1912 Biographical History of Barton County, Kansas


OF BARTON COUNTY, KANSAS 211

there are about six miles of tiling in the orchard and it is safe to say that Mr. Bosse is the leading orchardist in this part of the state of Kansas. He is an enterprising and progressive citizen and in addition to the property mentioned above he owns a great deal of town property in Ellinwood where he is well known and recognized as one of the old timers of the county who has done a great deal to further its interests and make of it one of the most desirable from an agricultural standpoint, to be found in the entire country.


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Scene From D. Bosse's Orchard, Ellinwood

212 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

ºººº Great Bend ºººº

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[IMAGE]
Crossing the Arkansas River at Great Bend 1872

IN JULY 29, 1871, the company was chartered that had been previously selected for the townsite of Great Bend. This company consisted of Thomas J. Mitchell, C. R. Curtis, Clark H. Charles and Robert T. Shinn of Quincy, Ills.; James Israel of Mount Vernon, Ohio.; Samuel D. Houston of Manhattan, Kansas; John T. Norton and A. L. Williams of Topeka, Kansas, and Thomas L. Morris of Barton County.

It was the intention of the company to locate the town on the north half of section 34, township 19, range 13, which is southeast of the site finally decided upon. There were several reasons why the site was changed, the principal one being that the present site is on higher ground and safer from the flood waters from the creeks and rivers.

The new town was christened Great Bend by Hiram Bickerdyke on account of the fact that it is located on the north bank of the Arkansas river at a point where the big bend in the river forms almost a half circle and the townsite is at the apex of this bend.

One year after the town was organized the first city election was held and it resulted in the election of the following officers: A. A. Hurd, mayor; A. S. Allen, G. W. Poole, M. S. Kutch, Ed Markwort and D. Cooley, councilmen. Mr. Cooley moved from the city within a month after his election and his place was taken on the council by Edward Tyler. James C. Martin was the first police judge and A. C. Moses the first city clerk, while D. R. Smith and James Gainsford were the first treasurer and marshal, respectively.

At this time the principal business activity was in the cattle trade and large herds of cattle from northern Texas, Indian Territory and Oklahoma were driven from the pastures in those states, north to the nearest railroad point from where they were shipped to the eastern markets. Until the town of Great Bend was organized, this business was monopolized by Newton, Abilene and Wichita. However, the A. T. & S. F. railroad had been built west to Great Bend at the time the first city election was held and Great Bend's closer proximity to the southern ranges gave it an advantage that finally resulted in a large part of this business being shifted to this point. George N. Moses was one of the pioneers in

OF BARTON COUNTY, KANSAS 213

[IMAGE]
Great Bend in 1872

this business and drove the first herd of cattle to pass through Great Bend from Texas to Newton in 1872.

The first building to be erected on the townsite of Great Bend was the Drover's Cottage, afterwards the Southern Hotel, of which Colonel Thomas L. Stone was the first landlord. The first store building was erected by Tyler and was also used as a residence. The hotel was located on lots 1 and 2, block 90, which is the ground now occupied by the Brlnkman bank building. In all there were forty-two buildings erected on the townsite during the year 1872.

The first city administration accomplished a great deal in attracting business to the town and encouraging the building of business and residence buildings. The principal work of the administration was in getting a part of the cattle trade from the towns farther east.

In 1873 the administration of A. A. Hurd was endorsed by the people of the town and he was re-elected as well as nearly all the members of the first council. W. H. Odell was elected as a member of the city council at this election.

Like all western towns of that period, Great Bend was a typical border settlement and was made up of a population that included many cattle men and buffalo hunters. The hunters sold their hides in Great Bend and the cattle men loaded their stock on the cars in which they were ttaken to the markets.

In 1873, one year after the county was organized, there were 2,500 acres of land under cultivation and the harvest that year gave a yield that was considered mighty good and consisted of the following: 48 acres of wheat, 30 acres of barley and 75 acres of oats, as well as a large number of acres of hay and smil crege of corn.

It was in 1873 that work on the court house was begun, this being the first building of any size to be built within the limits of the townslte.

