith Cushenbery, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.S. Cushenbery of Sharon, were married Sunday, October 8th, by Rev. F.S. Atwell.

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Married: Walter W. Parker and Josephine Pearl Kane of Kiowa, were married October 5th, by Rev. C.A. Kitch.

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Married: Jennings Hayes and Effie Keller of Isabel were married October 3rd by Rev. D.M. Scott of Sawyer.

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Died: Alice Estella Waller, only daughter of Col. and Grandma Dye, departed this life in Kansas City early Tuesday morning and was buried here Wednesday, October 4th, Elder Chas. A. Thornton officiating. Mrs. Waller was raised in Isabel and was thoroughly identified with the town. She was married to Clay Waller in 1886 and leaves two bright and intelligent boys to bear her name, Clyde, 19 years, and Fred, 15.

Oct 20, 1905

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Died: A. Conine of Kiowa, and an old citizen of Barber county, died Sunday morning at half past six o'clock, aged almost seventy-six years. The funeral service was held at two o'clock Monday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Clark Bunton. The deceased was a grandfather of Mrs. Walter Owen.

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Born: Proud and happy mean a good deal when properly interpreted, but they are meaningless sound when it comes to telling how Thomas P. Knight feels in regard to that pretty little seven pound daughter that came to his home Sunday morning. The whole community feel like congratulating Mr. and Mrs. Knight on this timely visit of the stork. May all the joy that comes with maternity and paternity be theirs and may this little Knight blossom as the day into a womanhood and happiness for all who live and like her parents. [Isabel news]

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Born: Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Blankenship have a fine baby boy at their home. Oliver has two of ‘em now. [Sun City news]

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Born: To Wm. Lusk and wife, on Sunday October 15th, a girl. Dr. Moore.

Oct 22, 1905

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Died: "Jerry Simpson Dead. Famous Character in Kansas Politics Yields to Death's Call. Summons Came Monday. After an Illness of Three Months - Interment Was Made in Wichita." Jerry Simpson, a former citizen of Medicine Lodge and three times Congressman from the seventh district, died at St. Francis Hospital, Wichita, at 6"05 Monday morning, October 23rd, aged 69 years, 6 months and 22 days. The funeral service was held in Wichita Wednesday afternoon by the Scottish Rite Masons and interment made in Maple Grove cemetery, Wichita. The funeral oration was delivered by Congressman Victor Murdock. Out of respect to the distinguished dead, flags in Medicine Lodge were suspended at half mast Tuesday and Wednesday. Jerry Simpson was born in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, March 31, 1842. His father was a saw mill owner and sailor on Prince Edward Island. When Jerry was a small boy, the family moved to upper Canada. At fourteen, Jerry left home and became cook on a lake steamer. Afterwards he was mate on one of the large lake sailing vessels. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted with the Twelfth Illinois Infantry, but after three months' service he was discharged on account of disability and again became a sailor. In 1864, he was captain of a big sailing vessel, and remained in the service until 1878 when his ship, the J.H. Rutler, was wrecked during a terrific gale near Ludington, Mich. On this occasion, Captain Jerry Simpson showed great personal bravery and through his efforts every man on board was saved. It was his last trip as a sailor after serving 21 years on the Great Lakes. October 12, 1870, in Buffalo, N.Y., Jerry Simpson and Miss Jennie Cape, of Westfield, Ind., were married. As a result of this union, there is one son, Lester, 27 years old. He is married and has a family in Roswell, N.M. In the summer of 1878, he came to Kansas and settled on a ranch in Jackson county. The year following he came to Barber county, where he spent the greater part of his Kansas life. Mr. Simpson's first political move was made in 1886, when he secured the nomination for the Legislature on the Union Labor ticket and was defeated. Two years later, he arranged a fusion of the United Labor and Democratic parties and was again a candidate for the Legislature, again meeting defeat. In 1890, he was a delegate to the Farmer's Alliance congressional convention in the Seventh District. Mr. Simpson was nominated for Congress. The district ___ gave the Republicans a majority of 14,000. In one of his first campaign speeches, Mr. Simpson remarked that if times became much harder, the farmers "would be unable to buy socks." The opposition took up the phrases and dubbed Mr. Simpson "Sockless Jerry." He turned the phrase to his own advantage and no man was so much talked and written about throughout the state as sockless Jerry Simpson. He won by 8,000 majority. Three times Mr. Simpson was elected to Congress from the Seventh District and was twice defeated. When Mr. Simpson reached Washington, the staid easterners were shocked. Stories of the Sockless Orator's ___ had preceded him and the natives expected a crank. They beheld instead a quiet, well ordered individual with a thin ___ face and genial gray eyes. His words and actions were sharp and quick. The Kansas man soon took rank as one of the keenest wits in Congress. He was the victim of many jokes, when he first appeared on the floor, but in each instance, his brilliant repartee won the day for him. The campaign of 1898 was the last political work of Mr. Simpson. He was defeated for Congress from the "Big Seventh" by Chester I. Long, the Republican candidate, after one of the hardest political battles ever known in this state. It is believed that the work of this campaign was too much for Mr. Simpson and that his ill health following immediately thereafter was the beginning of his last sickness. Mr. Simpson moved his family to Wichita in the summer of 1899. They remained there three years. While there, Mr. Simpson was manager of a livestock commission company, and during the greater part of the time did a flourishing business, but his health failed him and he was compelled to give up the work. During the winter of 1901, he moved his family to Roswell, N.M., in the hope that the change would benefit his health. He was the principal stockholder and manager of the Pecos Valley immigration company and probably did more for the developing and settling of the Pecos river valley than any other one man. About three months ago, Mr. Simpson's health became critical and for the pasty sixty days he has been confined to his bed. The technical name of the disease under which Mr. Simpson suffered is aneurism, an enlargement of the blood vessels of the chest. This enlargement caused a pressure on the esophagus which prevented swallowing and only liquid nourishment could be given him and at times even this was impossible. Mr. Simpson was taken to Wichita October 2nd and placed in the St. Francis hospital. The attending physician at the time said there was no hope for Mr. Simpson's recovery, but it was possible to prolong his life weeks and even months. Mrs. Simpson has never left the bedside since he was taken there. Aside from Congressman Murdock, and his private secretary, David Leahy, and a few other close personal friends, no one has been admitted to the sick room.

