Transcribed from History of Labette County, Kansas and its Representative Citizens, ed. & comp. by Hon. Nelson Case. Pub. by Biographical Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill. 1901

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FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP.

As far as I have been able to learn, but two parties had settled in this township prior to 1866. Francis Wall settled on the Southwest quarter of section 10, and Mr. Allen on the northwest quarter of section 13, in the fall of 1865.

During the year 1866 a number of parties came into the township. Early in the spring, William Springer settled on the southwest quarter of section 2, M. V. B. Coffin on the northwest quarter of section 3, and William Cline on the northwest quarter of section 4. James Logan came in March, and located on the northwest quarter of section 11, and James M. Logan on the southeast quarter of the same section. In May Charles Wadsack settled on the northwest quarter of section 12, and Frederick and Ernest Wadsack in the same vicinity. In June John Richardson bought Mr. Springer's claim for $200, to which he moved from the claim taken in Liberty township, and where he has since made his home.

Among those who made settlement during 1867 were W. S. Park, James Dike, S. H. Spurr and Charles Kelso. Mr. Spurr bought J. M. Logan's claim, and the latter settled on the northeast quarter of section 16.

INDUSTRIES.

M. V. B. Coffin was the first blacksmith in the township; he opened a shop at his home soon after settling there in the spring of 1866. He had been a soldier with Kit Carson, was a good workman, and had a good run of business. He died in January, 1867; Mr. Peters bought his tools. In 1867 J. M. Logan constructed a wooden mill for grinding cane, of which he and his neighbors raised quite large patches. He made a large amount of sorghum molasses.

ORGANIZATION.

In the original division of the county, what is known as Fairview township formed a part of Labette. On the application of A. S. Spaulding, Frank Williams, J. R. Sweet and some 50 other electors, the commissioners, on April 26, 1870, made an order organizing township 33, range 20, into a municipal township with the name of Fairview, and fixing the voting-place of the township at the office of Dr. A. S. Spaulding, on section 21. The following officers were appointed to serve until April, 1871: I. W. Patrick trustee; W. W. Babbitt, clerk; A. S. Spaulding, treasurer; W. H. Umbarger and John Robinson, constables. A. S. Potter and James Paxon were recommended for appointment as justices of the peace.

STOCK.

On May 20, 1870, the commissioners, on a petition therefor, made an order that stock be not allowed to run at large in the night-time, for the term of three years.

MOUNT PLEASANT TOWNSHIP.

W. F. Hamman was the first settler in this township. He erected his house upon the northwest quarter of section 2 in April, 1869. Soon thereafter Mr. Moray located upon the northeast quarter of section 11. In July E. A. Wait and his; brother, A. H. Wait, settled on section 12, and Henry C. McClelland on the southwest quarter of section 14. A little later in the season the northwest part of the township was settled. Benjamin H. Greer, George Greer, James Armstrong and Lewis C. Hill were the first settlers in this, part of the township.

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES.

In the fall of 1869 A. W. King, of Osage township, commenced preaching at the houses of Benjamin Greer and Lewis Hill. Services were kept up at private houses with more or less regularity until the Pioneer schoolhouse was built, when they were held there. They were principally conducted by Methodist preachers in charge of the Timber Hill circiut.

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS.

When Mr. Moray and his wife were camped upon their claim above referred to, before they had their house erected, the first child in the township was born to them. On October 1, 1869, W. F. Hamman lost his son Henry, which was the first death in the township. The first marriage in the township was that of George R. Greer and Mary A. Hill.

ORGANIZATION.

Mount Pleasant township was originally a part of Labette township. On May 20, 1870, G. W. Moray and 60 other electors petitioned for the organization of township 33, range 19, into a municipal township, which petition the board granted and named the township Mount Pleasant. Thereupon the board appointed the following officers: H. C. McClelland, trustee; Walter Downing, clerk; Henry Story, treasurer; Florence Hamman and C. E. Woodin, constables. Ezra A. Wait and John Hamblin were recommended for justices of the peace, and they were afterward appointed.

CARE OF STOCK.

On June 23, 1870, on a petition of its citizens the board made an order restraining the running at large of stock in the night-time for a period of five years.