In 1874, at the city election, the following

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Great Bend in 1882

214 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

[IMAGE]
Court House in 1874. Southern Hotel in Background

were elected to fill the different offices: Samuel Maber, mayor; councilmen, C. W. Gray, E. C. Sooy, H. H. Kidder, G. N. Moses and A. S. Allen; treasurer, I. H. Upton; police judge, J. C. Martin; city clerk. A. J. Buckland and W. W. Winstead and William Leak, marshals. It was during this administration that the court house was completed and on July 4, the new building was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies.

The year 1874 was famous or notorious for a plague of grasshoppers, and has since been referred to as "Grasshopper Year." For several days these pests were in evidence in such great numbers that at times they obscured the sunlight and devoured everything with which they came in contact that was not proof against their hunger and ferocity. It is related by old timers that the hoppers would swoop down on a field of corn and when they rose there would be nothing left to denote that there had been anything on the spot except the bare prairie. They also tell of the pests having often eaten clothing, and incidents are cited where they actually stopped a railroad train by piling up on the tracks in such numbers as to make it impossible for the engines to push their way through them.

It was during this same year that a genuine Indian war dance was held on the court house square. The Indians to the number of about 200 were led by Spotted Horse, chief of the Pawnees. The Indians danced themselves into an awful frenzy, much to the amusement of the people of the town and Indians who did not take part in the dance.

During this year a change was made in the city administration and D. N. Heizer became treasurer; A. C. Moses, city clerk, and James Gainsford took William Leak's place as one of the city marshals. It was also during this year that the famous trial of "Hefty," a noted character of the county, was held. He was charged with murder but was acquitted by Judge W. R. Brown, sitting in the district court. "Hefty" was acquitted after having been accused of brutally murdering two Frenchmen, new arrivals in the county.

In 1875 the following officers were elected and appointed: R. Taylor, mayor; G. N. Moses, William Torrey, A. J. Buckland, E. W. Burton and John H. Taylor, councilmen; A. C. Moses, city clerk; E. L Chapman, police judge; James Gainsford, marshall; D. N. Heizer, treasurer and A. A. Hurd, city attorney. It was during this year that "Mother Bickerdyke," the famous civil war nurse came to Great Bend on a visit to her sons, James and Hiram Bickerdyke. She was prominent in the work of relieving sufferers from the famine caused by the grasshopper pest.

In 1876 the city election resulted in the following officers being chosen to carry on the affairs of the rapidly growing town: C. F. Diffenbacher, mayor; E. W. Burton, John Taylor, R. C. Bailey, William Odell and A. S. Barnes, councilmen; A. C. Moses succeeded himself as clerk; Josiah Clayton, city attorney; E. L. Chapman, police judge; A. S. Allen, treasurer, and George B. Hayden, marshal.

Like all western towns of that period Great Bend was infested with a number of men and women who belonged to the rough element and the work of the administration of 1876 was directed towards ridding the town of this undesirable class. By this time the cattle trade had drifted farther westward and Dodge City was the town where most of the

OF BARTON COUNTY, KANSAS 215

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Barton County Court House

cattlemen and the cowboys made their headquarters. The administration succeeded in ridding the city of dance halls and obnoxious things that were a part of them. With the disappearance of this element the population which was enjoying a steady growth was made up of settlers and men who came here to engage in business or take up the work of farming. In fact this administration marked a new era in the life of the town.

The election of city officers in the year 1877 was marked by an issue that brought out some little argument. The question was whether or not the city officers should receive salaries, and A. C. Fair who stood for no salaries, received a majority of the votes and was elected mayor. The remainder of the city offices were filled as follows: G. H. Hulme, Joseph, Gray, T. C. Cole, Chas. Rozel and E. C. Bailey, councilmen; W. H. Odell was appointed police judge; W. H. Dodge, city attorney; A. S. Allen, treasurer and A. B. Underhill, marshall.

The administration of 1878 was composed of the following: G. N. Moses, mayor; C. W. Gray, J. C. McClure, A. A. Power, C. B. Chapman and Fred Vollmer, councilmen. This council appointed E. L. Chapman, police judge; W. H. Dodge, attorney; A. S. Allen, treasurer; W. H. Odell, clerk and J. T. Airhart, marshal.

In 1879 the election of city officers resulted as follows: A. W. Gray, mayor; R. T. Ewalt, R. C. Bailey, A. J. Buckland, M. B. Fitts and A. C. Fair, councilmen. The following were appointed: G. W. Nimocks, attorney; E. L. Chapman, clerk; C. Goit, police judge; A. S. Allen, treasurer and W. W. Winstead, marshal.

The affairs of the city were looked after during the year 1880 by the following: E. L. Chapman, mayor; A. J. Buckland, M. J. Fitts, F. Vollmer, A. C. Fair and Henry Moss, councilmen. During this period R. T. Ewalt was police judge; A. S. Allen, treasurer; Fred Long, clerk; W. H. Swift, marshal and street commissioner.

In 1881 the following city officers were elected: H. M. Kline, mayor; G. H. Hulme, Henry Moss, A. Laidlaw, A. C. Fair and A. J. Buckland, councilmen; R. T. Ewalt, police judge; James Clayton, city attorney; A. S. Allen, treasurer; W. P. Mellen, clerk and James Airheart, marshal.

The year 1882 was a good one for the cultivation of the soil and a number of new settlers arrived and located south of the river from Great Bend. At the election the following officers were elected: S. V. Brinkman, mayor; H. M. Kline, C. Goit, G. H. Hulme; Wm. Bruesser and A. Laidlaw, councilmen. This council appointed the following: R. T. Ewalt, police judge; Elrick Cole, attorney; A. S. Allen, treasurer; C. Goit, clerk and James Airheart, marshal. It was during this year that the town was visited by a smallpox epidemic that caused the death of fourteen people as well as making business poor in all branches. The disease continued in its spread for several months and at times a panic was threatened that might have resulted in depopulating the town.

In 1883 the spring election resulted in G. W. Nimocks being elected mayor with the following councilmen: J. C. Gwinn, E. R. Moses, R. C. Bailey, A. C. Fair and E. W. Moses. Mr. Ewalt continued as police judge, B. F. Ogle was appointed attorney; James Clayton,

216 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

clerk; A. S. Allen, treasurer and J. T. Airheart continued as marshal.

The election of 1884 was without any particular interest as the town was enjoying a good growth and the people seemed to work with a community of interests. The following were elected: E. W. Moses, mayor; G. N. Moses, T. O. Cole, J. C. Gwinn, E. E. Benedict and Wm. Bruesser, councilmen. Mr. Ewalt was again appointed as police judge; C. Gait, attorney; R. A. Charles, clerk; A. S. Allen, treasurer. The police department remained the same.

In 1885 E. W. Moses succeeded himself as mayor and had with him as councilmen: Dr S. J. Shaw, F. M. Burson, Wm. Bruesser, C. H. Patterson and W. H. Keeney. A. J. Buckland was appointed police judge; C. E. Castle, clerk; A. S. Allen, treasurer; J. W. Clarke, attorney, and Cal Crilley, marshal.* This administration accomplished a great deal of good for the town. The first drainage system was established and consisted of a ditch running from the west boundary of the city through the town to Walnut street, with laterals from both north and south.

In 1886 the city was changed from a city of the third class to a city of the second class. The officers of the city who had been elected in 1885 were appointed by Governor John Martin to serve until an election could be held under the new order of things. The election was held on the day appointed by the governor and resulted as follows: D. N. Heizer, mayor; A. S. Allen, treasurer; L. R. Nimocks, police judge; J. W. Clarke and A. J. Buckland, justices of the peace; John Dawson and L. P. Aber, constables. It was during this year that the first election of councilmen was held by wards and resulted as follows: First ward—J. Alefs and G. W. Poole; second ward—W. G. Merritt and A. Laidlaw; third ward—D.. Jones and D. C. Luse; fourth ward—D. Roberts and Fred Vollmer; treasurer of board of education, J. V. Brinkman; members of the board of education, A. C. Shermerhorn, D. M. Woodburn, G. W. Nimocks, C. F. Culver, A. H. Connett, A. R. Moss, D. Turner, S. H. Moss. S. M. Rusk was appointed street commissioner; C. E. Castle, clerk; F. Patterson, marshal and C. Q. Newcomb, city engineer. In November, 1886, at a special electicn F. J. Kramer was elected councilman to take the place of W. G. Merritt, who resigned. It was this year that the city of Great Bend was separated from the township as far as poitical matters were concerned.