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Married: From Kingman Leader-Courier - "Announcement cards are out telling of the marriage of Charles R. Scott and Mattie B. DeWeese. The marriage occurred Wednesday evening, October 18, 1905, and took place at the home of the bride's brother, B.A. DeWeese, in Richmond township, at 8:00 o'clock, Rev. Kellams of the Christian church officiating in the presence of the immediate relatives. The groom is a popular citizen and mechanic of Medicine Lodge and a man of good repute. The bride is a lady of refinement and culture and has hosts of friends in the county who will join in congratulations. The happy pair will make their home at Medicine Lodge where they will be at home to their friends after November 1st." There have been rumors upon rumors and suspicions of all kinds, but the above is the first notice of authority of an event in which the many friends of the parties named are greatly interested. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are two of the most popular people in Medicine Lodge and there is not a discordant note in the congratulations offered them. The happy couple arrived here Tuesday and are at home in the J.H. Owen residence.

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Born: To S.W. Ireland and wife on Sunday, October 22nd, a daughter.

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Married: A marriage license was issued Saturday to David W. Stephens and Lotta M. Eastman of Hazelton. They were married Wednesday evening [probably Oct 20th].

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Born: George Larkin was in town Saturday and he began to brag about the little daughter Dr. Kociell introduced into his home on October 16th.

Nov 3, 1905

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Died: Death has come into the family of John S. Knowles, of near Sun City, an old resident of Barber county, and removed a dear companion, Mrs. Susan A. Knowles, born in Erie, Pa., March 22, 1837. She was married to John S. Knowles at Clarence, Green county, WI. Five children were born to this union, three of whom live to mourn their mother's death. Mrs. Knowles was an excellent Christian woman, interested in all good works and has left an example that can well be followed by all who desire a higher and better life. And: We desire to express our thanks to the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us in our recent bereavement. Signed: J.S. Knowles and family.

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Married: On Thursday, October 26th, Rev. W.E. Kelly of Missouri and Maude McGuire, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.J. McGuire of Sharon, were united in marriage by Rev. P.L. French, pastor of the Church of God, at the bride's home. Both of these young people are well known in the eastern part of the county and everyone heartily congratulates them.

