Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Wheat.—This cereal has been grown in Kansas since the territory was thrown open for settlement, and probably in a limited way at the missions in pre-territorial days. Prior to 1860 no record was kept of the amount raised. That year the crop amounted to 168,527 bushels. As late as 1878 a discussion was going on in the state as to whether wheat could be successfully raised here. This prediction was made that year: "It will be safe to say that the day will not be far distant when Kansas will stand at the head as the greatest and best wheat growing state in the Union." Time has shown the prophecy to be correct, the increase in production being seen in the following table:

Year Acres Bushels Value
1880 2,444,434 25,279,884 $20,980,668
1890 2,321,113 28,801,214 23,410,548
1900 4,378,533 77,339,191. 41,974,145
1903 5,964,866 94,041,902 52,426,355
1905 5,925,338 77,178,177 53,889,365
1906 6,436,085 93,292,980 55,178,711
1910 4,870,450 61,017,339 52,785,965

Prior to 1872 the soft varieties of wheat were raised in Kansas. In that year Bernard Warkentin settled in Harvey county and introduced the Russian or Turkey (hard) wheat, and since its introduction it has supplanted nearly all the soft varieties. A flour is produced from this wheat that has become famous the world over. The Kansas hard wheat is also much sought by elevator men to mix with inferior grades in order to raise the standard. About the year 1900 macaroni wheat was introduced in the United States, and it has been demonstrated from experiments that it can be successfully grown in Kansas. While wheat can be grown with fair success in nearly every section of the state, the great wheat belt of Kansas may be roughly described as comprising the central section of the state between 97° and 99° 30', excepting Washington, Republic, Jewell and Phillips counties on the north, and Edwards, Kiowa, Comanche and Barber counties in the southwest. The wheat belt, however, is pushing from the Arkansas river towards the northwest part of the state.

Threshing Scene in Western Kansas

THRESHING SCENE IN WESTERN KANSAS.

From time to time there have been some large fields in wheat in Kansas. The first to attract attention was T. C. Henry's 10,000 acre field. This has since been exceeded by J. N. Fike of Colby, who on one occasion had in over 20,000 acres. Among the enemies of wheat, aside from drought and flood, are the Hessian fly and the chinch bug. During the '90s the ravages of the latter pest were so pronounced as to cause apprehension among growers. From experiments made by Francis H. Snow, for years connected with the University of Kansas, it was demonstrated that it was possible to inoculate the chinch bug with a contagious disease that produced death inside of ten days. Numerous experiments were made, which in the main were entirely satisfactory.

Pages 903-904 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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