REEL #M869/KSHS Microfilm Collection

The Medicine Lodge Cresset (meaning "bright light") was a weekly newspaper, published in Medicine Lodge beginning early in 1879. At the time this reel begins, Friday, January 4, 1895, L.M. Axline was the publisher. Local news included coverage from the surrounding communities, as well as Medicine Lodge. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net.)

Jan 1, 1897

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Married: Miss May Walstad, formerly of this county, and a sister to J.C. Walstad, of this city, was married to Milo Blodgett at the home of her mother in the Panhandle of Texas, on Dec. 23rd.

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Married: At the residence of the bride's father, G.W. Stevens, in this city, on Tuesday morning, December 29th, 1896, at 9:00 a.m., Miss Mary Stevens was married to Prof. Leonida T. Wilson, of Alva, O.T., Rev. Kirkpatrick, of Hazelton, performing the ceremony. The bride is well and favorably known in this community, where she has been active in charitable and church work. Her marriage and removal from t his city will be especially missed by the Sunday School and working force of the Presbyterian church, she being one of the leading spirits in those organizations. She is a young woman with grace of person and of pleasant disposition. Prof. Wilson is the present principal of the public schools of Hazelton, in this county, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson will make that city their home, at least until spring. The couple departed on the 10 o'clock train on the morning of their marriage for their home in Hazelton, followed by the congratulations and best wishes of the many friends of the bride in this vicinity.

Jan 8, 1897

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Born: A girl baby of regulation weight and really handsomer than her papa was born to Luke W. Chapin and wife on Monday, the 4th. Dr. Cushenbery in attendance. Mrs. J.B. Romig is taking care of the young lady and will instruct her in the fundamental principles of Republicanism though she will not be able to vote in Kansas.

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Anniversary: Friday of last week, Jan. 1st, was the 45th anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Chenoweth, of this city, and the ladies' Willing Workers of the Christian church organized a surprise for them. About sixty neighbors and friends called at their residence near the depot, loaded with a bountiful supply of material for a big dinner, and as they marched in and took possession of the house, they gave the worthy old couple a genuine surprise. J.L. Chenoweth and Miss Nancy McIntosh were married in Ohio on Jan. 1, forty-five years ago. Shortly after they removed to Iowa where they raised a family, and in 1878 they came to Barber county, Kas., where they have made their home. Mr. and Mrs. Chenoweth have lived Christian lives; the world is better for their having lived in it and now, as the shadows of the evening of life lengthen toward the east, they await the summons of the Master calmly and without fear, surrounded by relations, neighbors and friends who love, honor and revere them. What ruler or potentate has more to be proud of than they. Uncle Jake, as Mr. Chenoweth is known, is 70 years of age, while his worthy wife, known to her friends as Aunt Nancy, is 72.

Jan 15, 1897

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Marriage License: Issued by Judge Funk to John P. Hein and Mrs. Martha J. Parrish, both of Kiowa, yesterday, the 14th. They are aged 50 and 48.

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Died: Col F. W. Hickox died on Friday morning of last week, the 8th, at the residence of his adopted daughter, Mrs. R.J. Taliaferro, of old age and pneumonia, aged 78 years, 5 months and 25 days. The remains were shipped to Lamonte, Mo., for interment beside his wife. Col. Hickox had an eventful life. He was born in Missouri. During the war, he was a Union man and was influential in preventing Missouri from seceding. After the war, up to the Reconstruction period, he was a power in Missouri politics and for a time practically dictated political affairs in that state. At that time he was a Republican. He came to Barber county in 1885 in company with his wife. In 1888, his wife died while on a visit in Missouri and since that time he has made his home with Mrs. R.J. Taliaferro, his adopted daughter, and family. In 1890, Col. Hickox joined the Farmers Alliance, went into the People's party and was elected representative from Barber county on that ticket that fall. He served only one term. He was a member of the Missouri legislature for a term or two in the late 60s. Col. Hickox was a very shrewd man in his young days. He had forgotten more about politics than many fair politicians of this day will ever know. In politics, he believed in keeping his agreements the same as in business. He was generally respected by his neighbors and friends, though at various times in his life he had a good many political enemies. Peace to his ashes and rest to his soul.

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Married: At the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and D.F. Painter, in this city, on Thursday evening, Jan. 14th. 1897, Mr. Uriah C. Herr to Miss Lillian V. Painter, both of this city, Rev. Atwell performing the ceremony. The groom is one of the editors of the Barber County Index, while the bride is a sister to his associate editor and one of the most handsome and pleasant young ladies of this city. We wish them much joy.

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Married: C.E. Swartz, of Lake City, was married to Miss Rosa A. Brown, of Elm Mills township, on the 1st day of Jan., 1897, at Pratt, Kas. The bride is eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G.M. Brown and is a very estimable young lady. The groom is clerk for G.G. Shigley at Lake City and is said to be energetic and of pleasant disposition. We wish them much joy.

Jan 22, 1897

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Born: To James B. Neal and wife, recently, a son. James B. is sanguine that if the young man had arrived in time he would have voted for McKinley. [Sharon news]

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Married: Miss Bessie Woodward, formerly of this city, was married on Wednesday, January 20th, 1897, to Millard Word, at the Woodward homestead in the Strip, a few miles south of Kiowa. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R.M. Woodward. She is a handsome young woman of sterling character and many graces of mind and person. She grew up in Barber county and was loved and respected by all who knew her. Almost everybody in this county knows Uncle Dick Woodward and his daughter will have the best wishes of hundreds. Mr. Word, the groom, is said to be a young man of good character and more than ordinary business ability. He is a cattleman, owns a large number of cattle and is quite wealthy. Letters make Words, Words make sentences and may the newly wedded couple be blessed with columns. Let them also never forget that the little Words are the sweetest.

