Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Universalist Church.—Universalism, according to its present theological meaning, is the name applied to those who believe in universal salvation, or the belief that it is the purpose of God, through the grace revealed in Jesus Christ, to save all of the human race from sin. Universalists claim this interpretation of the Bible dates back to the Sibylline Oracles, the teachings of Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Marcellus and others, and that four of the early theological schools taught this idea. From the 7th century to the Reformation there was no great progress in the growth of Universalism, though it was manifest in the teachings of some, such as Almarac, John of Goch and Albertus Magnus. With the Reformation, Universalism received fresh impetus, and from it dates the modern history of the church. Some of the Protestant bodies advocated universal salvation, but it was not until 1750 that any organization bore the name, believers in universal salvation prior to that time being affiliated with various sects and religious organizations.

As early as 1636, the doctrine of Universalism was preached in Massachusetts colony and Rhode Island by Samuel Gorton. Some of the early Moravians who came to America in 1735 and settled in Pennsylvania were believers in universal salvation, and it was also advocated in Episcopal pulpits. Early in the 18th century Universalism gained a foothold among Congregationalists, but organized Universalism and the establishment of the Universalist church in America was the work of John Murray, who came to this country in 1770. The movement spread during the years of his teaching and associations were formed in Philadelphia and Massachusetts, where on Sept. 14, 1785, the "Independent Christian Society, commonly called Universalists," was formed at Gloucester by people who had left the First Parish church. The "Charter of Compact," drawn up by the Gloucester Universalists was generally accepted and in 1803, the annual session of the general convention, three articles of belief were agreed upon.

Universalist churches were established in Kansas in the late '60s and early '70s. The state census of 1875 gives 16 church organizations with a membership of 381. In 1890 there were six church buildings and all the organizations had a membership of 411, while in 1906 Kansas had 12 organizations, with a total membership of 937.

Pages 829-830 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo