Transcribed from History of Wyandotte County Kansas and its people ed. and comp. by Perl W. Morgan. Chicago, The Lewis publishing company, 1911. 2 v. front., illus., plates, ports., fold. map. 28 cm. [Vol. 2 contains biographical data. Paged continuously.]


CHAPTER XXII.

OUR BOYS IN THE PHILIPPINES.

Part 2


THE APPROACH OF WAR - PEACE RELATIONS END - THE CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS - KANSAS TO THE FRONT - THE CAMP IN SAN FRANCISCO - FIRST SMELL OF POWDER - THE DAY ON THE FIRING LINES - WHERE THEIR SPIRIT ORIGINATED - THE NIGHT ATTACK - THE FIRST REAL BATTLE - A SKIRMISH MARCH - MALOLOS IS TAKEN - CALUMPIT, NEXT STOP -TREMBLY AND WHITE IN SWIMMING - THE CAMPAIGN CONTINUES - OUTPOSTS ARE ANNOYED - BACK TO MANILA - THE BOYS WHO GAVE UP THEIR LIVES - THE MUSTER INTO SERVICE - THE BOYS FROM KANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

TREMBLY AND WHITE IN SWIMMING.

Calumpit was captured, but the Kansas soldiers were not satisfied, and the retreating Filipinos were pushed on back through the country toward Apalit. "One more river to cross," sang out one of the men as the Rio Grande was sighted. As the line approached Apalit it was evident that this river would prove more of an obstruction than the others. The Filipinos had erected breastworks and had secured some artillery which they trained on the advancing column.

Colonel Funston sent Corporal Ferguson, of Company E, out on the bridge to see whether or not it could be crossed in the night. He returned and reported that it would be a dangerous and probably fruitless undertaking. Colonel Funston, with 120 men, then went down the river and attempted to cross, but some barking dogs spoiled the plan.

The next day a raft, capable of bearing fifty men, was constructed and two volunteers were called for to swim the river with ropes, by which means the raft should be guided. It was found impossible to find men by means of volunteering; the whole regiment wanted the chance. Privates Edward White and William B. Trembly of Company B, both Kansas City, Kansas, boys, were finally chosen.

As they stood ready for the undertaking their muscles, made more prominent by the exercise of many months, worked under their clear skins, and they were impatient to plunge into the broad waters of the river. Each looped a rope over his bare shoulders, and with the knowledge that the success of their plan depended on swift, strong strokes, they struck out for the opposite shore. It was soon reached and the raft made the trip in safety. The little body of men charged on the insurgent line furiously, but were obliged to give way on account of the hot fire from the enemy's Mausers and Maxim gun. Then Colonel Funston, Captain Orwig and eight men crossed in a boat, and the boys drove the Filipinos out of their position and allowed the rest of the regiment and the First Montana to cross the bridge.

THE CAMPAIGN CONTINUES.

The Twentieth, with the First Montana, left Apalit on the morning of May 4th, and, after crossing several streams on railroad bridges, encountered the insurgents, who were entrenched on the north bank of the Santa Tomas river. Companies H and C were first engaged and they supported a battery composed of a Hotchkiss and a Gatling gun. After considerable firing, Company F relieved Company H, whose ammunition was running short. Company D was also engaged, and the enemy retreated to his trenches north of Santo Tomas, and there made a stronger stand.

One span of the bridge across the river had been cut, but Companies C, D and F effected a crossing and were soon re-inforced by Companies G and E. The insurgents were driven back and the Kansas boys occupied the field until May 6th, when they entered San Fernando.

On the evening of May 24th the regiment, under command of Major Whitman, left San Fernando, going into the country immediately west of the city to engage the enemy. The Third battalion was left in the reserve, and the First and Second made a detour to the right, moving under the cover of the woods to a point one hundred and fifty yards from the rebel entrenchments before being discovered. The First battalion attacked the enemy from the front, the Second deploying at nearly right angles to the entrenchments. The First battalion swung to the left and the Tagals were routed and compelled to retreat in disorder, the First battalion following them through and beyond Bacalor.

OUTPOSTS ARE ANNOYED.