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Died: At the residence of his parents, three miles northwest of Hazelton on the 13th of this month, of dropsy of the heart, G. Dunbar, more familiarly known among his friends as "Dick" Dunbar. He has had very poor health for over a year, but did not become confined to his bed until New Year's evening. Dick was in Hazelton New Year's day and went home late in the evening, took his bed and was not out of the house again. [Hazelton Express]

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Born: On the 15th, our attention was called by a peculiar yelping noise. Upon looking more closely, we saw Al. Wheat riding on a horse, his heels putting juber on the poor horse's ribs and Al. halloing at the top of his voice: "It's a girl! It's a girl!" Mother and child doing well, and at last reports Al was better and would probably live. [Eagle news]

Jan 29, 1897

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Married: S.O. Ward and Miss Carrie Warren, both of Sharon township, were married at the residence of the bride's parents on Wednesday evening, January 27th, 1897, Elder M.B. Ingle, of the Christian church, this city, officiating. The groom is one of the energetic and prosperous young farmers of the Sharon valley while the bride is one of the popular young ladies of that section. We extend congratulations and best wishes.

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Married: Last Thursday evening, at the home of her son, Al Parrish on south 5th street, at 9 o'clock, Mrs. Martha J. Parrish was united in marriage to Mr. John P. Hein. Rev. J.E. Everett officiating. The ceremony was witnessed only by near relatives. The contracting parties have many friends who wish them much joy and happiness. They will reside upon Mr. ____ claim near Virgil. [Kiowa Journal]

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Born: C.W. Hobbie is now the happy papa of a 10 lbs. girl. He is so happy that he dishes out the cigars by the box and tells the boys there is nothing like it. Mrs. Hobbie and baby are getting along nicely under the care of Dr. Karr. [Alva Republican]

Feb 5, 1897

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Born: A bouncing boy baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. F.S. Benningfield on Thursday of last week, January 28th.

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Born: A beautiful girl baby with black, curly hair and midnight eyes was born to Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Hill on Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 3rd, 1897. Dr. S. Kociell attending physician.

Feb 12, 1897

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Born: To Wm. Lightburn and wife, Jan. 18th, an 8 pound boy. No wonder Wm. wears that long smile. [Alva Pioneer]

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Married: At the home of Mr. Fred Hardy, Alva, O.T., Jan. 31, 1897, Mr. Wm. Gibson of Higgins, Texas, and Mrs. Maggie Zeiler of Woods county. Rev. T.E. Watt, officiating. [Alva Pioneer]

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Married: Sunday, February 7th, Joseph A Nelson, 28, and Lillie P. Murphy, 22.

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Married: At the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.T. Williams, this city, on Wednesday evening, Feb. 10th, 1897, F.J. Wadsworth was married to Miss Florence Williams, Rev. A.A. Parker officiating. Only a few of the immediate relatives and friends of the contracting parties witnessed the ceremony. After the ceremony and congratulations, and a wedding supper, the bride and groom went to the cozy home the groom had prepared on north Main street, and are now living at home and boarding at the same place. They received quite a number of handsome and useful presents. This young couple are so well and favorably known that they require no introduction at our hands. F.J. Wadsworth is [the] youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Wadsworth and is a young man of fair education, good business ability and stead and reliable. He has no bad habits and a host of friends. The bride is fully equipped to make him a loving and useful helpmeet, and we take pleasure in extending congratulations and best wishes for a long life, happiness and prosperity. [Information on the same page indicates Mr. Wadsworth was 24 and Miss Williams 22 years of age.]

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Married: At the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. J.Z. Fleming, on Wednesday evening, the 10th, Geo. B. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Mamie Beaver by Elder M.B. Ingle, of the Christian church. G.B. Moore is the youngest son of Mrs. J.B. Vaughn. He grew to manhood in this community and is known to almost everybody. The bride has lived in this county since a little girl and is a handsome, pleasant-speaking young woman. The invited guests to witness the ceremony were restricted to the immediate relations and friends of the bride and groom. The young couple have commenced housekeeping in rooms upstairs in the rear of the Cook block that have been handsomely furnished by the groom. The young couple have many friends and we join them in best wishes. [Information on the same page indicates Mr. Moore was 26 and Miss Beaver 20 years of age.]

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Married: At the home of the bride's parents in the eastern part of this township, near Pixley, on Sunday, Feb. 7th, 1897, Joseph A. Nelson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson, was married to Miss Lillie P. Murphy, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Murphy, by Rev. W.A. Cain. These young people also grew up in Barber county. They are intelligent and enterprising and have firm friends wherever known. The groom had prepared a comfortable home for his bride on his claim in Oklahoma, and on the day following the ceremony, they went to it and took possession. May peace, prosperity, joy and happiness be theirs. [Information on the same page indicates Mr. Nelson was 28 and Miss Murphy 22 years of age.] And on Feb 19, 1897, pg 3, col 3: Last week we made an error in saying that Rev. W.A. Cain performed the marriage ceremony for Joseph A. Nelson and Lillian P. Murphy on Sunday the 7th of this month. Elder W.H. Cross, of the Church of God tied the knot and should have been mentioned in place of Rev. Cain. Our error will make the happiness of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson nonetheless and their children and children's children will be nonetheless handsome.

Feb 19, 1897

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Born: We understand that a beautiful girl baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Cooke, of Lake City, on Friday last, the 12th. Dr. C.C. Bond in attendance.

