Albertson
Allen
Axline
Banfield
Barlow
Bishop
Blankenship
Bonafield
Bonfield
Bradbeck
Bridges
Brobeck
Bronson
Bucknum
Bullard
Burgess
Burgett
Burney
Burney
Busey
Caruthers
Claypool
Denton
Dewey
Doles
Doran
Dyer
Ellis
English
Espy
Fay
Fetty
Fetty
Fisher
Fossett
Frazier
Frazier
Garrigan
Gronemire
Hahn
Henkins
Highberger
Hitchcock
Hook
Hook
Hookstra
Howard
Hubbard
Hubbard
Hutchins
Iliff
Ingraham
Jones
Jones
Kidd
Kies
Knowles
Kurtz
Lindley
Lindner
Lineburgh
Lintner
Marony
McArthur
McCoy
McElroy
McHenry
McKinney
McKinney
McLeman
McNeal
McNeal
McReynolds
McReynolds
Melrose
Miles
Miller
Moore
Morgan
Morgan
Morris
Morris
Murphy
Nichols
O'Connell
O'Neal
Osborne
Page
Payne
Payne
Pearson
Pfost
Plagmann
Pool
Proctor
Purdy
Ramsey
Ratcliff
Repp
Richardson
Ritche
Roberts
Romig
Rowe
Rush
Salanders
Schuler
Shaller
Shannon
Shell
Smith
Snearley
Sparks
Springer
Spurlock
Stevens
Stockwell
Stone
Swartz
Taylor
Taylor
Taylor
Taylor
Thomas
Trayer
Troyer
Upperman
VanSlyke
Vickers
Vincent
Wallace
Walton
Walton
Walton
Warner
Warren
White
White
Wilcox
Winter
Wood
Wrenwick
Wright
Young

REEL #M866/KSHS Microfilm Collection

The Medicine Lodge Cresset (meaning "bright light") was a weekly newspaper, published in Medicine Lodge beginning early in 1879. At the time this reel begins, Thursday, October 1, 1885, T.A. McNeal and L.M. Axline were publishers and proprietors. Local news included coverage from the surrounding communities, as well as Medicine Lodge. This reel continues through October 25, 1888. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson thebissons@worldnet.att.net."

Jul 7, 1887
pg 2
Born: A daughter was born to J.B. Highberger, the 23rd. [Hazelton news]
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. A.B. Purdy died at her home south of this city on last Thursday morning, June 30th. Her body was taken to Ottawa, Kansas, her old home, for interment.
pg 3, col 2
Died: Frederick Burton, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Mac T. Morris, of Harper, died on the morning of the 3rd. Little Fred was almost one year old and was an exceedingly bright boy. Mac T. is senior of the Morris Bros. firm of this city and the bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this city.

Jul 14, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Married: On July 7th, Judge Hardy married Robt. J. Bishop and Mary J. Bridges, and on the 9th, Warren E. Jones and Carrie E. Shaller. All of this county we believe.
pg 3, col 1
Married: Frank Wright and Miss Minnie Murphy are to be married tonight at Harper. Miss Murphy is a sister of Mrs. Lew Lebrecht of this city.

Jul 21, 1887
pg 3, col 2
Born: Last Friday, July 15, a fine boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Stanley A. Warner.
pg 3, col 2
Died: Yesterday morning, at 12:30 o'clock, J.B. Page died at the Avenue House of blood poison. He was an insurance and windmill agent and formerly was in partnership with M.L. Wilcox. He was an old soldier and a member of the G.A.R., though the latter was not generally known until after he died. His home is at Nashville, Illinois. He leaves a wife and two children. Members of our Eldred Post buried him yesterday afternoon. Quite a number of is friends from Valley township, where he has canvassed principally, came in to assist in the last, sad rites. A postmortem examination held by Drs. Gillette and Moore of this city and Dr. Phipps of Indiana, disclosed dead bone in the jaw which started a diffuse abscess and caused blood poison.
pg 3, col 3
Died: "An Old Settler Dead" - Monday evening, July 18th, Lemuel Iliff breathed his last at the residence of his son, J.N. Iliff, of this city. For several years, Mr. Iliff has been failing and over a year ago was stricken with paralysis. Just before he died he was almost completely paralyzed. Lemuel Iliff was born in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, on October 28th, 1818, but has lived in the west most of his life. He married twice. By his first wife he had seven children, four boys and three girls. In early life he united with the Methodist church, but when he came to Kansas he found a United Brethren church at Lecompton, where he settled, and uniting with that church he remained a member until his death. He assisted in organizing the first church in Barber county. He visited this county in 1874 and in 1886 removed his family here and has made this his home since. He proved up the land now known as the Bechtel or railroad addition and this with other property placed him beyond want in his old age. Three of Mr. Iliff's children live in and near this city. They are J.M. and J.N. Iliff and Mrs. J.W. McNeal. His other children reside as follows: E.W. Iliff, Largo, New Mexico; A.B. Iliff, Lecompton, Kansas; Mrs. Spurlock, Ft. Riley, Kansas; and Mrs. Ella Wrenwick, whose home is in Washington Territory. Rev. McElroy preached the funeral sermon at the Presbyterian church Tuesday afternoon, after which the remains were placed beneath the sod of our city cemetery. Mr. Iliff was not a remarkable man in any way, but he was honest and a good citizen. He was a Union man and opposed to introducing slavery in Kansas, and he was not at all backward in expressing his opinions. He was fearless in the right and would always stand up for his convictions. A good man, a kind father and a faithful friend; he had almost reached the three score and ten point, when the sands of life ran low and he passed peacefully and quietly to his Maker. His children will sincerely mourn him and his many friends will long remember Mr. Iliff.
pg 3
Died: "The Valley of the Shadow" - At her home in this city, on Wednesday, July 20th, 1887, at 6:35
A.M., Kate L., wife of W.A. Schuler and daughter of Dr. B.R. and M.E. Burney, died of Bright's disease of the kidneys, aged 20 years, 6 months and 10 days. For a couple of months, Mrs. Schuler's health has been poor and several days since the doctors had lost all hopes of her recovery. She did not murmur when she knew that she must go; she said she was not afraid to die, that she had rather stay, but that the Lord's will be done. About a year and a half ago, Kate L. Burney and W.A. Schuler were married. Their life was a happy one. Contented and peacefully they lived and when a little boy arrived, some two months ago, their cup of joy seemed to be full. But the young wife, who had never been too strong, sickened and gradually faded until the earthly casket was not able to contain the brave, pure spirit and it took its flight. Men wept and women sorrowed as they never had before. It was not like the death of one whose life lines had run out or of one whose life had not really begun, but it was the death of one who had everything to live for: a kind husband, loving parents and brothers and sisters, kind friends and above all, a little pink-cheeked babe whose ruby lips had not yet learned to lisp her name and who must go through life without a mother's love or a mother's care. But yet she was brave and was not afraid to die, simply saying, "Thy will, O Lord, be done." It was the wish of Mrs. Schuler that Rev. A. Axline, who married her and Mr. Schuler in those happy days, also pronounce the benediction over her grave. He has been sent for and if he arrives from his home at Iuka in time, the funeral will take place this afternoon. The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock this afternoon from the Presbyterian church.

Jul 28, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Died: A correspondent signing "M.E.W.," informs us of the death of the little child of Mr. and Mrs. I.F. Melrose. The babe was seven months old and had been named "Ellen." Just after recovering from a severe attack of cholera infantum, the little one was attacked with brain fever.
pg 3, col 1
Born: Last Sunday, July 24, a ten-pound boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. A.R. McKinney. All doing well. Mrs. McKinney is with her sister, Mrs. T.S. Proctor, near Sun City.
pg 3, col 1
Born: On last Sunday evening, July 24th, to Mr. and Mrs. Bronson, a little rose-red baby girl. All doing excellently. Doc wears the paternal smile gracefully and has not as yet committed any overt acts.
pg 3, col 2
Born: Mrs. Dolly Espy returned yesterday from Missouri. She brought back with her a big baby boy. The fond husband and father met them at the train and for the first time gazed on the countenance of his second born. The young man is old enough to be named and carries Henry for his handle.
pg 3, col 2
Died: Harvey Springer, father of James and William Springer of this county, died at his home near Garnett, Kansas, on the 6th of this month, aged 77 years. Mr. Springer came to Kansas in '57 and all during the troubles was a free-state man, and one of those free-state men who were ready at any and all times to denounce slavery and were not afraid to back it up to the full extent of their strength. When the war broke out he was already aged and besides that his health had been broken in the Seminole War in Florida - in which war he was a gallant soldier - so he could not enlist, but he sent four boys, among them Jim and Bill, and no braver soldiers did Kansas have than the Springer boys. Mr. Springer leaves a wife and four children. Altogether he had eight children born to him, but four had gone on before. From his youthful days, Mr. Springer had been a member of the Methodist church and always lived a consistent, Christian life. He fought a good fight. His life's work was not in vain.

