Adams
Adams
Andrews
Balding
Baldwin
Bannister
Beal
Beardsley
Billings
Bissantz
Blake
Bloomaha
Brainard
Brown
Buck
Buck
Buck
Bullington
Burk
Burke
Carl
Carr
Carr
Carricer
Chitty
Clawson
Clift
Clinkscales
Collins
Cook
Cornelison
Decker
Decker
Decker
Decker
Decker
Dixon
Douglass
Edwards
Eslick
Espey
Feltner
Feltner
Feltner
Fisher
Flohr
Fosset
Fosset
Frisbie
Gallager
Garden
Garten
Garten
Garten
Gibbs
Gooddell
Hammack
Hammack
Hargis
Hargis
Harris
Hazeltine
Helton
Holloway
Jones
Jones
Josyling
Kern
Keyes
Lacey
Lake
Lake
Lake
Lake
Lake
Lake
Lake
Lappen
Laub
Laub
Lewis
Lockard
Louks
Maddox
Mainard
Marshall
Martin
Matthews
McAdams
McBeth
McCarty
McElwain
McIntyre
McKinan
McKinney
McNeely
Meincke
Merriam
Meyers
Miles
Mill
Miller
Mills
Montgomery
Moreland
Moreland
Moreland
Morris
Mulliken
Nichols
Noah
Noah
Noah
Nurse
Nurse
Paddock
Parr
Pfost
Pierce
Pierce
Pike
Prater
Pucket
Purdy
Rankin
Rankin
Reed
Reynolds
Richords
Risner
Rogers
Rogers
Schiedler
Sell
Shaw
Shepler
Shepler
Sims
Sims
Skeen
Slaughter
Slaughter
Smith
Stewart
Stilwell
Stockton
Stoughton
Sunnafrank
Tackett
Tackett
Tackett
Tarrant
Thompson
Thompson
Thompson
Thrasher
Tibbits
Tibbits
Turner
Tyner
Vaughn
Walker
Walton
Walton
Warrenstaff
Wheatly
Williams
Williams
Williams
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Winkler
Winters
Zimmerman

REEL #L48/KSHS Microfilm Collection

Kansas Prairie Dog

The Kansas Prairie Dog was a weekly newspaper, published in Lake City, Barber County, Kansas, beginning Thursday, February 19, 1885, with Mr. J.A. Williams as Editor and Reuben Lake as Proprietor. On May 21, 1884, J.A. Williams retired and was replaced by his brother, C.D. Williams. By July of 1886, C.L. Hammack had become Editor. Local coverage was primarily limited to Lake City, with some news of nearby townships, as well as Medicine Lodge. This reel continues through February 9, 1888. The information has been copied as accurately as possible, but errors may still occur. Minor printing errors have been corrected, but otherwise the information is presented as it originally appeared. Please consult the individual reels to verify an item. I do not have any further information about these individuals or families. Contributed by Ellen Knowles Bisson (thebissons@worldnet.att.net)



Mar 26, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Married: On Thursday, March 19, by James Nurse, Rev. Sims to Miss Jerusha Smith, all of Lake City township.
Married: On Thursday, March 26, at 4 o'clock p.m., Mr. Miles Risner and Miss Addie Pucket, near this city, James Nurse officiating. No cards, no cake, no editor, no arrest.

Apr 1, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: On March 31st, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Decker, a daughter. Mother and child doing well, and Frank will pull through by careful nursing.

Apr 9, 1885
pg 1, col 2
Born: Born on April first to the wife of Adam Sell living three and one half miles from this city, a son. [This lengthy announcement details the birth of a malformed baby to this family. Please contact transcriptionist for full details.]
pg 4, col 1
Married: Jeff Montgomery to Annie Garten, April 2nd, by Judge Hardy.

Apr 16, 1885, pg 1, col 2
Born: To the wife of Chas. Rankin today, a daughter, weight eight pounds. Mother and child doing well. Charley is absent in Kiowa.

Apr 23, 1885
pg 4, col 2
Died: "Flood, Loss of Life at Medicine Lodge, Twenty-one Bodies Found up to 8 o'clock Yesterday Morning" - Lengthy article about a devastating flood which occurred in the early evening on Apr 22nd, with significant loss of life, including the following:
     Mrs. Frank Shepler and daughter
     Mrs. Maddox and four children
     Jerry Gibbs
     Mrs. Harris and daughter
     Squire Paddock's family (9 members lost)
     Mrs. Dolly Espey
     Bullington family members (not specifically identified)

Apr 30, 1885, pg 1, col 2
Married: On Sunday at five o'clock p.m. by Jno. Andrews, J.P., S.Y. Carr to Maggie Carricer, all of this city. A large circle of friends assembled to witness the ceremony, and mirth and jollity reigned. Reub Lake managed to trap our newly elected squire and force him into the harness to administer the rites of holy matrimony, it was a surprise to Uncle John, but he acquitted himself nobly. After the knot was tied, dinner was announced and the company were seated at the table that fairly groaned under a load of tempting viands prepared by the hands of the fair bride. The following is a list of friends present: Mr. and Mrs. Lewis; Mr. and Mrs. Lake; Mr. and Mrs. Andrews; Mr. and Mrs. Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Updyke; Mr. and Mrs. Feltner; Mr. and Mrs. Stewart; Irene Lake, Dora Lonks, Tilley Lacey, Ellen Feltner, Jack Bell and Alvira Cummings; J.A. Williams and Minnie Andrews; Riley Lake; L. Uhrich; Andy Williams; Frank Bennett; Mark Flowers; Al. Cook; Charley Toler; Miss Vinson; B.W. Lemert. The many friends join in wishing the happy couple a long life of happiness and a long train of little Car(r)s.

May 14, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of Mr. Dixon, of this city, on Monday, a son, weight 8 lbs. Dr. Hutcheson officiating.

May 21, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of J.M. Hargis, on last Friday night, a daughter of regulation weight, Dr. Hutcheson officiating. Mrs. Hargis is now out of danger, and Joe will survive.

May 28, 1885
pg 1, col 2
Died: Last Sunday morning at 3 o'clock, Col. E.M. Beardsley passed away in the presence of his wife and youngest son, of phlegmanous eryesipelas. After prayer by Rev. Swartz of Ashland, Dr. Hutcheson delivered a eulogy, when the remains were followed at 4 o'clock p.m. to its last resting place in the cemetery west of the city by the largest gathering ever witnessed in this city on a similar occasion. Col. E.M. Beardsley was born in Gennessee county, New York, October 4th, 1828, and emigrated to Rock Island, Ill., when 15 years of age, where he engaged in the practice of law shortly afterwards. Entering the army, he served four years as Colonel of the 126th Illinois Volunteers. In 1870, he moved to Montgomery county, this state, and was one of the founders of Independence, and assisted in the organization of that county. He was twice elected to the legislature by Montgomery county. He has resided at Ottawa since 1883, and established a wide reputation as a criminal lawyer. He came to this city in March to engage in the practice of his profession and real estate business, when he was stricken down with disease that never permitted him to leave his room. During his long siege of sickness, he was cheerful and communicative to all, expressing a desire to mingle with our citizens and assist in the growth of our city. In the death of Col. Beardsley, we lose a valuable citizen, one that was ever ready to assist in public enterprises and extend friendship to his fellow man. He leaves a widow and five children, all married but one, to mourn the irretrievable loss of a kind husband and father. The eldest son resides in Memphis, Tenn., and only daughter, Mrs. Stockton, at Sharon, this county, and the three remaining sons at Ottawa. During his short stay here he made many friends who will extend their sympathies to the bereaved in their sad affliction. And @ pg 4: Card of Thanks - "We take this method of thanking our kind friends who have assisted us in our late bereavement, and wish to return our sincere thanks to Dr. Hutcheson, Mr. and Mrs. Lake, Mr. and Mrs. Andrews and family, Mr. and Mrs. Toler, and many others." Signed: Mrs. E.M. Beardsley and Al. L. Beardsley.
pg 4, col 1
Died: At Sun City, on the 26th, Libbie, daughter of William and Leannie Adams, aged 8 years, of measles.
pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of Leander Wilson, living on Elm Creek, Tuesday, a daughter of regulation weight. The little visitor was introduced by Grandma Keyes and given a reception. Mother and child doing well.