On the morning of the next day General Funston took a scouting party, composed of Companies D and H, a platoon of Company I and two companies of the First Montana, to make a reconnoissance toward Santa Rica. The party engaged the enemy for about an hour at Santa Rica and returned to San Fernando at about 4 P. M. At that hour the Filipinos threatened the outposts. Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I and L repulsed the attacking party and drove it north beyond Calumpit.

The next day the insurgents returned to the attack and again fired on the outpost. Company L was on duty and Companies B and F were sent as a reinforcement. The engagement lasted but half an hour.

The regiment was allowed to have some rest from that time until June 16th, except that occasionally a portion of the regiment would be sent out at night to reinforce the companies on duty at the front. This was on account of rumors to the effect that the insurgents were planning an attack on the city of San Fernando.

On the morning of June 16th, a large body of rebels attacked the Kansas and Montana line, the firing being kept up all around the city. Companies D and G were on outpost duty and Companies C and H, soon followed by the entire regiment, reinforced them. Companies C and E, under Major Bishop, went north under cover of the woods and surprised a body of insurgents, driving them back with a heavy loss, while the Kansans had but one man wounded. The Filipinos were soon repulsed and they retreated.

On June 22nd another attack was made and, while the firing opened very heavily on the east of the city, it was weak when it reached the Kansas line, and the insurgents were quickly and easily repulsed.

BACK TO MANILA.

Two days later, after one hundred and forty days of active service, the First and Third battalions returned to Manila, and went into quarters, the Second following on June 25th. The regiment was given provost guard duty in that city and remained there until sailing for home, except that on July 12th the Third battalion went to Paranaque to join General Lawton's division and relieve a detachment of the Fourteenth United States Infantry.

When our boys left sunny Kansas to go to the front to serve their country, they were raw recruits. When they returned, and were welcomed home with great orations and rejoicings at Kansas City, Kansas, and nearly every city and town in the state, they were experienced soldiers who had shared the hardships, the dangers, the triumphs and the glories of war.

But all of those who went away did not come back, and many hearts were sad, for the dead were many.

THE BOYS WHO GAVE UP THEIR LIVES.

The following is the long list of heroes of the Twentieth who gave up their lives on the field of battle:

Commissioned Officers: - Alfred C. Alford, of Lawrence, first lieutenant of Company B. Shot in the head and killed instantly on February 7th, in an engagement three miles north of Manila.

David S. Elliott, of Independence, captain of Company G. Shot through the body and killed on February 28th, at Caloocan.

William A. McTaggart, of Independence, second lieutenant of Company G. Shot in the head and killed on May 4th, at Santo Tomas.

Non-commissioned Officers: - Oscar Mallicoat, of Virgil, corporal of Company K. Shot in the head at Caloocan on February 23rd, and died in the hospital in Manila on February 24th.

A. Jay Sheldon, of Osawatomie, quartermaster sergeant of Company I. Wounded in an action a mile and a half north of Manila on February 7th, and died in the hospital at that city on February 9th.

Morris J. Cohen, of San Francisco, sergeant of Company B. Shot in the head and killed at Caloocan on March 23rd.

Robert M. Lee, of Manhattan, corporal of Company F. Died of disease on the way home on transport "Tartar."

Musicians: - Oscar G. Thorp, of La Cygne, bugler of Company F. Shot in the head and killed at Caloocan on March 11th.

Orlin L. Birlew, of Independence, member of the regimental band. Shot in the head and killed at Guiguinta river on March 29th.

Privates: - Charles E. Pratt, of Salina, Company M. Shot in the head and killed in an engagement one and a half miles north of Manila, on February 5th.

Ivers J. Howard, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company B. Shot in the stomach and killed at Caloocan on February 10th.

Alonzo V. Ricketts, of Stanton, Company I. Shot in the breast and killed at Caloocan on February 10th.

George H. Monroe, of Marinette, Wisconsin, Company F. Shot in the head and killed at Caloocan on February 23rd.

Larry Jones, of Pittsburg, Company D. Wounded in the head at Caloocan on February 25th, and died at Manila on the same day.

Howard A. Olds, of Fort Scott, Company F. Wounded in the abdomen at Caloocan on February 26th, and died at Manila on February 27th.

James W. Kline, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company L. Shot in the head and killed at Caloocan on March 13th.

John C. Muhr, of Westphalia, Company E. Shot through the left lung on March 23rd at Caloocan and died there on March 24th.

