Adams
Aubley
Axline
Barmore
Benedict
Best
Best
Best
Blackstone
Blankenship
Bloom
Boggs
Boling
Bragg
Brooks
Brown
Burney
Burney
Burtoff
Cameron
Carmichel
Carpenter
Case
Case
Chandler
Charless
Clay
Coleman
Conboy
Conlee
Cook
Copeland
Courtney
Cox
Cox
Currie
Curtis
Denton
Deselm
Dicks
Dilsavor
Dobbs
Doran
Downs
Downtain
Drysdale
Dye
Dye
Fager
Faxon
Feltner
Finley
Finney
Florence
Freeman
Gamble
Gant
Gant
Gibson
Grandstaff
Grandstaff
Grant
Gregory
Gregory
Hall
Hawver
Hayes
Hayes
Hayes
Heflin
Hegwer
Hill
Holden
Hough
Howe
Huesman
Hull
Hunt
Huston
Jarvis
Jarvis
Karr
Kauffman
Kauffman
Kidd
Knight
Knight
Lake
Langdon
Lepper
Light
Lonker
Lorton
Lukens
Mackey
Marshall
Mathews
McBrayer
McLane
McNeal
Mitchell
Moomau
Mounsey
Muchmore
Murphy
Murray
Neff
Neighbor
Ogden
Ormiston
Ormiston
Palmer
Parker
Patton
Pelton
Pelton
Poindexter
Pollet
Prock
Reed
Reynolds
Ritchie
Roberts
Robinson
Roderick
Rogers
Rorick
Rowley
Runyan
Runyan
Sample
Sample
Sandy
Seidel
Seidel
Sellers
Sharp
Sherman
Shrivers
Shultz
Sleeper
Smith
Smith
Snodgrass
Sparks
Sprading
Spradling
Springer
Standiford
Stone
Stone
Stout
Talbot
Taliaferro
Tanksley
Thompson
Unger
Updegraff
Vandiver
Vaughn
Wallace
Watkins
Wells
Wheat
Wilcox
Wilfley
Willan
Wiltshire
Winans
Wood
Woodward
Wright
Wright
Youmans
Young
Zucker

REEL #M871/KSHS Microfilm Collection

Medicine Lodge Cresset: July-Dec 1903

The Medicine Lodge Cresset (meaning "bright light") was a weekly newspaper, published in Medicine Lodge beginning early in 1879. L.M. Axline was publisher at the time this particular reel begins; Otis Lorton took over publication in February 1899. Local news included coverage from the surrounding communities, as well as Medicine Lodge. This reel begins Friday, January 7, 1898 and continues through Friday, February 22, 1901. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net)


Jul 3, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Died: “Mrs. Woodward at Rest” - Mary Susan Hough, wife of H.T. Woodward of this city, died at 11:30 o’clock Monday morning, June 29th, of a cancerous infection. The funeral service was held at the M.E. church at 10 o’clock Tuesday morning, her pastor, Rev. J.L. Patterson, assisted by Rev. R.H. Tanksley, preaching the sermon from Revelations 2:10 - “Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crown of life.” A large concourse of mourning friends followed the casket with its precious tenant to the city of the dead. Mrs. Woodward was born near Springfield, Illinois, on November 7th, 1853. She moved to Iowa and thence to Kansas with her parents and on July 3, 1872, was united in marriage with Hugh T. Woodward. To this union were born five children - Miss Bernice Woodward, Mrs. Sarah Kidd, George and James Woodward, and Mrs. Pearl Murphy - all surviving her and living in this city. In 1890, while living in Pratt county, she joined the Methodist church, and on February 16, 1896, transferred her membership to Medicine Lodge where she was known as a good worker, ever ready to extend a helpful and charitable hand. Her death is the first break in family ties. Wherever trouble and sickness came to darken a home, Mrs. Woodward was among the first to volunteer her services, and there are many in Medicine Lodge beside whose sickbed she has sat alone through the still watches of the night, or whose loved ones have had the dews of death wiped from their forehead by her hands, who offer tender sympathy and consolation that words too feebly express to the surviving husband and children. Mrs. Woodward has suffered for months untold pain. After nursing her husband and children through a serious term of infectious disease, she was taken ill with a disease that baffled the skill of the best physicians and surgeons of the state. At times her family were buoyed up by hopeful reactions only to be cast down by a more serious attack. For the past three weeks her life has been held by a slender thread.

pg 8

Married: Charles Pollet and Minnie Courtney were united in marriage Friday, June 26th, in this city by Probate Judge Gleason. They gave Belvidere as their home.


Jul 10, 1903

pg 1, col 3

Died: A.A. Denton died very suddenly about midnight Monday, July 6th. The immediate cause of death was heart trouble, though he had been suffering for some days from asthma and dropsy. He stepped out doors Monday night and failing to return when expected, Thos. Warwick, with whom he made his home, went to look after him and found him near the house dead. Mr. Denton had no relatives nearer than a nephew, A.H. Denton, cashier of a bank in Arkansas City, and three nieces at Ft. Smith. They were all in the east and could not be reached but his nephew’s wife came Tuesday night to attend the funeral. Mr. Denton did not seek friendships and lived much of the time alone, but to the few friends he made he always extended a genial welcome and to them he was known as a well-informed gentleman. Mr. Denton came here about nine years ago at the solicitation of Thomas Best to make experiments in the manufacture of syrup from sorghum. He carried on these experiments with considerable success until a year or two ago, part of the time under direction of the Department of Agriculture. He was considered the highest authority on sorghum syrups and cane culture in t his country. For the past year and at the time of his death, he was under engagement with the Southern Cane Growers’ Association to prepare a series of papers on cane culture and syrups. One of his recent papers caused a demand for a special edition of 10,000 copies of the journal in which it was printed. Mr. Denton was 64 years old. Brief funeral services were held at the home of Mr. Warwick at 9 o’clock Wednesday morning by K.G. Heyne, rector of St. Mark’s church. Interment was made in Highland cemetery.

pg 8, col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Park Moomau, on Monday, July 6th, a girl.

pg 8, col 1

Married: W.H. Downs and Bessie Barmore of Kiowa were united in marriage in this city Wednesday, July 8th, by Probate Judge Gleason.

pg 8, col 3

Married: Nathan D. Neff and Mary G. Thompson, of Hazelton, were united in marriage in this city Monday, July 6th, by Probate Judge Gleason.

pg 8, col 4

Died: A little child of Mr. and Mrs. Blankenship of Isabel, who recently moved to that place from Missouri, died on Monday. The child was taken sick on the train. It was eighteen months old.

pg 8, col 5

Birthday: Grandma Sprading, who makes her home with her son southeast of town, was pleasantly surprised on the Fourth by a number of friends dropping in with baskets filled with the necessaries for an excellent dinner. Those in the party were Mrs. George T. Knight, John Wilhelm and wife, Joseph Wiley and two daughters, Arthur and Misses Della and Lucy Harlan. And @ Jul 17, pg 8: The surprise party on Grandma Sprading [also spelled Spradling] on July 4th was in honor of her seventy-fourth birthday, and was gotten up by her son William, who neglected to tell the invited guests of the nature of the party until their arrival so as to make it a double surprise party.


Jul 17, 1903

pg 5, col 2

Birthday: Following an established custom, Mr. and Mrs. Riley Lake gave a birthday dinner in honor of their eldest son, Russell, Sunday of this week when he entered his seventh year. Guests present were Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Lake, Mrs. L.M. Durfee and G.G. Shigley. Ice cream and cake, with cigars and cold bottles followed the dinner.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Elisha Stout and wife on Saturday, July 11th, a son. Dr. Coleman.

Born: To U.G. Rogers and wife of Elm Mills township on July 10th, a daughter. Dr. Kociell.

pg 8, col 4

Born: To Dan Deselm and wife on Saturday, July 11th, a daughter. Dr. Coleman.


Jul 24, 1903

pg 1, col 1

Died: “The Wife of V.E. Sleeper of Valley Township Found Dead in the Yard” - About six o’clock Thursday evening of last week, Martha Lee Sleeper, wife of V.E. Sleeper, a young farmer of Valley township, was found dead in the yard at her home. Just a little while before, her husband had left her in her usual health to go to Nashville on an errand. The body was found by a son of Oscar Ormiston who was working for Sleeper. The position of the body and the lacerated condition of the forehead and hands by gravel indicated that she had fallen forward heavily and died without a struggle. Coroner Moore and County Attorney Tincher were sent for immediately and after gathering what information they could from the family and neighbors, it was decided to have a postmortem examination. Dr. Kociell was called to assist Dr. Moore, and then, in view of rumors that had started, it was thought best by the family to have an inquest. Coroner Moore empaneled the following jury to conduct the investigation: Oscar Ormiston, George Austin, M. Coughenour, J.S. Bruner, John McClelland and J.A. Louthan. After hearing the evidence, the jury found that death resulted from valvular heart disease. The physicians say this was superinduced by the bursting of a blood vessel. What caused the rupture of the blood vessel is a matter of conjecture. It might have been caused by the very hard work she had done that day - the family washing and cleaning house. Mrs. Sleeper had enjoyed excellent health, apparently, until the past few months when she had frequent fainting spells. The funeral service was held at the residence Friday afternoon by Rev. J.L. Patterson, pastor of the Methodist church of this city. Interment was made in the Mumford cemetery. Mrs. Sleeper was twenty-three years of age and the eldest daughter of H.I, Tilden of Isabel. She was held in high esteem by all who knew her, and her sudden death was learned with sorrow by all in the township. She was born in Sumner county but has lived most of her life in the neighborhood in which she died. She leaves two children, two and three years old, and a husband. [See transcription of KSHS Reel #M808 @ Jan 11, 1899 for marriage of Martha Tilden and V.E. Sleeper.]

pg 1, col 5

Birthday: Alma Palmer gave a party to a number of her young friends Friday in honor of her eleventh birthday.

pg 8, col 5

Marriage License: The Pratt papers of last week note that a marriage license was issued in that county to William J. Wiltshire of Pratt and Carrie L. Gregory of Barber county.

pg 8, col 5

Married: R.F. Huesman and Myrtle Neighbor of Crystal Springs were married by Probate Judge Gleason Thursday of last week. The young couple remained here two or three days.


Aug 7, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Died: The Pratt Republican had the following notice of the death of W.L. Cox, an old frontiersman and pioneer citizen of Barber county: On July 27th, Wesley L. Cox passed away. In the death of Mr. Cox, Pratt loses one of her oldest and most highly esteemed citizens. He came to Barber county in the early seventies and settled on Turkey Creek and lived there until a few years ago, when he moved to Coats. Mr. Cox was born in Morgan county, Indiana, September 16th, 1830, being 72 years and 10 months old at the time of his death. He was married in Springfield, Missouri, to Rachael Ann Reed, 43 years ago and she survives to mourn the loss of a devoted and faithful husband. For several years Mr. Cox has been an invalid, having suffered a stroke of paralysis from which he never recovered. His death was not unexpected and it was only a question of a short time when he would have to pass over to the great beyond. Although he had never professed religion, he tried to live an honest and honorable life and when the end came, said he was ready to go. The funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon at the residence in Coats, Rev. C.W. Owens preaching the funeral sermon, after which the Masonic order took charge of the body and under their services it was laid to rest in the Coats cemetery.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To [Rev.] R.H. Tanksley and wife, Tuesday morning, August 7, a daughter. Dr. Coleman.

pg 8, col 3

Marriage License: Issued in Anthony to Wm. L. Rorick of Corbin to marry Erie C. Carmichel of Kiowa.

pg 8, col 4

Married: Cards were received here this week announcing the marriage of L.Wiley Langdon and Lula C. Karr at Aline, Oklahoma, on August 1st. The bride is a daughter of Dr. J.D. Karr of Alva and well-known in Medicine Lodge where she grew to womanhood.


