Transcribed from History of Labette County, Kansas and its Representative Citizens, ed. & comp. by Hon. Nelson Case. Pub. by Biographical Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill. 1901

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JACKSONVILLE DISTRICT, NO. 11.

This was a union district, embracing the northeastern part of Neosho township, lying west of the river, and a part of Neosho county, with the school site at Jacksonville, in Neosho county. On September 12, 1867, David Evans, clerk, reported that Jennie McDonald, had taught a three-months' school at a salary of $23.33 1-3 per month, With an enrollment of 15 scholars, and an average attendance of. 9. The following year O. Herraman and A. J. Kennedy, the former at a salary of $60 and the latter $25 per month, taught a four-months' school, with a total enrollment of 55.

BOWMAN DISTRICT, NO. 12.

This district lies in the western part of Fairview township. There is no doubt but that a district was formed having this number by Superintendent Newlon, although there is nothing on file showing its original organization, nor anything in respect to the district, until after 1869. On February 11, 1870, an order was made for the formation of the district, and the first election directed to be held at the house of William Wood, on February 23, 1870. Whether the district of this number formed in 1867 embraced entirely different territory, the organization of which never became perfected, or whether it originally embraced the same territory as is now comprised in the district, I am unable, with the information I now have, to decide; I am however, disposed to think that District No. 12 as formed by Superintendent Newlon was never fully organized, but was laid off when there was little settlement, and contained within its bounds the territory forming that district as we now know it. The first officers as now shown by the records were, in 1870, Frank Williams, director; I. W. Patrick, clerk; A. S. Spaulding, treasurer.

MONTANA DISTRICT, NO. 13.

The first report on file is not dated, but is supposed to be the report for 1867. It is signed by B. W. Bennett, clerk, and represents this district as being in Big Hill township. It is otherwise blank, excepting the statement that there are 8 males and 10 females in the district. The next report is signed by Henry M. Minor, clerk, and is dated August 31, 1868, showing 22 males and 20 females in the district, and that there has been a three-months' school taught in the district, but not by a qualified teacher; of course this was a private school. While the report does not show it, the fact is this was a subscription school, taught in the summer of 1867 by Alice Biggs, in the old log store building belonging to B. F. Simons - the first house built on the town-site. Mr. Minor remained clerk the following year, and reported 82 children of school age in the district, 46 of whom were attending school. A three-months' school had been taught by John Hudson, at $26.33 2-3 per month. This first public school was taught in an old log house on the southwest quarter of section 8, township 32, range 21, in the spring of 1869. In 1870 the board consisted of J. J. Woods, director; H. M. Minor, clerk; and A. Gebhart, treasurer. Capt. A. Gebhart and J. J. Woods were the building committee for the erection of a new school-house. Bonds in the sum of $3,000 were voted, and the house cost $2,200. It was dedicated November 19, 1870, Colonel Horner delivering the address. Soon thereafter the first school in the new house was taught, by E. D. Graybill. The old building having become badly out of repair, bonds were voted early in 1897, and a new school building was erected that summer, and in which school was opened at the commencement of 1898. Two teachers have been employed since 1888, and part of the time during some prior years. The teachers in the more advanced room since 1888 have been: W. A. McKee, Lena Bates, Homer Metier, Flora Beale, R. P. Arnold, Leslie Scott, Tully DeArmond, Lula Peak, Sherd Barcus, Lillie Willi and Angeline Phillips.

CENTRAL DISTRICT, NO. 14.

The original order for the formation of this district is not to be found; but a petition dated March 6, 1868, signed by J. H. Hart and some 20 more residents of the district, asking for a change in the boundaries of the district, seems to have been granted March 9, 1868. The first report is signed by James F. Molesworth, clerk, and dated September 1, 1868. It shows 18 children in the district, and that a public school was then in progress. This was the first school in the district. It was taught by Mrs. Almeda Molesworth, in a cabin standing on the southeast quarter of section 17, belonging to S. T. Cherry. The following year Mr. Molesworth reported 46 children in the district, 38 of whom were attending school, the average attendance being 17, and that Almeda Molesworth had taught a three-months school at a salary of $22 per month. The school-house was built in 1869; it was a frame building, covered with walnut siding.