Jun 4, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Died: Mr. Billings, father-in-law of Tom Reynolds, died at Sun City Saturday night, and was buried Sunday.

Jul 2, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of J.S. Kern, in this city this morning, a son, weight 12 pounds, with Dr. Hutcheson officiating. Doc says the boy is a fine one and Mrs. Kern is improving. While J.S. has not been visible on the streets yet, we presume he will recover. Another victory for Lake City.

Jul 9, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Died: At Medicine Lodge, Wednesday July 1st, Miss Hettie McElwain, of measles. Miss McElwain had a number of friends in this city who will regret to learn of her sudden and unexpected death. [Memorial poem follows.]

Aug 13, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of W.O. Thompson, on the 7th, a daughter, Dr. Hutcheson officiating. Mrs. Thompson and the little daughter are doing fine and W.O. is improving.

Aug 20, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Died: The little three year old daughter of Leander and Mary Wilson died of whooping cough last Thursday and was buried in the cemetery west of town Friday.

Aug 27, 1885
pg 4, col 1
Married: Preston Parr and Victoria Mills were married at the residence of Clem Mills, Tuesday, Judge Hardy officiating.
pg 4, col 1
Died: Sunday, August 23rd, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Holloway, aged six months, of brain fever. We hereby extend the sympathies of a large circle of friends in behalf of the bereaved parents. The little one was laid to rest in the cemetery west of the city, Monday.
pg 4, col 1
Died: The little nine year old daughter of Hicks Laub was bitten last Saturday evening by a rattlesnake that had secreted itself near the door of the residence. The little children had been playing around the door all evening unaware of any impending danger. Shortly before attracting the child, a dog was bitten by the same snake and only lived twenty minutes. The little child being the next object of its attraction was bitten on the top of the foot. Dr. Hutcheson was sent for and did everything possible to kill the deadly effects of its poisonous fangs, but owing to the time required in reaching the little sufferer, his efforts were of no avail, and the little one passed away in a sleeping stupor from which it could not be rallied, just 56 hours later. The little one was interred Tuesday in the cemetery west of town.

Sep 3, 1885, pg 4, col 2
Died: Near Lake City, Sunday night, August 31st, Newtie, only son of Mr. and Mrs. W.O. Thompson, aged nine years. [Memorial poem follows.]

Sep 10, 1885
pg 4, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a little daughter born to the wife of J.B. Jones, Tuesday, of regulation weight and mother and child doing well.
pg 4, col 1
Born: G.W. Mainard was the worst excited man in town Tuesday night, he was rushing around with lantern in hand and probably visited every room in the Commercial [hotel] in search of Dr. Hutcheson. The returns all in Wednesday indicate a little daughter born at his residence in this city.
pg 4, col 2
Died: S.J. Shepler, an aged and respected citizen of Barber county, died at Medicine Lodge Wednesday night of consumption. Deceased was one of the early settlers of Barber county and was twice elected to the office of county clerk and has held other offices of trust within the gift of our citizens. He was a man that was universally liked throughout the county and a man whom no one questioned his honesty, integrity and ability as a county officer. He was also a prominent Mason and will be buried with Masonic honors tomorrow.

Sep 17, 1885
pg 4, col 1
Died: Dan Louks, well acquainted here and a brother of Miss Dora Louks, died at Mead Center of typhoid fever and was buried on the 5th.
pg 4, col 1
Married: At the residence of Mrs. Garten, this Thursday evening, James Nurse officiating, Mr. Chas. Flohr to Miss Nannie Garten.

Sep 24, 1885
pg 4, col 1
Born: Wednesday night to Mr. and Mrs. McNeely, this city, a son, Dr. Hutcheson officiating.
pg 4, col 1
Married: At Kansas City, August 11, 1885, A.D. Cook of this city to Miss Nellie Thrasher of Kansas City. The above may seem something on the ancient order, but it is new to Lake City and vicinity. Al made a brief visit to Kansas City last month and while there had the nuptial knot tied in order to save time and a return to the city. The boys admit Al played it on them and his secret would have kept several moons yet, but for Reuben Lake and family, who while in Kansas City last week were apprised of the fact and of course gave it all away. The bride is well and favorably known here and her friends will be glad to welcome her return to Lake City. Al says owing to circumstances he will bring his bride to Lake City in a few days. The DOG joins his many friends in wishing Al and his fair bride unending happiness and may they be blessed with pleasures and fruits of a long and prosperous life. In a few years, Al may relate to his children with some degree of pleasure when he surprised the boys, but at this time is silent. And @ Oct 8, pg 4, col 1: Mr. and Mrs. A.D. Cook arrived from Kansas City last Sunday and were given a serenade about twelve o'clock the following night, the pieces consisting of six-shooters, Winchesters, tin cans, bells, etc. Al responded right liberally and the boys dispersed, giving vent to three rousing cheers.

Oct 1, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Birthday: A birthday was given at the residence of James Burke, this city, by Grandma Burke yesterday, the occasion being the birthday of little Ella Burke, aged 4 years. Invitations were sent out to the little folks and about 13 made up the party in honor of whom a sumptuous supper was spread. It is said the little folks acquitted themselves creditably and a number of presents were made. It was a nice little party and doubtless the little folks wish Ella many more such happy occasions.

Oct 8, 1885
pg 4, col 1
Married: Eugene Bannister and Miss Etta Stilwell were married at Medicine Lodge last Sunday. Both are well known in this vicinity and the announcement of their marriage will be read with interest by their friends. Gene recently sold out at Sun City and will, we are informed, go into business at Kinsley.
pg 4, col 1
Married: At Larned, Kas., Tuesday, September 29th, H.A. Noah to Miss Hattie M. Buck, both of this city. Mr. Noah belongs to the enterprising class of business men of Lake City, and Miss Buck, the bride, is the daughter of H.M. Buck, and one of the most accomplished young ladies in this city. They are extensively acquainted throughout the county and the DOG joins with the community in congratulations and best wishes for a long and happy life. Sunday an elegant dinner was given in honor of this happy couple at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Buck and a large number of friends were present. Following are a list of the presents: Bed spread and two cut-glass fruit dishes, Riley Lake and Miss Nevada Pierce; cut-glass fruit dish and half dozen sauce dishes, Miss Rebina Cumins; one cut-glass set, Miss Irene Lake; cut-glass cake stand, Dr. Hutcheson; dozen linen napkins and one pair linen towels, J.S. Runyan; broom and one pound of candy, Dr. Hutcheson; set of silver knives and forks, Mrs. H.M. Buck; rocking chair, Mr. and Mrs. R. Lake. [See below @ Jul 22, 1886 for birth of son to Mr. and Mrs. Noah.]