Aug 14, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Married: From the Portales, New Mexico Daily Press, we learn of the marriage of Eli Benedict of Alva and Mrs. Beatrice Snodgrass of Medicine Lodge. The ceremony was performed at the Portales Hotel by Rev. M.D. Hill, pastor of the Methodist church, on Friday evening, August 7th. Both of these people are well known in Medicine Lodge, having been residents of this city a number of years. Rumor has connected their names matrimonially several times the past few months. Their friends here extend congratulations and best wishes.

pg 1, col 3

Anniversary: “Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary” - The arrival of a number of their neighbors, with baskets filled with good things to eat, on Friday of last week reminded R.V. Bloom and wife of Mingona township that they had been married just fifty years, and that it occurred back in old Pennsylvania. Those who were present to help make this golden wedding anniversary a pleasant affair were Rev. L.M. Belden and wife, Mrs. Zaring and little son, A.A. Marchel and wife, George Osborn and wife, John Bloom and family, Wm. Calloway and family and Walter Lonker. Mr. Bloom and his estimable wife have lived in Barber county a number of years. They have made themselves by hard work a pleasant home, comprising three quarter sections of land, and, more than all, enjoy the esteem and good will of everyone.

pg 5

Married: Wm. Gamble and Miss Nellie Prock were united in the holy bonds of matrimony last Sunday evening at 7 o’clock, Rev. Scott officiating. The Cresset extends congratulations. See also pg 8, col 3, for license issued “Thursday of last week to William E. Gamble and Miss Nellie Prock, both of Hazelton.”

pg 8, col 3

Married: Sam’l Shultz and Miss Cora Young of Sun City were married Tuesday, August 11th, by Probate Judge Gleason.

pg 8, col 4

Died: The infant daughter of Oscar Ormiston of Mumford died Tuesday, August 11th.

pg 8, col 4

Born: To Wilbur Hayes and wife Saturday night, August 8th, a son. Dr. Moore.

pg 8, col 4

Married: I.B. Hayes of Sharon secured license to marry Mrs. Martha McLane of Kiowa last week. They were married Friday evening, August 7th, in Sharon by Rev. A.C. Brown.

pg 8, col 4

Born: Howard Stone was over from the Sharon valley Saturday in a particularly high state of elation. A little daughter arrived at his home the same night the rain came, July 31st.

pg 8, col 4

Married: J. Copeland of Sherman, Texas, secured license here last Tuesday to marry Phoebe Wilcox of New York City. They were married the same day at the Methodist parsonage by Dr. Patterson.


Aug 21, 1903

pg 1, col 1

Died: “An Old Citizen Dead, Uncle Ed Youmans a Victim of Heart Failure - Death Occurred Last Friday” - At 2:30 o’clock last Friday afternoon, August 14, 1903, Edward Hunt Youmans died at his home in this city of heart failure. The news of his death spread rapidly over the town and was a surprise and a shock to every one. Only a few of his most intimate friends knew of his illness and none suspected that death would come so soon. He had not been very well for several months but only a few regarded his ailment as serious. On Friday morning he arose and ate his breakfast. About noon he was attacked with a vomiting fit. A physician was called and after giving medicine to relieve the nausea, the doctor told him if he would turn over on his right side, he might rest easier. He replied, “All right, doctor,” and in doing so breathed his last. The funeral service was held at the family residence at 3:30 Monday afternoon by R.H. Tanksley, pastor of the Christian church. Interment was made in Highland cemetery. Out of respect for the deceased, every office and place of business in the city closed from three to five o’clock, and almost the entire population attended the funeral. To those who have daily come in contact with his optimistic character for so many years, it is hard to realize that Uncle Ed Youmans now sleeps with the dead. No matter how dark the cloud of adversity hung over head, he always believed it would soon give way to the blue skies of a better day. Mr. Youmans was the oldest business man in Medicine Lodge, having located here in the fall of 1877 and opened a general store. He has remained in business continuously, the different styles of the firm being Standiford & Youmans, Standiford, Youmans & Co., the company being Richards & Rogers of Wichita, Standiford, Youmans & Rogers, Standiford, Youmans & Eldred, L.A. Eby & Co., and B.J. Youmans. He came to Kansas from his native state, New Jersey, in 1847 and opened a general store at Osawatomie, and he came from that town to Medicine Lodge. On November 27, 1861, he was married to Barbara J. Standiford in Miami county. She survives him, and during all their long years together we doubt if ever a marital cloud cast a shadow across the threshold of their home. Out of a family of eight brothers, he is the seventh to pass away, his age being sixty-seven years, four months and eleven days. His native town is Washington, New Jersey. Those from out of town who attended the funeral were William Youmans, a brother, of Osawatomie; Thomas Youmans, a nephew of the same place, Mance Nichols and daughter, Miss Marguerite, of Newkirk, Oklahoma, W.W. Standiford and son, Burney, brother and nephew of Mrs. Youmans, of Woodward, Oklahoma, and L.A. Eby of Acme, Texas. The pall bearers were Judge C.W. Ellis, John Finley, G.W. Hendrickson, G.W. Stevents, J.P. Hall, J.H. Owen, W.C. Millar, and James Dobbs. [This obituary continues, but the transcription is incomplete after the foregoing.]