NEW HOPE DISTRICT, NO. 15.

This district is located near the north part of Neosho township, east of the Neosho River. The first report is dated September 1, 1868, signed by Edward Spicer, clerk, and shows only that there were 34 children in the district. The next report is Signed by O. Sweet, clerk, and shows 50 children in the district, with 42 attending school, the average attendance being 24, and that Miss Jennie M. Beck had taught a three-months' school at a salary of $15 per month.

CONCORD DISTRICT, NO. 16.

On January 29, 1868, L. A. Rogers and James W. Galyen presented a petition for the formation of this district. It was made to embrace the northwestern part of Neosho township and the northeastern part of North township. Prior to this, Superintendent Newlon seems to have formed, or to have contemplated the formation of this district, but no order for such formation is to be found. The first report, dated August 1, 1868, signed by L. A. Rogers, clerk, shows 33 children in the district, with 37 attending school, and an average attendance of 16. Mrs. Pauline A. Ames had taught a three-months' school, at a salary of $20 per month. A. P. Gore succeeded Mr. Rogers as clerk, and the following year makes two reports - one in August, showing 39 children in the district, 20 of whom had been attending school, and one in October, showing 78 children in the district, 57 of whom had been attending school. E. H. Taylor had taught a three-months' school at a salary of $33-33 1-3 per month. The first school-house in the district was built of logs, the settlers turning out and doing the work; it was located on section 7, in Neosho township, and was put up in the fall of 1868. Subsequently the site was changed to North township, and a good frame building was erected.

LIBERTY DISTRICT, NO. 17.

The original order for the formation of this district is not among the public records. But probably in 1868 Superintendent Reed, on the petition of L. N. Shelledy, Samuel Lewis, W. H. Scott, Ed. Mercer, and other residents of the district, made an order for the subdivision of said district; the boundary of this district thereafter to commence at the northeast corner of Liberty township, thence extending South three and one-half miles, to Labette Creek. The first report of this district is signed by W. B. Jones, clerk, dated September 14, 1868, and simply shows 21 children in the district. In a report dated September 14, 1869, signed by Charles Demend, clerk, it is shown that there are 53 children in the district, with 10 attending a three-months' school, taught by Miss Mary Bowlu, at a salary of $12 per month; but there is also a report on file dated September 15, 1869, signed by Eli Sayers, clerk, showing 66 children in the district, 44 in school, but not giving the name of the teacher. Evidently one of these is intended for some other district, but both purport to be for District No. 17.

WOODS DISTRICT, NO. 18.

This district was formed during Superintendent Newlon's administration, but the record thereof is not now to be found. On April 4, 1868, on the petition of F. W. Latham, it Was reorganized and made to embrace a tract three miles square in the Southwestern part of what is now North township. The first report, dated September 8, 1868, signed by Aaron Midkiff, clerk, shows 24 children in the district, but no school. F. W. Latham, clerk, in a report dated August 31, 1869, reports 45 children in the district, but no school taught. In the spring of 1873 a school-house was erected and well furnished, from the proceeds of $1,000 in bonds which had been voted. This house was used until some time in the "nineties" when it was replaced by a new building.

M'CORMICK (AFTERWARDS CUNNINGHAM)
DISTRICT, NO. 19.

According to the records now on file, this district was formed October 7, 1868, and embraced the northwest part of what is now Mound Valley township. The district seems to have been contemplated in 1867, but the record of its organization, if one was had at that time, is lost. The first report, dated October 15, 1868, signed by William Jones, clerk, shows 18 children in the district, but no school. On August 14, 1869, the first meeting was held, at which it was decided to locate the schoolhouse on the northwest corner of Mrs. McMichael's claim, and to circulate a subscription paper for material for building a schoolhouse. J. Bishop, clerk, reported 13 children in the district at that date. The first school in the district was taught in a "shake" claimhouse, with dirt floor, on section 26, township 32, range 17, by Mrs. Mollie Courtney, commencing in September, 1869. This was a subscription school, and continued for three months. In 1870 the board consisted of J. H. Beggs, director; H. B. Griffith, clerk; and J. M. Courtney, treasurer.

WILD CAT DISTRICT, NO. 20.