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Died: Mrs. Maxwell, well known here as Della Roberts, sister to Mrs. H.H. Case, died very suddenly on Saturday morning last at her home in Milan, Kans., from hemorrhage. Mr. Case and wife went to Milan Saturday, attended the interment at the Winfield cemetery on Sunday and returned Monday. Just 25 days previous to the death, Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell had been married and the sudden and almost tragic death of the bride leaves the young husband heartbroken.

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Died: Our Sharon correspondent gives an account of the death of J.O. Lumpkin. Mr. Lumpkin was only about 32 years of age. He had consumption and was unable to withstand a severe attack of pneumonia. He was the Republican candidate for superintendent of public instruction in 1894. He had many graces of mind and character and was loved and respected wherever known. His wife and little child have the sympathy of all. And at pg 3, col 6: The death of James Lumpkin on Friday of last week, the 12th of February 1897, has cast a gloom over the entire neighborhood. He was a young man of good morals and splendid talents as a teacher, and had passed most of his short life in this county. At the time of his death he was residing in the western part of Harper county where he had been employed in teaching until his sickness. On Sunday he was buried in the cemetery south of Sharon. He leaves a widow and one child. His aged father, three brothers and one sister are still living to mourn his loss. Death had called away his brother Robert, his mother and his brother Millard within a few years. James was a respected member of the Christian church at Sharon and frequently exhorted with good effect. [Sharon news]

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Died: Following is a list of the interments in the city cemetery, Medicine Lodge, Kans., for the year 1896: Feb 5th, Mrs. Rebecca J. Wiley; Feb 11th, Emma Kinkaid; Feb 27th, Infant - Carrol Cullison; Mar 17th, Mrs. Thos. Warwick; Apr 12th, W.H. Sparks; May 10th, G.M. Ashley; Jun 12th, Infant - Watkins; Jun 15th, Infant - Porter; Jun 21st, Infant - Ruby B. McDaniel; Sep 9th, Luther Garland; Dec 9th, Mrs. Mary E. Dyer; Dec. 16th, Wm. A. Garland.

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Married: Wm. V. Stranathan was in town on Monday and called upon Probate Judge Funk and secured a marriage license for the union of himself and Miss Fannie E. Smith. The young couple were married at the residence of the bride's parents on Wednesday evening, surrounded by friends and relations. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Stranathan, of Moore township, and is one of the staunch and progressive young men of the county. The bride is a daughter of Wm. Smith, and, we understand is a young lady of beauty and kindly qualities. May they meet with success and always be happy. On Mar 5, 1897, pg 2, col 5: Hardtner correspondence Kiowa Journal - The boys who went to charivari Will Stranathan and wife were surprised by another party who could make more noise than they could. It was a joke on the boys and took away most of their fun.

Feb 26, 1897, pg 3, col 2

Born: Mr. and Mrs. Guy C. Sparks are the proud parents of a handsome 9 pound boy baby, born on Sunday, the 21st. Dr. Cushenbery reports all doing well except Guy and that his symptoms are improving daily. We extend congratulations to Grandpa Huffaker and serve notice that we shall expect him to use his influence toward bringing up the young man a good Republican.

Mar 5, 1897

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Born: Dr. W.H. Moore reports a girl baby born to Mr. and Mrs. E.F. Hill, of Sharon township, on Monday of this week, the 1st.

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Born: Mr. and Mrs. P.E. Hussey are the proud parents of a girl baby of regulation weight and prettiness, born on Friday of last week, the 26th.

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Died: Judge O.C. Howe has received word to the effect that his son-in-law, Wm. C. Burton, died at his home in New York, Wayne county, Iowa [sic - transcribed as printed], on Feb. 28. Mr. Burton was a civil engineer by profession and it was while working on railroad work the exposure developed consumption. He has been an invalid for years and his death was not altogether unexpected. About ten years ago, he married Helen M., daughter of Judge and Mrs. O.C. Howe. Two children - boys - were born to the union. One of them died when about a year old in this city and is buried in the city cemetery. The wife and the other boy survive the husband and father.

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Married: At the residence of Wm. D. Crawford in Sharon township, this county, on Thursday of last week, Feb. 25th, 1897, G.W. Cavanaugh, of Dover, O.T., was married to Miss Anna B. Dillon, of Oskaloosa, Iowa, by T.W. Davis, J.P. The groom is a nephew of Wm. D. and James F. Crawford, while the bride is a niece of Mrs. T.W. Davis. Much joy to the happy couple.

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Married: Thos. A. Ireland and Miss Eva Quirk, both of Springvale, Pratt county, got a marriage license from Probate Judge Funk on Saturday last, the 27th, and then wended their way to the M.E. parsonage where Rev. Parker tied the knot in the most approved style and in accordance with the latest rules and regulations. Let not the Ireland that was married be confounded with our own Thos. Ireland, of this city. Our Ireland, so far as appearances go, is still an unconquered Ireland. Still, we must add on the side that our Thos. Ireland is entirely worth the efforts of some young lady to conquer. He is old enough to marry and settle down. How would it do to have another case of the English capturing Ireland?

Mar 12, 1897

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Died: Mrs. A.D. Shaw reached the bedside of her mother, Mrs. P.A. Simmons, at Brooklyn, N.Y., just fifteen minutes before Mrs. Simmons died. And also: pg 3, col 4: Mrs. P.A. Simmons, mother of Mrs. A.D. Shaw of this city, died at her home in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Saturday, March 6th, 1897. P.A. Simmons was assistant cashier of the First National bank, of this city, during the time it was run by J.A. Blair and O.C. Ewart, and made this city his home and the home of his family for several years. When Messrs. Blair and Ewart sold out, he accompanied them to Kansas City and later to New York. Mrs. Simmons was a good woman, wrapped up in her family and church work. She was always kind and considerate of others and was always doing all she could to make the world brighter and happier. She was about 47 years of age. She leaves a husband and two daughters, Mrs. A.D. Shaw, of this city, and Miss Ethel Simmons, who is just budding into womanhood, and who lives at the home in Brooklyn. The stricken family have the sympathy of this entire community and of all the people who have ever known them, as the Simmons family have been loved and respected wherever they have resided. Both Mr. and Mrs. Simmons were earnest working members in the M.E. church.