pg 1, col 4

Married: Miss Mabel Stone, daughter of Silas E. Stone, a former businessman of Medicine Lodge, was married at Los Angeles, California. on August 4th, to Monroe Harold Conlee. The Los Angeles Daily Times has the following notice of the wedding: “The Church of the Epiphany, East Los Angeles, was the scene of a pretty wedding last evening when Miss Mabel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Silas E. Stone of Workman street, became the bride of Monroe Harold Conlee of this city. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Henderson Judd, chaplain of Bishop Johnson, and an old-time friend and rector of the bride’s family in Michigan, Rev. A.G.L. Trew, D.D., rector of the church, being absent on vacation. The church was artistically decorated in white and green for the occasion by relatives of the bride and groom. Miss Bess Conlee, sister of the groom, attended the bride, and Roy Stone, brother of the bride, acted as best man, accompanying the groom from the Guild Hall to the chancel. Mrs. Trew, wife of the rector and the accomplished leader of the choir of the Church of the Epiphany, skillfully interpreted the ‘Wedding March from ‘Lohengrin,’ as the bride, leaning on the arm of her father, preceded by the bridesmaid and the ushers, moved up the aisle to the altar. The bride was attired in white silk mull over taffeta and her long wedding veil falling in graceful folds was fastened by natural orange blossoms. The maid of honor was dressed in blue silk mull over white, heavily embroidered, and carried a bouquet of white carnations. After the impressive service, which was witnessed only by relatives and intimate friends, the wedding party retired to the home of the bride’s parents, where a supper was served. Mr. Conlee, son of Rev. J.R. Conlee, is an official reporter of the Superior Court of Los Angeles county and is a rising young man of this city. Mrs. Conlee is a graduate of the State Normal School and has for three years been a successful teacher in the public schools of Santa Monica. This marriage is the consummation of a friendship formed in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Conlee, after a few weeks’ absence, will return to Los Angeles, where they will, in the near future, have their home on Lovelace avenue.”

pg 5, col 1

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Poindexter, a baby. Dr. Atwell. [Sharon news]

pg 8, col 3

Married: W. Claude Muchmore and Cordelia May Wood of Kiowa were united in marriage by Probate Judge Gleason at his office Tuesday morning.


Aug 28, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Married: On Sunday, August 23, at the Baptist parsonage in t his city, Harvey Pelton of Sharon and Bertha Ritchie of Medicine Lodge, were united in marriage by Rev. J.J. Griffin. Mr. Pelton is the son of Judge and Mrs. J.L. Pelton of Sharon and a young man we have known long enough to give an A1 recommendation of uprightness and industry. Mrs. Pelton is a niece of R.H. Clay and wife of this city.

pg 1, col 2

Married: On Friday, August 21st, Probate Judge Gleason at his residence married A.J. Boling and I.E. Dye of Capron, Oklahoma.

pg 1, col 2

Married: On Wednesday evening, August 26th, Roy C. Parker and Frances Hegwer, of Kiowa, were married in this city by Dr. Patterson, pastor of the M.E. church.

pg 1, col 3

Died: From the Kiowa Journal - At 5:30 o’clock Monday a.m., W.F. Smith was taken from our midst and we mourn the loss of an honored citizen. Mr. Smith had been in poor health for some time, the final cause of death being consumption. The deceased was a little over 70 years of age and had lived in Kiowa since 1885, coming here in the fall of that year from Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Smith was a veteran of the civil war and a loyal Mason. A brief service of prayer was held at the home, after which the remains were removed to Trinity church, comrades and brethren acting as bearers. The service at the church was taken from the Book of Common Prayer, and was beautiful and comforting in its simplicity. There were no remarks. The remains were taken to Springfield, Illinois, for interment, accompanied by Mrs. Smith and the two daughters.

pg 8

Birthday: The neighbors of R.J. Taliaferro, east of town, got up a big surprise party in honor of this fifty-first birthday, Wednesday of last week, and to top out the evening’s entertainment presented him with a rocking chair. Bob was so overcome that he was not able to get to town for a week.


Sep 4, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Married: A double wedding occurred at the residence of John Hull in Moore township on Tuesday, September 1st, Miss Nettie Hull and Frank Wright, and Miss Effie Hull and Aden Hall being united in marriage. We join with the many friends of these young people in wishing them long, happy married lives and prosperity.

pg 1, col 4

Birthday: Margaret and Charley Jerome Chandler will celebrate Margaret’s second birthday Tuesday, September 8th, by giving a lawn party in the afternoon from 2:30 to 5 o’clock. Every child in Medicine Lodge and vicinity is invited to come. Where children are too small to come alone, parents or older children are requested to bring them. And @ Sep 11, pg 1, col 4: “Great Birthday Celebration” - The celebration of Margaret Chandler’s second birthday Tuesday afternoon was a great event to the little people of Medicine Lodge and vicinity. Almost 200 children of various ages were present and over eleven gallons of ice cream and accessories were consumed. Mr. Chandler gave all the guests of his little daughter a ride on his automobile. Charley Jerome Chandler, the younger brother of Miss Margaret, came in for a share of the entertainment.

pg 5, col 1

Born: Fred Dicks is the proud papa of an eight pound girl, born Tuesday morning. Mother and child doing well, and we think that Fred may recover with careful attention. [Hazelton news]

pg 8

Marriage License: Issued Friday to Eugene C. Downtain and Miss Myrtle Jarvis of Kiowa. Both are well known young people of the south part of the county.

pg 8

Born: To Ernest Lonker and wife on Wednesday, September 2nd, a son. Dr. Coleman.