The original order for the formation of this district is in the handwriting of Superintendent NewIon, and seems to have been the last district formed tinder his administration. It is located in Montana township, east of the Neosho. Aside from the order for its organization, there is nothing on file showing that anything had been done therein prior to April 20, 1870, when the petition of Daniel Hoy and others was presented for a change in this district, which seems to have been made; also reorganization thereof had in the early part of 1874. The first report on file is dated September 12, 1870, signed by James White, clerk.

RED ELM DISTRICT, NO. 21.

This district is located in the southwest corner of Neosho township. There is nothing of record, either original or copies, showing when it was organized. It must have been during Superintendent Newlon's administration, or very soon after Superintendent Reed came into office. The first report, dated September 10, 1868, is signed by Newberry Cooper, clerk, in which he says that they have had no school, but will have the following winter if they can get their house completed in time. The report shows 54 children in the district. September 15, 1869, Mr. Cooper again reports, showing 68 children in the district, 47 of whom have attended a three-months school taught by Miss Mary Slane, who had received $2 per scholar, there being no public money in the district.

SPRING HILL DISTRICT, NO. 22.

On a petition of Harvey I. Cox and others, dated January 19, 1869, this district was formed, embracing the southwestern corner of North township. The first election was held at the house of Harvey I. Cox, on February 13, 1869. Harvey I. Cox was the first clerk. In 1870 a frame school-house was built, which was replaced with a fine brick house about fourteen or fifteen years ago.

CLOVER DISTRICT, NO. 23.

Under date of March 28, 1869, Superintendent Elliott made an order for the formation of District No. 23. in the northeast part of Oswego township, north and east of the Neosho river, and appointed the first school meeting to be held at the house of D. M. Clover, April 7, 1869. On August 31, 1870, what is marked as the second annual report was made by L. W. Crain, which is the first one, on file. It shows 33 children in the district, 24 of whom were attending school, with an average attendance of 20. The schoolhouse was not plastered until 1871.

OAK GROVE DISTRICT, NO. 24.

On March 11, 1869, the petition of W. S. Newlon, R. W. Bagby, S. Holbrook, C. Montague, F. Swanwick and others was presented for the formation of a new district. Upon this petition the order of the superintendent was made, forming District No. 24, embracing the north part of Oswego township and the south part of Montana township. The first officers were: C. Montague, director; Henry Lively, clerk; F. Swanwick, treasurer, chosen at the first meeting, which was held at the house of W. Lane, April 10, 1869. The first report is dated September 14, 1869, signed by Henry Lively, showing 42 children in the district, 38 in attendance upon school, with an average attendance of 13 1-3, and a subscription school having been taught by Miss Amanda Powers. This was the first school in the district, and was taught in a cabin on the southeast quarter of section 5, Oswego township. In January,1870, a log house was built at the southwest corner of section 33, in Montana township; it was built by subscription for church and school purposes. The first public school in the district was taught by Henry Lively, commencing in this house as soon as it was completed. The next school was taught by John P. Jones, commencing November, 1870. On September 27, 1873, at a public meeting of the district, a new school-house site was selected, on section 5, and it was voted to erect a stone school-house thereon.

BREESE DISTRICT, NO. 25.

February 15, 1869, C. M. Fentriss, M. Huntley, G. W. Yandle, L. W. Leak, and several other residents of the territory, petitioned for the formation of a district in the northwest corner of Richland township, lying east of Labette Creek. The petition was granted, and District No. 25 was organized. There are no officers reported until 1870, when the board consisted of Lewis W. Leak, director; L. F. Summers, clerk: and H. C. Hardway, treasurer. The school-house was built in the summer of 1871, and in it, in the fall of that year, John Lawrence commenced teaching the first school in the district. In 1899, a new schoolhouse was erected to take the place of the old one, which had become much out of repair.

HIATT DISTRICT, NO. 26.

On April 17, 1869, an order was made for the formation of District No. 26. No boundaries are given in the order, but it seems to have been situated in Hackberry township. The first meeting was held at the house of G. W. Franklin, April 30, 1869. On September 14, 1869, James McRoberts, clerk, reported 40 children in the district, but that no school had been taught. In 1870 the board consisted of J. M. McCoon, director; G. W. Franklin, clerk; George S. Downing, treasurer.