Hiram L. Plummer, of Garnett, Company E. Shot in the head and killed near Caloocan on March 25th.

Albert S. Anibal, of Independence, Company G. Shot below the heart in an action near Caloocan and killed on March 25th.

Curran C. Craig, of Garnett, Company E. Wounded in the abdomen in an engagement near Caloocan on March 25th, and died at Manila on March 26th.

Troy E. Fairchild, of McCune, Company D. Shot in the head and killed in an action near Polo on March 26th.

William Keeney, of Topeka, Company I. Shot in the head and killed at Marilao river on March 27th.

John Scherer, of Los Angeles, California, Company G. Shot in the heart and killed at Marilao river on March 27th.

William Carroll, of Frontenac, Company D. Shot in the head and killed at Marilao river on March 27th.

Alvah L. Dix of Independence, Company D. Shot in the head and killed at Guiguinta river on March 29th.

Samuel M. Wilson, of Salina, Company M. Shot in the head and killed at Guiguinta river on March 29th.

Adrian A. Hatfield of Topeka, Company I. Wounded in the neck at Marilao river on March 27th, and died in the hospital at Manila on March 31st.

Joseph A. Wahl, of Lawrence, Company H. Wounded in the neck at Marilao river on March 27th, and died in the hospital at Manila on March 31st.

Resil Manahan, of Topeka, Company A. Shot and killed at Calumpit on April 26th.

Henry H. Morrison, of Salina, Company M. Shot in the chest at Apalit on April 27th, and died in the hospital at Manila on April 29th.

Merton A. Wilcox, of Lawrence, Company H. Shot in the stomach and killed at Santo Tomas on May 4th.

William Sullivan, of Topeka, Company A. Shot in the groin and killed at San Fernando on May 24th.

Ernest Ryan, of Abilene, Company L. Wounded in the abdomen at San Fernando on May 24th, and died in the hospital at Manila on May 25th.

Albert Ferugs, of Yates Center, Company E. Died in San Francisco on June 17th.

Orville R. Knight, of Fort Scott, Company F. Died in San Francisco on June 24th,

Louis Moon, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company B. Died at San Francisco on June 24th.

Harry Pepper of Topeka, Company L. Died in San Francisco on June 26th.

Clifford K. Greenough, of Bennington, Company L. Died in San Francisco on June 24th.

Cecil Flowers, of Kansas City, Company L. Died in San Francisco on July 22nd, and buried at the Presidio on July 23rd.

Wilson H. McAllister, of Salina, Company M. Died in San Francisco on July 10th, and remains shipped to Miltonvale on July 12th.

John H. Bartlett, of Watson, Company F. Died at San Francisco on July 14th.

Elmer McIntyre of Neosho Falls, Company E. Died in San Francisco on August 24th, and interred in Presidio cemetery on August 28th.

Louis Ferguson, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company B. Died at Manila on December 24th.

Dalias Day, Paola, Company I. Died at his home in Paola, Kansas on November 2nd.

William Vancil, of Fort Scott, Company I. Died on board transport "Indiana" on December 7th.

Raymond B. Dawes, of Leavenworth, Company C. Died at Honolulu on November 22nd.

Edward A. Rethemeyer, of Topeka, Company A. Died of small pox at Manila on January 8, 1899.

Eteyl P. Blair, of Topeka, Company A. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 11, 1899.

John D. Young, of Wamego, Company A. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 15, 1899.

Charles Graves, of Centralia, Company C. Died in hospital at Honolulu on November 25, 1898.

Bert Cornett, of Torento, Company E. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 3, 1899.

William B. Bash, of Fort Scott, Company F. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 6, 1899.

Powhattan T. Hackett, of Fort Scott, Company F. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 9, 1899.

Louis R. Badger, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company P. Died of smallpox at Manila, January 10, 1899.

Benjamin W. Squires, of Junction City, Company L. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 14, 1899.

Norman E. Hand, of Abilene, Company L. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 18, 1899.

David L. Campbell, of Junction City, Company L. Died of smallpox at Manila on January 19, 1899.

Charles B. Snodgrass, of Minneapolis, Company B. Died of smallpox at Manila on February 2, 1899.

Fred Maxwell, of Richmond, Company K. Died of smallpox at Manila on February 23, 1899.

Sim P. Barber, of Abilene, Company L. Died of smallpox at Manila on March 27, 1899.