In January, 1887, C. E. Castle resigned as city clerk and his place was filled by the appointment of C. W. Murphy and at the same meeting of the council Wm. Osmond was appointed city attorney.

It was during the administration of 1887 that the city of Great Bend voted aid in the sum of $23,000 for the Kansas & Colorado Pacific Railroad company. This company built the road that is now a branch of the Missouri Pacific from Great Bend to Hoisington. At the election in that year the following were selected to fill the different offices: Mayor, A. S. Buckland; police judge, W. H. Odell; treasuier, James Clayton; treasurer of the board of education, R. F. Typer; justices of the peace, George Crummack and John W. Brown; constables, L. P. Aber and Parker Corbin; councilmen—First ward W. O. Morrison; second ward, George Spencer; third ward, F. B. Caldwell; fourth ward, F. B. Schuster and S. H. Moss; members of the board of education, J. W. Thompson, S. J. Shaw, D. Turner, Charles Allison and Charles E. Hedges. C. W. Murphy was chosen for city clerk; attorney, D. A. Banta; marshal, J. W. Dawson; street commissioner, J. T. Airheart. G. . Poole resigned as a member of the council and at a special election held April 25, ......................

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Louis Zutavern, City Treas.

OF BARTON COUNTY, KANSAS 217

...... was elected to take his place. In July of this year C. W. Murphy resigned as clerk and the vacancy was filled by the appointment of Will E. Stoke.

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First Seven Sheriffs of Barton County

In 1888, at the spring election, the following were chosen to fill the city offices: Councilmen, W. E. Harper, C. L. Moses, G. N. Moses, J. B. Daniels; school board, A. C. Schermerhorn, C. F. Culver, J. C. Gwinn, W. W. Culver.

It was during the administration of these officers that the first city water works system was installed, a franchis being granted to the Great Bend Water Supply Company. The franchise was to run for twenty-one years. The city voted aid for the Chicago, Kansas & Western ailroad Company in the sum of $15,000. The road extended from Great Bend to Scott City and is now a branch of the Santa Fe Railroad Company. In November of this year Charles Chamberlain was elected councilman to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of J. B. Daniels.

In 1889 O. B. Wilson was elected mayor with the following councilmen: John Langham, W. B. Cornell, C. H. Hulme, C. B. Gillis and C. Q. Newcomb. The board of education was composed of C. F. Diffenbacher, G. W. Nimocks, J. K. Humphrey and William Torrey, with C. W. Murphy, treasurer. The following were appointed by the city council: W. H. Odell, police judge; James Clayton and John F. Lewis; justices of the peace, L. P. Aber and John W. Dawson, constables; O. J. Richmond, treasurer. The remainder of the city offices were filled with the same as during the previous year. At a special election in 1889 J. S. Dalziel was elected a member of the city council to take the place of W. E. Harper, who resigned and M. Gilmore was elected to take the place of Charles Chamberlain.

In 1890 the city election resulted in the following being chosen to look after the affairs of the city: Councilmen, John Taylor, C. L. Moses, W. P. Coles and M. Gilmore. The boad of education was composed of A. C. Schermerhorn, A. J. Buckland, A. H. Connett and Fred Vollmer.