DICKERMAN DISTRICT, NO. 27.

On April 18, 1869, this district was formed, and embraced the central portion of Fairview township, extending east as far as Labette Creek. The first meeting was held at the house of Joseph Barker, on April 6, 1869. September 7, 1869, A. S. Potter, clerk, reported 56 children in the district, no school having yet been taught therein. In the fall of 1869 a subscription school was taught by Esther Biggs, in a log house on the northwest quarter of section 23. Thomas Bulwer was director, A. S. Potter, clerk, and E. Wiggins, treasurer, in 1870. In the fall of 1870 the first public school in the district was taught by Mary E. Dickerman, in a frame house on the northwest quarter of section 27. A school-house was built in the spring of 1871, which, on May 21, 1885, was burned to the ground.

LOCKARD DISTRICT, NO. 28.

This district is situated in the central part of Hackberry township, south Of Hackberry Creek. The first official document which I now find among the public records relative to District No. 28 is an annual report dated August 31, 1870, signed by John Shumoker, clerk. The only item of information contained in this report is that they have 24 children in the district; no school is yet reported. I can find nothing further among the public records indicating when it was organized.

STOVER DISTRICT, NO. 29.

This district was formed April 29, 1869, on a petition of J. P. D. Mouriquand, J. M. Logan, George Pfaff, and others, and embraced a tract in the north part of Fairview township extending west from Labette Creek. The first election was held at the house of J. S. McManis, on May 11, 1869. September 8, 1869, M. H. Logan, clerk, reported 34 children in the district, but that no school had been taught. The first school-house was built in the fall of 1869.

HARMONY GROVE (OR CARPENTER, NOW MORTIMER) DISTRICT, NO. 30.

This district is located in the central part of Osage township. A log house was used for the first school-house in the district, and in it William Jeans taught the first school, in the summer of 1869. In the summer of 1871 a frame house was built, and in it the following winter the first school was taught, by John Stroud. The first school board consisted of Leroy F. Dick, director; William H. Carpenter, clerk; and Henry Reed, treasurer. Another reports the board to have been W. H. Carpenter, director; George N. Jeans, clerk; and J. H. Dienst, treasurer.

PRAIRIE VALLEY DISTRICT, NO. 31.

This district must have been organized in 1869, although the records concerning its organization are not to be found. As originally constituted, it embraced the entire northwestern quarter of North township; subsequently its territory was much reduced, District No. 104 having been taken therefrom. There is no report or other official record whatever on file with reference to the district prior to 1871, when the board consisted of S. Hardman, director; James F. Harris, clerk; A. J. Ingraham, treasurer.

HEACOCK (OR STONE PALACE) DISTRICT, NO. 32.

This district is situated in the northern part of North township. The record of its organization, if one was made, is lost. The first we have is a report made August 31, 1870, by A. Fagan, clerk, showing they have 50 children in the district, 30 attending school, with an average attendance of 22. In 1871 the board was composed of George Miner, J. C. Merwin, and C. W. Rictor.

PARSONS DISTRICT, NO. 33.