Nov 10, 1905

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Married: A pretty wedding occurred at the home of the bride's parents near Richmond, Oklahoma, on Wednesday evening, November 1st. The contracting parties were Miss Celia Hayes and Mr. John Jesse. The bride is the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Hayes, former residents of Barber county and the groom is an industrious young farmer of Mingona township. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J.C. Shuck of Deighton, Oklahoma, in the presence of a number of relatives and friends. Those present from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Mills of Lake City, Mr. Watson Doles of Medicine Lodge and Mrs. M.L. Newland of Harper. After congratulations, all repaired to the dining room where a bountiful supper was partaken of. The following is a [partial] list of presents: Set of dishes, wash bowl and pitcher, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Mills and Mr. and Mrs. B.B. Graves; Five dollars, George Jesse; Nickel teapot, Mr. and Mrs. GA. Graves; Glass berry set, Miss Blanche Jesse; Meat platter and bowl, Mrs. Hattie Shearer; Tureen, Miss Maude Hayes; Four piece tea set, Rolf, John, Jones and Ruth Graves; Pitcher and salad dish, Mr. and Mrs. M.L. Hoyt; Glass fruit stand, Clifton and Clifford Hayes.

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Married: Miss Helen Stith, well known here, was married on Wednesday evening of last week to Roy Shannon of Attica. The newly married couple will reside at Danville, Harper county. Mr. Shannon has been elected cashier of a bank in Danville.

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Died: We are very sorry to hear of the recent death of Mrs. Frank Smith at Medicine Lodge from some form of fever. She formerly lived on the old Frank Gordon place. [Aetna news, from the Coldwater Star]

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Died: Bert, the fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Snedegar, died at his home in Capron, Oklahoma, October 30, from typhoid fever. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the M.E. church in Capron and the remains buried in the cemetery at that place. [Kiowa news]

Nov 17, 1905

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Died: "Samuel Stewart Drowned. Prominent Citizen of Barber County Meets With Fatal Accident. Occurred Yesterday. Drove Into Deep Water and Quicksand at the Mouth of Cedar Creek." Samuel Stewart, one of the most widely known men in Barber county, was drowned yesterday afternoon in the mouth of Cedar creek, two and one half miles west of Medicine Lodge. The horrible accident occurred about 4 o'clock. He had started out with H.C. Alexander to show him a piece of land. They were riding in Mr. Alexander's top buggy and when they reached the crossing where Cedar creek empties into the Medicine river, Mr. Alexander, who was driving, hesitate a moment, but Mr. Stewart assured him that the crossing was all right. They drove in and immediately the horse went out of sight and the top of the buggy dropped forward. Mr. Stewart was pitched out of the buggy on the left side, going south. Mr. Alexander was caught by the top, but he called to Stewart and receiving no reply, crawled through the back of the top and began to disrobe. Just then Stewart rose to the surface and Alexander pushed the buggy whip towards him but the current swept him beyond reach. Afterwards, Stewart almost reached the bank when he sank out of sight. Mr. Alexander made further effort to reach Stewart but failing he hurried to where Gus Olson was working and sent him to town for help. Olson notified Wm. Reutlinger and then stopped at Miss Best's and telephone the horrifying news to town. Mr. Reutlinger, who lives near where the accident happened, went to the scene. He found the body of Mr. Stewart under the buggy and was getting it out when the men from town arrived. A bruise on the face indicates that possibly he was stunned by striking some part of the buggy when pitched out. Mr. Alexander's horse was also drowned. At the time of going to press, the funeral arrangements had not been determined. Mr. Stewart was 46 years of age and was one of the most popular men in Barber county. He leaves a wife, four sons and one daughter. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and Woodmen lodges. Mr. Stewart was an extensive dealer in land and cattle and owned several thousand acres at the time of his death. And also on Nov 25, pg 1, col 3: "Laid Away to Rest. Large Concourse of People Attended the Funeral of Samuel Stewart. Interment at Sharon. His Tragic Death Drew Friends and Acquaintances From All Parts of the County." The funeral of Samuel Stewart, whose unfortunate and horrifying death by drowning in the mouth of Cedar creek was told in these columns last week, was held in the Christian church at Sharon at 2:30 Friday afternoon, November 17th, and interment made in the Sharon cemetery beside his parents and a brother. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. W.M. Cover, pastor of the Presbyterian church of this city. The pall bearers were selected from the Knights of Pythias lodge of this city, of which the deceased was a member. They were Sim Ewalt, Scott Rubert, G.W. Shaw, F.B. Chapin, H.H. Case and James Debbs. It is said that it was the largest funeral ever held in Barber county. Samuel Stewart was born at Keokuk, Iowa, July 19th, 1858. When sixteen years old he left home to make his own way. On October 18, 1881, he married Secillia Thompson in Illinois and in 1884 he came to Barber county and settled on a quarter section of land about half way between this city and Sharon. He is survived by a wife, four children, two brothers and a sister. The children are Mrs. Lloyd Davis, Frank, George, Charley, and Roy Stewart. At the time of his death, he was possessed of 8900 acres of land, a large amount of live stock and other property. The value of the estate above liabilities is estimated at $50,000. There is no information pertaining to his death materially different from the report in the Cresset last week. Mr. Reutlinger found the body in three or four feet of water and floating about two feet under the surface, instead of under the buggy. A great many people have visited the scene of the drowning and the wonder of it all is how a vigorous man like Mr. Stewart could possibly have drowned here. It is a narrow place that looks as if one might cross in two jumps. It is evident that he was stunned by striking his head against something hard as he was thrown from the buggy.