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Married: Tuesday, March 9, at the Keyes ranch in Elm Mills township, Robert H. Burns and Jennie M. Kinder, Rev. A.A. Parker officiating.

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Married: Miss Lyda Dobbs, sister of the Dobbs boys of this city, and Bert Tilten, both of Oxford, Kas., were married yesterday (Thursday) evening, at the home of the bride's parents at Oxford. Miss Carrie Carmichael went over on Tuesday and Jas. Dobbs on Wednesday to attend the ceremony. We think Mr. Tilten is marrying into a mighty good family and will say so.

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Born: A handsome girl baby of regulation weight was born to Mr. and Mrs. Park Moomau on Sunday last, the 14th. Park and his wife recently arrived from Illinois. They will probably make this county their home.

Mar 26, 1897

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Married: At the Central Hotel, March 23rd, by Rev. W.A. Cain, Mr. William B. Downtain and Miss Henrietta G. Talbott, both of Kiowa, Kan.

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Died: Mr. and Mrs. Fred Leibst buried their infant boy on the 12th. He was only sick twelve hours. This makes four they have lost - one near Roundup, and three are buried at Mumford. They feel their loss very keenly. [Valley news]

Apr 2, 1897

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Born: Mr. and Mrs. F.R. Hayes are the proud though reticent parents of a big boy baby, born March 5th.

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Born: Uncle Milt Clements was mail carrier from Sun City Tuesday. He reported that a girl baby of regulation weight was born to Rev. and Mrs. Fallas on Sunday last, the 28th. Dr. Hutcheson, of Coats, introduced the young lady and all doing well.

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Birthday: Tuesday, March 30th, was the seventh anniversary of Barney Bristow's birth, and he prepared to celebrate it by giving a party to some of his playmates. The storm that evening, however, broke the party up and it was adjourned to Wednesday, from 4 to 6 o'clock in the afternoon when the lads gathered at the Grand hotel and had what they termed "a dandy time."

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Birthday: On Saturday evening last, the residence of Park Moomau was the scene of another "freedom" festivity, it being Fred Moomau's 21st anniversary. He was completely surprised. Misses Lee and Maude Tilden, Temperance Strohl, Lizzie Heacock, Sadie and Ina Moomau, and Messrs. Walter, Fred, Charlie and Cleveland Moomau, Clarence Strohl, Victor Sleeper, Oscar McCoy, Charley Dunham and Bob Tilden, besides Park and his wife, made up the company. They played games and had an enjoyable time. Refreshments consisting of cake, apples and "Adam's Ale" were served. All went home feeling it was good to be there. [Valley news]

Apr 16, 1897

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Anniversary: Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Ellis will celebrate their silver wedding Saturday evening, the 24th.

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Anniversary: We received an account of the celebration of the tin wedding of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Davenport, at their home, on Tuesday, the 13th, too late for publication this week. And also at Apr 23, pg 3, col 6: April 13th, being the 10th anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Davenport, their kind and appreciative neighbors and friends by previous agreement met at their home, with well filled baskets and there spread such a dinner that could not fail to please an epicure. Many useful "tin" presents were received. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Bob Taliaferro, Mrs. John Iliff, Mrs. Thos. Murphy, Mrs. Harry Stevens, Mrs. Balding, Mrs. T.A. McCleary, Mrs. C.G. Taliaferro, Mrs. John Murphy, Mrs. L.J. Zimmerman, Messrs. Davenport and Thompson and Misses Sadie Iliff and Jennie McGregor. The noticeable lack of gentlemen can only be accounted for by the fact that all were so business engaged that even a savory dinner could not tempt them. All present had an enjoyable visit with their host and hostess, and wished them a long and prosperous life and many more such happy occasions when they departed.

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Marriage License: Judge Funk issued a marriage license on Saturday, April 10th, to Chas. Neale and Mattie Martin, both colored, and on the evening of that day, they were married at the residence of Uncle Dave Jones by Rev. Parker. They are keeping house on Walnut street.

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Engaged: Invitations have been received in this city announcing the marriage of Miss Jessie Noe, known as Jessie O'Bryan, to William Stone Stump, at Woodward, O.T., on April 21st, 1897. The many friends here of the bride-to-be send most sincere best wishes in advance.

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Died: Celestia Caroline, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.R. Lawry, died on Friday morning, April 9th, at 2:00 o'clock. The little one was buried on Saturday in the cemetery near the Doles school house. Funeral ceremony at the home of Elder Ingle. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of all.

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Married: The following, taken from an Omaha paper, shows that Miss Myrtle Carroll has been married and is now Mrs. Judge Baker. "The marriage of Judge Benjamin S. Baker and Miss Myrtle Irene Carroll was quietly celebrated at the residence of the groom Wednesday evening, April 7th, in the presence of a few relatives and friends. Rev. Dr. S. Butler of the St. Mary's Avenue Congregational church performed the ceremony. The bride and groom left at 7:50 for a tour of the south and east. They will make their future home in Omaha, and will be at home to their friends after May 1st, at their beautiful residence [at] 32nd and Pacific streets. Mr. Baker is widely known as a prominent attorney and is at present judge of the criminal court in this city, while Miss Carroll is one of Omaha's most accomplished and charming young ladies. Mr. and Mrs. Baker's host of friends join in wishing them every happiness in their new relation."