Oct 15, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports the arrival of a fine daughter at the residence of Hicks Laub, last Monday night.

Oct 22, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Died: John Meyers, an old resident of this county, living west of Sun City, died Monday night of consumption.

Dec 3, 1885, pg 4, col 1
Married: Jack Stewart, familiarly known as Happy Jack, and Bessie Rogers, both well known in t his city were married at Medicine Lodge today. May Mr. and Mrs. Happy Jack journey through this vale of tears with unbroken happiness and never ceasing prosperity.

Dec 10, 1885, pg 3, col 2
Birthday: Sunday, the 6th, was the 46th birthday of our fellow townsman Reuben Lake. In honor of the occasion, Mrs. Lake prepared an excellent dinner and invited a few of Mr. Lake's numerous friends to join her in celebrating the occasion. Among these present we noticed: Messrs. Carter and wife, Buck and wife, Stewart and wife, Livingston and wife, Rankin and wife, McAdams, wife and daughter, Feltner and wife, Nelson and wife, Rowley and wife, Andrews and wife, Mrs. H.A. Noah, B.W. Lemert, Frank Gordon, Wm. A. Mahan, Horace Frisby, Dr. Hutcheson, Frank Bennett and Jack Bell. A pleasant social time was had, new acquaintances were formed and old friendships renewed. The old settlers compared notes and discussed their experiences to the interest and we believe profit of the newcomers. Reuben Lake and his family were among the first settlers of this valley. Then the buffalo roamed in countless numbers where now gently graze the peaceful herds of Herefords and Pole Angus. Twice during their residence here was this valley depopulated by the murderous redskins, but through all the dangers and privations incident to a frontier life, Mr. Lake and his family remained quietly and bravely on guard until civilization, comfort and luxury have sought them. All present enthusiastically agreed that the world is much better off on account of Reuben Lake having been born and permitted to live in it, and all earnestly wish that by the time the figures that now mark his age on the dial plate of time are reversed, he shall have acquired such a competency as will permit him and his good wife to enjoy a luxurious ease and that their lives may be extended to a ripe old age.

Dec 17, 1885, pg 3, col 1
Born: Uncle Steve Carr was setting 'em up to the boys Monday and appeared to be the gayest among the gay. Upon inquiry, we were informed that a new arrival had put in an appearance Saturday night at the residence of Uncle Steve. Dr. Hutcheson introduced the little stranger who has been christened Reuben and will become a permanent resident of Lake City.

Dec 31, 1885, pg 3, col 1
Married: Today in t his city by Squire Nurse, Edward Mulliken of Deerhead, age 49, and Miss W.A. McKinan, of Marian, Ind., age 44. The DOG wishes that the couple now united in the midway of life may live to a ripe old age.

Jan 7, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Abbot Clinkscales, on the 2nd, a daughter, of regulation weight possessing all the qualifications of a refined and cultured little lady. We have it direct from Sam that his only sister is a daisy and it makes no difference if all the old cows die now.
pg 3, col 1
Died: Near Deerhead January 2nd, Ethel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. McCarty, aged 11 months. Ethel was a bright promising little child, a sun beam in the family circle, yet after a lingering illness her childish prattle and bright smiles have ceased forever, called to join those gone before. The burial took place in this city Monday in the cemetery west of town.

Jan 14, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Died: At 11 a.m. today (Friday) of consumption, Buddy, son of William Tackett, aged 18 years. The young man had lately arrived from Colorado where he had been in the hopes of regaining health, and had been at home but a few days. The funeral will take place in this city tomorrow.

Jan 21, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Birthday: James Nurse celebrated the third anniversary of his wedding Thursday evening.
pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Hargis on the 17th, a daughter, Dr. Hutcheson reports Mother and child doing well and Andy out of danger.
pg 3, col 2
Died: At Newton January 16, 1886, Willie, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Mose Hazeltine. The family have friends in th is city who will be pained to learn of the death of little Willie, and will join the DOG in extending sympathies to the bereaved parents in this their irretrievable loss.

Jan 28, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Married: Lake City comes to the front with another wedding this week, the contracting parties being John D. Decker and Miss Cindia Winters who were married at the Lodge Monday by Judge Hardy. Mat the Winters prove to be the sunny part of John's life is our wish. [See below @ Nov 25, 1886 for birth of their first child.]
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a son born to the wife of Mr. Josyling living near the Pratt county line yesterday.
pg 3, col 1
Died: Dr. H.W. Meincke, well and favorably known throughout the county as a physician, died at Medicine Lodge Tuesday of pneumonia, aged 27. Dr. Meincke was a foreigner by birth and had gained a large and lucrative practice in the county. He was elected coroner last fall on the Democratic ticket.

Mar 4, 1886
pg 3, col 2
Birthday: February 27, A pleasant little birthday supper and dance was given at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Blake yesterday evening, in honor of their daughter, Miss Eva Blake and Miss Dora Fosset. A nice little party assembled and were greeted in a manner that characterized the enjoyment of the evening. The supper was a credit to the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Blake. The music was equal to the occasion and the dance proved to be the crowning event of the evening. May the young ladies witness many happy birthdays and that Mr. and Mrs. Blake will not forget February 26, 1887, as I am waiting to dance again. Signed: One of the Party. [Blakes Hollow news]

Mar 18, 1886
pg 3
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a son born to the wife of Bill Williams, living south ___ of this city, today.
pg 3, col 2
Died: The news of the death of Pat Gallager at his residence in Gallager, Comanche county at 11:30 today (Friday) was received in this city with no little surprise this evening, although it had been announced a few hours earlier that his recovery had been despaired of. His death resulted from tonsilitis swollen throat and glands which first appeared nine days ago. He used various treatments with no good results. Dr. Hutcheson of this city was called Wednesday night in consultation with Dr. Darling of Nescatunga, but all efforts seemed to no avail. This morning he called his wife and children to his bedside, gave each a kiss, spoke of his business intelligently and asked that he be let die easy, if possible. Tracheotomy was performed which relieved his breathing and he soon fell asleep and died without a struggle three hours after the operation. Deceased was a native of Ireland, and located upon the townsite of the now flourishing little town that bears his name in t he neighborhood of twelve years ago. By his persisting efforts and energy, he succeeded in building up a pleasant little town and accumulated considerable property, was universally well liked and made friends everywhere. He leaves a wife, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Feltner of this city, and four children. Deceased was thirty years of age and was comparatively strong and robust in health. The funeral will take place in this city tomorrow at 4 o'clock under the direction of the I.O.O.F. Lodge of this city.

Apr 1, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Born: To the wife of Mr. Bush in this city Tuesday night, a son of fine healthy proportions. Dr. Hutcheson reports mother and child doing well.

Apr 8, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. McElwain, mother of the McElwain boys, died Tuesday of malarial fever, aged about 70 years. The funeral took place at Medicine Lodge, Wednesday.
pg 3, col 2
Born & Died: "A Sad Ending" - It is with regret that we announce the sad intelligence of the death of Mrs. Henry M. Mason, at their residence one mile north and west of this city. Dr. Hutcheson was called and after some difficulty, a little daughter was born Tuesday, which lived but 48 hours. The patient survived the operation and seemed in good spirits, had expressed herself as feeling somewhat relieved, when she complained of a burning sensation about the heart and stomach, turned herself over in the bed and was a corpse in a few moments. The supposed cause of death was air entering the open veins of the uterus and passing to the heart. Mr. and Mrs. Mason came here a year ago last November from Kentucky, purchased the Hill place and had surrounded themselves with every comfort of a nice home and were comparatively happy until death crossed the threshold. The remains of mother and child were forwarded to their former home in Versailles, Ky., Thursday, followed by the sorrow-stricken husband.