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Born: To E.D. Skinner and wife, on Friday November 17th, a daughter. Dr. Coleman.

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Born: To E.A. Miller and wife, Friday, November 17th, a son. Dr. Donovan.

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Died: Maude Strickland, daughter of Thomas Strickland, a former citizen of Mingona township, died at her home in Oklahoma on November 8th, aged 19 years. The cause of death was typhoid fever.

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Married: Milton Bullington of this township and Miss Blanche M. Boden of Ford county were married at the bride's home on November 2nd. They are now at home near this city and one and all join the Cresset in extending congratulations. We thought at first the boys around town were trying to fool us but Milt says the report of his marriage is "straight goods."

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Married: Otis W. Neal, son of J.B. Neal, and Abbie L. Tincher, daughter of A.T. Tincher, two popular young people of Sharon township, were married Wednesday, November 15th, by Dr. Atwell. They will continue to make their home in the Sharon valley and their many friends hope their lives will be long and prosperous.

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Married: Joseph W. Saunders of Hazelton and Bessie Martin of Kiowa were married Wednesday, November 15th.

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Married: Last Friday evening at 8 o'clock occurred the marriage of Miss Grace McAllister to Dr. J.A. Burnett at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. McAllister in the east part of the city. Presiding Elder A.O. Ebright of Winfield, Kansas, performed the ceremony which united these two hearts for life. The invited guests were only immediate relatives of the contracting parties. [Kiowa news]

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Born: To Roy Cross and wife, a daughter. Dr. Newman.

Nov 24, 1905

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Died: "F.J. Saunders Dead. Prominent Citizen of Sun City a Victim of Heart Disease. Death Was Unexpected. Had a Convulsion Early Sunday Morning and Passed Away Two Hours Later." A telephone message Sunday announcing the death of Frank J. Saunders, postmaster of Sun City, was another dreadful shock to this community. Mr. Saunders had been ailing for two weeks but continued to attend to his duties. Saturday he worked about the place, helped dehorn some cattle, performed his usual chores and retired early, stating that he felt too tired to go up town to his store. About 5 o'clock Sunday morning the household was aroused by the screams of Mrs. Saunders. Mr. Saunders had a convulsion and had lapsed into unconsciousness. E.E. Hagerman, who was boarding at the Saunders home, and Will Morris, of this city, who was spending the night there, rendered what assistance they could. The sick man regained consciousness again but two more convulsions followed quickly and at 7 o'clock he died, apparently in great agony. Dr. Rogers of Lake City had been summoned by telephone but he did not arrive until half an hour after death. Frank J. Saunders was born in Salem, Massachusetts, June 11, 1848, and was, therefore, at the time of his death on November 19, 1905, 57 years, 5 months and 8 days of age. He first came to Barber county in the early settlement of the county. Later on he moved to Coldwater. About ten years ago he returned to Sun City and opened a general merchandise store, and for most of this period has been postmaster. He has been prominent in county affairs and served a term as county commissioner. Twenty-seven years ago he married Miss Mollie Adams. To this union four daughters and one son were born, and all of them and a loving wife live to mourn his sudden and untimely death. The funeral services were held in the Baptist church Monday afternoon by Rev. Mr. Spencer of Lake City and Rev. C.W. Owens of Belvidere, and at 4 o'clock his body was laid away to its final rest in the Lake City cemetery. Also, from the family: We desire to thank our sincere and dear friends who so kindly assisted us in our great bereavement - the loss of husband and father. Their kindness shall always be cherished in our hearts. Signed: Mrs. F.J. Saunders and family, Mrs. Maud Hoagland, Mrs. Mable Harris.

