Pages 666-668, transcribed by Carolyn Ward from History of Allen and Woodson Counties, Kansas: embellished with portraits of well known people of these counties, with biographies of our representative citizens, cuts of public buildings and a map of each county / Edited and Compiled by L. Wallace Duncan and Chas. F. Scott. Iola Registers, Printers and Binders, Iola, Kan.: 1901; 894 p., [36] leaves of plates: ill., ports.; includes index.


666 cont'd HISTORY OF ALLEN AND  

D. R. INGE.

Work is the common lot, of all and the majority of men devote their energies to some line of activity in business, yet many are the records of failures. The secret of this is found in a few causes, a lack of energy, of resolution, of persistent purpose and of practical common sense. These are the elements which contribute to prosperity and they are the salient features in the business career of D. R. Inge, making him one of the substantial citizens of Woodson County.

A native of Indiana, Mr. Inge was born in Parke county, that state, on the 21st day of November, 1838. His father, Chesley L. Inge, was a native of Virginia and was married there to Miss Frances M. Lipscomb, also a native of the Old Dominion. They removed to Parke County, Indiana at an early day, and in the midst of the green woods the father entered land from the government and transformed it into a good farm

  WOODSON COUNTIES, KANSAS. 667

and home for his family. There he resided until 1873 when he came to Kansas, taking up his abode in Neosho Falls, where he died the following year, at the age of seventy-five. His wife survived him until 1878 and died at the age of seventy-four. They were parents of twelve children, four of whom are now living: William, a resident of Parke County, Indiana; James, of Missouri; Chesley, of Kansas City, Kas.; and D. R., of this review.

Mr. Inge, whose name begins this article, was the ninth in order of birth in his father's family. He was reared upon a farm in his native county and received such educational advantages as were afforded by the common schools of those days. He remained under the parental roof until twenty-one years of age and then started out in life on his own account. He was married in 1861 to Miss Susan Ships who has indeed been to him a faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey. She was a native of Pennsylvania, and in 1858 became a resident of Indiana, her parents having both died in the Keystone state. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Inge has been blessed with four daughters, Mary M., wife of Daniel Phillips, of the city of Oklahoma; Lenora, wife of Joseph Wilson, a lumber merchant of Neosho Falls; Luella, wife of E. A. Stillwell, cashier of the Neosho Falls bank, and Cora, wife of William Shockey, assistant cashier of the Neosho Falls bank.

After his marriage Mr. Inge operated his father's farm for three years and then removed to Illinois, where he rented land and engaged in farming for two years. Believing that he would have better opportunities in the newer and less thickly settled West, he came to Kansas in 1866, locating in the northwest corner of Allen County, where he and his brother George together purchased a section of land, going in debt for the greater part of it. He turned his attention to the stock business, buying, feeding and shipping stock on a small scale until he became established, and as the years passed he extended his operations, becoming one of the large cattle dealers in the county. By hard work and close attention to business he soon had his farm paid for and also extended the boundaries of his property by additional purchases. There is no man in Allen County that has handled more cattle than Mr. Inge. He continued to reside upon his farm until 1895 when he took up his abode in Neosho Falls and turned his attention to banking, establishing the Neosho Falls bank with a capital stock of five thousand dollars. He was chosen president of the bank and also one of its directors, while E. S. Stillwell became the cashier. He yet remains at the head of the institution which is regarded as one of the reliable and influential concerns of the county. He also handles some cattle, buying and shipping when he finds a favorable opportunity, but at the present time he is largely retired from active business life save for the management of his real estate investments. He owns twelve hundred acres of land in Allen and Woodson Counties and has six business buildings in Neosho Falls besides two residence properties. When he was married his cash

668 HISTORY OF ALLEN AND  

capital did not consist of one hundred dollars, but, by unabating industry and determined purpose he has steadily added to his accumulations until he is now one of the wealthiest citizens of Woodson County. He has figured quite prominently in local politics and is an influential member of the Republican party, having supported its principles throughout his entire life. He was elected to serve as county commissioner of Allen County and filled that position for one term with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He was then re-elected for a second term but soon resigned, in order to remove to Neosho Falls. Socially he is connected with Neosho Falls lodge, K. of P. Thoroughness characterizes all of his efforts, and he has ever conducted his business with a strict regard to a high standard of commercial ethics. The success of his life is due to no inherited fortune or to any succession of advantageous circumstances, but to his own close application, tireless industry and sterling integrity.


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Pages 666-668, transcribed by Carolyn Ward from History of Allen and Woodson Counties, Kansas: embellished with portraits of well known people of these counties, with biographies of our representative citizens, cuts of public buildings and a map of each county / Edited and Compiled by L. Wallace Duncan and Chas. F. Scott. Iola Registers, Printers and Binders, Iola, Kan.: 1901; 894 p., [36] leaves of plates: ill., ports.; includes index.


Tom & Carolyn Ward
Columbus, KS

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