Sep 11, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Birthday: The surprise party at C.M. Shrivers’ on September 2nd - Mrs. Shrivers’ 22nd birthday - was a surprise indeed. When the advance guard arrived at about eleven o’clock, they found Mr. and Mrs. Shriver in the hayfield making hay. The guest just kept coming until every available space in the yard was occupied by buggies and double seated rigs. Mr. and Mrs. Shriver were so surprised that they hardly knew what to say or do, but the visitors were equal to the occasion. There evidently were carpenters in the bunch for loose boards were gathered up and tables built in the house and on the porch. These were soon laden with the delicacies brought by the visitors. They were literally loaded with the fat of the land, chickens, turkeys, cakes, pies, jellies, preserved fruits, peaches and grapes which were partaken of by all, while the friendly spirits, the joyous laugh, and the sparkling good humor bespoke a gathering of friends where each vied with the other to make all happy. Vocal and instrumental music of the very best was provided. Old and young took part in singing good, devotional songs. Miss Pearl Blackmore presided at the organ in a masterly manner. Prominent among the visitors were Mr. and Mrs. John Whitaker and children Oklahoma. The oldest couple were Mr. and Mrs. B.F. Blackmore of Sharon. Elder McLain and family, A.W. Schnelle and family, about a dozen, Jas. Stolebarger and family, the writer did not get to count that family, some of the little folks kept running around so we didn’t know when we had them all numbered, and many other prominent neighbors and friends of Mr. and Mrs. Shrivers were present whom we haven’t the space to give special mention, who left many valuable presents as souvenirs of the occasion.

pg 5, col 2

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. John Sandy, on September 7th, a fine boy.

pg 8, col 3

Birthday: Seven little girls arranged a pleasant little surprise party for Frances Case Wednesday afternoon of last week. The occasion of the party was Frances’ seventh birthday.

pg 8, col 3

Engaged: Cards were issued this week announcing that the marriage of Edgar A. Grandstaff and Miss S. Edna Kauffman will take place at the Methodist church on Thursday evening, September 17th. [See below for details of wedding.]


Sep 18, 1903

pg 1, col 1

Married: “A Pretty Church Wedding” - At 8 o’clock last evening, September 17, 1903, at the Methodist church in Medicine Lodge, Dr. Patterson, the pastor, performed the ceremony which united in marriage Edgar A. Grandstaff and S. Edna Kauffman, two well-known young people of this city. A large number of friends witnessed the ceremony. The bride’s maid was Miss Grace Taylor and the groom’s best man was Frank Williams. The maids of honor were Miss Lila Coyle and Miss Grace Williams. The ushers were Henry Hanson and Bennie Kauffman. The wedding march was played by Mrs. J.L. Brady. After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. B.S. Kauffman, on Kansas avenue west. Mrs. Grandstaff has grown up in Medicine Lodge and enjoys a large circle of friends. Mr. Grandstaff is a young business man of Medicine Lodge. The Cresset hopes their married life will be as smooth as still waters and that its length will be marked by uninterrupted sunshine and blue skies.

pg 1, col 1

Married: James M. Bragg, of Eagle township, son of Register of Deeds Bragg, and Vivian M. Smith, granddaughter of Wm. Smith of Elwood township and daughter of Mrs. Len Smith, were united in marriage in this city Wednesday afternoon, September 26th [sic], by Probate Judge Gleason. They will make their home for the present in Eagle township. The Cresset extends congratulations.

pg 1, col 3

Engaged: Mr. and Mrs. George W. Winans of Hutchinson announce in the Hutchinson News this week the engagement of their daughter, Miss Louise Cochran Winans, to Mr. Ralph H. Faxon of Medicine Lodge. The marriage will not take place until early next summer, after Mr. Faxon’s return from Washington. Miss Winans visited in Medicine Lodge last week as the guest of Mrs. Chester I. Long. She is a very accomplished singer, and has appeared in a number of public concerts. Mr. Faxon is secretary to Senator Long, a position he has filled with credit and ability for a number of years. He is a bright and entertaining writer and has done a great deal of newspaper work. [See below @ Sep 18, 1904 for further information.]

pg 5, col 1

Born: Ed Vandiver and wife were made happy by the arrival of a fine boy last week. [Sharon news]

Born: Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Burtoff are the happy parents of a fine boy which arrived Saturday, September 12th. Dr. Atwell. [Sharon news]

pg 8, col 3

Died: The five-months-old daughter of Wm. Robinson of Kiowa died Thursday of last week of cholera infantum.

pg 8, col 5

Born: To Frank Blackstone and wife, Thursday night, September 10th, a son. Dr. Coleman.


Sep 25, 1903

pg 1, col 5

Birthday: Col. O.S. Boggs celebrated his 77th birthday Wednesday with his annual dinner at the Grand Hotel. On the table set in his honor was some fine fruit from his own orchard. As evidence of his sprightliness and lingering youth we saw him dance a jig on Saturday.

pg 8, col 3

Born: To Harry Huston and wife of Attica, on September 8th, a son.

pg 8, col 4

Married: O.B. Finley and Emma Dye, two young people of Isabel, were married at Alva on September 7th

pg 8, col 5

Died: The infant son of Dr. and Mrs. A.D. Updegraff of Anthony died Saturday, aged one day. Mrs. M.E. Updegraff of this city, grandmother of the child, went to Anthony Saturday and arrived a short time before it died. The parents have the sympathy of everyone.


Oct 2, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Married: “A Happy Home Wedding” - Last evening, October 1st, S.R. Willan, a young ranchman living southwest of town, and Miss Ada Mounsey were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Mounsey. Only the immediate relatives of the parties witnessed the ceremony performed by Dr. Patterson, pastor of the Methodist church. Both of these young people are conspicuous church workers, and from every standpoint their mating portends a happy married life. The Cresset extends its best wishes for a fulfillment of this horoscope of their future.

pg 1

Anniversary: W.C. Sellers and wife were made the victims of a very pleasant surprise dinner Friday, gotten up by Miss M. Nell Sample and Mrs. J.S. Runyan, assisted by Ed Sample and Mr. Runyan. The dinner was in honor of their twenty-third wedding anniversary.

pg 1

Married: Mr. Robert Marshall of this city and Miss Bertha Louise Brooks were married at Glade Springs, Virginia, the home of the bride, on Tuesday, September 22nd. They arrived here on Saturday evening, and for this week will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. T.J. Best, and next week will begin housekeeping on the Benedict place just west of town. Mrs. Brooks and Mrs. Best were girlhood friends.

pg 8

Born: To Wm. Roderick and wife of Sharon township, on September 26, a daughter. Dr. Cushenbery.

pg 8

Married: Clarence D. Sample, now of Capron, Oklahoma, was married September 15th, in Denver, Colorado, to Miss La Fay Hill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Hill of Kiowa.

pg 8

Died: Mrs. David J. Zucker, Jr., known to Medicine Lodge people as Bessie Drysdale, died suddenly at her home in St. Louis on September 20th. She was a sister of Mrs. Will Cook.