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Died: Frank Holmes died at his home in Kansas City, Mo., on Friday, April 9th, after a long illness, from consumption. Frank Holmes was well and favorably known in this county, having lived here a number of years. He was Clerk of the District Court for four years and made a competent and accommodating official. He made a great deal of money at times during his life, but was a man who lived up to his means and was almost without means when he died. He leaves a wife and three children. Two of the children, Joy and Earl, are almost grown, have positions and have been the support of the family during their father's illness. Among the pall bearers were E.B. Peck, H.B. Steck and C.S. Jobes. The many friends of Mrs. Holmes and the children have the sympathy of this entire community.

Apr 23, 1897

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Marriage License: On Saturday last, Judge Funk issued a marriage license to Ralph W. Strong and Miss Grace Barnett, both of Nashville, Kingman county.

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Died: Mrs. W.H. Moore received word that her father, Mr. Nelson, died at his home in Bloomfield, Ia., Wednesday, the 21st. He would have been 90 years old this fall.

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Died: On April 16th, 1897, at her residence in Mingona township, Mrs. Laura Jane Kimball, of consumption. The deceased was born Dec. 15th, 1843, and became a member of the Baptist church at the age of eighteen. She leaves a number of sorrowing sons and daughters to mourn her loss. The funeral services were conducted by Elder M.B. Ingle, of the Christian church, and the interment was at the cemetery at Lake City. Death claims us for his own, but the time is coming when God will triumph over the tomb, and we shall stand victorious with Him who conquered the grave.

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Died: It is reported that Capt. Horace Pardee died on Wednesday of last week, April 14th, near Kiowa. Capt. Pardee came to Barber county in 1876 with his family and settled on Mule creek. He was well-to-do in the early days, but of late years has not been well off financially. Horace Pardee enlisted as a private in Co. H, 7th Kansas Cav. at Leavenworth, Oct. 15th, 1861; Nov. 8th of the same year he was promoted to captain of the same company. He resigned May 15, 1862. The 7th was the first regiment raised by Col. Jennison and was known far and wide. The above is taken from the report of the adjutant Gen. and is furnished by Jas. Springer who, with W.B. and another brother, belonged to the famous 7th Kansas cavalry.

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Married: Kiowa Review - Cards are out announcing the marriage of Dixie VanGundy to Geo. E. Bacon, at the home of the bride elect, this evening. They will be at home to their friends after May 1, 3rd and Miller street. And on Apr 30, 1897, pg 3, col 2: Marriage License - Geo. E. Bacon and Miss Dixie VanGundy, both of Kiowa, were issued a license to wed by Judge Funk on Tuesday, the 27th. Mr. Bacon and Mr. VanGundy came up for the license.

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Birthday/Reunion: Thursday last, April 15th, was the day set for the reunion of Grandma Osborne 's children - it being her 94th birthday. Her oldest son, Judge Osborne, was 74 years old April 14th. Her other sons, Dr. Osborne, of Eagle, age 71, and C.W. Osborne, who has been a resident of Elwood township for 14 years and whose age is 60, were present. For some unknown cause, her daughters failed to appear. One lives in Florida, one in Oklahoma and one at Independence, Kan. The one living at Independence is the oldest child and is 77 years of age. The meeting took place at the residence of Dr. Osborne, with whom Grandma has made her home for the past twenty-five years. Early in the day, friends of Grandma called to congratulate her and were welcomed by the host and hostess. Besides the relatives, about thirty of the neighbors and friends were present. At 1:00 p.m., the welcome voice of the cook proclaimed the glad tidings that dinner was awaiting us. The procession marched to the dining hall. After placing Grandma at the head of the table with two of her sons on her right and one on her left with their families, the Divine blessing of our Heavenly Father was invoked and our capacious stomachs were filled with a good, wholesome dinner. After dinner the programme was changed to vocal music. Mrs. Bud Hall, Miss Mirtie Hall, Misses Cora and Lena Bragg,, Miss Emma Avery, Miss Anna Osborne, Mrs. Conner, Capt. Henshaw, Lew Bragg, Bud Hall, and others gave us the best of music which edified the company and especially Grandma Osborne. After a short speech of welcome by Dr. Osborne, the guests presented many nice presents to Grandma, all of which she high appreciated. With merry laughter, heart hand shakes and cheery farewells, we left for our homes, having enjoyed a happy, welcome visit that will be long remembered by all who participated. [Eagle news]

Apr30, 1897

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Marriage License: On Monday, the 26th, Chas. F. Goodan and Miss Maud A. Dunbar, both of Hazelton, secured a marriage license from Judge Funk.

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Anniversary: Sunday, April the 25th, 1897, was the twenty-fifth, or "silver" anniversary of the marriage of Charles W. Ellis and Frances M. Cartan, who were married at Beloit, Wis., April 25th, 1872, and accordingly preparations were made to celebrate the event at their home near this city, on Saturday evening last,, the 24th. However on that evening there was a severe rain storm and only a few of the invited guests attended, still enough were present to have a very pleasant time. Among the presents was a beautiful silver tea set of six pieces presented by friends of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis in this city. Waldron Chase was appointed spokesman for the donors and made the presentation with the following neat little speech [Consult reel #M869 for the full text]. Those unable to attend on Saturday evening were disappointed to a certain extent and accordingly it was decided to have the affair over again on Monday evening, the 26th. Monday night proved to be pleasant and clear and guests to the number of more than sixty attended and filled the Ellis home. Suitable refreshments were served each evening and the guests were nicely entertained. That Mr. and Mrs. Ellis may live to celebrate their golden wedding was the wish of all. Quite a number of nice silver presents were received.