CANADA TOWNSHIP.

On January 23, 1867, Alexander and Milton Duncan located on section 7, township 34, range 18, and were the first settlers in what is now Canada township. A little later in the season Jonathan Hill settled on section 28, Gresham Gokey on section 29, and sometime during the year John Nellis, J. Roberts, George Mays and Lewis Scott settled in the township. John McNeal came in October, 1868. I do not find the names of other settlers prior to those who came in the spring of 1869. During this year quite a large immigration came into the township, among whom may be mentioned H. Hedemann, D. M. Pitt, J. F. Walford, H. A. Linn, William Walters, David Ross, Howard Phenis and sons, John Phillips, Mrs. Mary Price, Ola Olson.

Mr. Phenis and his sons had a shinglemill, in 1869, on section 32, from which they supplied the settlers in that neighborhood with shingles for their cabins.

The first child born in the township was Milton Duncan, son of Alexander Duncan, on February 12, 1868. The first death was that of an old man named Munk.

ORGANIZATION.

In the absence of any record I take the statement of Mr. Dickerman, who was then county clerk, that, of the nine precincts into which the county was divided, in March, 1867, by the commissioners appointed for its organization, the southwest part was called Pumpkin Creek. No election was held therein at the first election for county officers. When the commissioners met and organized, on June 5, 1867, they made an order for the organization of the two west precincts, in which it was provided that "Canada township shall include 33 and 34, range 18, and the west half of the 33 and 34, range 10, and as far west as the county line." This is, the first official record we have relating to this township, or giving it a name. It was not until October 21, 1867, that a voting-precinct was designated for the township; at that time it was fixed at J. M. Duncan's. On November 21, 1867, the commissioners made a new order dividing the county into townships, in which it was ordered that "Canada township, No. 9, shall include town 33 and 34,, R. 17 and 18." On April 6, 1868, the north half of township 33, in ranges 17 and 18, was attached to Osage township. The first election in the township was held November 5, 1867, at which J. R. Shippey was elected trustee, J. M. Duncan and G. W. Mays, justices of the peace; John Nellis and John Scoville, constables. The record does not show who the opposing candidates were; but the vote was a tie on justices between Mr. Mays and some one else, and Mr. Mays was successful in the casting of lots for the office. By an order made April 14, 1869, township 35, ranges 17 and 18, was attached to this township.

PROTECTING CROPS.

On May 27, 1871, on the petition of E. B. Baldwin and 42 others, the commissioners made an order restraining stock from running at large in the night-time for a term of two years.

HOWARD TOWNSHIP.

The first settler in what is now Howard township was John Kennedy, who located on the southwest quarter of section 12, township, 35, range 17, in 1867.

The settlement of this township fairly commenced in 1869, and among those who located here that year are the following: W. H. Godwin, on the northeast quarter of section 3; Clinton Hawley, on section 2; Jesse McClintock, on the northeast quarter of section 11; E. R. Lee, on the southeast quarter of section 33; Lee Loverage, on the southwest quarter of section 33; W. S. Getzendaner, on section 13, range 17; H. H. Long, on the northeast quarter of section 5.

In March, 1870, E. B. Baldwin located upon the northeast quarter of section 2, and during the same season settlements were made by William Blackford on the southwest quarter of section 4, __ Scott on the southeast quarter of section 24, B. W. Harwood on the northwest quarter of section 10, George McKee on the southeast quarter of section 10, David McKee on the southwest quarter of section 14, J. M. Hart on the northwest quarter of section 11, Dana H. Fuller and Aldin Fuller on section 4, Banks Hall and John W. Hall on section 13, D. Smallwood on section 1, Frank Pfiester on section 7.