Apr 15, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. J.H. Taylor, who died at West Plaines, of heart disease, passed through this city Wednesday to Medicine Lodge for burial. Mr. J.H. Taylor, husband of the deceased, was formerly in the meat business at Medicine Lodge.
pg 3, col 1
Married: It is announced that County Superintendent Gerlie Skeen will be married April 21st to M.J. Lane of Medicine Lodge. Miss Skeen has made an efficient officer and a large circle of friends throughout the county. The DOG extends early congratulations and trusts that the cares of the superintendency will be much lighter in the future.
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. Jane Martin, wife of Henderson Martin, died of malaria fever at their residence east of this city last Saturday and was buried Sunday in the cemetery at this place. Mr. Martin had recently built a new residence and was surrounding himself with the comforts and conveniences of a pleasant home. Mrs. Martin leaves a husband and seven children.

Apr 22, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Died: Lydia Tackett, little 11 year old daughter of Wm. Tackett, died at her father's residence in this city last Sunday morning, of consumption. Lydia was a bright little child just blooming into girlhood, loved by all her little friends and a pet in her home. When she recognized that death was drawing near, she could scarcely consent to give up life so young. Yet, 'tis the will of the Ruler of all nations.

May 6, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a little daughter born at the residence of Taylor Nichols Thursday night, weight two and a half pounds.

May 13, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. Vaughn, living down the river, was made a happy and proud father this Friday morning by the appearance of a nice little daughter at his house, of regulation weight and fine healthy lungs.
pg 3, col 1
Married: At Medicine Lodge Thursday, Wm. Tackett and Mrs. Mandy Decker, both of this city. Mr. Tackett is a successful merchant of this city and the bride was the widow of Arthur Decker, who it will be remembered was accidentally killed in Pratt county a little over a year ago. The happy couple has the best wishes of the DOG, and may love's link ever remain unbroken. At a late hour last night, the boys made night hideous with cowbells, shotguns and whoops that caused the groom to come to the front with cigars and refreshments.

May 27, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Married: Frank Lockard and Dora Douglass of Sun City, were married at the Lodge Wednesday.

Jun 3, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Born: To the wife of James Carl in this city Wednesday night a son, tipping the beam at 12 pounds.

Jul 22, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Noah, on Wednesday July 21st, a son weighing 10 pounds. [See above @ Oct 8, 1885 for marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Noah.]

Jul 29, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Died: Amos S. Wilson died at his residence on Elm Creek, in this county on Friday, the 23rd, of typho malarial fever. Mr. Wilson, at the time of his death, was about 62 years of age, and for a year past had been in very feeble health. He was one of the pioneers of the county, having resided at the place where he died for the past ten years, and was quite extensively engaged in the cattle business. In his death Barber county loses one of its best citizens. He was honorable and upright in all of his dealings; kind and obliging as a neighbor, and was universally esteemed by all who knew him.

Aug 5, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Died: A child of C.H. Reed's, of this township, died last Monday at the age of 4 months and 14 days.

Aug 26, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Died: Mrs. Reuben Lake received the sad news yesterday that her father, Wm. Beal, died Thursday, August 19, at his home in Hannibal, Mo., of heart disease. He was also the father of Mrs. James Garten, who lives near this place.
pg 3, col 2
Married: Monday, August 23, 1886, by James Nurse, Mr. Fred Slaughter to Miss M.F. Lacey, both of this place. The marriage ceremony took place at the residence of the bride's brother-in-law, Ed Buck, at 8 o'clock p.m. After the ceremony was performed, quite a number of the boys visited the house with tin cans and cow bells to give the newly married couple a few selections which had been chosen for the occasion, but Fred not wanting to be disturbed by the music, immediately went up in town and opened up a few cases of "lemonade" and told the boys to help themselves which they did and we would judge from the noise made, that some of them, through accident, got a "stick" in it. The DOG joins their many friends in wishing them all the happiness and prosperity this world affords. [See below @ Mar 17, 1887 for birth of son and Lake City Bee @ Apr 27, 1888 for Mrs. Slaughter's death.]

Sep 9, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Born: A 9 pound girl at Jim Garden's. Dr. C.C. Bond officiating.
pg 3, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a 12 pound boy at Wm. Lappen's.
pg 3, col 2
Died: Quite a sad accident occurred here last Thursday at 2 o'clock p.m. at the residence of A. Feltner's. Charley Matthews, the little two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Matthews, of near Aetna, in some way got a small bottle of carbolic acid off a stand table, which had been placed there by some one while cleaning house, and drank part of it and in less than ten minutes after drinking it he was perfectly paralyzed. Drs. Hutcheson and Hovious were sent for but they could not do the little fellow any good. He lived until about 4 o'clock p.m. Friday and was buried at Lake City cemetery Saturday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Matthews have the entire sympathy of this community in their sad bereavement.
pg 3, col 2
Birthday: Last Saturday evening there was quite an enjoyable time spent by the ladies of this place at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Buck's, it being the 56th anniversary of Mrs. Buck's birth. The gathering was a surprise to Mrs. Buck, the ladies preparing the supper at their homes and filling their baskets with pies, cakes, chickens and all other things that a person could wish for, and walking in without saying "peas." There were about 12 or 15 ladies present (gentlemen not admitted), and they all report a pleasant time. Following is a list of the presents given to us by one in attendance: Mrs. Doctor Hovious, silk handkerchief; Mrs. Frank Brainard, apron; Mrs. Lewis, china cup and saucer and apron; Mrs. Ed. Buck, tidy; Mrs. H.A. Noah, autograph album; Mr. H.A. Noah, cashmere shawl sent in by his wife; and Mrs. Scott Buck, autograph album.

Sep 23, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Born: September 18th, to Mr. and Mrs. Leander Wilson, a 10 1/2 pound girl. Dr. Hovious officiating.

Sep 30, 1886, pg 3, col 1
Died: A two year old son of Garet Collins died very suddenly last Monday.

Oct 14, 1886, pg 3, col 2
Died: On Thursday, October 7, 1886, at 6 o'clock p.m. at her home in Lake City, Kansas, Mrs. Maud Brainard, wife of Frank Brainard. The deceased was born and raised in Altoona, Pennsylvania, and at the time of her death was twenty-four years old. She was married in Chicago, in March, 1885, to Frank Brainard and lived in Nebraska until they came here about four months ago. She was a kind and faithful wife, a believer in the word of God and a faithful worker for Him. A few days before she died, she told some of her friends that she was going to die and that she was going to heaven. The remains were taken to Wellington, Kansas, for burial on Friday, October 8th. Mr. Brainard has the sympathy of the entire community in this, his sad bereavement. And @ Dec 2, 1886, pg 4, col 2: We are informed that Frank A. Brainard, who formerly ran the [Lake] City drug store at this place but recently moved his stock of goods to Argonia, was taken to Wellington last week and judged insane.

Oct 21, 1886
pg 4, col 1
Died: The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David McIntyre, who lives 8 miles southwest of here on Mule Creek, died last Thursday evening.
pg 4, col 1
Born: To the wife of Mr. Baldwin, who lives south of town, on Thursday night, October 14th, an eight pound girl. Perhaps this is why Dr. Hutcheson did not know that he was married that night.

Oct 28, 1886
pg 4, col 1
Married: Myron Purdy was married at Watkins, N.Y. a few days since, to a highly accomplished belle of that city. His friend join the Union in extending congratulations and wishing the young couple a happy voyage over the sea of life. (Sun City Union)
pg 4, col 1
Married: Mr. Alex R. McKinney, of this city, was married at the residence of the bride's parents, at Richmond, Ky., on Wednesday, the 20th, to Miss Emma Cornelison, Eld. McClintick officiating. The happy couple arrived here Monday and are now at home to their friends. The best wishes of the Index are freely extended to them. (Medicine Lodge Index)

Nov 25, 1886
pg 3, col 1
Born: On last Thursday night to Mr. and Mrs. John Decker, a girl, Dr. R.C. Hutcheson officiating. We did not learn its weight, but Doc says it is a "whopper." We understand that John lost a good cow on the results. [See above @ Jan 1886 for Mr. and Mrs. Decker's marriage.]
pg 3, col 2
Birthday: "Nineteenth Birthday" - On last Thursday, Miss Nevada Pierce celebrated the 19th anniversary of her birth at the residence of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.L. Pierce near Sun City. About twenty-five of her friends were in attendance and all report an enjoyable time. At one o'clock her guests were invited into the dining room where there was all that any one could wish for to eat, prepared by Miss Nevada and her mother for the occasion. They remembered the Prairie DOG family with some excellent cakes for which we here offer many thanks. The following is a list of the presents: D.L. Pierce, photograph album; Jane Daugherty, black cashmere dress; Grandma McClain, cup and saucer; Irina Lake, silk handkerchief; Sarah Althouse, toilet set; F.L. Gordon and Charlie Carl, tea set; Olin Lamport, pitcher; John Lamport, fruit dish; George Folwell, pickle dish; Redie McClearey, large birthday card.

Dec 2, 1886
pg 4, col 2
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Frank Feltner on last Monday night, a ten pound boy. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson officiating. Frank says he thinks with good training, the boy will be able to knock John L. Sullivan out in the first round.
pg 4, col 2
Died: Last Thursday night at 11 o'clock at the residence of T. Mill's about six miles outside of town, James H. Burk, of this place. The cause of Mr. Burk's death was from an injury received while harnessing a mule, the mule throwing him against a post breaking his arm, and as he complained of no other pain and that there were no signs of any other injury, it was supposed that the arm was al that was injured until about six hours before his death when he complained of his head paining him. The doctor thinks a blood vessel in his head was ruptured. Mr. Burk was well known in this section on the county, having lived here for several years, and was liked by all. He was an honest, hard working young man, always trying to do that which was right. The funeral took place Friday at 3 o'clock p.m. at Lake City cemetery. He leaves a wife and three small children to mourn his loss who have the entire sympathy of this community in this, their sad bereavement.

Dec 23, 1886, pg 4, col 1
Married: At the residence of the bride's mother in Sun City, on the 19th of December by Rev. Owens, John T. Clawson and Miss Nannie Walker.

Dec 30, 1886, pg 4, col 2
Married: Rev. C.W. Owens performed the ceremony that connected I.S. Prater and Miss Mollie Adams in the holy bonds of matrimony, on December 24, 1886, at the residence of the bride's father, Wm. Adams. May their journey through life be that of happiness and prosperity is the wish to the DOG.

Jan 6, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Married: December 31, 1886, by Rev. C.W. Owens, at the residence of the bride's parents near Sun City, Sam'l Helton to Miss Mary Clift.
pg 4, col 1
Married: Mr. John Bissantz and Miss Julia Balding, both of Sun City, were married by Rev. Schiedler in the Odd Fellows Hall at that place January 1st, 1887, in the presence of a great many friends. We extend congratulations.
pg 4, col 3
Married: On last Sunday afternoon, January 2, 1887, at 3 o'clock, Riley Lake and Miss Nevada Pierce were united in the holy bonds of matrimony by Rev. J.H. Schiedler, at the residence of the bride's parents, Capt. and Mrs. D.L. Pierce, near Sun City, in the presence of about thirty of their friends and relatives. After the ceremony was performed, all were invited in to the dining room where there was a large table and upon which there was all that the inner man could wish for. Mr. Lake is an energetic young man and is well known throughout Southwestern Kansas, he being the proprietor of Lake's stage line, one of the best paying lines in the state, and having lived in the county for about fifteen years, and he has many warm friends who wish him a smooth journey through life. Miss Nevada Pierce, or rather Mrs. Lake, is one of the leading lights in society in this part of the county, and will make Riley a kind and loving wife: one that will care for him in the hours of sickness and cheer him in the dark days of life. This young couple have a bright future before them and the DOG their many friends in wishing that their future may continue to grow brighter and that their path through the journey of life may be strewed with flowers instead of thorns. The following is a list of presents received from their friends and relatives: Reuben Lake, Commercial Hotel, furniture and three lots; Mrs. Reuben Lake, bedroom set; D.L. Pierce, carpets; J.M. Bell, parlor set; Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Noah, lamp; C.D. Nelson, towels; Mrs. C.D. Nelson, vases; Mr. and Mrs. P. Lake, set of silver knives; Mr. and Mrs. Jas. York, glass set; Mr. and Mrs. Math Credus, glass set; M.J. Pierce, towels; Willie and Lewis York, sauce dishes; Miss I.B. Lake, table cloth and napkins. And also, @ pg 4, col 2: "The Serenade" - The boys gave Mr. and Mrs. Riley Lake a serenade last Monday night with tin cans, cow bells and six-shooters. They kept up their music on the outside for quite a while but as they could not raise them from their silent slumbers, they decided that they were opossoming, so procured some old rags and crammed them in the chimney, preventing the smoke from coming out, thinking that they would sure bring them to terms, but it did not. They then entered the house and discovered that Riley and his wife had safely locked themselves up in another room where the smoke did not affect them, so they commenced their music in the house and finally Riley decided that he had had enough so he gave one of the boys on the outside a jug containing one and one-half gallons of A. No. 1 "red eye," and some blackberry and they soon carried the news to the boys in the house. In less than an hour, three or four of the boys were missing and it was a cold night. Those that were sober commenced to search for the missing ones. They found them scattered all over town, some in stables and some under sheds, and one of them, who lived out of town a short distance, found himself the next morning in the corn shock. Two of the boys got on the "war path" and h ad several rounds for the championship of the town. Both were very weak and of course neither received any serious injury, but the next morning one looked as though he had been mixed up with a gang of cats on a midnight serenade and that they had "done him up."

Jan 13, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Married: At the residence of Sheriff C.D. Nelson's in Medicine Lodge, Thursday, January 6th, by Judge H.H. Hardy, Horace Frisbie to Miss Nora Walton, both of Deerhead. The DOG joins their many friends in wishing them a pleasant journey through life.

Feb 10, 1887, pg 4, col 3
Birthday: A real enjoyable little affair came off at the residence of our esteemed lady friend, Mrs. Reuben Lake, on Friday the 4th, it being Mrs. Lake's forty-second birthday. The program was deeply and skillfully laid by Mrs. H.A. Noah and Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious and they were ably assisted by Mrs. Riley Lake and Miss I.B. Lake in carrying out their plans, thus rendering the surprise complete. The following ladies met at the Commercial Hotel and thence proceeded to the residence of Mr. Reube Lake: Mrs. H.M. Buck, Mrs. Moreland, Mrs. Jno. McAdams, Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Ed. Buck, Mrs. H.A. Noah, and Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious. The ladies took with them a liberal supply of nearly all the delicacies known to the culinary art, and just here I will challenge the world to produce better cooks than we have in Lake City and I can get a number of witnesses from our party Friday who will back me in this opinion. After the ladies had spent a few pleasant hours with one of the best ladies on earth, supper was prepared and the husbands of the above named ladies were invited, your correspondent being one of the lucky numbers in the lottery. A more enjoyable time it has never been my lot to witness. After supper we were treated to some admirable piano music by Mrs. Riley Lake. The following is a list of the presents: Mrs. H.M. Buck, bread dish; Mrs. H.A. Noah, cake stand; Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious, apron; Mrs. S.G. Stewart, silk handkerchief; Mrs. Moreland, perfume satchel; Mrs. Jno. McAdams, tuck comb; Mrs. Ed. Buck, apron. The people of this town should never neglect an opportunity to attest their love and respect for Mrs. Lake and indeed Mr. Lake's entire family. Wishing the older members long life and prosperity, the younger ones, health, happy marriage and a bright future, I have the honor to subscribe myself. Signed: A Friend.

Feb 17, 1887, pg 4, col 3
Birthday: Last Friday afternoon quite an enjoyable surprise party occurred at the residence of J.L. Moreland, it being the 23 anniversary of his daughter's birth, Miss Clara Moreland. The following ladies were in attendance: Mrs. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson, Miss Lizzie Andrews, Miss Alice Crowdus, Miss Emma Rhodes, Misses Ollin and Netta Rowley, and Miss I.B. Lake. They took with them a full supply of pies and cakes with a great many other things, too numerous to mention and about 5 o'clock they enjoyed themselves eating a fine supper. Miss Clara received several nice presents but we failed to get the entire list.

Mar 3, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Jack Morris, Thursday, February 24th, a girl. Dr. Hutcheson says that Jack was betting on two boys.
pg 4, col 1
Born: Dr. Hutcheson reports a new heavy weight boy at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chitty. It arrived Wednesday evening.
pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Bud Tibbits, who lives north of town but lately from Ottawa county, Mo., a girl. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson officiating.
pg 4, col 1
Born: We failed to mention last week the new arrival at Rev. J.H. Schiedler's Saturday the 19th. It was a boy weighing nine and one-half pounds. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson was in attendance.

Mar 10, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Birthday: Miss Emma Moreland celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of her birth at the residence of her parents in this place last Monday evening. Quite a number of her friends were invited and they spent a very pleasant afternoon in listening to some excellent vocal and instrumental music rendered by the Misses Moreland. At 6 o'clock, her guests were invited into the dining room to eat an excellent supper prepared by Mrs. Moreland for the occasion. She received some nice presents of which the following is a list: Mrs. S.G. Stewart, toilet set; Mrs. Ed. Buck, collar; Mrs. F.A. Lewis, two towels; Mrs. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson, pocket book; Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious, glass slipper; Miss I.B. Lake, plush picture frame; Miss Tessie Keller, handkerchief; Miss Cassie Watson, hair wreath; Miss Clara Moreland, perfume bottle; Jim Moreland, one bottle of perfume.
pg 4, col 2
Birthday: Last Friday afternoon, Mrs. H.A. Noah, of this city, was tendered a very pleasant surprise party by a great many of her lady friends, it being her twenty-second birthday. Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious superintended the affair and all their plans were carried out completely. The ladies met at the residence of Mr. Reube Lake's about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, loaded with presents and that which is good for the inner man. They formed a line, two abreast, and marched up Main Street to Mrs. Noah's residence and by rapping several times they discovered that she was not at home but as the door was unlocked, they walked in and commenced to prepare supper, and after they had been in the house several minutes, Mrs. Noah, who was across the street visiting, saw them through the window and immediately went home to welcome her guests. After the ladies had passed several hours in a social "chat," supper was prepared and the husbands of the ladies present were invited to call at 6 o'clock p.m. sharp, and get supper. We were fortunate enough to be one among the number and can enjoy a good meal once a month as good as any one, and consider oneself one of the best judges of good "grub" when permitted to test it, and will say that it was as fine a supper as we have ever sampled and hope the good work will go on. There is one thing we must not fail to mention and that is the excuses given by H.M. Buck, Reube Lake and S.G. Stewart for not having much of an appetite, and that is that they had been eating the entire afternoon, but we believe they were informed several days before and had been fasting for the occasion. The following is a list of the names of those in attendance: Dr. and Mrs. R.D. Hovious, Mr. and Mrs. Reube Lake, Mr. and Mrs. Peleg Lake, Dr. and Mrs. R.D. Hutcheson, Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Riley Lake, Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Buck, Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Moreland, Mrs. John McAdams, Mrs. F.A. Lewis, Mrs. Ed. Buck and our self and better half.

Mar 17, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Slaughter last Monday evening, a boy of average weight. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson was in attendance.
pg 4, col 1
Born: Dr. R.D. Hovious reports two new boys southwest of town this week:
One was born Tuesday night to Dr. and Mrs. Turner; and
One arrived Wednesday evening and will call Mr. and Mrs. Frank Decker pa and ma.

pg 4, col 2
Married: "A Jewish Wedding" - Mr. Simon Fisher and Miss Bloomaha were married at the groom's house two miles south of Deerhead on the 10th. All citizens of Deerhead and the Jews and gentiles in the surrounding country turned out to see the first Jewish wedding in the settlement, or perhaps in the county, but judging from the number of beautiful Jewish maidens we saw yesterday and a corresponding number of young men of the same race, I shall hope to participate, at an early date, in several of these novel weddings. Mr. Fisher had provided a very bountiful supply of "Pure Holland" and cake, the former got in its work in fine shape and every felt good. I will try and give your readers an idea of how a Jewish wedding is conducted. First, the groom escorted by Mr. Levin and Mrs. Rashbam, each bearing a lighted taper, walked about three rods from the house and placed themselves under a red chupa, which was held about seven feet from the ground by four of the groom's friends. The Rabbi, Mr. Fisherman, then read a short Jewish prayer to the groom, when the bride, who was veiled and escorted by Mrs. Levin and Mrs. Rashbam, each bearing a lighted taper, was led four times around the groom and then placed on his right under the chupa supported by the two ladies with lighted tapers and after wine had been presented to the groom and bride, there being about a pint in a glass, held by one of the tribe, whose name we did not learn, the ceremony began, and not being acquainted with Jewish language we were unable to catch on, but judging from the serious look on the groom's face and the tears shed by the bride throughout the ceremony, which lasted near a half hour, showed us that the knot was a swinger, warranted not to rip, tear or run down at the heel. As soon as the Rabbi got through and the groom and bride had taken another sip of wine, the good man who held the glass finished her up fully three-fourths full, and then threw the glass away, broke the bottle and commenced to run toward the house followed by the Rabbi, bride and groom and all the Jewish and gentiles. Mr. Fisher's house is quite roomy but only a third of the visitors could get into the room. The presents were numerous and show that Mr. and Mrs. Fisher have many friends in this county. I forgot to state that the bride has only been in America a few weeks and is unable to speak a word of English. After taking another sip of Holland, dancing commenced, Mr. Charles furnishing excellent music. Signed: Freddie.