Oct 9, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Died: [Following is a partial obituary for Uncle Ben Vaughn; please consult the issue for complete text]...family residence on Monday afternoon, Elder A.O. Walker, pastor of the Christian church, conducting the service. Interment was made in Highland cemetery. Uncle Ben Vaughn, as everybody called him, was one of the oldest settlers in Barber county, having located on what is now the Otis Coyle place in ‘73 or ‘74. His life was lived according to his ideas of citizenship, and in his makeup hypocrisy had no place. He was twice married and is survived by his second wife, and six children - Mrs. W.B. Springer of this county, Mrs. Laura Finney and Mrs. Belle Murray of Kansas City, Mrs. Carpenter of Lamar, Colorado, John and Thomas Vaughn, also of Colorado. Mrs. Springer, Mrs. Finney and John Vaughn were present at the funeral.

pg 1, col 4

Married: Vernon Mitchell of Medicine Lodge and Alice Pelton of Sharon will be united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Pelton, east of Sharon, Sunday evening, October 11th. Both of these young people are well-known in this city and around Sharon. The bride has spent most of her life in Barber county, and is capable of making a happy home for the husband of her choice. The Cresset takes pleasure in congratulating them in advance.


Oct 16, 1903

pg 1, col 4

Married: At the residence of H.H. Case, Wednesday morning, October 14th, Dr. T.A. Coleman and Miss Minnie Roberts were united in marriage by Judge C.S. Gleason. The wedding was a quiet affair, only relatives of the bride being present. After the ceremony the happy couple left for Kansas City and the former home of Dr. Coleman in north Missouri where they will visit a few days with his parents. The bride is a sister of Mrs. H.H. Case and for the past two years has made her home here. Dr. Coleman during his residence here has made numerous friends and built up a large and successful practice. On their return to Medicine Lodge, they will make their home in the house the Doctor recently purchased from W.R. Forsyth. The Cresset joins with their friends and acquaintances in wishing them all the joys incident to a long married life. And @ Oct 23, pg 8: Dr. T.A. Coleman and bride returned Monday from Kansas City and north Missouri. On Monday night it kept them dodging to escape the small boys armed with bells and other instruments for creating noise.

pg 1, col 4

Married: “A Swell Wedding” - Senator Long went to Kingman Wednesday to attend the wedding of Miss Geraldine Wallace to Mr. Guy W. Talbot of Peoria, Illinois. It is said to have been the largest and swellest wedding ever held in southwest Kansas. The groom, who is a railroad official, brought a party of prominent Illinois people in his private car, and among the prominent Kansans present were Senator Long, Governor Bailey, Congressman Murdock, Supreme Court Justice Pollock and Bank Commissioner Morton.

pg 1, col 4

Died: Word was received here Tuesday that Frank Feltner had died at his home on the Yellowstone. The cause of death is said to have been blood poisoning brought on by a wheat beard which lodged in his throat not long ago. His body was buried Wednesday at Lake City. He was a brother of Mrs. Dick Mathews of this city. Mr. Mathews left here Tuesday night to arrange for his burial.

pg 1, col 5

Died: “Dr. Sparks Dead, The End Came Unexpectedly Last Saturday Morning, Funeral Tuesday Morning” - At 10 o’clock Saturday morning, October 10th, Dr. Clarence L. Sparks died at his home on north Main street. He had been ill for some time with typhoid fever and heart trouble, and the direct cause of his death was heart failure. The fever was yielding all right, seemingly, to the treatment, and as it had been several days since he had any trouble with his heart his family and physician felt assured of his recovery. He rested well Friday night and all felt so hopeful Saturday morning that his brother, Dr. W.L. Sparks of Pratt, arranged to return home. A few minutes before 10 o’clock he was attacked with a sinking spell and before the physician could be called he passed away. The fever germs were contracted a few weeks ago on his visit to the new country in Oklahoma where he had gone to look after his real estate. The funeral was not held until Tuesday morning to give his mother and sister of Las Vegas, New Mexico, an opportunity to attend. Owing to a delayed train, they did not arrive until it was over and his body had been laid away in Highland cemetery. The funeral services were held in the Christian church, conducted by A.O. Walker, pastor of the church, and the Masonic order. Members of this order and Knights of Pythias attended in a body. Clarence L. Sparks was born in California November 8, 1873. In 1881, his parents moved to Barber county, and, excepting a year in Oklahoma, he has since resided here. In 1897, he opened an office here for the practice of his profession - dentistry. In January, 1897, he was married to Miss Nellie Currie, daughter of C.B. Currie, who, with two small children, a mother, brother and sister, survive him. He carried $4,000 insurance in the Modern Woodman of American and New York Life Insurance Company. His death is an unusually sad one, and the grief of his wife, mother and sister brought tears of sympathy to the eyes of all. To them there is no healing balm, no consolation except the measure that the passage of years can bring.