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Married: Otis Garriott and Eva Pearl Blackmore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Blackmore of Sharon township, were married Sunday evening, November 19, 1905, by Dr. F.S. Atwell, in the presence of the immediate relatives and a few intimate friends. After the ceremony and hearty congratulations, the guests sat down with Mr. and Mrs. Garriott to an elegant wedding supper prepared by the mother of the bride. A feature of the supper was the great variety of fruit, all grown on the Blackmore farm. The bride was becomingly dressed in a gown of white albatross trimmed with lace. Both of these young people grew up in the Sharon valley. They will go to housekeeping on their own farm as soon as a house can be built. For the present, they will reside with Mrs. Garriott's parents. Relatives and friends remembered them with gifts as follows: [partial listing] Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Blackmore, Stand cover, vase and dresser scarf; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Balding, Set of Japanese sauce dishes; Stewart Garriott, collar and cuff box and $1; Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Blackmore, water and tea set, berry set, salt and pepper set and toothpick holder; Mr. and Mrs. Tom Murphy, crumb tray, vase and sauce pan; Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Fair, white table linen. The Cresset was remembered with a box of fine apples and cake from the wedding feast.

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Married: From the Champaign (Ill.) Daily News of November 16th, we take the following notice of the marriage of a Barber county boy: The marriage of Mr. Walter L. Moomau and Miss Mary Howard took place at 8:30 o'clock Wednesday evening at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Howard at 1303 west Park street, Urbana. Rev. S.E. Fisher, pastor of University Place Christian church, officiated. The wedding was characterized by simplicity. After the ceremony, the guests were invited to the dining room where an elaborate dinner was served. The house was artistically decorated in garlands of blue, many flowers being placed in profusion around the rooms. Among the out-of-town guests were Mr. and Mrs. H.B. Howard, of Underhill, Vt., who are here on their wedding tour, having only been embarked on the matrimonial seas in the last two weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Moomau will be at home to their acquaintances after November 25 at their new residence, 815 West First street, Urbana. He is a machinist employed by the Leavitt Company.

Dec 1, 1905

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Born: To C.J. Heise and wife of Mingona township, Tuesday morning, November 28th, a daughter. Dr. Coleman. [See Dec 15, 1905 for death of Mr. Heise.]

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Born: To Harry Huston and wife of Attica, last week, a son.

Dec 8, 1905

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Died: Word was received here this week of the death of Simon Lebrecht, a pioneer merchant and citizen of Medicine Lodge, at Chicago on November 27th. The cause of death was stomach trouble. He was buried in Chicago. Simon Lebrecht was about seventy years of age. He leaves a wife and seven children. When the new county in southern Oklahoma was settled, he moved from t his city to Lawton and with his sons opened a general store. Some months ago he became ill and a few weeks since he went to a Chicago hospital for treatment. Corrected on Dec 22, pg 1, col 4: Mrs. Scott Rubert received a letter Monday from Miss Rebecca Lebrecht stating that her father, Simon Lebrecht is not dead as announced here and at Harper two weeks ago. She says, however, that he is very ill in a Chicago hospital with cancer of the stomach and that the physicians hold out no hope for his recovery. And on Jan 19, 1906, pg 1: The Harper Sentinel of last week says: "The report went out some time ago that Simon Lebrecht, so well known here, had died in Chicago. At that time the report was untrue. Now we are sorry to say that the former report is a fact. Mont. Murphy, Sr., advised us that Mr. Lebrecht had died at his home in Chicago last Sunday. All of the relatives of the deceased were present to cheer him in his last hours. The many Harper friends of Simon Lebrecht sympathize with the sorrowing relatives in their sad loss.

pg 1, col 4

Married: On Wednesday evening, November 29, 1905, Clarence C. Benefiel and Nellie H. McCoy were united in marriage at the Presbyterian church by the pastor, Rev. W. M. Covert. Mr. Benefiel is a young man of almost exemplary habits. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Benefiel and is interested in the W.S. Benefiel Hardware Company of this city. His bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. McCoy. She was born and raised in Medicine Lodge and is a young lady of many social and domestic attainments. Both of these young people are prominent in church and auxiliary society circles. They will begin housekeeping in the Lewis property on Walnut street, with the best wishes of everyone. [See Sep 28, 1906, pg 8, for birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Benefiel.]

pg 1, col 4

Married: George E. McGinnis and Grace M. Weidner, two well known young people of Moore township, were married on Thursday, November 29th, by Rev. C.A. Kitch of Kiowa. And also at pg 4, col 2: A very pretty wedding was that which occurred at the M.E. parsonage Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock when Rev. B.A. Kitch united in wedlock Grace Mae Weidner to Mr. Geo. E. McGinnis. Mr. and Mrs. McGinnis are among Barber county's most popular young people. They will be at home after December 10 on what is known as the Johnson farm, owned by Fred Humphrey in Moore township. [Kiowa news]

pg 1, col 4

Died: Ruby Mary Dobbs, the beautiful baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Dobbs of Medicine Lodge, died at 11 o'clock p.m., Wednesday, November 29th, 1905, aged one year and twenty-four days. The cause of death was cholera infantum from which she had suffered less than a week. The funeral service was held at the family home at 2:30 Friday afternoon by Rev. W.M. Covert, pastor of the Presbyterian church. Music was furnished by Mrs. D.W. Major, Mrs. W.R. Forsyth, Mr. W.S. Benefield and Mr. Percy Knight. The pall bearers were Misses Bernice Williams, Mary McCoy, Frances Axline and Lillian Lorton. Interment was made in Highland cemetery. Words fail to frame themselves into fitting or adequate phrases of consolation in such a time as this and only serve to keep open the bleeding wounds left by the sickle of the grim reaper. None can know how heart-rending is the silent grief of the father or the depth of the unspeakable agony of the mother but those whose homes have been similarly devastated. Mr. and Mrs. Dobbs desire us to express their appreciation of the kindnesses shown by many friends and for the offerings of flowers. [Note: This baby was born on Nov 5, 1904, see above.]

pg 4, col 2

Died: Wendell, son of Mr. and Mrs. F.A. Lewis, at the home of his parents, Monday, Nov. 27th, 1905, aged 4 years, 1 month, and 11 days from membranous croup. Funeral services were held from the family residence Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock by Rev. C.A. Kitch, after which the remains were interred in Riverview cemetery. The floral designs were many and beautiful. [Kiowa news]

pg 8, col 4

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. J.N. Tincher on December 2nd, a daughter. Dr. Coleman. The young lady will be named Lala Coreine Tincher.

pg 8, col 5

Married: Quince Circle of Moore township was married on November 20th at Vinton, Louisiana, to Miss Viola Hudson whom he met while both were students at the Kansas State Agricultural College.

Dec 15, 1905

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Died: C.J. Heise of Mingona, who has been hovering between life and death for the past nine weeks, died at 11 o'clock a.m., December 13th, 1905, aged thirty-five years. He was taken ill with typhoid fever but the fever was broken three weeks ago. The cause of death was suppression of the kidneys and abscesses. His death is a particularly sad one. He leaves a wife and three little daughters, one a babe of only about two weeks old. Rev. Frank C. Ward, pastor of the Baptist church held a brief funeral service at the family home yesterday morning. The body was taken to his old home in Lecompton for burial. [See Dec 1, 1905 for birth of Mr. and Mrs. Heise's daughter on Nov 28th.]

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Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John Vannaman of Moore township, Saturday, Dec. 3, 1905, a son. [Kiowa news]

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Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Coss, on Wednesday, November 29th, a son. The little fellow came near being a Thanksgiving bird, but we believe that Tom and his estimable lady are as thankful for the safe arrival of the little one, as if he came a day later. Dr. Bucklin of Sawyer was the attending physician. [Isabel news]

Dec 27, 1905

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Married: The marriage of Arch Vernon MacRoberts and Miss Ethyl Flint took place at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.W. Flint, six miles east of Medicine Lodge, at 9 o'clock, Wednesday morning, December 20th. Rev. E.A. Newby, pastor of the Christian church of Alva, performed the ceremony in the presence of a few intimate friends of the family. The young people left soon after the ceremony for Kansas City and Monticello, Missouri, the home of Mr. MacRoberts' relatives. The bride's wedding gown was of white silk and her traveling dress was red velvet. Mr. MacRoberts is associated with A.D. Shaw of this city in the cattle business. They own a large ranch in Comanche county. The bride is a lovely and accomplished girl.