Mar 24, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Died: At Mingona, March 16th, 1887, B.V. Stoughton at the age of 70 years. His funeral was preached at the school house in Mingona by Rev. C.W. Owen, March 17th. The deceased leaves many friends and relatives to mourn his death.
pg 4, col 1
Birthday: Several of the young ladies of this place tendered Miss Bash Marshall a surprise birthday party yesterday evening, it being the 18th anniversary of her birth. We failed to get the full particulars, but understand they had quite an enjoyable time.
pg 4, col 1
Died: At her home near Deerhead, last Tuesday at 6 o'clock p.m., Mrs. Richords, wife of John Richords. She leaves a husband and five small children who have the entire sympathy of the citizens of this community in this, their sad bereavement.

Mar 31, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Died: Of heart disease last Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock, Mrs. Rogers, wife of John Rogers, at her home four miles east of this city. She was buried at the Lake City cemetery Wednesday afternoon. The deceased leaves a husband and two small children any many friends to mourn her loss.

Apr 14, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Died: Mrs. Mary Miller, wife of Lawrence Miller, who formerly lived in this place, died at Durango, Colorado, April 10th.

Apr 28, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Rankin Tuesday evening, a boy of extra weight. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson officiating.

May 5, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Married: At Whitewater, Wis., April 26th, C.M. Jones, of Nescatunga, to Miss Maud Merriam, of Whitewater. Mr. Jones is a banker at Nescatunga and one of the most prosperous business men of this part of the state and we understand that Miss Merriam is one of the leading ladies in society at Whitewater and will, no doubt, make Mr. Jones a worth companion. The DOG wishes them a happy journey through life.

May 12, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Married: Sam'l C. Tarrant and Miss Lillian E. Wilson, of Elm Mills, were married by Judge Hardy at Medicine Lodge, Wednesday, May 4th. The DOG joins their many friends in this part of the county in wishing them a pleasant journey through life.

Jun 2, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Tibbits last Sunday morning, a boy weighing three pounds. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson in attendance.

Jun 16, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Lige Eslick, last Saturday at 2:30 p.m., a boy of average weight. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson in attendance.

Jun 23, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Died: It is with pain that we are called upon to record the death of Thos. J. Williams, the little son of Wm. J. and Mary J. Williams, aged 14 months and 27 days. His death occurred upon the 16th, after an illness of about six days. The bereaved father and mother have the sympathy of this entire community in their sad bereavement. Though brief was the span of little Tommy's life within this vale of partings, and sorrow and tears, he is better off by far than we, for his young life knew not the bitterness of sin, and without doubt his pure spirit, an angel cherub has winged its flight to that bright, and radiant land, where all is joy, and peace, and love; where all who have faith in the Holy Lamb of God, shall dwell, one happy family, in blissful ties never to be broken. And following: Card of Thanks: Lake City, June 21, 1887 - We are very thankful to our Lake City friends and our relatives for the kindness they showed toward us and our deal little one which we had the misfortune to lose on the 16th, and especially John Roller and Miss Lizzie Dinsmore, and we are very grateful to Dr. Hovious for the kind and faithful work he did to keep our little one with us but medical aid and good nursing would not save our child. We are satisfied all was done that could be done. Our little boy Tommy was one year, two months and twenty-seven days old. We have two consolations: we know he was well cared for and know his little soul is at rest. Signed: W.J. and Mary J. Williams.

Jul 7, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Died: Friday morning July 1st, Mr. Gooddell, aged 59 years, who lived in Pratt county, and was buried in the Lake City cemetery July 2nd.

Jul 28, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Sunnafrank, July 19th, 1887, a daughter. Mother and daughter doing well and with good care Mr. Sunnafrank will pull through.

Aug 4, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Born: Dr. R.C. Hutcheson reports a 6 pound boy at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Edwards, who live north of town;
Born: Also a 10 pound boy at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. McAdams.

Aug 11, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Birthday: Wednesday was Miss I.B. Lake's 17th birthday and while she was at the Lodge attending the show, quite a number of her lady friends decided to give her a surprise ice cream birthday party on her return in the evening. Ice cream and cake was prepared and the ladies met at the residence of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Lake, about 7 o'clock in the evening to await her arrival, but she did not come until a very late hour. The party had come to the conclusion that she was not coming and enjoyed themselves eating the ice cream and cake and then returned to their homes. They left several valuable presents.

Aug 18, 1887, pg 4, col 3
Birthday: Wednesday, August 10th, was Mrs. J.L. Moreland's 55th birthday, and a great many of her lady friends had decided to tender her a surprise birthday party on that day, but as Mrs. Moreland seemed to suspicion something of the kind was going to occur, they postponed the surprise until Thursday afternoon, making it complete as she had no idea they would come Thursday. The party met at the post office about 2 o'clock in the afternoon and from there they went in wagons and carriages to Mrs. Moreland's, three miles north of town, and to say they had an enjoyable time would hardly express it. The following is a list of presents: Mrs. Reube Lake, fruit dish; Mrs. S.G. Stewart, six dessert dishes; Mrs. John McAdams, apron; Mrs. Dr. R.D. Hovious, pair of towels; Mrs. H.A. Noah, handkerchief and perfume; Mrs. H.M. Buck, silk handkerchief and fruit cake; Mrs. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson, pair of towels; Mrs. C.L. Hammack, jelly dish; Rev. and Mrs. O.B. Shaw, white silk handkerchief; Miss Emma Moreland, hand painted cabinet picture case; Miss Clara Moreland, sack of grapes; and Jim Moreland, silk handkerchief.

Sep 1, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Died: At her home in Sun City Monday night at 12 o'clock, Mrs. J.J. Miles, 22 years old and wife of James Miles. The funeral services were held in Sun City at 9 o'clock a.m. Afterwards, the remains were taken to Saratoga for interment. She leaves a husband and one child to mourn her loss.
pg 4, col 2
Died: Last Sunday morning, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. J.A. Sims. She was buried in the Lake City cemetery Monday afternoon. The parents have the sympathy of the entire community in this, their sad bereavement.
pg 4, col 3
Died: Just as the Angel of God drew aside the great curtain of night and let the first ray of light flash over our little city, death with his unerring aim for "shining marks" struck Oren Claud Shaw, who was just one year six months and 27 days old. He was the only son of Rev. and Mrs. O.B. Shaw who have been highly esteemed citizens of our town for the past four months. Claudie had been sick five days and nights with dysentery, superinduced by teething. He had two physicians with him and all that was possible was done to relieve pain and prolong life, but all to no avail. His suffering was intense, until Sunday afternoon when he became comparatively easy and slept some, but early in the night he became restless and remained so to daybreak, when death came, he sank into a semi-comatose state and remained so until the close which came at 8 o'clock. His funeral was preached at the home by Rev. R. Sanderson of Medicine Lodge, after which the remains were taken to the cemetery west of town and interred. The largest funeral procession ever seen in Lake City followed the remains to their last resting place, thus attesting their respect for the bereaved parents and their love for the deceased. The parents take this method of expressing their most profound thanks for the care and kindness of the physicians, Drs. Hutcheson and Hovious, and the especial care, kindness and aid shown and rendered them and their baby during his illness, by their friends and neighbors. Though the affliction is great and seems almost unbearable, yet the parents have much to console them, they know their "Claudie is at rest" and that they have the full condolence and sympathy of the entire town and surrounding country. [Memorial poem follows.] And also: Card of Thanks: To our friends, physicians, neighbors and the people generally: we desire to return our sincere thanks for the kindness, consolation, comfort and assistance shown us and our beloved Claudie during his late illness. We have no language that will fully express our gratitude, therefore we can only say we are inexpressibly grateful to all. Signed: Rev. and Mrs. O.B. Shaw.
pg 4, col 3
Died: Ella C., daughter of T.A. and S.E. Walton, born in Laurence county, Ohio, died August 28th, 1887, at 8 a.m., aged 21 years and 8 months and 8 days. She was buried in the Deerhead cemetery August 29. She had suffered long with Bright's disease. She professed a change of heart at the Christmas meeting, she wrote to her brother in Stephens county and other friends that she was going to die and wanted them to meet her in heaven. She suffered long and was willing to go, only wished to stay with Ma and Pa to help them. The friends and neighbors willingly did all they could for her for which she was very thankful. Signed: E.B.