Aug 4, 1887, pg 3, col 2
Died: C.B. Fay died at his home in this city, Monday afternoon, about 5 o'clock, and his body taken charge of by the Masonic fraternity of which he was a sound member. His remains were shipped to Menarka, Wisconsin for burial, on the Ft. Scott train, at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning. Dr. Farrow and undertaker Beck embalmed the body for shipment and N.A. Barlow accompanied the remains as an escort from the Masonic lodge of this city. Mr. Fay was one of our most honored and respected citizens; was prominently mentioned for county office, and manager of the Badger Lumber Co's. yards at this place. He was an old soldier having served his country for over three years in a New York regiment. Mr. Fay was 45 years old and leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death. [Hazelton news]

Aug 11, 1887
pg 3, col 2
Marriage License: Last Monday, Charles Frazier and Mary E. English, both of this county, took out a marriage license.
pg 3, col 2
Married: By Judge Hardy, on August 3rd, 1887, John B. Miller to Sarah Snearley, both of Hazelton.
Aug 18, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Young, of this city, on last Saturday morning, August 12th, a girl baby of average weight. Dr. Burney was master of ceremonies. The only rhyme says that "Saturday's child must work for a living," but it looks as if the same thing catches most of them born on the other days of the week.
pg 3, col 2
Marriage License/Married: The Probate's record shows that Edward C. Stone and Rosella M.Henkins, of Kiowa, secured a marriage license on August 13th. On August 15th, Henry L. Thomas and Della Smith, of Canema, secured their license. On August ___, Judge Hardy married Jeff D.Stevens and Minnie M. White. Stevens is of New Mexico and Minnie of this county.
pg 3, col 3
Died: Wm. O'Connell died Sunday morning of typho-malarial fever and was buried Monday. One of his sons has been quite sick with the same disease, but is now convalescing and another son has taken down sick since his father was confined to his bed a week ago last Thursday. This family are indeed greatly afflicted. They are strangers here, having arrived from Michigan only a few months ago. [Hazelton news]

Sep 1, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: On Monday evening, August 29th, there was born to Mr. and Mrs. D. VanSlyke an eleven pound boy. The Colonel felt so proud of young Van that he got a brand new set of scales to weigh him with. This is the first boy in the family.
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Osborne, on Sunday, August 28th, a handsome girl baby of regulation weight. Dr. Burney was in charge. [See below @ Aug 9, 1888 for death of this baby.]
pg 3, col 2
Died: On Saturday evening, about ten o'clock, Robert Henry, five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. H.M.Ingraham, died after several days illness with typho-malarial fever. The funeral was preached at the M.E. church on Monday, by Rev. Sanderson, and the remains interred in the city cemetery. Robert was a bright, active little fellow, beloved by all his playmates and the blow is a severe one on the fond parents. He was a very sick boy from the start, but the doctors, knowing that his youth was in his favor, hoped to see him get well, and worked faithfully, but skill and care were of no avail, and humanity can only bow in submission.

Sep 8, 1887
pg 2, col 4
Died: On the 28th day of August, at her father's residence at Deerhead, Kansas, Ella C., daughter of T.A. and S.E. Walton. She was born December 25, 1865, in Labella, Ohio, being twenty-one years, 8 months, and three days old at the time of her death. She had been suffering for years with Bright's disease, and for about three months before her death, was compelled to sit in a chair all the time, yet she never complained or murmured, but seemed to think, "Thy will be done." She only said, "I wish I could stay with pa and ma but I will go to Heaven." She has always been a devoted daughter and sister and will be missed so much by the family, but our comfort is that we know "Our loss is her gain." She has passed beyond this world of sorrow and pain and dwells in bliss immortal. Ella was a favorite in the neighborhood and her many friends did everything that would add to her comfort. Her young friends will miss her in their circles. She will be missed in the Sabbath school for she was a good worker in the church and Sunday school. She professed religion last winter and has been a good Christian since that time. [Memorial poem follows.]
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. J.J. Miles, of Sun City, well known here as Miss Emma Hookstra, died on Monday of last week. She leaves her mother, a husband, a little babe, a sister and a brother. Her disease was consumption.
pg 3, col 2
Born: Last Saturday morning - early - a handsome boy baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Walton. Friday, Sept. 2nd was C.A.'s birthday and it was the intention of Mrs. Walton to make her husband a birthday present. Promises were made in good faith and Dr. Gillette was on hand to see that the present was duly honored, but in spite of all the pink and white gift did not arrive until 12:15 A.M. - we might add "central time" - Saturday. Such is life.
pg 3, col 3
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgan, on Monday, September 5th, a beautiful girl.
pg 3, col 3
Marriage Licenses: Probate Judge H.H. Hardy, on Saturday, September 3rd, issued a marriage license to Chas. L. Burgett and Clay E. Shell, both of this county. On Monday, the 5th, he issued a license to Valentine Repp and Elizabeth Kurtz, both of Deerhead.
pg 3, col 5
Died: "Uncle A.J. Rowe Dead" - On Monday of this week, the information was brought to this city by Walter Beebe that Andrew Jackson Rowe, an early settler at Medicine Lodge, who went to No Man's Land almost two years ago to carve for himself a new home, had died on Wednesday, August 31st, 1887. The sorrow was widespread on receipt of the news, for almost everyone who has been here any length of time was acquainted with the old gentleman and respected him for his homely, kindly ways and courteous bearing. Andrew J. Rowe was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on the 29th day of September, 1816, arrived at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1875; moved to No Man's Land in May, 1886, and died on his claim August 31st, 1887. In his early life he married an estimable lady who survives him and who bore to him several children. We think he lived in Missouri for a term before coming to this city. During his residence here, Uncle Rowe was known to all. Being of a very religious turn and a strict member of the Methodist church. He took great interest in churches and Sunday schools. He was kindly and hospitable and nothing suited him better than plenty of game, with guns and ammunition for killing what he wanted and then congenial company to help pass away the time and feast upon the luxuries. Then on Sabbath day, he would always attend worship if any was held within reach. Aunty Rowe, his respected wife, was a fit companion. She was hospitable and kind, and many is the time she has watched over sick boys who were braving the hardships of frontier life, with a mother's care. She has the sympathy of her many friends in this section. Her son, John, is with her and we have not heard what they propose to do.

Sep 15, 1887, pg 3, col 1
Married: On Sunday last, Mr. James A. Garrigan and Miss Mary Payne, both of this county, were married at the Catholic services by Father Kearful. We understand that Mr. Garrigan is a contractor on the railroad.

Sep 22, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Married: Judge MacDonald tied his first matrimonial knot on Thursday of last week. He married J.M. Ratcliff and Mary Burgess, both of this city.
pg 3, col 1
Married: Last Monday morning, early in the day, Rev. J.C. McElroy married J.F. Fisher and Miss Jennie Jones, both of Sharon, at the Grey Eagle restaurant in this city.
pg 3, col 2
Married: On Wednesday of last week, September 14th, 1887, F.R. Wood, the genial senior of the firm, Wood & Vincent, was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. Wallace, at the residence of the bride's parents, at Elyria, Ohio. When the Junior of this firm went east this summer, we expected a marriage, but he came back single and we did not really think that the quiet Wood would deliberately and premeditatedly go and do it. The Cresset wishes Mr. Wood and his bride all the good things imaginable and hope that to each other they will always be young, though the frost of years does bring the silver and dim the flashing eyes.

Sep 29, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Marriage License: Last Saturday, Oliver Fetty, of Amber, and Miss Sadie Troyer, of this city, secured a license to marry. [See below @ Oct 6th for marriage; note that the spelling of the bride's name changes from Troyer to Trayer.]
pg 3, col 2
Died: On Monday, September 19th, Col. J.S. Busey died at the residence of his sister at Champaign, Illinois. Col. Busey leaves a wife and several children. He was about sixty years of age when he passed away and in those sixty years he had worked hard and accumulated considerable property, comprising real estate and stock in Illinois, and real estate and stock in this county and stock in Manitoba. His death is a great loss to this county as the Colonel was progressive and enterprising.
pg 3, col 3
Died: "Dr. D. McArthur Dead" - On last Saturday, September 24th, 1887, Dr. D. McArthur, of Mumford, this county, died at his home from cancer in the stomach. His funeral was preached on Sunday by Rev. J.C. McElroy, of this city, and the remains were followed to the grave by one of the largest processions ever in the county. For some time Dr. McArthur had been troubled with cancer and this summer went east to be treated. Physicians removed a small cancer from one ear and cured it, but examinations showed one in his stomach, also, that was incapable of treatment on account of location. Mr. McArthur joined the church early in life and has always been a consistent, Christian gentleman, and when he found that he must surrender to the dread messenger, he arranged his worldly affairs and quietly awaited the summons. From friends of the family we have received the following account of the Doctor's busy life: Daniel McArthur was born in Argyle, Washington county, New York, September 4, 1814, moved to Ohio, with his parents in 1825, and was married to Miss Margaret McLeman on May 10th, 1838; in 1844, he settled in Perry county, Ohio, where he practiced his profession for six years. He then removed to Uniontown, Muskingun county, Ohio, where he remained two years and then removed to Plymouth, Washington county, Ohio, where he remained until 1865, and then removed to Linn county, Missouri, where he remained un 1884, when he removed to Barber county, Kansas. While in Linn county, Missouri, he lost his wife on August 12th, 1876. By this wife he had four children, the eldest and youngest of whom are still living. On November 25th, 1879, he was again married to Sarah I. Frazier, still surviving, by whom he had one son, now living. After a long and painful illness, he departed this life on September 21, 1887, at 2 o'clock and 10 minutes, P.M., surrounded by every member of his own family, aged 73 years and 20 days. Another life, which had passed the limit and was probably hastened only a few days by disease, has gone on before. As the curtains of evening are drawn, giving us the mellow rays of the departing sun and afterwards the twilight growing dimmer and dimmer as the minutes pass away, so died Dr. McArthur after a day's life full of good works, Christian fortitude and Samaritan kindness.
pg 3, col 4
Married: At the residence of the bride's father near Hazelton on Sunday, September 25th, 1887, HarryPlagmann, of this city, to Miss Ella F. Warren, Rev. Burton of Hazelton officiating. Only a few of the immediate relatives of the bride were present. Harry Plagmann came to Medicine Lodge some three months since from Harper, and has since had charge of L.F. Pearson's drug store. He has made a host of friends who will give him and his fair bride a hearty welcome. The young couple are keeping house in the H.A. Bailey residence on the west side.

Oct 6, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Married: In last weeks issue, we mentioned that a license had been issued to Oliver A. Fetty and Sadie Trayer, of Amber, and this week we are happy to announce that they were married by Justice Philip Butcher. It is said that Phil did the job up gracefully.
pg 3, col 1
Born: On Monday evening, October 3rd, handsome twin boys were born to Mr. and Mrs. WayneMcKinney. All getting along nicely.
pg 3, col 2
Born: A boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Swartz, of Cedar creek, on Sunday, October 2nd.
pg 3, col 2
Marriage License: On Tuesday, October 4th, Frank McReynolds and Anna Lindner, both of Sharon, secured a license to marry.
pg 3, col 2
Born: We understand that Mr. and Mrs. W.L.P. Burney are the happy parents of a dandy girl. Their address is still Harrisonville, Missouri.
pg 3, col 3
Married: At the residence of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Denton, the bride's brother-in-law and sister, on yesterday (Wednesday) evening, at 8:30 P.M., Mr. Isaac F. Shannon was married to Miss AnnieRoberts, Rev. J.C. McElroy officiating. Only a few of the immediate relatives and friends of the high contracting parties were present, and altogether, the event was one of the pleasantest ever known in the city. Promptly at the appointed hour, the manly bridegroom and handsome bride stepped before the minister to the music of a mandolin march, played by F.T. Vincent, accompanied by Miss Alice Taylor on a guitar. Mr. S.L. Overstreet and Miss Kate Drysdale acted as best man and lady. In a short time, the words were said and the happy couple were recipients of many congratulations. I.F. Shannon came to Medicine Lodge almost three years ago and was shortly afterwards joined by his brother, H.L., and together they form the enterprising, prosperous law, loan and abstracting firm of Shannon & Shannon. I.F. came from Indiana to this state. In Indiana he was engaged in the law and newspaper business, being in charge of the Vincennes News for some time. Miss Roberts is also from Indiana and has been living with her sister for about a year. She has made many friends and is a young lady peculiarly gifted both physically and mentally. May the happy couple enjoy all the pleasures of life.

Oct 13, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Lineburgh, on Saturday last, October 8th, a 10 1/2 pound boy. Dr. Burney in attendance. No cigars.
pg 3, col 3
Marriages: On October 7, Chas. Gronemire was married to Miss Carrie Gronemire by Probate Judge Hardy. The bride's maiden name was Carrie Romig, but was changed to Gronemire by her married with a brother of the present husband. The death of the first husband occurred shortly after his marriage, which took place nine months since. Wm. L. Morris, of Lipscomb, Texas, was married to Eva L. Richardson, of Barber county, on October 6th. The bride was only 14 years old.
pg 3, col 3
Marriage License: Issued to John L. Hook and Dora Bonfield on October 12.

Oct 20, 1887
pg 2
Married: Jonathan Hook and Miss Dora Bonafield, both being of the same mind in believing that man should not live alone, repaired to Judge Hardy on the 12th- for his permit - and on the 13th, their happy boat was shoved off on life's rippling waves by Esq. Peachy, and performed at the residence of F. Bradbeck, brother-in-law of the bride, where a number of friends had gathered, and where the happy groom and bride received the congratulations and presents of their many friends. The infair [?] at the groom's father's house yesterday was an enjoyable affair. The scribe is grateful for being remembered. [Pleasant Ridge news] [Note: In another note, Bradbeck is spelling Brobeck ; Bonafield is spelled Banfield.]
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. W.H. Moore reports that a girl of regulation weight was born to Mr. and Mrs. John White of Mule creek.
pg 3, col 3
Marriage License: On yesterday, the 19th, a marriage license was issued to James Hubbard and MaryRush ; and to Arthur L. Taylor and Gussie G. Albertson. All of this county.
pg 3, col 3
Anniversary: Last Friday evening, October 14th, was the twelfth anniversary of the marriage of Rev. and Mrs. J.C. McElroy, and in order to celebrate the event suitably, quite a number of their friends and members of Mr. McElroy's church gathered at the parsonage. We understand that a number of presents were made, among them an overcoat for Mr. McElroy and a dress for his wife. After the company got warmed up, they decided to make the affair more elaborate and dressing the principals up in their wedding garments of twelve years ago, sent for the Rev. Sanderson, the M.E. minister, and had the marriage ceremony over. Altogether it was a very pleasant affair and a just appreciation and tribute to the sterling worth of the Presbyterian minister and his estimable lady.

Oct 27, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Married: At the residence of T.M. Kidd, in this city, on Tuesday, October 25th, George W. Marony, of Inyo, Harper county, was married to Rebekah J. Dyer. Justice D.A. McCandless performing the ceremony in his own inimitable style.
pg 3, col 1
Born: On Saturday last, October 22nd, a handsome girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. R.H. Hahn. All doing well.
pg 3, col 2
Marriage License: Issued yesterday for John F. Taylor, of Kiowa, and Emma G. Pool, of Hazelton, who are to be married this (Thursday) evening, October 27th, at the residence of the bride's parents, X.T. Pool and wife, at Hazelton. The contracting parties are highly spoken of and it promises to be one of the most auspicious matches in the southeast part of the county.

Nov 3, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. T.L. Lindley on Sunday, October 30th, a boy - full weight.
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. E. Winter, on Sunday, October 30th, a boy baby. Dr. Kociell officiated.
pg 3, col 2
Married: On Wednesday of last week, October 25th, Adolphus Bucknum was married to Miss Nannie Ritche, at the residence of E.R. Howard, by our urbane Probate Judge, Capt. H.H. Hardy. Both of the contracting parties are of this county and well liked and respected by all who know them. The bride is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. E.R. Howard. The Cresset force and family acknowledge the present of a wedding cake - not a few pieces, but a whole cake - and the boys in the office remarked, as they stowed away the flaky sweetness, that according to their ideas of marriage, Mr. and Mrs. A. Bucknum are the only couple who have been legally married in the county. This is the first instance we have received a WHOLE cake. May the happy couple's life be as pure and full of sweetness as that cake, and may they be appreciated socially by their neighbors, as well as that cake was physically by the Cresset force.

Nov 10, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: On Sunday of this week, November 6th, a boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Vickers.
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. W.H. Moore caught a ten pound girl at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. C.T. Blankenship, of Mule Creek, on November 9th.
pg 3, col 2
Born: A young republican voter made his appearance at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. G.W. Ellis on the morning of election day, November 8th. He came in time to vote early and often, but his parents would not allow him to go to the polls, fearing he would be challenged on the ground of not being old enough.
pg 3
Married: Oh! Yes, we had a wedding in our valley - the first for some time, we suppose owing to the dry weather, the boys are afraid to undertake keeping one more. Mr. Frank McReynolds was married to Miss Annie Lintner on Wednesday, October 5th. May peace, love and happiness reign with them. [Cedar township news]
pg 3, col 3
Married: Mr. Geo. Nichols and Miss Stella Payne were married today at the residence of the bride's mother.
pg 3, col 3
Died: "In Memory of Duncan Doles" - A brave and true patriot, who died October 12, 1887, near Medicine Lodge, Kansas. By the death of our beloved comrade and friend, the family are deprived of an affectionate and loving husband and father, and the neighborhood of an honorable and respected citizen. He was a worthy member of Co. G, 22nd Regiment of Ohio volunteer infantry, and was discharged at Camp Dennison by the expiration of term of service. His death was caused by the exposure and hardships during his term of service. Since his residence in this county, he has won a host of friends and, what can seldom be said, we do not think he had a single enemy. The family have the sympathy of the entire neighborhood, tin this, the hour of their bereavement. From one of his many friends. Signed: C.H.C.