Oct 23, 1903

pg 1, col 2

Born: To Wm. Curtis and wife, yesterday morning, October 22nd, a daughter. Drs. Coleman and Moore.

pg 1, col 4

Died: “Pioneer Citizen Dead” - Died, after an illness of twenty-eight days, Augustus Bellamy Reynolds, at his home near Hazelton on October 14, 1903. He was born at Glens Falls, New York, October 27, 1827, the family being one of distinction and long residence in the Empire State. Ancestors of the family took a prominent part in the Revolution and the war of 1812. James Green Reynolds, father of the deceased, was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving under General Wool. His mother was a member of the well-known Greene family of Connecticut, a number of whose members were officers in the Revolution. Mr. Reynolds was united in marriage in 1853 to Margaret A. Holden at Hamilton, Canada. He leaves a wife, three sons and two daughters as follows: Holden A., Frederick W., George H., Mrs. Wm. Jarvis of Hamilton, Canada, and Augusta Reynolds of near Hazelton. Mr. Reynolds was a member of The American Secular Union and Free-Thought Federation. A champion for education and intellectual development. For a man of his years, he was remarkably well preserved physically and mentally, taking an active interest in the current events, both local and foreign. Having the advantage of a thorough education he possessed wide knowledge of ancient as well as modern history, discussing it with accuracy and fluency. For the first time in many long years he has failed to respond to roll-call for life’s duty, for the first time his heart fails to give its response of sympathy and kindness to his fellowmen, for the first time his hands fail to extend to perform the home duties previously so faithfully performed. To have made the most of our opportunities, to have improved our minds and the minds of those about us, to have loved and cherished those dependent upon us, to have dealt kindly with our friends and honestly with our neighbors, charitably with strangers, to have rejoiced with the fortunate and happy, to have decreased the sum of human misery, to have bettered humanity, this is the grandest achievement of man. [Memorial poem follows.]


Oct 30, 1903

pg 1, col 3

Birthday: John S. Runyan has always shown considerable zeal in putting up surprises and jobs on his friends that usually result in pleasure to the victims, but on Wednesday the tables were turned on him most effectually and now he fully realizes how his victims felt. On going home to dinner he found the house in possession of J.P. Hall and wife, W.C. Sellers and wife, Miss Nell Sample and Ed. Sample. When they admitted him to the sacred precincts of his own home he found an unusually excellent dinner served and all the self-invited guests seated around the table. After he had been sufficiently harassed he was informed that the cause of the invasion of his home was that his fiftieth birthday might be properly celebrated.

pg 1, col 4

Anniversary: Cards were received here first of the week announcing that Mr. and Mrs. J.W. McNeal would celebrate their twenty-fifth anniversary at Guthrie, Oklahoma, on Wednesday evening, October 28th. They were married in Medicine Lodge away back in 1878, when there was not much here but expectations. They have prospered in friendships and the material things of earth, and we trust that the span of their married life is not half run. Mr. McNeal was one of the original publishers of the Cresset, but he early forsook newspaper work for banking. He has lived in Guthrie since the opening of Oklahoma, and has gained prominence in territorial affairs.

pg 1, col 5

Died: Mrs. Annie S. Unger, wife of Rev. S.L. Unger, pastor of the Congregational church at Kiowa, died on October 19th, aged 36 years, 4 months and 13 days. She had been in bad health for some time. Her remains were taken to Galesburg, Illinois, for interment.

pg 5, col 1

Born: We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fager upon the advent into their household Sunday of a boy baby, net weight 12 pounds. [Lake City news]

pg 8

Born: To Frank Hayes and wife on October 21st, a son. Dr. Cushenbery.


Nov 13, 1903

pg 8

Born: To Frank Knight and wife on Monday, November 9th, a daughter. Dr. Moore.

pg 8

Married: John Wells and Bonnie Adams, second daughter of S.J. Adams, are supposed to have been married at Pratt yesterday. It is said that they left here late Wednesday afternoon for that purpose.


Nov 20, 1903

pg 1

Engaged: Cards are out announcing the approaching marriage of Harry L. Burney of this city to Miss Clara B. Seidel of Kiowa, which will occur at the Congregational church in Kiowa on Wednesday evening, November 25th.

pg 5

Engaged: Cards have been sent out for the wedding of Mis Rena Mackey and Mr. Charles McBrayer, Wednesday evening, November 18, 1903, at 8:30 o’clock at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Mackey, in this city.

pg 8, col 3

Married: Pratt Republican - Friday, Burt Lewis Gregory of Barber county, and Miss Myrtle Angeline Freeman of Pratt county, were married by Probate Judge Hess.

pg 8, col 3

Died: Robert Cameron Charless, little son of Mr. and Mrs. John Charless, died at Roswell, New Mexico, on Wednesday, November 11th, aged a few weeks more than one year.

pg 8, col 3

Born: The announcement of the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Preston Patton of Tustin, California, was received here this week. Mrs. Patton was formerly Miss Carrie Gibson.

pg 8, col 4

Married: R.W. Cameron, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Cameron of Alva, well known in this city, was married Wednesday of this week to a young lady of Peoria, Illinois.


Nov 27, 1903

pg 1, col 4

Married: At the residence of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Hunt, in Valley township, at 5 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, November 25th, Thom P. Knight and Miss Aimee Doran were united in marriage by Rev. Roy Corrie of Greensburg. Only the bride’s relatives and a few intimate friends of the groom were present. The bride is a young lady very highly commended, a daughter of T.A. Doran and a sister of Jim Doran. Tom Knight, who has at last, and to the surprise of many friends, shaken off the shackles of bachelorhood, is one of the best fellows who ever trod Mother Earth. He located in Valley township in 1884, and now lives in Isabel, and if any one ever thought ill of him it has never been known. We join in the hearty congratulations that every one gladly extends to Mr. and Mrs. Tom P. Knight.

pg 1, col 4

Married: Harry L. Burney of Medicine Lodge, son of Dr. and Mrs. B.R. Burney, and Clara B. Seidel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Seidel of Woods county, Oklahoma were married at the Congregational church at Kiowa by Rev. S.L. Unger at 8 o’clock Wednesday evening,, November 25th. The bride is a comely young lady of many accomplishments, popular among her acquaintances, and the ideal helpmate of a home-loving man. Harry Burney was born and raised in Medicine Lodge and consequently we have a proprietary interest in him and what he does. A few years ago he went to Kiowa to take a position with the York-Key Mercantile Company, which he retained until about two months ago, when he came back to Medicine Lodge. A few weeks ago he became a member of the mercantile firm of Burney, Elliott & Co., and from henceforth will be identified with the business and social interests of his native town. We trust his highest ambitions will be realized and join with Medicine Lodge in welcoming his bride to our city.

pg 8

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. H. Cox on Monday, November 23rd, a son. Dr. Moore.