On March 5, 1871, W. J. Millikin took the southeast quarter of section 22, and sometime during the season, some early in the spring and some not till fall, settlements were made by P. B. Clark on the northwest quarter of section 24, Samuel Smith on the northwest quarter of section 12, James Bennett on the northeast quarter of section 20, Walter Bennett on the northwest quarter of section 29, William Reasor on the southeast quarter, John Reasor on the northwest quarter, and George H. Goodwin on the northeast quarter of section 27. James Steel took the southwest quarter, William Steel the northwest quarter, Boon Thompson the southeast quarter, and J. K. Russell the northeast quarter of section 23; John Vance the southwest quarter and Christian Lieb the northeast quarter of section 24; Lincoln Clark, and William and John High section 1. W. M. Mabrey located on the southwest quarter of section 11, in range 17

ORGANIZATION.

The territory of which I am now speaking was a part of Canada township until after the spring election of 1872. At that election the opposing candidates for justice of the peace were J. M. Hart and H. H. Long, both residing in what is now Howard township. The vote between them being a tie, lots were cast resulting in the choice of Mr. Hart, who thereby became the first officer of the new township. On April 5, 1872, E. B. Baldwin presented the petition of himself and 81 other electors asking the commissioners for the formation of a new township, embracing all the territory in ranges 17 and 18 lying south of the line running east and west through the middle of township 34, leaving three tiers of sections in township 34 in the old township, and putting three tiers of section in township 34 and all of fractional township 35 in the new township. This petition was granted, and the order of the commissioners made creating said territory into a municipal township, which they named Howard in honor of the county clerk. Thereupon the following officers were appointed for the township thus organized: E. B. Baldwin, trustee; William J. Millikin, clerk; Joseph Buckley, treasurer; J. J. Breeding, constable. Mr. Buckley failed to qualify, and the commissioners soon thereafter appointed William Blackford treasurer in his place.

BUSINESS.

There have been several places in the township at different times where small stores have been conducted. Capt. J. W. Hall started a store on his premises in the summer of 1870, which he conducted only a short time. W. H. Godwin and F. W. Noblett kept a small stock of groceries at the Dora postoffice. The town of Willeyville, afterward called Deerton, while it existed was in this township, and the business houses in operation there have been spoken of in connection with that name.

INCIDENTS.

John McClintock and Nettie Smallwood, on December 22, 1872, were joined in marriage, being the first couple married in the township, and the marriage of H. F. Jones and Mary McClintock followed some two or three weeks later. Among the first births in the township were sons in the families of W. J. McClintock and D. H. McKee, in the summer of 1870, and on August 15, 1870, a daughter, Julia A., to Colonel Baldwin and wife. A son of G. B. McKee was injured by falling into a well, from which he died; this was the first death in the township, and I understand that B. W. Harwood, who was murdered on August 15, 1872, was the second person who died in the township.

ELM GROVE TOWNSHIP.

The first party to locate in Elm Grove township was William Bowen, who took his claim on sections 3 and 10 early in the spring of 1867, the old settlers say, although no one whom I have met is able to fix the date of his settlement. Probably the next settlers in the township were R. P. and Amas Totten, who located on section 10, as it is thought, in the summer of 1867. A few parties made settlement here in 1868. Madison Sharp came in June and located on the northeast quarter of section 13, although he did not bring his family until the following February. At the same time Thomas Sharp located on the southeast quarter of the same section. In 1869 many more families came in. C. M. Keeler located on same section with William Bowen, Daniel McIntyre on the southwest quarter of section 12, Joseph Gray on the northeast quarter of section 3, A. J. Moler on the southwest quarter of section 13, James Woodville on section 12, in township 35. Wesley Faurot came July 29th this year, and settled in the extreme southeast corner of the township; Harvey Jones also settled in the southern part of the township. In July C. B. Pratt took the northwest quarter of section 3, in township 35, and opened thereon the first store in the township; he was appointed postmaster of the postoffice at that point, which was called Ripon. In October Dr. D. P. Lucas settled on the northwest quarter of section 12, in township 35; and during the season Thomas Summerfield settled in the same locality, on the southeast quarter of section 9. Probably still more families whose names I have not mentioned came in this year. The settlement of the southwestern part of the township did not commence until the spring of 1870. In June Peter Shufelt found a small house on the southwest quarter of section 20 which had been put there by some one who had left. He took possession of this and made claim to this quarter, afterward paying the man for his house. Harrison Sword settled on the southwest quarter of section 30, A. J. Lots on the southwest quarter of Section 7, Peter Rhodes on section 18, H. H. Lieb and R. W. Lieb also in that vicinity. During the season Owen Wimmer and sons located on section 29, but did not bring their families until the spring of 1871; Alfred Elliott located on the northwest quarter of section 30. In 1871, Junius, Peter and Lewis Goodwin settled on section 31.