In 1891 the city offices were occupied by A. Laidlaw, mayor; Parker Corbin, police judge; O. J. Richards, G. L. Chapman, treasurer of the board of education; John F. Lewis and James Clayton, justices of the peace; J. W. Dawson and L. P. Aber, constables. The council was composed of John Langham, J. B. Hannum, Wm. Kelley, W. W. Culver and the long term members elected at the election of 1890. The board of education was made up of C. F. Diffenbacher, Charles E. Dodge, S. J. Day and Wm. Torrey. R. A. Charles was clerk; G. W. Nimocks, attorney; W. W. Winstead, marshal and street commissioner.

The election of 1892 resulted in the following being elected: Wm. Friend, R. C. Bailey, G. H. Hulme and W. H. Swift, councilmen; A. C. Schermerhorn, A. J. Buckland, D. C. Luse and W. H. Keeney, members of the Board of education; R. A. Charles, clerk; G. W. Nimocks, attorney and R. T. Ewalt, marshal.

In 1893 E. W. Moses was elected mayor; C. M. Smith, police judge and O. J. Richards, treasurer; C. L. Hobart, clerk; J. W. Clarke, attorney and W. P. Cone, marshal. The council was composed of the holdovers and L. P. Aber, Geo. W. Moore, A. R. Moss and I. N. Woodward who were elected at the election in this year. The board of education was

218 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

composed of Bruce Jones, Charles E. Dodge, W. H. Hulls and C. W. Murphy.

The succeeding council, the members of which were elected in 1894, together with the holdovers, was one that did a great deal of good for the town in the way of public improvement. Those elected at the election of 1894 were: John Hiss, Theodore Griffith, George Kincaid and I. N. Woodward.

The board of education elected at this election were: Albert Weiss, A. J. Buckland, D. G. Gibbons, Wm. Torrey and Fred Vollmer. C. L. Hobart served this year as. city clerk, James W. Clark as attorney and R. T. Ewalt as marshal. It was in September of this year that C. M. Smith resigned as police judge and J. W. Brown was elected to fill the vacancy.

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Court House in Winter

In 1895 the following were elected and appointed to fill the offices in the city administration and they, together with those who already were holding seats in the city council, continued the work of building the town and making it better in every way: G. N. Moses, mayor; W. M. Gunnell, police judge; J. Geo. Brinkman, treasurer; L. P. Aber, John Dickson, A. R. Moses and H. L. Shore, councilmen. The new members of the board of education elected were: J. H. Borders, Chas. E. Dodge, D. C. Luse and Fred Vollmer. During this administration G. L. Chapman was treasurer of the board of education; B. F. Ogle and J. H. Jennison were justices of the peace and J. W. Dawson and W. F. Cone served as constables, while F. V. Russell was attorney; C. L. Hobart, clerk and R. T. Ewalt, marshal.

On January 6, 1896, C. L. Hobart resigned as city clerk and the vacancy was filled by James A. Townsley, who received the appointment and it was during the same year that L. P. Aber and A. R. Moss resigned as members of the council and their places were not filled until the city election of the spring of 1896.

The election of 1896 resulted as follows: Henry J. Meyers, James E. Savage, Theodore Griffith, A. H. Schaeffer, George C. Kincaid and E. G. McNown were chosen for members of the council, and Pat Boughan, H. J. Kline. A. J. Buckland, Isaac Reynolds and D. J. Newton were chosen to serve on the board of education. George Crummack was appointed as clerk, F. V. Russell, attorney, and R. T. Ewalt succeeded himself as marshal.

In 1897 George N. Moses was re-elected mayor and the following councilmen were chosen: James E. Savage, John Dickson, I. N. Wilhide and Thomas Clayton.

The following members of the board of education were elected: Edwin Tyler, Wm. Osmond, D. C. Luse and E. P. Smith. This was the first election in the city after the new law made the offices of clerk, marshal and street commissioner elective ones, and George Crummack, R. T. Ewalt and W. A. Rush were elected to fill these offices, respectively. During the administration W. M. Gunnell was police judge; Louis Zutavern and J. W. Dawson were constables and G. L. Chapman was treasurer of the board of education.