Nov 17, 1887, pg 3, col 1
Born: On Tuesday morning, a ten pound girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Ramsey. Look out for a big cut on prices at Ramsey & Sheldon's.

Nov 24, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: On Saturday of last week, November 19th, a handsome voter was born to Mr. and Mrs.Caruthers. The young lady will only be allowed to exercise her right of suffrage in municipal affairs. All doing well. This makes two pairs for the genial senior editor of the Index - Kings and Queens.
pg 3, col 4
Birthday: Aetna, Kansas, Nov. 21st, 1887 - On Saturday evening, the 19th, a large number of invited guests assembled at the "Southern Kansas Hotel" in Aetna, to celebrate the 23rd birthday of Mr. Benjamin E. O'Neal. All partook heartily of an oyster supper, fine cake, etc., after which they repaired to the parlors and participated in a number of amusing games conducted by the younger persons of the company. Everyone enjoyed several hearty laughs, though after all, a shadow of sadness would come with the thought that it must be a whole year before Ben could give another birthday party. Those present were: Ben E. O'Neal and Miss Story, A.O. Hardy and Miss Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. Donnell with their daughter Mandie, Mr. and Mrs. Geirard, Mr. and Mrs. Zerber with their son Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Will Handy, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Handy, Mr. and Mrs. O.P. Morris, Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Bright and daughter Verna, Mr. and Mrs. Denton, Mrs. Dunilson, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Morris (host and hostess) and their daughter Myrtle. Messrs. Parent, Ed. O'Neal, Bronson, Morris, Coffman, Dolkey, Chas. and Jas. Ross. Mr. Ben O'Neal came here about two years ago from Gent, Caralli [?] Co., Ky. He took a claim and roughed it through, and now has a good piece of land close to town. Recently in company with Mr. Parent of Ohio, he purchased the extensive general store of Ryerly, Dark & Runyan and the boys are going a rattling business. Mr. O'Neal is such a genial, social person, he seems like a kind of second cousin to every body, so all the men call h im Ben, and all the ladies call him Benny. He is fast becoming one of the solid, reliable men of the country, and when, as the signs of time indicates, he has led one of Wichita's fairest maidens to the altar, Ben will be fully settled.

Dec 1, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Born: A bouncing ten pound boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. John Hutchins on Sunday last, November 27th.
pg 3, col 1
Born: Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Upperman are the proud parents of a ten-pound boy born on Wednesday, November 30th.
pg 3, col 1
Marriage License: Abraham L. Salanders and Ada G. McCoy, both of Hazelton, secured a license last Saturday, November 26th, and are probably man and wife by this time.
pg 3, col 1
Marriage License: On November 22nd, Judge H.H. Hardy issued a license to Chas. C. Stockwell, of Burlington, Kansas, and Cora _____ , of Sharon. [Incomplete transcription]
pg 3, col 2
Married: On Saturday, November 26th, Isaac McHenry, of Pratt Center, and Miss Minnie Hubbard, of Elm Mills, were married by Probate Judge H.H. Hardy at the Medicine Lodge House. The handsome bride is a daughter of the proprietor of the Medicine Lodge & North-western stage line.
pg 3, col 2
Married: Edgar B. Pfost and Mrs. Nannie E. Fossett, both of Deerhead, were married on Tuesday, of this week, November 29th, at the office of the Probate Judge, by his honor, the Judge. Mrs. Fosset is a daughter of the well-known and highly respected Thos. A. Walton, of Deerhead. The young couple take to-day's train for the former home of the groom at Urich, Missouri, where they will probably spend the winter. The Cresset extends its best.