ORGANIZATION.

By the division first made, what is now Elm Grove township was apart of Canada and Hackberry townships. After November 21, 1867, until its organization by itself, it formed a part of Hackberry township only. On July 27, 1870, W. H. Bowen and 55 others having petitioned therefor, the commissioners made an order for the organization of townships 34 and 35, in range 19, into a municipal township, with the name of Elm Grove; and on July 29th appointed the following officers: D. McIntyre, trustee; John Lane, clerk; John Freeman, treasurer; Charles Ballard and S. Bentley, constables; and recommended W. H. Bowen and T. H. Noslen for appointment as justices of the peace.

STOCK.

On April 12, 1871, upon a petition of its citizens, the commissioners ordered that stock be prohibited from running at large in the night-time for the term of three years.

OMITTED.

This township had the misfortune not to be named in the apportionment of 1871, and it was not until 1873 that it was made a part of any legislative district.

CEMETERY.

In the fall of 1869 James M. Woodfill died, and was the first person to be buried in the cemetery then started on section 12, in the south part of the township. His wife Sarah soon followed him, and was the second to be interred in this cemetery.

HACKBERRY TOWNSHIP.

A few parties settled in this township in the fall of 1865. James Moss, Robert Hastings and Mr. Cawthorn located on section 1, Mr. Henderson on section 12, and Mr. Chandler near by. A few more parties came in the following year, and among them Mr. Redfield, who settled on the northwest quarter of section 1, Luman Reed on the northeast quarter of section 25, and Robert Gill on section 22. Many settlers came in 1867, commencing early in the spring and continuing to arrive during the summer. In June Gilbert A. and J. T. Cooper located on the south half of section 14, and about the same time Alexander Bishop settled on the northwest quarter and Jerry Strickler on the northeast quarter of the same section; William Newcomb settled on section 11, and Henry G. Pore on section 12. In July George W. Franklin and L. C. Howard located on section 2; William Sullivan, Robert Johnson, Abner DeCou, Benjamin Hiatt, James Sloan, Walter Pratt and Caleb Phillips came sometime during the year. It is possible that some of the parties named came in 1866 instead of 1867. Elder Cooper settled on section 8 early in 1868, and was the first Baptist minister in that vicinity. In October William Hannigan bought the northwest quarter of section 9 from Cal. Watkins, who had taken it sometime previous thereto. About the same time Martin Jackson, Aaron Young and Mordecai Ramsey came in. In February, 1869, D. C. Constant settled on the southeast quarter of section 18; on March 9th G. W. Jenkins on the northeast quarter of section 33; and in July J. L. Jones on the northwest quarter of section 5, township 35.

ORGANIZATION.

In the first division of the county, Hackberry township included township 34, range 20, and the east half of range 19. By the new division, on November 21, 1867, it was ordered that "Hackberry township, No. 5, shall include town 34. R. 19 and 2o." On April 14. 1869, township 35, lying in these ranges, was attached as a part of the township. The first election in the township was held at the time of the election of the first county officers, April 22, 1867, but there is no record of the result. At the election held April 7, 1868, the following officers were elected: G. W. Franklin, trustee; William Johnson, clerk; H. G. Pore, treasurer; L. C. Howard and D. M. Bender, justices of the peace; D. Day and William Hiatt, constables; and William E. Pratt, road overseer.

CARE OF STOCK.

October 4, 1869, the residents having petitioned therefor, the board ordered that stock be not allowed to run at large in the night-time for the period of five years.

RICHLAND TOWNSHIP.

The first settlement of this township has been spoken of in another part of this work. It may be said to have been the first part of the county settled by the whites, but the settlement was entirely broken up in 1863. The settlement as it now exists commenced in the fall of 1865. Among those who came that season were Thomas King, who settled on the northeast quarter of section 18, William Busby on the northwest quarter of section 17, William Puitt on the southeast quarter of section 7, Zephaniah Woolsey on the southeast quarter of section 27; a man by the name of Baker and his three sons, Berry, John and William, and two sons-in-law, Dotson and Maxwell, along Labette Creek on sections 22, 23 and 26; G. W. Yandel and his sons-in-law, David Lewellin and Chas. A. Rankin, came in November, 1865, and took claims, but did not bring their families until the following spring. These parties and also Mr. Yandal's son, Columbus, settled on sections 6, 7 and 8. About the same time George W. Kingsbury settled on section 6.

During 1866 many parties came into the township, some coming early in the spring and others later in the season. In the spring the Rice brothers, Benjamin, John and James, John Green, Orville Thompson, John W. Wiley, Gilbert Martin, Samuel Braught, Allen Barnes, Mancil Garret, Lorenzo Braught, James Smith, and perhaps others, settled in the northeastern part of the township north of Labette. In May S. R. Southwick settled on the northeast quarter of section 29, William Shay on the southeast quarter of section 20, John Kinney and sons on the northwest quarter of section 28, George Lane on the southwest quarter of section 28, Abraham Ewers on the southwest quarter of section 31. In June Samuel Gregory settled on the southeast quarter of section 26, and in August Mr. Yunker on the southwest quarter of section 29, and Mr. Bedicker on the northeast quarter of section 32. On August 12th Franklin Asbell bought the northeast quarter of section 18 from Thomas King and became a permanent settler thereon. On October 10th David U. Watson settled on the southwest quarter of section 21, and John N. Watson on the southeast quarter of section 29; about the same time Marshall J. Lee settled north of Labette Creek, Milton Helm on the northeast quarter of section 29, and Riley Hawkins on the southwest quarter of section 20; Stephen Bright bought the southwest quarter of section 7 from Woolsey; John and Cass Steel settled on section 8, Salina Grant on the northwest quarter of section 30.

On January 1, 1867, Moses Powers located on the northwest quarter of section 21; in April Isaac Butterworth bought the northwest quarter of section 30 from Salina Grant, and made his home thereon.

BUSINESS.

The first store in the township, aside from those located in Chetopa, was kept by Orville Thompson, a little north of Labette Creek, on the east road leading from Oswego to Chetopa; it was started in the spring of 1866. Soon after this the town of Labette was started, on the Neosho.

DRAINAGE.

For many years a large part of the land south of the Labette was covered with water so great a portion of the year that it was practically of little use. In 1882 a ditch was dug, draining this swamp into the Neosho, thereby making a large tract of land capable of cultivation.

CEMETERY.

In April, 1874, John F. Hill deeded three acres of land in section 9, on which the Pleasant Valley Cemetery was laid out; George Gennoa was the first person buried therein. This cemetery has been nicely improved and quite extensively used.

ORGANIZATION.

The commissioners appointed for the organization of the county in laying it off into precincts constituted township 34, range 21, a township, which they named Chetopa. The first official reference we have to this township is on July 2, 1867, when it was "Ordered, that the township called Chetopa, the southern township of Labette county, be changed according to the request of the petitioners, to be called Richland township hereafter." On November 21, 1867, in dividing the county into townships, the commissioners ordered that "Richland township, No. 4 shall include town 34, R. 21." While we have no record showin[sic] the names of the persons who were elected officers at the election held April 22, 1867, we soon thereafter find J. N. Watson acting as justice of the peace. He resigned on October 23, and on November 19 the commissioners appointed G. H. English, and two days later they also appointed William H. Reed justice of the peace. On April 7, 1868, the following officers were elected: Robert Steel, trustee; R. B. Wallan, clerk; Daniel Quinby, treasurer; George Kincade and B. B. Baker, justices of the peace; J. W. Wiley and A. P. Kinkade, constables; Allison Hasty, road overseer. On April 14, 1869, an order of the commissioners was made attaching township 35, range 21, to Richland township.

Transcribed from History of Labette County, Kansas and its Representative Citizens, ed. & comp. by Hon. Nelson Case. Pub. by Biographical Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill. 1901

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