Transcribed by Carolyn Ward from History of Butler County, Kansas by Vol. P. Mooney. Standard Publishing Company, Lawrence, Kan.: 1916. ill.; 894 pgs.


DEDICATED

TO THE MEMORY OF MY WIFE.

FRANCES E. MOONEY,

WHO FELL ASLEEP — CROSSING THE GREAT DIVIDE — FEBRUARY TWENTY-FIRST. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN. FOR FORTY YEARS MY COMPANION AND FRIEND; ALWAYS ASSISTING, NEVER HINDERING; LIVING ON THE SUNNY SIDE, REFUSING THE CLOUDS; WHOSE COMING BROUGHT DELIGHT AND GLADNESS; WHOSE DEPARTURE TOOK AWAY THE MOTIVE, THE INCENTIVE, THE INSPIRATION OF LIFE, LEAVING AN EXISTENCE OF CHAOS, DESOLATION AND GLOOM. HER HOUSEHOLD WAS HER JOY; HER HOME HER TREASURE; HER FRIENDS HER PRIDE; HER FAITH IN ALMIGHTY GOD, AND THE IMMORTALITY OF THE SOUL, HER COMFORT. "HER CHILDREN RISE UP AND CALL HER BLESSED; HER HUSBAND ALSO. AND HE PRAISETH HER."

VOL. P. MOONEY.


FOREWORD

"Histories are as perfect as the historian is wise and is gifted with an eye and a soul."—Carlyle.

The contributors to this work, the historians, are men and women, writing from personal knowledge, personal observation, and personal experience; those that have made, created, and assisted in making and creating that of which they write. That they are wise and gifted and endowed with, and possessed of both eye and soul, is a self-evident fact; and the reader will be convinced that they speak that which they do know. This history being based upon such evidence, which becomes the best evidence attainable, its reliability, its perfection, and its authenticity, are assured.

The history of Butler county is the history of an empire. While many of those pioneers of early days have taken their chamber in the silent halls of death, have gone to that country from whose bourne no traveler hath ever yet returned, yet a goodly number remain among us; ripe in years, experience and information. From them we learn of those whose brain and brawn laid, and assisted in laying the foundation of what is today a county. "Magnificent in its greatness and great in its magnificence" — a county with a diversity of interests and resources practically unlimited; a county where school houses and church spires are always in sight; a county whose people are happy, contented and prosperous, possessed of refinement and culture, attained unto an intellectual level; and equipped to meet the broader view and higher purpose of the civilized world.

As we contemplate the results of the efforts of these hardy, earnest early settlers, and realize the wonderful transformation by reason thereof, and as we enjoy the fruits and benefits of their labors, their toil, their hardships, their sacrifices, our hearts go out in thankfulness to Almighty God for that American spirit possessed by our ancestry, which battles, builds, creates, and makes two blades of grass grow where but one grew before.

The reminiscences of these pioneers form a most essential, valuable and interesting portion of this work. There is nothing mythical or legendary contained in them. They are not dream stories, but reliable and authentic stories of the men and women, boys, and girls of early days. Their romances, their trials, tribulations and triumphs. They who stayed, who endured, who conquered, who are entitled to, and who will receive greater things in the days to come.

Grateful acknowledgment is hereby made to the press of Butler county, and to those whose kindness of heart and whose ready pen have rendered material assistance in the preparation of this work; and to those pioneer men and women whose lives and experiences make this history possible, a great many of whom are no longer here, but whose memory remains like unto a benediction; and to my daughter, Corah Adelaide Mooney, for her efficient help.

Recognition is made of the following bibliography used in the preparation of this book: Kansas State Historial Collection; Wilder's Annals of Kansas; Kansas in American Commonwealths, by Leverett W. Spring; History of Kansas, William C. Cutler; Cyclopedia of State, F. W. Blackmar; Kansas Session Laws, Bulletins, Pamplets, Records, etc.

VOL. P. MOONEY.

El Dorado, Kans., September, 1916.


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Transcribed by Carolyn Ward from History of Butler County, Kansas by Vol. P. Mooney. Standard Publishing Company, Lawrence, Kan.: 1916. ill.; 894 pgs.


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Columbus, KS

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