Dec 8, 1887
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. May Kies, wife of B.E. Kies, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. C.H. Morgan at Hillsdale, Michigan, at 2 o'clock on Saturday morning, Nov. 26, of consumption. The funeral was held at the home where she died at 1 o'clock, p.m., Sunday. The many friends of Mrs. Kies in this vicinity sympathize with the bereaved husband.
pg 3
Married: At the residence of the bride, near Rainbelt, Nov. 28th, 1887, by Rev. B. Mills, Mr. John E. Allen, of Wichita, and Miss Emma Taylor. The bride is one of Meade county's best school teachers, a lady of excellent disposition and more energy than usually falls to the lot of young women. She was also one of the Republican's excellent correspondents. The groom is a young man of good habits and we are pleased to learn contemplates at a nor far distant day of coming to this county to live. They are now visiting Wichita with his people. We join their many friends in wishing them bon voyage. The above from the Meade County Republican , interpreted into language of Barber county means that J. Ed. Allen and Emma Taylor, both formerly of this city, are married. The many friends of Ed. and Mrs. Allen in this vicinity will wish them unbounded success. We know them both to be young people of unusual sense and if they have half a chance will get along nicely.

Dec 15, 1887
Died: On Sunday, December 11th, 1887, at 8:30 A.M., Mr. M.H. Hitchcock died at his residence in this city of lung trouble, surrounded by his sorrowing and almost heart broken family. Mark H. Hitchcock was born in Rowe, Massachusetts, in the year 1828, and therefore was in his fiftieth year at the time of his death. When 18 years of age, he removed to Galesburg, Illinois, where he resided four years. He then removed to Poughkeepsie, New York, where he resided until 1885, when he came to Neosho Falls, Kansas, and in February '86 came to Medicine Lodge, where he was joined by his family in March of that year. In 1862, Mr. Hitchcock was married to Maria E. Dewey, at Poughkeepsie. Four children are the result of that union: Steve B., Florence L., Lottie M. and Bertha S. The widow and her children are left to mourn the demise of the kind, indulgent father. Mr. Hitchcock's has been a busy life. While still a young man, he was made superintendent of the city alms house in Poughkeepsie. There his executive abilities were so well demonstrated that he was made superintendent of the city railway. The latter position he held for twelve years. He then, in company with a gentleman named Henry W. Bullard, purchased the Poughkeepsie foundry and machine works. Finally, he engaged in the manufacture of agricultural implements on his own account, and while running the Hitchcock agricultural works patented several important improvements in farm machinery. Mr. Hitchcock when a boy suffered a sun stroke and has never been a strong, robust man. While in the alms house and on the railroad, he met with several accidents. Then the dust and heavy work about a foundry and machine shop did not agree with him, so he was obliged to flee to the west for his health in 1885. Immediately after his arrival in t his city, Mr. H. engaged in the real estate business with L.F. Pearson, and has since been in the same business, either with Mr. Pearson or by himself. Despite his feeble health, he worked hard and kept up a brave heart. He expected to pass away almost any day, still as long as he could get around at all, he worked hard endeavoring to advance his own and the interests of the community in which he lived. He was an exemplary citizen, a model husband and father and a good business man. From early childhood, he has been a church member and consistent Christian. The funeral was preached at the Presbyterian church on Tuesday, the 13th and the remains placed at rest in the city cemetery by a large concourse of sorrowing friends. Reverends McElroy and Sanderson officiated.

Dec 22, 1887
pg 3, col 2
Married: Harvey Knowles was in town last Saturday, togged out in his best clothes. We remonstrated with him, but could get no satisfaction. A later examination of the Probate Judge's record explained the whereforeness. Harvey R. Knowles was married on Saturday last to Miss Lydia H. Claypool. Both are of Mingona township. Judge Hardy tied the knot in his own inimitable style.
pg 3, col 4
Married: At the residence of the bride's parents, near this city, in the presence of a few friends, on Wednesday, December 21st, 1887, Thomas M. Doran to Miss Ethel Sparks, Rev. R. Sanderson officiating. One by one the boys are deserting the state of bachelorhood and joining the benediction throng. Even Tom Doran has succumbed. Thomas M. Doran is too well known to need an introduction from us. His pleasing address and ready wit make him the life of every company where he is present. He has many friends, is well educated and thoroughly understands business. His handsome bride is the daughter of R.M. Sparks. She is respected by all for her courteous bearing and cheerful disposition. No young couple has ever been married in Medicine Lodge for whom more will wish well than for Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Doran. They took the afternoon train for the east and will visit for a few days with relatives and friends.

Jan-May 1888

Barber County Newspapers



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