Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Theosophical Societies.—The first organization of this kind was founded in New York in 1875 by Helena Petrovana Blavatsky, Col. Henry S. Olcott and William J. Judge, under the name of the Theosophical Society and Universal Brotherhood. For some years the special attention of the members was directed to education in theosophical philosophy and to the development of the organization in America and Europe. In 1879 Madame Blavatsky and Col. Olcott went to India and established the headquarters at Adyar, Madras, while Mr. Judge remained in charge in America. Madame Blavatsky died in 1891 and Mr. Judge assumed entire charge of the society in America while Col. Olcott continued the work in India. About this same time Mrs. Besant became one of the prominent workers in Europe. Friction arose between Mrs. Besant and Mr. Judge in 1894 as a result of which two parties developed. Early the next year the American section voted to support Mr. Judge and organized the Theosophical Society in America. Similar action soon followed in several European countries and these organizations affiliated with the American Society. The dissenting members retained the name Theosophical Society, with three sections, American, European and Indian.

Upon the death of Mr. Judge in 1896, Katherine Tingley became the leader in America and of the affiliated societies of Europe. In 1898 she organized the Universal Brotherhood and within a short time the Theosophical Society in America. Subsequently these two organizations became merged under the title of Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society, but again some of the dissenting members retained the old name and organization, so that today there are three societies in America—the Theosophical Society, American Section, the Theosophical Society in America, and the Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society. All the societies unite in having for their principal object the universal brotherhood of humanity, and require sympathy with this object the condition of membership.

Theosophical bodies have no churches or edifices, but hold their services in halls or private houses, and there is no regular ministry connected with any of the bodies. The three organizations, taken together, have 84 organizations in the United States with a total membership of 2,336. The Theosophical Society, American Section, has one organization in Kansas, established in the '90s, with a membership of 14.

Pages 805-806 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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