Fred Maxfield, of Kansas City, Kansas, Company B. Died at Manila on June 12, 1899.

Guy Nebergall, of Newton, Company I. Died of disease at Manila on May 5, 1899.

Isaac C. Cooper, of Kansas City, Kansas, corporal of Company B. Died of smallpox at Manila on February 1, 1899.

John M. Ingenthron, of Westphalia, Company L. Died of disease on way home on the transport "Tartar."

George W. Mills, of Silver Lake, Company I. Died of disease in the general hospital at San Francisco after the return of the regiment.

THE MUSTER INTO SERVICE.

When the Twentieth Kansas Volunteers were mustered into service at the fair grounds in Topeka on May 13, 1898, the following men were put in charge of it, with the rank, name, age, occupation, date of muster and residence given:

Colonel - Frederick Funston; 33; newspaper man; May 11th; Iola.

Lieutenant Colonel - Edward C. Little; 39; lawyer; May 10th; Abilene.

Major - Frank H. Whitman; 27; second lieutenant U. S. A.; May 10th, U. S. A.

Major - Wilder S. Metcalf; 42; broker; May 11th; Lawrence.

Adjutant - William A. DeFord; 26; lawyer; May 9th; Ottawa.

Quartermaster - Lafayette C. Smith; 50; lawyer; May 10th; Waconda.

Surgeon - John A. Rafter; 41; surgeon; May 13th; Holton.

Assistant surgeon - Charles S. Hoffman; 32; physician; May 13th; Columbus.

Assistant surgeon - Henry D. Smith; 23; physician; May 13th; Washington.

Chaplain - JohnG. Shileman; 40; minister; May 12th; Phillipsburg.

Sergeant Major - Frederick R. Dodge; 35; bookkeeper; May 13th; Leavenworth.

Quartermaster sergeant - James A. Young; 26; manager; May 12th; Baldwin.

Chief musician - Charles E. Gormley; 26; musician; May 12th; Topeka.

Principal musician - Earl H. Dryer; 24; musician; May 12th; Topeka.

Principal musician - Arthur E. Ellison; 21; musician; May 12th; Topeka.

Hospital steward - Coryell Faulkner; 25; physician; May 13; Topeka.

Hospital steward - William E. Hungerford; 36; pharmacist; May 13th; Meriden.

Hospital steward - Seth A. Hammel; 19; pharmacist; May 13th; Topeka.

Company A, Topeka, mustered in as company on May 9th - Captain, John E. Towers, Topeka; first lieutenant, Frank J. Frank, Topeka; second lieutenant, Everett E. Huddleston, Topeka.

Company B, Kansas City, Kansas, mustered in as company on May 9th - Captain Fred E. Buchan, Kansas City; first lieutenant, Charles B. Walker, Kansas City; second lieutenant, Ervin B. Showalter, Kansas City.

Company C, Leavenworth, mustered in as a company on May 13th - Captain, William S. Albright, Leavenworth; first lieutenant, Harry H. Seckler, Leavenworth; second lieutenant, John Haussermann, Leavenworth.

Company D, Pittsburg and Girard, mustered in as a company on May 11th - Captain, Henry B. Orwig; first lieutenant, Williams J. Watson, Pittsburg; second lieutenant, Thomas K. Ritchie, Pittsburg.

Company E, Garnett, mustered in as a company on May 10th - Captain, Charles M. Christy, Waverly; first lieutenant, Daniel F. Craig, Garnett; second lieutenant, Philip S. Ray, Yates Center.

Company F, Fort Scott, mustered in as a company on May 12th - Captain, Charles S. Martin, Fort Scott; first lieutenant, William A. Green, Fort Scott; second lieutenant, Harry W. Shideler, Fort Scott.

Company G, Independence, mustered in as a company on May 12th - Captain, David S. Elliott, Independence; first lieutenant, Howard A. Scott, Independence; second lieutenant, William A. McTaggart, Independence.

Company H, Lawrence, mustered in as a company on May 9th - Captain, Adna G. Clarke, Lawrence; first lieutenant, Albert IT. Krause, Lawrence; second lieutenant, Alfred C. Alford, Lawrence.

Company I, Osawatomie, mustered in as a company on May 12th - Captain, Charles S. Flanders, Osawatomie; first lieutenant, Walber P. Hull, Topeka; second lieutenant, Arden W. Flanders, Osawatomie.

