Transcribed from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.


James G. Strong, a prominent attorney of Blue Rapids, Kan., was born at Dwight, Ill., April 23, 1870. He is a son of James G. and Rebecca M. (Wilt) Strong, both natives of Lebanon, Ind. The father was a graduate of the Indianapolis Law School and practiced law in Dwight, Ill., for a number of years. While there he was a member of the Illinois house of representatives, representing Livingston county. He also served in the Illinois senate several terms. He drafted the first railroad commission bill in the United States, creating the office of railroad commissioner of Illinois. He was a stanch Republican and among his political friends and associates were many men who became State and National characters. In 1882 he came to St. Marys, Kan., where he was engaged in the grain and milling business; also in the real estate business. He removed to Blue Rapids in 1891, where he was engaged in the same line of business for a time, and later took up the practice of law again, and until the time of his death practiced in partnership with his son, James G.. whose name introduces this review.

James G. Strong received his early educational discipline in the public schools of Dwight, Ill., and St. Marys, Kan., graduating from the same at the latter place. He then entered Baker University. He was at Baker University three years, when he came to Blue Rapids and studied law under his father and was admitted to the bar in 1895, and since that time has been engaged in the practice of his profession in Blue Rapids. He has been city attorney of Blue Rapids fifteen years and has served two terms as assistant attorney general of the State of Kansas, and been a member of the school board six years. He is a Progressive Republican and takes an active interest in the party organization and is a member of the Fifth district congressional committee and organized Marshall county and assisted in carrying it for Roosevelt in 1912 and was a member of the National Republican convention the same year from the Fifth congressional district.

He was a member of the committee that drafted the "Get together" recommendation at the convention recently held at Topeka. Mr. Strong has been active in an industrial way outside of the field of his profession and politics. He is president of the Blue Rapids Telephone Company, which he organized, and has held that position since its organization. He also organized the Marshall County Power and Light Company, of which he is manager. This company has invested many thousand dollars in the equipment of its plant and now has the finest water power to be found in the State. It is capable of furnishing all necessary light and power to the surrounding country for a considerable distance. His telephone office is equipped with all modern improvements. Mr. Strong has done much to improve this section of the State.

He was married, December 18, 1894, to Miss Frances E. Coon, daughter of Emir and Elizabeth (Boynton) Coon, of Elyria, Ohio. Emir Coon was a son of Judge John V. Coon and both father and son were prominent lawyers of Marshall county, Kansas. Judge Coon was a member of the Genesee colony, which settled Blue Rapids, Kan. Mrs. Strong was born in Elyria, Ohio, came west with her parents as a child, and received her education in the public schools of Blue Rapids and is a graduate of the high school. To Mr. and Mrs. Strong were born two children, George E., who is a student in the University of Kansas, and Erma E., who is attending high school at home. The family are members of the Episcopal church and Mr. Strong's fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America and has often represented these various orders in their State meetings.

Pages 573-574 from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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