May 7, 1897

pg 3, col 5

Married: At the residence of the bride's parents in the north part of Sharon township on Tuesday, May 4th, 1897, Grant A. Randolph was married to Miss Jessie K. Burgess. The ceremony was presided over by Rev. A.A. Parker of the M.E. church, this city. Both bride and groom are well and favorably known in northeast Barber. Mr. Randolph is an exemplary citizen, a good neighbor and a gentleman. The bride is one of those young ladies whose manner, disposition and qualities of mind fit her to make a perfect helpmeet. The Cresset simply voices the wish of their many friends in hoping they will enjoy long life, happiness and prosperity. We take the following from a brief account of the nuptials handed in by one who was in attendance: "A small company of the relatives and friends were present. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A.A. Parker. After the wedding dinner, the guests departed leaving with Mr. and Mrs. Randolph their sincere wishes for a long and happy married life.

pg 3, col 5

Birthday: One of the most enjoyable gatherings we have witnessed in Moore township since the holidays was observed on Monday of this week, May 3rd, at the residence of "Father Wright, " the occasion being the sixty-sixth birthday of "Mother Wright." Her Sunday School class had arranged a surprise for her and about 11:00 a.m. gathered in with their parents to the number of thirty-two and with songs and recitations and a profusion of flowers gladdened and cheered the much loved grandmother, who is held in highest esteem by all in the community. Some of the wreaths and mottoes were very pretty, and an original poem written by Mrs. Whitten in honor of the event, recited by her daughter, Emma, gave evidence of extensive literary ability. Father and Mother Wright are among the oldest settlers in Moore township and can count children, grandchildren and great grandchildren to the number of thirty-nine. Signed: A PARTICIPANT.

pg 3, col 6

Died: Mrs. Frank John, nee Minnie Drysdale, died suddenly at her home in Cheyenne, Wyoming, on Sunday, May 2nd. Mrs. John lived in this city for several years. She was a sister to Mrs. W.E. Cook and Frank Drysdale, of Kiowa. She was married to Mr. John at St. Louis, Mo., June 18th, 1896, and was 26 years of age at the time of her death.

May 14, 1897

pg 3, col 3

Divorced: Mrs. Grigsby was granted a divorce from her husband. This was a case from the south part of the county. Flora B. Hargis, who lives near Lake City, was granted a decree of divorce from Thos. O. Hargis, the care and custody of two minor children and $20 per month alimony from June 27th, 1891. C.J. Skeen was granted a decree of divorce from his wife. The defendant was in court and as she was agreeable to the separation, the decree was allowed on the grounds of extreme cruelty and gross neglect of duty. This might be termed a sad case. Capt. Skeen is an old settler. Last year he married a handsome young wife in Missouri and now, probably in less than a year, the love sprite has flown and the Capt. is left a disconsolate grass widower. Many of the Captain's old acquaintances will not see how it was possible for him to get done up, but there is the divorce record.

pg 3, col 3

Died: May 10th, at her home two miles west of Medicine Lodge, Mrs. Elizabeth Clark. Elizabeth Small was born March 5th, 1839, in Dearborn Co., Ill. She was married Jan. 12, 1860to George Clark. Of tis marriage there were seven children, five of whom still survive her. In early life she joined the Baptist church, but later united with the M.E. church. Her death was very sudden. She was in fair health and had during the day been able for her usual duties. In the evening, as the storm came up, she went to help her husband care for the chickens, returning to the house a few minutes before him. When he returned, he found her prostrated and in a few moments, life had gone. Neuralgia of the heart is assigned as the cause of her death. Funeral services were conducted at the M.E. church on Tuesday by Rev. A.A. Parker. All the family, including her two daughters from Harper, were present for the services.

pg 3, col 3

Married: Cards have been received announcing the marriage of Miss Irma May Evans to Frank Priestley, at the residence of the bride's uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John Ollre, at Gonzales, Texas, on Sunday last, May 16, 1897. Mrs. Priestley resided in this county for several years and in this city a portion of time. She has friends and admirers wherever known and all will wish her every success and happiness in her married life. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Evans who reside near Alva and a sister to Mrs. W.C. Millar, of Lake City.

May 21, 1897, pg 3, col 3

Died: Telegrams were received in this city Tuesday announcing the sudden death of Miss Arrah Julian on her claim in Oklahoma near Kiowa on that day. Her brother drives the Standard Oil distributing wagon and one of the messages was to J.B. Gano to notify her brother. Accordingly, Mr. Gano secured a horse, met Mr. Julian a couple of miles south of town and exchanged positions with him in order for him to return speedily to Kiowa. The notice of Miss Julian's death created considerable interest, it being feared foul play had something to do with it and parties in this city had attended an A.O.U.W. meeting at Kiowa where she was present and apparently well, only the night before, but the following from the Kiowa Review indicates nothing criminally wrong:"Miss Arrah Julian, daughter of F.C. Julian,, was found dead on her claim six miles south of Kiowa yesterday morning. Her brother, Homer, left her a few hours before, all well. Some neighbors called at the house and found her dead. Dr. Harris was called immediately and found her body still warm."