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Great Bend in 1880

In 1898 the following were elected and appointed: Peter Jordon, marshal; George Crummack, clerk; B. S. Dale, street commissioner; Henry Meyers, M. Eppstein, R. A. Allison and H. L Shore, councilmen; Pat Boughan, Martha L. Moore, A. R. Moss and W. R. Bunting members of the board of education, and F. V. Russell served as attorney. In January, 1899, Frank Brown was appointed clerk to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of George Crummack.

G. H. Hulme was elected mayor in 1899 with the following members of the council: C. G. Morrison, John Dickson, Thomas Clayton and I. N. Wilhide. J. F. Lewis, R. A. Charles, O. W. Dawson and I. N Woodward were elected as members of the board of education. It was during this election that the new law went into effect which made the office of city attorney an elective one and F. V. Russell was chosen. This year found W. M. Gunnell as police judge; Louis Zutavern, treasurer; G. L. Chapman, treasurer of the board of education; B. F. Ogle and J. H. Jennison, justices

OF BARTON COUNTY, KANSAS 219

of the peace and W. H. Zutavern and W. H. Cone, constables. R. T. Ewalt again served as marshal and D. J. Newton, street commissioner.

In 1900 W. M. Gunnell died and B. F. Ogle was appointed to fill the office of police judge. In this year the following councilmen were elected: J. F. Durkin, L. P. Aber, A. H. Schaeffer, R. A. Allison and H. L. Shore. The following members of the board of education were elected: Ira H. Clark, F. M. Russell. H. E. Lindas and W. R. Bunting. During this adminstratlon P. Cooprider was marshal; F. E. Brown, clerk; William Osmond, attorney; W. P. Cone, street commissioner and R C. Bailey, assessor.

In 1901, the law was changed and the offices of clerk, marshal, attorney, assessor and street commissioner became appointive ones. It was at the election of this year that L. P. Aber was elected mayor; D. D. Page, police judge; Louis Zutavern, treasurer and G. L. Chapman, treasurer of the board of education. The following councilmen were chosen at this election: J. F. Durkin, L. J. Barker, Thomas Clayton, B. S. Dale and F. B. Newcomb. The members of the board of education elected were: John F. Lewis, R. A. Charles, O. W. Dawson and I. N. Woodward. M. B. Fitts was appointed city clerk; F. V. Russell, attorney; Frank D. Wilson, marshal; S. H. Luttrell, street commissioner. B. F. Ogle and J. H. Jennison were justices of the peace, while W. P. Cone and H. M. Wells served as constables. On June 3, F. D. Wilson resigned as marshal and his place was filled by the appointment of George E. Webber. S. H. Luttrell resigned as street commissioner and Frank Harvey was appointed to fill the vacancy. In July, M. B. Fitts resigned as clerk and his place was taken by Wm. Woodward. In December, George Webber reslgned from the office of marshal and his place was taken by F. D. Wilson. January 7, 1902, Mr. Woodward resigned from the office of clerk and W. P. Feder was appointed to fill the vacancy.

[IMAGE]
Old Time Threshing Outfit

In 1902, the following were elected to fill the offices of the city: Councilmen: W. T. Kendall, H. J. Smith, B. S. Dale and Alfred Miller. The election resulted in the selection of Ira H. Clark, F. M. Russell, H. E. Lindas and W. R. Bunting to serve on the board of education. The following were appointed: W. P. Feder, clerk; F. V. Russell, attorney; Joseph Schaeffer, marshal; James A. Airheart, street commissioner.

At the election of 1903 Martin Weirauch was elected mayor with the following councilmen: L. C. Miller, J. G. Slentz, J. B. Rediger and F. B. Newcombe. For the board of education, J. F. Lewis, R. A Charles, O. W. Dawson and I. N. Woodward were elected.

This administration made the following appointments: Police judge, D. D. Page; treasurer board of education, G. L. Chapman and Louis Zutavern continued as city treasurer.

In July of 1903, Mr. Weirauch resigned as mayor as did also Mr. Slentz as councilman. A special election was held July 28, 1904, which resulted in the election of E. W. Moses as mayor, and H. E. Dean to fill the vacancy in the council. Mayor Moses appointed F. D. Wilson, marshal. In October of that year Mr. Morrison died and his place as clerk was taken by W. E. Torrey.