Dec 11, 1903

pg 5, col 1

Died: At the home of his daughter in Wilmore, Saturday, December 5th, 1903, Harrison Wright, aged 74 years and 8 days. Mr. Wright was the father of Mrs. Belle Heflin and for the last year and more had been living with her in Lake City and on the Rauhut place in McAdoo and had only been in Wilmore a day or two.

pg 5, col 1

Died: [There is an obituary for both Mr. and Mrs. John Gant of Kiowa county, but the transcription is incomplete. Mr. Gant died on “Thursday of last week,” and Mrs. Gant died “less than 24 hours later.” See Dec 18 for detailed obituary.]

pg 8

Born: To Doc Wheat and wife of Woods county, Oklahoma, on November 29th, a son.

pg 8

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. James Dobbs, on Monday morning, December 7th, a son. Dr. Cushenbery.


Dec 18, 1903

pg 1

Died: At 10 o’clock, Saturday morning, December 12th, Henry Conboy died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Philo Sherman, of Nippewalla township, of cancer in the face. He was 67 years and 27 days of age when death relieved him of his terrible suffering. The funeral service was held at his home at 10 o’clock Sunday morning, by Rev. J.J. McLain, and interment followed in the cemetery in this city. Henry Conboy was born in Johnson county, Iowa, and moved to Barber county one year ago. He leaves a wife and daughter.

pg 1

Died: John Gant and his aged wife died within twenty-four hours of one another near Belvidere a few days ago and were laid to rest in the same grave. They resided for awhile in Barber county. Following obituary has been handed to us: John Gant was born in Alford, Lincolnshire, England, Oct. 34d, 1819. He was married Feb. 7th, 1844, to Elizabeth Grant, and during the same year, they emigrated to Ontario, Canada. After ten years residence there, they moved to Iowa, and successively tried their fortune at Ft. Scott, Kansas, and Colorado, finally settling near Belvidere, Kiowa county, Kansas, in 1875. He has been a successful farmer and stock raiser. Of late years he has been a sufferer from Bright’s disease, but the immediate cause of death was pneumonia. His wife, Elizabeth Gant, survived him but about twenty-four hours, dying of the same disease. She was a devout Christian woman, having united with the M.E. church in early life, and lived a life consistent with that faith. To this union were born nine children, five of whom survive their parents, four sons and one daughter. None of the children were near enough to attend the funeral, Elder Ilo of Present, Pratt county, preached a short funeral sermon, after which kind and loving hands laid Grandpa and Grandma to rest in the same grave. The sun was sinking low in the west when we did this last act of kindness for them, a fit closing to a long and happy married life. “Be ye ready for at a time ye think not the Son of Man cometh.”


Dec 25, 1903

pg 1, col 4

Died: The Cresset received a letter this week from Mrs. M.E. Cook of Sioux City, Iowa, announcing the death of her brother, H.P. Howe, at her home on December 16th. The cause of death was pneumonia, and he was only ill seven days. Mrs. Cook took the remains to his old home at Effingham, Kansas, for interment, which occurred last Friday afternoon. It will be remembered that Mr. Howe made his home here with Mrs. Cook for three years before her removal from Medicine Lodge. He was a quiet, unassuming gentleman, and it is with feelings of sorrow that we learn of his death.

pg 1, col 5

Married: David Hawver of Cleveland, Kingman county, and Miss Lyda A. Watkins of this city were married at 8 o’clock Wednesday evening, December 23rd, at the Methodist church by the pastor, Dr. J.L. Patterson. The ceremony was witnessed by a large company of well wishing friends. The wedding march was played by Miss Forsyth and bride and groom were attended to the altar by T.A. Watkins and wife, brother and sister-in-law of the bride. After the ceremony, the happy couple returned to the lecture room of the church to receive the congratulations of their friends. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Watkins, and all her life has lived in Medicine Lodge. Mr. and Mrs. Hawver will make their home in Cleveland, and the Cresset trusts it will ever be filled with the sunshine of domestic happiness.

pg 1, col 5

Married: At the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Ogden of Eagle township, on Wednesday, December 23rd, their daughter, Frances E. Ogden, was married to Orrin Rowley. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J.J. Griffin, pastor of the Baptist church of this city. After the ceremony the guests sat down to a splendid wedding supper. A dinner was given Mr. and Mrs. Rowley in this city yesterday by Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Sharp. Both of these young people are well known in the county, and are deserving of the good wishes of every one. Mr. Rowley is the son of Mrs. Isaac Sharp of this city and a hustling young ranchman of Eagle township.

pg 1, col 5

Married: William C. Aubley, a well-known young farmer of Mingona township, and Lucy Lukens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Lukens, were married at the bride’s home Monday evening, December 21st, by Rev. J.J. Griffin, pastor of the Baptist church of this city. The Cresset joins with their many friends in the congratulations that have been showered upon Mr. and Mrs. Aubley.

pg 1, col 5

Married: At the probate judge’s office on Thursday afternoon, December 17th, Fenton Wilfley of this city and Sarah Florence of Cleo, Oklahoma, were joined together in wedlock for weal or woe by Probate Judge Gleason. Both of these people are old enough to know their minds, the groom being past sixty-five and the bride fifty. The Cresset congratulates them.

pg 1, col 5

Marriage License: Issued Wednesday to Wm. H. Lepper and Arvilla B. Light of Sharon township.

pg 8

Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Best on Friday morning, December 18th, a son. Dr. Cushenbery. This explains why Mr. Best greeted the dawn that morning with loud blasts on a tin horn.

pg 8

Married: Matt Brown of Alva and Mrs. Alice T. Dilsavor of Kiowa were married last week.

Jan-June 1904

Barber County Newspapers



Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

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