May 28, 1897, pg 3, col 6

Died: Mary C., widow of Luther Garland, died at her home in this city on Friday, May 21st, 1897, and was buried on the 22nd by the side of her husband and son in the city cemetery. The funeral occurred from the residence and was conducted by Rev. W.A. Cain, pastor of the Baptist church, this city. Mary C. Watson was born in Indiana, Dec. 13, 1840. She was married to Luther Garland in January, 1857. Two children, Effie and William, were born to the union. Only Effie survives the mother. Mrs. Garland joined the Presbyterian church when a young lady, lived a consistent Christian life and was a member of the Presbyterian church, this city, when the summons came. For the last 35 years, Mrs. Garland was an invalid. She bore her cross with Christian fortitude. Last fall her husband, a hale, strong man, met with an accident that caused his death. Some four months ago, her son accidentally shot himself and died from the wound. Altogether, her cup was filled to overflowing with sorrow and trouble. She was loved and respected by all who knew her. She came to this city with her husband and children some ten years ago.

Jun 4, 1897

pg 2, col 3

Anniversary: Last Tuesday occurred the 25th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Mussen, of Cedar township. Their children planned a surprise for them on that evening. It was a surprise indeed. One hundred and two persons gathered at their home and found Mr. and Mrs. Mussen retired for the night. Here is a list of presents: A dozen silver knives and forks; one-half dozen silver teaspoons and a butter knife from their children and Wm. Oswald; one silver sugar shell from J.H. Maddox; one half dozen silver teaspoons from John McCambly; silver sugar bowl and spoon holder by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Ross, Mr. and Mrs. M.W. Short, Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Cass, Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Ware, Mr. and Mrs. H. Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. John Leader, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Doolittle, Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Ross, Mr. and Mrs. Will Cozad, Mrs. S.J. Ross of Wichita and Messrs. G.T. Wilson, S. Helena and Dick Watt; silver sugar bowl by Fred Solf, Miss Osa Rogers, Albert Solf and Miss Effie Herrin; cream pitcher by Miss Amelia Goff and brothers, Willie and Johnny; silver butter knife and pepper service by Miss Viola Bernard and brother Tommy. After the presentation of gifts, the company was served with ice cream, cake and lemonade which had been previously prepared by friends. [Cedar news]

pg 3, col 2

Born: John Luallen is setting up the cigars on account of a girl of some eight pounds who arrived at his house last Sunday afternoon.

Jun 11, 1897

pg 3, col 2

Born: On Thursday of last week, June 3rd, a nice girl baby of regulation weight was born to Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Farley of northeast Medicine Lodge township.

pg 3, col 2

Born: R.S. Bisby is feeling proud and prosperous over the arrival of a nine pound boy at his house on Sunday May 30th. We are sorry we failed to announce the young man last week, but will say he is thriving and everybody, including Bob, getting along nicely.

pg 3, col 4

Died: Derrick Updegraff died at Hennessey, O.T., on Monday, June 7th, 1897, of old age, and as buried in the cemetery, Medicine Lodge, Kan., Wednesday, June 9th. Derrick Updegraff was born in Pennsylvania, April 1st, 1805, and was, consequently, 92 years, 2 months and 6 days old at the time of his death. During his life he lived in Pennsylvania, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas and possibly other states. When a young man, he went from Pennsylvania to Indiana and there in 1826, when 21 years of age, married a Miss Stubbs. Five children, Daniel, Edward, Albert, Samuel and Mart E., were born to this union. About 1840, Mr. Updegraff removed with his family to Iowa and settled in Henry county. There his wife died and he there married his second wife, Mrs. Martha McMillan. To this union four children were born - Alpha, Mate, Minnie and Margaret. Mrs. McMillan had two children when she married Mr. Updegraff - Laura and Loretta - which made a family of eleven. In 1856, shortly after his second marriage, Mr. Updegraff removed to Kansas and settled near Topeka. At that time the trouble was brewing between the free state and pro-slavery elements - the first throes of the Civil War. When the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad was built through Kansas, Derrick Updegraff became a contractor on construction work and assisted in grading the roadbed from Topeka to Hutchinson. In the fall of 1871, he visited Barber County, and spent most of that winter hunting on the Medicine River. He had a dugout on the point of land where Elm Creek joins the Medicine River. His family was at Hutchinson and he made several trips bach and forth during the winter - on many of which he was accompanied by his son Al. In April 1872, he moved his family to what is now Medicine Lodge, which was then an unsettled country, and it was Derrick Updegraff who proved up on the townsite of Medicine Lodge and was virtually the father of the town. When the county was organized in 1873, Derrick Updegraff was elected Probate Judge and it was that election which gave him his title, Judge Updegraff, by which he was known, loved and respected by all. Judge Updegraff lived quietly in Barber county until a couple of years ago. He built and conducted the first hotel in Medicine Lodge and was noted far and wide as a landlord who refused no one food or shelter. If the guest could and would pay, he did so; if not, he was welcome just the same. Judge Updegraff's second wife, a most estimable lady, died some twelve years since. Of his children, only four survive him. They are Mart E. Updegraff, of this city; Alpha Updegraff, of Cleo, O.T.; Miss Mate Updegraff, of Hennessey, O.T.; and Mrs. Margaret Roberts, also of Hennessey. Two of his stepchildren survive him in Mrs. Loretta Collins, wife of Chas. Collins, of Hutchinson, and Mrs. Laura Anderson, wife of J.S. Anderson, of this city. He furnished three soldiers for the Union cause in the late war - Daniel, Edward and Samuel Updegraff - and while none of them were killed or died in service, two of them died from the effects of service and wounds, and on their account, Judge Updegraff drew a pension for about two years previous to his death. Derrick Updegraff was in many respects a remarkable man. Physically strong beyond the average man, he was also vigorous mentally. ....generous to a fault and hopeful under all circumstances. He is one of the last of that hardy race of pioneers and frontiersmen who conquered the wilderness from the Alleghanies to the Rocky Mountains. It is said that in his prime he was remarkable for physical strength. At that time he never met a man who excelled him in that line. When a young man he followed flat boating down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans, and buying livestock and driving it to Cincinnati, O., and Indianapolis, Ind. He amassed a small fortune for those days, but the presence or absence of money did not affect him much - he was always the same. Derrick Updegraff was a fearless man. He detested wrong and upheld the right. His aim always seemed to be to find what was right, just and equitable and then he could always be counted on that side. He was kind to persons and animals and was the friend and champion of the weak and afflicted. His generosity was such that he would divide his last dollar or crust with any person - though it be a stranger - if he thought that person was in need. Still he was firm when necessary and no man was more feared by evil doers than he because he detested their nefarious practices and was not afraid to denounce them and punish them. The death of Derrick Updegraff was as it should have been. He was in his usual health on Monday. In the evening h e ate a hearty supper. He retired and went to sleep. About ten o'clock at night, his daughter Mate thought he was breathing heavier than usual and went to his bedroom. She saw at once that he was passing away. Endeavors to arouse him failed and in a few minutes, the pulse ceased to beat, the noble heart was still and old Judge Updegraff, in a dreamless sleep, passed from his tenement of clay to the presence of his God. A grand old man has gone. He fought a good fight and kept the faith. He loved his country, his family and his friends. Today his body lies in the bosom of our mother earth and let us hope that his spirit dwells with God. The sands of time will run; grass and flowers will cover his grave, but as the years roll by, let those who stand by his grave in the city of the dead remember that Derrick Updegraff was a man who endeavored to be just and was truthful, kind, honest and true.

