Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Wild Hog, a Cheyenne chief, was a member of the Dull Knife band of northern Cheyennes, about 200 of whom made a raid from the Indian Territory across western Kansas in the fall of 1878, committing a number of murders and destroying much property. They were pursued, Wild Hog and his companions were captured and confined in Fort Robinson, Neb., for some time, but chafing under their close confinement, they made a dash for liberty on the morning of Jan. 21, 1879, using firearms which their squaws had smuggled in to them, and killing some of their guards. The Indians escaped, but not until a number had been wounded. The bloody trail was immediately followed by Capt. Wessells at the head of a body of troops, and the next day a desperate battle took place in which a number of troops were killed and the band of fleeing Indians almost exterminated, but 7 warriors—Wild Hog and 6 others—and 16 women and children being left out of the total number who left the territory.

Wild Hog and his 6 companions were taken to Fort Leavenworth and later to Dodge City, where they were held for trial at the June term of the district court of Ford county upon the charge of murder. At the opening of the trial the counsel for the defense asked for a change of venue, which was granted, and the case went to the district court of Douglas county at the October term following. At that time the prosecution asked for a continuance on account of the absence of witnesses from the state. This was not granted and the case was dismissed, the Indians being turned over to Indian Agent Miles. At the time of the battle Wild Hog was painfully injured in the fleshy part of the thigh. He was then about fifty years old, and is described as having good features and a well shaped head. He was 6 feet 4 inches tall and magnificently proportioned. He married a Sioux woman and had several children, his eldest daughter being one of the few survivors found in the trenches after battle in which she was wounded.

Pages 916-917 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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