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Married: County Treasurer F.J. Warren and Miss Cora Bragg, deputy Register of Deeds, stole a march on most of their friends by getting married without saying anything about it. The ceremony was performed at 8 o'clock Wednesday evening, December 20th, by Probate Judge Gleason, at the home of the bride's parents, Register of Deeds and Mrs. W.L. Bragg. These popular young people have the best wishes of everyone.

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Died: Elza Kennedy, an old and esteemed citizen of Barber county, died at his home in Sharon, on Wednesday, December 20th, 1905, at 11 o'clock p.m., after an illness extending over several weeks. The funeral service was held at the Methodist church in Sharon yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The deceased was born Jan. 26, 1842. He served in the war of the rebellion with credit to himself and country. He leaves a wife and five children - three girls and two boys - who have the sympathy of everyone.

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Died: Mrs. M.E. Elliott died Monday night, December 18th, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. V.S. Cook, near this city, aged seventy years. She had been in poor health for some time, but had only been confined to her bed about a week. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at Mr. Cook's residence by Rev. W.M. Covert, pastor of the Presbyterian church. The deceased was the mother of Mrs. V.S. Cook, F.D. Elliott and P.F. Tarwater of this city and two sons living elsewhere.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To C.W. Kidd and wife on Friday, December 15th, a son. Dr. Coleman.

Dec 29, 1905

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Married: One of the brightest weddings of the season occurred at noon on Christmas day at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Webster, three miles southeast of Sharon, when their daughter Clara was united in marriage to Joseph Richardson of Tucumcari, New Mexico, by Rev. F.S. Atwell. After the ceremony, between 30 and 40 guests sat down to a bountiful turkey dinner. A choice list of presents was received. The groom is assistant engineer on a railroad in New Mexico, where they will make their future home.

pg 1, col 3

Married: William T. Morris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Morris of this city, and Florence Saunders, daughter of Mrs. Mary Saunders of Sun City, were married Sunday afternoon, December 24th, 1905, at the Baptist church in Sun by Rev. J.M. Adams, the oldest minister and resident of Barber county. A large number of relatives and friends were present. Both of these young people were born and raised in Barber county and their friends and well wishers are only limited by the number of their acquaintances. For the present they will make their home with Mr. Morris' parents south of town. They received a number of useful and valuable presents.

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Died: On Friday morning, December 22, 1905, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. B.E. Wadsworth, Eliza Jane Thomas, wife of Franklin Thomas, aged 76 years, 2 months and 23 days. She had been declining for several weeks and her death was not unexpected. The funeral service was held at the Wadsworth home Saturday afternoon by Rev. W.M. Covert, pastor of the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Thomas' maiden name was Eliza Jane Anderson. She was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. While yet a child she moved to Ashland, Ohio, and in 1854 married Franklin Thomas and moved to Doniphan county, Kansas. In 1879, she and her husband came to Barber county and they were among the first settlers in the Sharon valley. A few years ago she and her husband sold their farm and came to Medicine Lodge to live with their daughter, Mrs. B.E. Wadsworth. Mrs. Thomas was the mother of nine children. Three died in infancy. The eldest daughter died in Georgia and another daughter, Miss Leona Thomas,, died here nine years ago. The surviving children are Mrs. W.R. Gilmore, Highland, Kansas; Mrs. Emma Christy, Chicago; Mrs. B.E. Wadsworth and Miss Zella Thomas of this city. She had been a member of the Christian church for many years. The husband and children desire us to express their appreciation of the assistance given them by friends and neighbors.

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Born: Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Greever of Byron are the proud parents of a 9 pound son, born Tuesday of last week.

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Born: A son was born to Harvey Warren and wife on December 15, 1905. Dr. Kociell.

Jan - June 1906

Barber County Newspapers



Tom & Carolyn Ward
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