Jun 18, 1897

pg 3, col 1

Born: Dr. W.H. Moore reports a nice girl baby born to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Reutlinger on Saturday last, the 12th. And June 25, pg 3, col 4: On Saturday evening last, June 19th, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Reutlinger passed away, aged 7 days. It was buried in the city cemetery on the evening of that date.

pg 3, col 2

Died: Our friend G.A. Bucklin informs us that Irene, one of the Brown triplets, died on Monday, the 14th, of cholera infantum, aged eight months and one day. The Brown triplets were noted all over this section and the parents will have the sympathy of all.

pg 3, col 5

Married: The residence of Mr. B.F. Kemp, near Sharon, was the scene of a happy and delightful event. At 8 o'clock, Tuesday evening, June 15th, 1897, a select number of friends and relatives were gathered to witness the marriage of Miss Emma Kemp and Elbert S. Rule. Mrs. Whittaker, of Kiowa, played Mendelsohn's wedding march to which the young couple entered into the room, and the ceremony was solemnized by Rev. S. McKibben, after which congratulations were extended in a very courteous and affectionate manner. An excellent repast was then served and a most genial and delightful time enjoyed by all present. Miss Emma Kemp is one of Sharon's most amiable young ladies, of generous disposition and winning manner. Mr. Rule is the enterprising junior partner of the firm of Wm. Rule & Son. His business ability is pushing Sharon to the front and security for it considerable prestige as a trading point. They command the esteem and love of a large number of friends who predict for them a joyous, prosperous and successful voyage through life.

Jun 25, 1897

pg 3, col 1

Born: Dr. Cushenbery reports a boy baby born to Mr. and Mrs. McGuire on Monday, the 27th.

pg 3, col 2

Married: Probate Judge Funk issued a license this week for the marriage of Geo. W. Phillips to Miss Kate G. Stewart and we presume the wedding has occurred ิere this and extend congratulations.

pg 3, col 4

Born: Dr. W.H. Moore reports a girl baby of regulation weight born to Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Welch on Saturday last, the 19th.

pg 3, col 4

Died: The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Burson died at Dr. Moore's residence, this city, yesterday (Thursday) evening, the 24th, of congestion of the brain, aged two months. The babe had been sick a couple of days and yesterday Mrs. Burson brought it from the home near Eldred to town for treatment.

pg 3, col 4

Married: We clip the following account of the marriage of Miss Violet Benedict to George Herbert Wilson from the LaJunta, Colo., Tribune: "Tuesday evening, June 15th, at the home of the bride's mother, occurred the marriage ceremony of George Herbert Wilson and Miss Violet Benedict, Rev. Hart officiating. Only relatives and a few most intimate friends were present. The ceremony was pronounced at 10 o'clock, and the newly wedded pair departed on the midnight train for a month's visit with relatives at Boston and greater New York. The bride is well known in the church and social circles of this city and has hosts of friends who wish her all joy and happiness. The groom, who is clerk in the master mechanic's office, is very popular among his associates and friends. The wedding was to have occurred June 16th, but when the interested parties discovered that the railroad employees had organized to treat them to a charivari, they thought to deceive them by getting married one day earlier, thinking they would be "o'er the border and far awa'" before the crowd would know it. But the boys were all on the alert and, as the ceremony was completed, the waiting crowd was notified and the discordant serenade began. The bride and groom instantly made their appearance on the porch and that quelled the storm. Mr. Wilson treated the crowd and they soon dispersed. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson will reside in LaJunta."

pg 3, col 5

Married: On Sunday night last, Frank E. Lockert was married to Miss Fay Adams, at the residence of the bride's mother in Sun City township. The marriage was one of convenience and necessity and we understand the young people will not live together.

pg 3, col 5

Married: Henry S. Davis and Miss Carrie M. Daniels were married at the residence of Geo. C., this city, yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, the 24th, by S.S. Funk, probate judge. Mr. Smith and family and Mrs. Funk were witnesses. Mr. Davis is a member of the Davis Bros. firm of merchants, at Hardtner, while the bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.T. Daniels. Mr. and Mrs. Davis are an estimable young couple and we join their many friends in hearty congratulations.

July - Dec 1897

Barber County Newspapers



Tom & Carolyn Ward
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