Sep 8, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. L. Pike Sunday at 4 o'clock p.m., a 10 pound boy. Dr. R.C. Hutcheson officiating. Mother and boy doing well.
pg 4, col 3
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Zimmerman last Monday morning, an eight pound boy.

Oct 6, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Born: To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Winkler, last Sunday, a 10 pound boy. Dr. R.D. Hovious officiating.

Oct 13, 1887, pg 4, col 2
Died: At the residence of her mother (Mrs. E. Lake), Miss Lulu Lake, aged about nineteen years, on Tuesday evening, August 30, 1887, after an illness of about two weeks. The funeral services took place Wednesday afternoon, and the remains were interred in the Centerville cemetery. Miss Lulu was a faithful and conservative member of the M.E. church, always living in the fear and admonition of the Lord. Her disposition was kind and gentle, and she was loved and respected by a host of friends who are made very sad at her early demise. As a proof of her faith, peace with God, we have only to say that she passed gently away, telling those who were watching that she was nearing the rest that is found only in the great illimitable. God in his wisdom has seen best to remove from our midst a young lady who possessed many commendable traits of character; a noble and obedient daughter; a kind and loyal sister; a joyous and happy companion. To the afflicted mother and the many relatives and friends to whom she was most dear, we can only give the consolation that, although we will see here no more in this world of trials and care, we may again meet her "on that beautiful shore." (Erie Democrat)

Nov 3, 1887
pg 4, col 1
Died: Last Monday night, October 31st, near Mingona, Walter Nurse, aged 23 years, of typhoid fever. He had been sick about three weeks and seemed to be getting better until Monday afternoon. The funeral services were held at the Lake City cemetery Tuesday evening followed by a large number of friends and relatives from Mingona and this city. The deceased was a single man, but leaves a mother, sister, three brothers and many friends to mourn his loss. The family and friends have the sympathy of the entire community in this, their sad bereavement.
pg 4, col 1
Died: Mrs. Susan V. McBeth, aged mother-in-law of Mr. Charles O. German, died at his residence, 1422 Belvedere avenue, yesterday morning of congestion of the brain. Arrangements have not been made yet in regard to her funeral. (Kansas City Times, October 31) Mrs. McBeth is a sister of John Andrews of this city and will be remembered by many of our citizens as visiting Mr. Andrews several years ago at this place. While here she made many warm friends who will regret to learn of her death. Mr. and Mrs. John Andrews left for Kansas City last Sunday.

Dec 8, 1887, pg 4
Married: E.B. Pfost and Mantie E. Fosset were married at the Lodge last Tuesday and were to start for Missouri last Friday. [Deerhead news]

Dec 15, 1887, pg 4, col 1
Birthday: Monday, December 12th, being Miss Pearl Thompson's 14th birthday, several of her young friends concluded to give her a surprise party. At about 1 o'clock they departed for her home, taking with them several well filled baskets, also several nice presents. Among the party were Misses Belle Cuppy, Daisy McAdams, Grace Dicken, Effa Dicken, Lizzie Lake, Eva Lewis and Masters Dell Buck, Sam McAdams, Eddie Lewis and Fred Lake. They all report having a good time.

Jan 19, 1888, pg 4, col 1
Married: Last Tuesday at Medicine Lodge by Rev. R. Sanderson, Jacob Warrenstaff of this city and Miss Annie L. Wheatly of Elm Mills. The DOG joins their many friends in wishing them a happy and prosperous journey through life.

Jan 26, 1888 [Last issue on reel]
pg 4, col 1
Died: On last Monday, of brain fever, Bessie Brown, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brown, who reside ten miles south of this place. The remains were buried in the Lake City cemetery last Wednesday afternoon. Her funeral will be preached at the Brown school house near the head of Bear Creek on Tuesday next at 10 o'clock a.m. The bereaved parents are not left to mourn the loss of their little daughter alone. And also @ Feb 2, 1888: Died at her home near Lake City, Barber county, January 23rd, 1888, Bessie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Brown, aged eleven years and five months. She died very suddenly, cause _____ fever. A few days previous to her _____, she had a severe fall....which bruised her head and probably hastened the death...Bessie was a bright and beautiful little girl, carrying joy and sunshine wherever she went. Her kind teacher was often surprised and pleased to see how quickly she grasped the meaning of a difficult sentence or problem. Her mind was developed far beyond her age. She was the joy and pride of her home. Her school-mates loved her...and their sobs and tears were mingled with those of the bereaved family as they took the last sad look at Bessie's sweet face. Her sickness lasted but three days, during which she suffered much, until the death angel came to her relief. Words of comfort were spoken by Elder...., Evangelical minister and...sorrowfully borne to the Lake City cemetery. Her parents and two...who are left to mourn... [This page is only partially legible.]
pg 4, col 2
Died: It is with sadness we chronicle the death of Rev. W.H. Tyner, of Beulah, Kansas, January 23rd. Rev. Tyner has been a faithful worker in the cause of Christ for many years. His relatives and many friends who mourn his loss have the consolation of knowing that his efforts have been crowned with marked success. Rev. Tyner will be remembered by many of our readers as visiting this city one year ago last summer during the illness of his niece, Mrs. C.L. Hammack, and while here had the pleasure of hearing him deliver a sermon in the opera house.
pg 4, col 2
Birthday: One of the most pleasant society gatherings in this city is certainly a birthday surprise party and there is not a few of them either. Just as soon as one surprise is over, the ladies begin to talk about who shall be the next and they not only make the party an enjoyable occasion, [they also make it a complete surprise]. The latest surprise party is that of Mrs. F.A. Lewis, last Saturday being the 29th anniversary of her birth. The ladies met at the residence of S.G. Stewart and at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, they marched up Broad street to the residence of their lady friend whom they intended to surprise on the corner of Broad and Lake streets, taking with them all that the inner man could desire in the way of edibles. After the ladies had spent several hours in a social chat, their husbands were sent for and they all enjoyed themselves eating an excellent supper. Mrs. Lewis received some very handsome presents from the following ladies: Mrs. H.M. Buck, a set of silver knives and forks; Mrs. I.C. Cuppy, set of napkins; Mrs. Noah, white apron; Mrs. S.G. Stewart, silk handkerchief; Mrs. R. Lake, towel; Mrs. R.D. Hovious, pair of kid gloves; Mrs. R.C. Hutcheson, white apron; Mrs. H.A. Noah, pair of hose; Miss Emma Noah, lamp mat; Mr. F.A. Lewis, tea pot.

Barber County Newspapers



Tom & Carolyn Ward
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