Company K, Ottawa, mustered in as a company on May 10th - Captain, Edmund Boltwood, Ottawa; first lieutenant, John F. Hall, Pleasanton; second lieutenant, Robert J. Parker, Ottawa.

Company L, Abilene; first lieutenant, Edgar A. Fry, Abilene; second lieutenant, William A. Callahan, Junction City.

Company M, Salina, mustered in as a company on May 10th - Captain, William H. Bishop, Salina; first lieutenant, Edward L. Glasgow, Salina; second lieutenant, Ernest H. Agnew, Minneapolis.

THE BOYS FROM KANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

Company B, First Battalion - Charles R. Walker, captain, commanding company.

Jacob R. Whisner, first lieutenant, with company.

Benjamin E. Northrup, second lieutenant, with company.

Alfred C. Alford, first lieutenant, killed in action.

Fred E. Buchan, captain, discharged to re-enlist.

Fred D. Heisler, first sergeant.

Harry G. Smith, quartermaster sergeant.

Sergeants - Judd N. Bridgman, Claud Spurlock, Arthur Page Jackson and Lemuel D. Cummins.

Corporals-Fred A. Hecker, Bain Dennis, James H. Cook, Peter J. Nugent, Jacob Hammer, Robert T. Boyd, Peter M. Sorenson, Orno E. Tylor, William B. Trembley, Dana C. Pease, Charles T. Baker, Charles I. Lowry and George W. Orr.

John A. Johnson, artificer.

Musicians - Otis W. Groff and George Bethemeyer.

Privates - Frederick A. Cook, Clarence Chase, Richard Mapes, Jesse Helm, Harvey S. Harris, William R. Hinkle, Charles R. Holman, William H. Hoffman, Daniel S. Hewitt, William L. Johnson, Robert S. Johnson, Michael Upetich, Spudgeon G. Matson, Alexander M. Mitchell, Charles M. Pease, Harlie Pearson, Thomas E. Ridenour, Wilson B. Smith, William J. Saunders, Charles Wingert, James E. Williamson and John Woodward.

Wounded and sent home - Edward D. Walling, corporal; Charles A. Kelson, artificer; John W. Gillilan, Edward Crane, Marvin J. Powell and Charles D. Wait, privates.

Discharged at San Francisco on account of disability - Eugene Davies, sergeant; Frank E. Van Fossen and Charles K. Wood, corporals; William A. Crowell, George McMeachin, Edward B. Hoppin, Manty Yeaky, Frank A. C. Shellhardt, Frank L. Heyler, John M. Boyle, Dow G. Burroughs, Charles Debeque, Edward W. Ellis, John N. Benson, Francis McCrea, George E. Voss, Harry Lancaster, George M. Davison, Elmer D. Mabry, Hugh H. Smart and Burt J. Stuart, privates.

Discharged by favor - Jesse F. Fairleigh, private.

Discharged to re-enlist - Frank Auswald, sergeant; Edward Barret, Charles Dingle, Bert K. Donohue, William F. Duensing, John H. Gallagher, Hugh McMeachling, Stephen Munich, Claud S. Phillips, Sylvester F. Rothwell, Lewis J. Rouse and Elmer Urie, privates.

Discharged, remaining in Manila - Frank Freeman, Persy Gibson and Michael J. Lambert, privates.

Discharged, returning with the regiment - Edward White, private.

Died of disease - Isaac Cooper, artificer; Frederick Sharland, cook; Louis Moon, Louis Wren Ferguson, Charles B. Snodgrass and Leroy Maxfield, privates.

Killed in action - Morris J. Cohen, sergeant; Ivers J. Howard, private.

Wounded in action - Claud Spurlock, sergeant; Daniel S. Hewitt, Elmer Urie, Harvey S. Harris, Charles Pease, Peter M. Sorenson, Alexander M. Mitchell and Wilson R. Smith, privates.

Wounded but not reported - John H. Gallagher, private.

Deserted - Louis Arwood and Jackson C. Copeland, privates.

On the sick list - Charles W. Forlyle, Lewis H. Youser, George C. Robinson, Benjamin F. Zimmerman, Jacob Guffy, John W. Prine and William Litchfield, privates.


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