A petition dated February 23, 1869, made by R. T. Caldwell, Anson Kellogg, A. Midkiff, S. N. Fultz, Maria Hussey, George Brock, and several others, was presented to the superintendent, on which he soon thereafter made an order for the organization of District No. 33, embracing, in addition to the territory now composed in that district, several additional sections. The first meeting was held at the house of Aaron Midkiff, at which the following officers were elected: Anson Kellogg, director; George M. Wilson, clerk; Joseph Simpson, treasurer. September 10, 1869, George M. Wilson, clerk, reported 20 males and 14 females in the district on the 31st of August, 15 of whom - 10 males and 5 females, with an average attendance of 10 were in school, in progress at that time, taught by Maria Hussey, at a salary of $16.66 2-3 per month. This school was taught in an out-house belonging to A. Midkiff, on the southwest quarter of section 19, North township. The next school was taught from September to December, 1870, by Miss Sophronia Emery, in a vacant log house belonging to Samuel Eves, on the northeast quarter of section 24, in Walton township. This was the first public school taught in the district. On March 31, 1870, the first annual meeting was held, at the house of Aaron Midkiff, and the following officers elected: Anson Kellogg, director; H. L. Partridge, clerk; George Brock, treasurer. The latter failing to qualify, W. K. Hayes was soon after appointed to fill the vacancy; and this same board was continued in office during two years. In March, 1872, they elected Dr. G. W. Gabriel director, T. C. Cory, clerk, and Dr. T. R. Warren, treasurer. At the meeting held March 31, 1870, the board were directed to take steps to build a school-house. On September 17th of that year, bonds in the sum of $1,000 were voted, and the board purchased lots 15 and 16 in block 72, and on this, during the winter of 1870 and the spring of j871, a one-story frame building was erected as the first school-house in the district. It was not completed until June, and was accepted by the board August 1, 1871. On May 8, 1871, Miss Kate Squires and Miss Sophronia Emery began a subscription school in the new school building, which was then enclosed but not fully completed. On August 10th the board decided to enlarge the building by adding six feet on the west end, making two school rooms. This house was afterward bought by the colored people, to be used as a church. The house thus completed was built with the proceeds of the $1,000 in bonds. In the fall of 1871 the school opened in the new school-house, with E. H. Taylor and Miss Sophronia Emery as teachers. On October 3, 1871, on a vote to issue $15,000 in bonds with which to erect a new school-house, there were 108 votes in favor of the proposition, and but 5 against it. The bonds were sold at 87 1-2 cents on the dollar. In January, 1872, the contract for the erection of this building was, let to T. B. Douglas, of Clinton, Missouri, for $11,993. On his failure to give bond satisfactory to the board, they attempted to take the contract from him and give it to Martin Mason, also of Clinton, Missouri, at the agreed price of $13,000: but the district assumed to overrule this action, and allowed Mr. Douglas to go on with the work. He failed to compete his contract, and the district had the loss to sustain. The building was completed and ready for the opening of school in the fall of 1872. In March, 1873, Parsons was incorporated as a city of the second class, whereupon the board of education was elected at the city election in April. Presidents of the board: 1873, George A. Reynolds; 1874, O. L. Hall, George W. Briggs: 1875, G. C. West; 1876-79, A. Wilson; 1880-81, R. H. Patrick; 1882, William Moir; 1883, S. Kniffin; 1884, J. M. Gregory; 1885;, W. J. Quick; 1886, I. N. McCreery; 1887, J.I. Caldwell; 1888, R. D. Talbot; 1889-90, J. T. Tinder; 1891, A. H. Tyler; 1892, O. H. Stuart, G. H. L. Copeland; 1893, Ira F. Adams: 1894, R.I. Johnson; 1895-96, W. H. Martin; 1897, George S. Anderson;1898, A. B. Manning; 1899, F. O. Boyd; 1900, Josiah Richmond. Clerks: 1873, J. H. Metier and W. A. Gillam; 1874, P. M. Griffin; 1875, M. Noyes; 1876, George Thornton; 1877-81, James Grimes; 1882-86, A. H. Tyler; 1887, C. W. Duzan and A. G. Thurman; 1888, A. H. Tyler and A. G. Thurman; 1889, Mary S. Outland and J. W. Iden; 1890-99, J. W. Iden; 1900, Arthur Cranston. Principals: 1872, J. H. Griffith; 1873, David Donavan; 1874, Mrs. E. J. Collins; 1875, Mrs. Jennie Arthur. Up to 1876 the schools were superintended by citizens NA who were not teachers, and who were expected to do little more than have a general oversight, to know what the schools were doing. J. G. Parkhurst and M. W. Reynolds were two of the parties who filled this position. Commencing with 1876, the superintendents had charge of the school, and did more or less teaching. Superintendents: 1876, B.F. Hickey; 1877-79, M. Chidester; 1880, O.M. McPherson; 1881-87, L. Tomlin; 1888-90, C. H. Harris; 1891-94, H. C. Ford; 1894-98, S. D. Frazier; 1898-99, H. Winsor; 1899-1901, N. H. McDonald. The first graduate was Maude G. Keyser, who completed the course in 1881; there was no graduating class in 1882. There have been 71 males and 156 females, total 227, graduated from the high school. There are four ward school buildings, all brick, as follows: the first, built in 1872, in the Second Ward, on the west half of block costing $15,000; the second, erected in 1880, in the Third Ward, between Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth streets all in between Belmont and Corning avenues, costing $10,000; the third, erected in the First Ward, in 1881, on block 111, cost $6,000; the fourth, erected in 1884, in the Fourth Ward, situated west of block 160, cost $12,000. A high school building, situated in the west part of the city, costing $30,000, was completed in 1893. A new ward building for the Fourth Ward, costing $10,000, was erected in 1899, in place of the original one, which was taken down.