The election of 1904 resulted in the choosing of the following councilmen: W. F. Honnen, N. J. Smith, Thomas Clayton and Alfred

220 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY

Miller. For the board of education the following were elected: Ira. H. Clark, F. M. Russell, H. E. Lindas and Wm. Rubart. W. E. Torrey was appointed clerk; Wm. Osmond, attorney; F. D. Wilson, marshal and E. Price, street commissioner.

In 1905, E. W. Moses was again elected as mayor of the city with the following councilmen: J. F. Durkin, H. E. Dean, C. S. Allison and W. R. Bunting. Louis Zutavern, treasurer; Ed. L. Chapman, treasurer of the board of education and for members of the board the following were elected: H. H. Whiteside, R. A. Charles, Porter Young and M. Simpson. The following appointments were made: W. P. Feder, clerk; Elrick C. Cole, attorney; F. D. Wilson, marshal and E. Price street commissioner.

[IMAGE]
City Hall, Great Bend

At a meeting of the council February 6, 1905, after some discussion had been indulged in regarding the advisability of erecting a city building W. F. Honnen, N. Smith and Thomas Clayton were appointed a building committee. Then began systematic work which resulted in the building of a fine brick and stone structure to be known as the Great Bend City Hall. It is located at the corner of Williams and Lakin streets and is ample for all needs of the city for years to come.

In 1906, the new city building was dedicated and thrown open for the use of the city officers. At the election held in the spring of this year the following were named: W. F. Honnen, N. Smith, C. N. Moses and F. H. Miller, councilmen; S. J. Newcombe, W. J. Sama, E. E. Morrison and D. C. Luse, members of the board of education. Elrick C. Cole continued as attorney; F. D. Wilson as marshal and E. Price as street commissioner.

In 1907, E. W. Moses was elected mayor with the following councilmen: Amos Johnson, G. N. Moses, B. E. Giles, W. R. Bunting. Members of the board of education: W. J. Sama, A. M. Collins, Lester Cox and Porter Young. H. A. Hall was elected police judge; Louis Zutavern, treasurer and Ed. L. Chapman, treasurer of the board of education; James Clayton and J. H. Jennison continued as justices of the peace with W. T. Bennister and W. B. King as constables. F. D. Wilson was appointed marshal; Frank Hitchcock, assistant marshal; E. Price, street commissioner and F. A. Moses, clerk.

In 1908, the following councilmen were elected: W. F. Honnen, N. Smith, E. H. Miller and W. C. Merritt. For the board of education: S. A. Newcombe, E. E. Morrison, J. E. McMullin and Wm. Rubart. The appointive offices were filled by the same gentlemen as were appointed in 1907.

In 1908 O. W. Dawson was elected mayor with the following councilmen: W. L. Smith. G. N. Moses, B. E. Giles and O. M. Frazier. The same appointive officers were chosen with the exception of F. D. Wilson, whose place was taken by the appointment of Axel Wemmergren as marshal. Louis Zutavern was again elected treasurer and James Clayton police judge. Ed Chapman continued as treasurer of the school board, for which the following were elected: E. W. Seward, F. V. Russell, Porter Young and Lester Cox.

In 1910, the following councilmen were elected: W. F. Honnen, J. F. Lewis to fill the vanancy made by the resignation of W. L Smith, E. W. Moses, W. E. Hayes and W. G. Merritt. For the school board: S. A. Newcombe, E. E. Morrison, J. E. McMullin and Louis Omer. The appointments were the same as the previous year.

It was during the administration of 1910 that steps were taken that finally resulted in letting a contract for a sewage system for the city. The contract was let December, 1910, and called for an expenditure of approximately $100,000. The contract was awarded to


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Transcribed from Biographical history of Barton County, Kansas. ; Illustrated. Published by Great Bend Tribune, Great Bend, KS : 1912. 318 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. Transcribed by Carolyn Ward, July 2006.


Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

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