WHEATLAND (OR HARD-PAN) DISTRICT, NO. 34.

This district was formed July 8, 1869, and embraced a tract in Mound Valley township, west of Pumpkin Creek, and north of the line between townships 32 and 33. The first election was held at the house of C. Lyerly, July 2, 1869. J. M. Richardson was the principal one interested in the organization of this district The first school taught in the district was in a house belonging to Mr. Richardson, by his son, J. M. Richardson, Jr. The school was taught for several years in this house. Bonds were thereafter issued, and a new school-house erected. In 1870 the officers were: J. M. Richardson, director; William Reeder, clerk; John B. Campbell, treasurer.

SNOW HILL DISTRICT, NO. 35.

This district was formed July 9, 1869, and embraced a tract in the southwest part of Osage township, most of it lying in what is now Montgomery county. The first election was held at the house of A. W. Cook, July 20, 1869. When this territory was attached to Montgomery county this district became disorganized. In 1872 a new district was organized, in the extreme southwestern corner of the county, and was given this number. Its first officers were: Wm. Mabrey, director; W. S. Getsyendinger, clerk; W. B. Roberts, treas urer. Mr. Mabrey was director for fourteen years. Some time thereafter a storehouse in Parker was purchased, and moved out to the district for its first school-house.

MOUNT ZION DISTRICT, NO. 36.

This district was formed July 10, 1869, and lay in the southwest part of Osage township. The first meeting was held July 20, 1869. Miss Josie Hockett taught her first school in a log cabin on the southeast quarter of section 6, township 32, range 18. The first board now shown by records was that for 1870, and was composed of S. C. Hockett, director; Charles Beggs, clerk; and William Johns, treasurer.

TIMBER HILL DISTRICT, NO. 37.

This district was formed July 10, 1869, and lay in the southern part of Osage township. The first election was held at the house of F. Labadie, July 20, 1869.In the fall of 1869, E. D. Graybill induced the settlers to put up a log house on the southwest corner of Timber Hill town-site, in which that winter he taught the first school in the district. The following winter W. A. Starr taught in this building. A. W. King was clerk in 1870; he is the only officer reported prior to 1871.

DENNIS DISTRICT, NO. 38,

Was formed July 10, 1869, and lay in the central part of Osage township, and embraced the present town-site of Dennis. A log house was put up in this district in the spring of 1870, in which Mrs. Lapham taught a three-months' school. After the location of Dennis in this district a new frame school-house was erected in town, in the summer of 1885. The district board in 1870 consisted of N. P. Lapham, director; George W. Major, clerk; Jacob Beaty, treasurer. The first frame school-house burned down and thereafter a two-room building was erected farther north than the site of the old house. Since employing two teachers, the principals, or teachers in the more advanced room, have been: 1889-90, E. H. Easterling; 1890-91, S. L. Fogleman; 1891-92, Rose Williams; 1892-95, C. E. Boye; 1895-96, Olive Ten Broeck; 1896-97, C. S. Neale; 1897-98, E. C. McKinley; 1898-99, S. F. McClelland; 1899-1900, E. C. McKinley; 1900-01, S. O. King.

BRADFORD DISTRICT, NO. 39.

On July 10, 1869, an order was made for the formation of this district, but probably it was not acted on, for another order was made on April 6, 1870, under which the district was formed, and lay in the northwest corner of Walton township. The first meeting was held at the house of M. S. Mason, on April 16, 1870, at which George T. Walton, M. S. Mason and John Lunciford were elected the board for that year.

Transcribed from History of Labette County, Kansas and its Representative Citizens, ed. & comp. by Hon. Nelson Case. Pub. by Biographical Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill. 1901

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Labette County KS 1901

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